Space All Over the Workplace


Space

Alex Riley takes two young rookies into the workplace. Honey and Leon get an out-of-this-world experience when they work with space scientists.


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Transcript


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Do you like science and experiments? Do you like flying, floating around?

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And are you interested in travel?

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Then maybe you should consider a career in space.

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This episode is out of this world.

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Our two astro-rookies will visit cutting-edge space centres

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for an astronomical experience.

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But can their minds and bodies take it?

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Or will they get lost in space?!

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Let's find out as we go All Over The Workplace!

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BELLS TOLL SIRENS WAIL

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CROWD CHEERS

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LASERS PEW-PEWING

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There are millions

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and billions

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and trillions of stars.

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Yes, and there are millions and billions and trillions

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of jobs in the space industry.

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You could be an astrophysicist, a cosmologist, an engineer,

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an astronaut. You could even be a rocket scientist.

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We're about to meet two rookies who are dead keen to

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launch their careers into space.

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My name's Honey, I'm 11.

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I'm from Glasgow,

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and I want to be an astrophysicist.

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There's my favourite word,

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which is spaghettification.

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It's the process of being, like...

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..squished and drawn really thin,

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and that's what black holes do to you.

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If I discovered a planet,

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I would probably call it Poppadom...

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..cos that's my favourite food.

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Hi, I'm Leon, and I want to be an astronaut.

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Well, I want to become an astronaut

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because I'm passionate about space,

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and also because there are dangers in space,

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and I like to face a little challenge.

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I want to be, like, in no, no gravity.

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I want to know how to feel,

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just aimlessly floating.

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Leon and Honey have both travelled from their own spot on the planet

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to team up with Alex in Oxfordshire,

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where they will begin their first mission.

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So, Leon and Honey, why do you want to work

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in the world of space exploration?

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Well, I want to be an astronaut because I love a challenge,

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and I really like high-adrenaline sports.

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OK, well, I think that would be ideal for being an astronaut.

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What about you, Honey?

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Well, I'd really love to be an astrophysicist

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cos space is so mysterious.

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And there's so many mysteries to solve.

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I really enjoy maths and science,

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and I think I'm quite good at problem-solving.

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That's very important to have those things.

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Well, that's what you have to say,

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but here's what your parents think.

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She's very independent, very determined.

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Honey generally doesn't come and ask for help.

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A few disputes with maths,

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when Honey thinks she's got it right and...

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she thinks you've got it wrong.

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Anything to do with space and science, that's his passion, really.

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He wants to get where he's going so quickly sometimes,

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-without actually focusing on the detail, I think, sometimes.

-Yeah.

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-So, what do you make of that, then? You are always right...

-Yeah.

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-And you get completely carried away.

-Yeah.

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But you've got to stay calm in space,

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and astrophysics you need to make sure everything's spot-on

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and take criticisms from other people.

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No-one's perfect, you know.

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LAUGHTER Absolutely!

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Plenty to work on, you two, so come with me!

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Our solar system is made up of eight planets that orbit our sun.

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Mercury is closest to the sun.

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Venus is next, then it's Earth.

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Hello, Mum!

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Our neighbour is the red planet, Mars.

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The next four planets are all made of gas.

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You can't land there, as there's nothing to land on.

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There's Jupiter.

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Here's Saturn, famous for its rings.

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Then, there's Uranus.

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Finally, Neptune,

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which takes 165 Earth years to go around the sun.

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-So, have you any idea what you're going to be doing?

-No.

-No idea.

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We're here at STFC RAL Space,

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where they make measuring instruments which they send up

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into space on satellites,

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and here astrophysicists study the information that comes back from

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-the satellites to learn the secrets of the planets and the stars.

-Wow!

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-Yeah.

-Whoa.

-Pretty cool, eh? BOTH: Yeah.

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So come with me, then.

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RAL Space is at the cutting edge of space science.

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They work with the European Space Agency and Nasa.

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They've made cameras for the International Space Station,

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and have also worked on one of the instruments

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for a new space telescope

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that will be launched in 2018.

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Here's our first mentor,

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Dr Sarah Beardsley.

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She's head of space engineering and technology here,

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which means that she oversees a team of electronic engineers,

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who make hi-tech gadgets which get sent into space.

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Sarah, what are your three top tips for working in the space industry?

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First thing to do is to love what you do.

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There are lots of different jobs. Make sure you love what you do.

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Second is make sure you're very patient,

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because the instruments we send into space can take ten years or more

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to design and build and test, so have lots of patience.

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And finally, have lots of perseverance.

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Keep on trying.

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No matter what anybody tells you,

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make sure you believe that you can do it,

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and always follow your dreams.

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Sarah's top tips are - love what you do.

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Interested workers are happy workers.

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Patience.

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Building gadgets that go into space takes time,

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so you will need to be in it for the long haul.

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And perseverance.

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It's a tough job, but belief, determination

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and hard work can take you a long way.

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So, what have you got lined up for us today?

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Right, well, we thought you might want to

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go into one of our clean rooms and work on some space test equipment.

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-BOTH: Yeah.

-Fantastic.

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OK, welcome, guys, to our changing area for our clean rooms.

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And this is where we get changed so that we are able to go

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into the clean room without damaging any of our equipment.

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-You ever been to a swimming pool and used...

-Yeah, yeah.

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You do that and then you put your foot over the bench here.

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You put the other one on, and then you come over,

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and then you can stand up on the cleaner area.

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We have to put a face mask on,

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because when we breathe out, we can breathe out lots of particles

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-and germs.

-Why do we need to do this?

-Well, that's a good question.

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We have to do this because our bodies are really dirty.

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Even if you've had a shower just ten minutes before,

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your skin starts to flake, and that's quite dirty,

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and you don't want all of that kind of particles

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going into your very sensitive space instrumentation.

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I think we look like space ducks.

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Quack-quack. LAUGHTER

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-OK, and welcome to our space test chamber.

-Ooh.

-Whoa.

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Wow, this is cool.

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This is where we test a lot of our instruments,

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and small satellites that go into space.

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So, typically, an instrument will go from about -50 degrees centigrade

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right up to 50, 60, 70 degrees centigrade hot, as well.

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The way we keep the temperature quite controlled

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is by using something called multilayer insulation.

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You can touch it with your gloved hands.

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What does it feel like?

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-BOTH: Tinfoil.

-It feels like tinfoil.

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What's inside here are lots of different layers,

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and it acts like a blanket.

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It's just like when you're in bed,

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you cover yourself over with the blanket,

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it keeps your temperature constant,

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protects you from the heat, and from the cold.

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So, now you've got to work out

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-what is the best way of putting this multilayer insulation.

-Er...

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Shall we start with Leon's piece, because it's smaller?

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And it might be easier to handle.

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-So, where do you think that might go best?

-There?

-Yep.

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Tuck that in behind there.

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As a normal astrophysicist,

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you wouldn't be in conditions like this most of the time -

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you'll be analysing information

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and pictures that come down from telescopes and instruments in space.

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And so you'd be sat at a computer screen,

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working, and working out puzzles and problems.

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The people who do this kind of work are some of our skilled technicians,

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who may come into business as apprentices or graduate entries,

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and become highly skilled in doing this kind of very precise work.

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-You don't necessarily need a degree to get in?

-Absolutely.

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A lot of the people who do this kind of work

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come through the apprenticeship schemes that we have here,

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and it's possible to get space engineering apprenticeships

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these days, which is a fantastic opportunity

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to get right into the space business, right from day one,

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as soon as you leave school.

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OK, this is looking pretty good, guys,

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I think you've done a good job there. Are you happy with that?

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-BOTH: Yeah.

-OK.

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Shall we get out of these clothes, and go back outside?

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-BOTH: Yeah.

-Fantastic, let's go.

-Excellent idea.

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This is Professor Richard Harrison.

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He's the chief scientist at RAL Space,

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and he's spent most of his career

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studying solar physics.

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That's the branch of astrophysics

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which specialises in the sun.

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He has a wealth of knowledge

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to share with our rookies.

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What are his top tips?

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First thing I'd say is believe.

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When I was your age, to say that you wanted to work in space

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was something that was very, very unusual.

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There are careers there now.

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There's a lot more happening, you really can do it.

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The second thing I would say is, to be an astrophysicist,

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you need to get the qualifications,

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you need to go and do your A-levels, do a physics degree,

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or something like that.

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And the third thing, that I always did,

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I always kept an astronomy diary.

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So you go out in the back garden

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and you see the satellites going over, or a comet,

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or a planet or whatever, just keep a little note of all these things,

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and it just keeps the interest going,

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and you can remember all the wonderful things you've seen.

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Richard's top tips are...

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Believe you can do it.

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There are many more jobs in space science

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than there used to be.

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Get qualified.

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Hard work at school,

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especially in science subjects.

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And keep an astronomy diary.

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An interest in the night sky

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is a great way to learn about space.

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We have some images that we've taken in space, of the sun,

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and the way the sun impacts the Earth,

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and you two, I hope you'll help me try to find things

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in those images.

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-Sounds great.

-Fun.

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-What do you think this is?

-The Earth.

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It's the Earth. So the Earth is what?

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-It's a planet.

-It's a planet.

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-Now, I think you know what this is. Don't you?

-Yeah.

-BOTH:

-The sun.

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It's the sun. Right.

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This is the sun as you would see it with your eyes,

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but you should never stare at the sun with your eyes,

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because it's so bright you could damage your eyes.

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-But what can we see?

-The black spots on the side,

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where, like, storms on the sun have been happening.

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The sunspots. Yes.

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You're right.

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That one is about the size of the Earth.

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-What?

-Whoa.

-ALEX:

-Wow.

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-If you think how big the Earth is...

-Yeah.

-..and how big our country is,

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and how tiny you are on there, that is about the size of the Earth.

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-Oh, my...

-The sun is that big.

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Now, what we're going to do is look at...

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-images from a spacecraft, taken today. Look at that.

-Wow.

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Now, what on earth am I looking at here?

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-If you look at the Earth, what can you see?

-Clouds.

-Clouds.

-Clouds.

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-We could actually see clouds in the Earth's atmosphere.

-Gas clouds.

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-Solar flares?

-You're very near. Yes, it's the sun's atmosphere.

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You have to have a special camera that has a kind of a filter

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that allows you to look at the light you can't see with your eyes.

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So, let's look at a movie of that now.

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On here, you can see the sun's atmosphere,

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and it looks like a plate of writhing spaghetti, doesn't it?

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BOTH: Yeah. What do you think it's made of?

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-Gas.

-It is.

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In fact, the sun isn't solid at all.

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That's weird, isn't it? BOTH: Yeah.

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Isn't that strange! Here's something really dramatic.

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From one of our instruments in space...

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-Look at that!

-Whoa, that's cool.

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Is that a solar flare?

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There is a solar flare in there.

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It looks like a volcano.

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And it does look like a volcano.

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-So does any of that hit the Earth?

-Yes, it does. It can, certainly.

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And it causes lots of effects on the Earth.

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That's what causes the aurora to light up, these lights in the sky.

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But they can also cause problems

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for people who are on satellites,

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or you can have power blackouts.

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It's not something to worry about, we just need to understand it,

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so with a lot of our spacecraft we're trying to understand

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what's happening in the sun's atmosphere,

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and how these things come out towards us.

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In these images, the sun is off the right-hand side of the image.

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The Earth is a long way over there,

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and you can see how much the sun is just throwing into space,

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all the gas that it's throwing out.

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It's really quite violent down there.

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Can you imagine coming in in the morning, you sit at your desk,

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you put images on the screen -

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nobody's ever seen that before.

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You're the first person to see something.

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And you don't know what's going to be in that particular set of images.

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It could be something that... A new discovery or something like that.

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That's quite exciting.

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Going into the clean room was really good,

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because of all the kit we had to put on,

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and we felt like professionals.

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It made me feel even more excited

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when we watched the sun videos

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because I found out lots more facts

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about how the sun affects the Earth.

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Trying some astrophysics

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was really inspirational

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because it wasn't quite like I thought.

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But it was still really amazing.

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I liked going in the clean room,

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even though I said I never want to go

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in one of those suits again.

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I had issues with the sticky tape.

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When I was watching the sun videos,

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looking at it from, like, in space

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was really exciting.

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Astrophysics was quite fun.

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It's just a range of different things

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and you never know what's coming up next.

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It's a bit like your dreams.

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But I would still prefer

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to be an astronaut!

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Well, Honey, I thought you did really well.

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I loved the way that you

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approached all the problems

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in a calm and methodical way.

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Sometimes I thought that you were

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a little bit quiet.

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I know you've got lots of questions inside you -

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sometimes you just need to go out there and ask more questions.

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Honey, you did really, really well.

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I was very impressed by your questions.

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They were brilliant, and you showed

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that you knew some of the answers already

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when I asked things, for example,

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and that was excellent.

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You've a good knowledge base there.

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Hi, Leon. You were brilliant.

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One thing I loved about you is

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you were never afraid to ask questions.

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Sometimes you needed a little bit more patience.

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You would jump in too far sometimes.

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Sometimes, just think about what you're doing

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a little bit more.

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Leon, you did brilliantly.

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And I was particularly impressed

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by your attention to detail.

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You could look into the images

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and find things,

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and that's the sort of thing

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you really need as an astrophysicist,

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to go in there and find the little objects,

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the new discovery or whatever,

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so that was brilliant.

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These are my three top tips to becoming a physicist.

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First of all, you should be inquisitive.

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You should ask questions all the time.

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As a physicist, one of the things I mainly do is

0:14:240:14:26

try and discover things and understand things,

0:14:260:14:28

and try and solve problems sometimes,

0:14:280:14:30

so asking questions is really key.

0:14:300:14:32

Tip number two.

0:14:320:14:33

I think, find something that you really like.

0:14:330:14:35

One of the great things about studying physics is

0:14:350:14:38

you are literally studying everything in the universe,

0:14:380:14:40

and that's from the outer reaches of the galaxy, the universe,

0:14:400:14:43

to the tiniest particles we've found,

0:14:430:14:46

and everything else in between.

0:14:460:14:47

And then, finally, I think it's be persistent and be an opportunist.

0:14:470:14:51

I have found that, throughout my career, there's some times

0:14:510:14:55

when things just go horribly wrong and you want to give up,

0:14:550:14:58

but then I think it's really handy to have a crazy dream.

0:14:580:15:00

Mine is that I actually want to travel into space one day.

0:15:000:15:02

It's slightly odd, and slightly crazy,

0:15:020:15:04

but that dream has kept me going,

0:15:040:15:06

and it's enabled to me to get a degree, get a PhD,

0:15:060:15:08

become DOCTOR Maggie,

0:15:080:15:09

and I think without a crazy dream I wouldn't have been able to do that.

0:15:090:15:12

The rookies have travelled to St Pancras station in London,

0:15:130:15:16

where Alex is about to reveal a stellar surprise.

0:15:160:15:19

So, have you got any idea what we're going to be doing next? BOTH: No.

0:15:200:15:23

OK. I'll tell you the secret.

0:15:230:15:25

We're going to go to the Euro Space Center in Belgium...

0:15:260:15:29

BOTH GASP ..and do some astronaut training.

0:15:290:15:31

-That's brilliant!

-That's so cool!

-Yeah! And not only that,

0:15:310:15:34

we're going to be meeting a genuine real-life actual astronaut.

0:15:340:15:37

-Oh, that's amazing!

-That's so cool!

0:15:370:15:39

Come on, then, let's get on the train!

0:15:390:15:41

Alex and the rookies have travelled

0:15:450:15:47

via the Channel Tunnel

0:15:470:15:48

to the Euro Space Center in Belgium.

0:15:480:15:50

The centre hosts loads of hi-tech kit

0:15:530:15:55

to simulate various aspects of space travel,

0:15:550:15:58

and astronaut training.

0:15:580:16:00

If you're going to do some space training,

0:16:010:16:03

you need the right clothing.

0:16:030:16:04

So we've surprised Holly and Leon

0:16:040:16:06

with their very own space flight suits.

0:16:060:16:09

Astronauts wear overalls like these

0:16:090:16:11

when they're working on the International Space Station.

0:16:110:16:14

Pedro Duque was the first Spanish astronaut

0:16:160:16:18

to blast into space.

0:16:180:16:21

He's been to space twice.

0:16:210:16:22

Once in a US shuttle,

0:16:230:16:25

and once in a Russian Soyuz rocket.

0:16:250:16:28

An earlier version of the rocket

0:16:280:16:30

that took British astronaut

0:16:300:16:31

Tim Peake into space.

0:16:310:16:33

So, Pedro, can you tell us your three top tips

0:16:330:16:36

for being a good astronaut?

0:16:360:16:38

The first tip would be trust your team.

0:16:380:16:41

So you're going to fly in space not because of what you do,

0:16:420:16:46

but because of what thousands of people have prepared for you,

0:16:460:16:49

and you have to trust your team.

0:16:490:16:50

Try to be very accurate.

0:16:500:16:52

If you press buttons in any order in a music player or something,

0:16:530:16:57

it doesn't matter. But in a rocket, it does matter.

0:16:570:17:00

Then the third one is going to be keep always high spirits.

0:17:000:17:03

Things will happen, but if you keep high spirits all the time,

0:17:040:17:08

then the team will be in the mood to solve it.

0:17:080:17:11

Pedro's top tips are...

0:17:120:17:15

Trust your team.

0:17:150:17:16

Astronauts must have confidence in

0:17:160:17:18

their highly-skilled support team.

0:17:180:17:21

Be accurate.

0:17:210:17:22

Precision is crucial inside a rocket.

0:17:220:17:25

Mistakes must be avoided!

0:17:250:17:27

And... Positive outlook.

0:17:270:17:29

Challenges always arise in space.

0:17:290:17:32

Staying positive helps when solving problems.

0:17:320:17:34

How did you apply to be an astronaut?

0:17:340:17:37

-PEDRO:

-I had already studied to be an engineer,

0:17:370:17:39

I had worked a little bit,

0:17:390:17:40

I was doing diving and everything,

0:17:400:17:42

so I applied to the European Space Agency.

0:17:420:17:45

-In fact, it did appear in the newspaper as a job offer.

-Really?!

0:17:450:17:49

Pedro, what have you got lined up for Honey and Leon?

0:17:490:17:52

We're going to try out simulators

0:17:520:17:56

that are similar to what we use to train astronauts for space.

0:17:560:18:01

Marco is an instructor, and he's going to help us.

0:18:010:18:04

So we'll see if you are able to trace this dotted line

0:18:040:18:07

-on this piece of paper with a wax crayon.

-Sounds simple. Really easy.

0:18:070:18:10

-Pretty easy.

-It does, doesn't it? Yeah.

0:18:100:18:12

Not so easy when strapped into a multiaxis chair.

0:18:120:18:16

Astronauts use kit like this during training

0:18:160:18:18

to get their body accustomed to what might happen on space flights.

0:18:180:18:22

It's a test of coordination, and whether you're calm under pressure.

0:18:220:18:26

First up for this disorientating challenge is Honey.

0:18:260:18:29

Oh, no, this is going to be fun.

0:18:300:18:32

I don't think I'm going to be very good at this drawing.

0:18:320:18:35

OK, you can start now.

0:18:350:18:36

-You OK?

-Yeah.

0:18:370:18:38

-It's not that bad, is it?

-No.

0:18:400:18:42

-ALEX:

-So, what was this machine used for?

-Fi-i-ine.

0:18:420:18:45

It's used to see if astronauts are capable of coping

0:18:450:18:48

with the disorientating effects of spinning around a multiple axis.

0:18:480:18:53

She's spinning on the three axes,

0:18:530:18:55

so any direction you can think of, she will be spinning in.

0:18:550:18:59

In physics, a system like this is referred to as a chaos pendulum.

0:18:590:19:02

Honey has been pretty accurate.

0:19:020:19:05

Let's see how Leon gets on.

0:19:050:19:07

-HE LAUGHS

-This is hard!

0:19:110:19:13

HE GROANS

0:19:130:19:16

It actually helps, focusing on a specific task.

0:19:160:19:18

The spinning is worse if you're just

0:19:180:19:20

-concentrating on the spinning.

-So you've got a little task...

0:19:200:19:23

-Exactly.

-..that you can focus on.

0:19:230:19:25

-Like trying to regain control of the spacecraft.

-Exactly.

0:19:250:19:28

Whoa.

0:19:280:19:29

Judging by his attempt,

0:19:290:19:30

Leon looks like he could do with a bit more practice.

0:19:300:19:33

My top tips for being an astronaut.

0:19:390:19:40

First of all, do science or engineering. Something technical.

0:19:400:19:45

Enjoy all sorts of things in life,

0:19:450:19:47

because nobody wants to be with a boring astronaut in space.

0:19:470:19:50

You need to be a good communicator - not just to the public,

0:19:500:19:53

but actually also to your crew and all of the teams around you,

0:19:530:19:57

and importantly, then, be a team worker.

0:19:570:20:00

So, somebody who likes to work in groups with other people.

0:20:000:20:04

We have here the simulator of the space shuttle,

0:20:050:20:08

-the size of the space shuttle.

-Wow.

-Whoa, that looks cool.

0:20:080:20:11

We are going to simulate the launch.

0:20:110:20:14

Leon, you will be the pilot,

0:20:140:20:16

Honey will be the commander,

0:20:160:20:18

Alex and I, we will be in mission control,

0:20:180:20:20

and we will be giving you some instructions, and being your team.

0:20:200:20:23

-Whoa!

-Whoa, that's cool.

-Off you go, then.

0:20:230:20:26

Have a safe journey. And, you know, send me a postcard.

0:20:260:20:29

-Yes, we will.

-OK!

-Right, ta-ra.

0:20:290:20:30

The rookies won't actually be going into space...today.

0:20:320:20:35

But real astronauts do train for space flights

0:20:350:20:38

using simulators like this one.

0:20:380:20:40

-PEDRO:

-Please proceed with your first checklist,

0:20:400:20:42

and report results.

0:20:420:20:44

-Instrument power on.

-Roger, instrument power on.

0:20:440:20:47

Checklist number three on.

0:20:480:20:50

OK, three.

0:20:500:20:51

UFTs are on.

0:20:510:20:52

Instrument power on.

0:20:520:20:54

-Instrument power on. You see the other side?

-Flight control power on.

0:20:540:20:58

Flight control power on.

0:20:580:20:59

General-purpose computer, one to five, on.

0:20:590:21:03

Emergency lighting off.

0:21:030:21:04

Emergency lighting is off.

0:21:040:21:06

-Timer to reset on.

-Timer to reset.

0:21:060:21:09

OMS ENG are in off position.

0:21:090:21:13

Orbital manoeuvring system engines are in off position.

0:21:130:21:16

We see you are complete with your checklist. Please proceed.

0:21:160:21:18

13, 12, 11,

0:21:190:21:22

ten, nine, eight, seven...

0:21:220:21:24

-six...

-Main engines start.

0:21:270:21:28

..five, four,

0:21:280:21:30

three, two, one...

0:21:300:21:32

-Zero.

-Starting ignition.

0:21:320:21:34

Honey and Leon are experiencing what it's like to blast off into space!

0:21:390:21:44

Liftoff, we have a liftoff!

0:21:460:21:48

Hi there, you two. Wow.

0:21:500:21:52

That was exciting. How was it?

0:21:520:21:54

-Fun, really fun.

-Yeah?

-Really exciting! And realistic.

-Yeah.

0:21:540:21:58

So, one thing you had to do is to always know exactly

0:21:580:22:02

which button are you touching.

0:22:020:22:04

So you first look at the button,

0:22:040:22:06

you first look at the button again,

0:22:060:22:08

and then you touch the button.

0:22:080:22:10

-OK.

-That's very important.

0:22:100:22:11

You don't want to be pressing the wrong button, I suppose.

0:22:110:22:14

Probably not, no. And then, when you report what you did...

0:22:140:22:18

It's good that the ground, the people on the ground, know that

0:22:190:22:22

you are actually thinking about it, so you have to say what you did.

0:22:220:22:26

So, "I turned on the flight number two."

0:22:260:22:30

Instead of just reading, because then they know you have read

0:22:300:22:33

-and you KNOW what you're doing.

-OK.

0:22:330:22:36

I was a bit nervous before I went on

0:22:360:22:38

the multi-axis chair,

0:22:380:22:40

but when I got on it

0:22:400:22:41

I really wanted to stay on it for longer.

0:22:410:22:44

The shuttle simulation was amazing

0:22:440:22:47

because it was like you were in a real shuttle.

0:22:470:22:50

Quite a lot of astronauts

0:22:500:22:51

are astrophysicists, too,

0:22:510:22:52

because they have to do experiments in space,

0:22:520:22:55

and I think that could be me in the future.

0:22:550:22:57

The multi-axis chair was actually quite fun,

0:22:570:22:59

cos you were spinning around,

0:22:590:23:01

but the task wasn't that easy,

0:23:010:23:04

because your brain's trying to concentrate

0:23:040:23:06

on the paper, and your brain's

0:23:060:23:08

shaking around in your head,

0:23:080:23:09

so it's a bit like doing your homework

0:23:090:23:11

when someone interrupts.

0:23:110:23:13

Doing the shuttle mission was hard

0:23:130:23:14

because you had to think about

0:23:140:23:16

the switches you flick,

0:23:160:23:17

and I like to rush into stuff.

0:23:170:23:19

So, Leon, you did great on the multi-axis chair.

0:23:190:23:22

Your body could take the movement

0:23:220:23:24

without any problems.

0:23:240:23:25

Slight lack of coordination

0:23:250:23:27

on the drawing,

0:23:270:23:28

but I'm sure that if you keep it up you will be fine.

0:23:280:23:30

And Honey, you were amazing.

0:23:300:23:32

I mean, your drawing was almost flawless.

0:23:320:23:34

Keep up the good work, and you'll be fine.

0:23:340:23:36

Leon, in the shuttle simulator,

0:23:360:23:38

I have to say you were speaking very clear on the radio,

0:23:380:23:41

you were quick

0:23:410:23:43

on finding which buttons you had to flip

0:23:430:23:47

in order to follow your procedure.

0:23:470:23:49

Maybe if I can give you an advice,

0:23:490:23:53

you should refrain from

0:23:530:23:54

touching all the other buttons randomly.

0:23:540:23:56

Honey, in the task that you had in the shuttle simulator,

0:23:560:24:00

I noticed that you tried to be perfect

0:24:000:24:02

all the time,

0:24:020:24:03

and always press the right buttons.

0:24:030:24:05

This is something that we appreciate

0:24:050:24:06

very, very much.

0:24:060:24:07

Being an astronaut may be out of this world,

0:24:120:24:15

but that doesn't mean you can escape everyday chores like vacuuming.

0:24:150:24:19

The UK's own Tim Peake demonstrating his housekeeping skills.

0:24:190:24:23

Bet Mum's very proud.

0:24:230:24:25

Even simple things like washing your hair can become a tricky affair.

0:24:260:24:30

Here, we see US astronaut Karen Nyberg showing us

0:24:300:24:33

the latest in alien hairstyles.

0:24:330:24:36

Lovely.

0:24:360:24:37

Of course, the simplest option is to have no hair.

0:24:380:24:40

Here's Chris Cassidy using special suction clippers to keep trim.

0:24:410:24:45

Like vacuuming your head.

0:24:460:24:48

Speaking of trim, what about exercise?

0:24:480:24:50

Astronauts need to keep in shape on board, but the microgravity -

0:24:500:24:54

that's weightlessness, to you and me -

0:24:540:24:55

means you have to strap in for a run.

0:24:550:24:58

She's going nowhere fast.

0:24:580:24:59

I think my ultimate career highlight

0:25:040:25:06

was doing a space walk.

0:25:060:25:09

Where you put on a huge, protective set of clothing

0:25:090:25:13

that's really more like building a little one-person spaceship

0:25:130:25:18

around your body,

0:25:180:25:19

and then de-pressurising,

0:25:190:25:21

letting all the air out of one part of your spaceship,

0:25:210:25:24

and then pulling yourself out into the universe.

0:25:240:25:28

And being alone out in the universe

0:25:280:25:31

as an astronaut.

0:25:310:25:32

That...

0:25:320:25:34

was the coolest thing that ever happened to me.

0:25:340:25:36

The rookies have had an experience of universal proportions.

0:25:380:25:42

Their minds and bodies have been tested to extremes,

0:25:420:25:45

and they've even blasted off into space!

0:25:450:25:48

Well, almost.

0:25:480:25:49

But have they got what it takes to do it for real?

0:25:490:25:52

Honey and Leon, I think you've got what it takes to make

0:25:560:25:59

your way in the space-exploration business.

0:25:590:26:01

You've both got passion and enthusiasm,

0:26:010:26:03

and I know you'll do well.

0:26:030:26:05

Honey, Leon, given the enthusiasm you've shown,

0:26:050:26:08

the questions that you've asked, the interest you've shown,

0:26:080:26:11

I have absolutely no doubt whatsoever that you could both

0:26:110:26:14

have wonderful careers in space science in the future.

0:26:140:26:18

Honey and Leon, I saw that you trusted your team,

0:26:180:26:22

I saw that you wanted to be accurate all the time,

0:26:220:26:25

and I saw that you kept high spirits

0:26:250:26:27

and high enthusiasm in everything you did,

0:26:270:26:29

so I think you've got all that it takes to be an astronaut.

0:26:290:26:34

You've been through the whole thing now.

0:26:340:26:35

You've met an astrophysicist, you've studied the sun,

0:26:350:26:38

you've done astronaut training,

0:26:380:26:40

you've met a real-life astronaut!

0:26:400:26:41

So, after all that...

0:26:410:26:43

Leon, do you still want to be an astronaut?

0:26:430:26:45

-Yes, I do!

-Yeah, you sure?

0:26:450:26:47

Yeah, because all the assignments I've done,

0:26:470:26:49

I found them really exciting. It makes me want to do it more.

0:26:490:26:52

OK. What about you, Honey? You wanted to be an astrophysicist.

0:26:520:26:55

Do you still want to be one of those?

0:26:550:26:57

I do still want to be an astrophysicist,

0:26:570:26:59

but also do a bit of astronaut work.

0:26:590:27:01

Well, you can do that, can't you?

0:27:010:27:02

You can do that. You can start as an astrophysicist

0:27:020:27:04

-and then go up into space.

-Yeah.

-So, it's open to you, isn't it?

0:27:040:27:07

Well, follow your dream.

0:27:070:27:08

Shoot for the moon. And if you don't make it,

0:27:080:27:11

at least you'll reach the stars.

0:27:110:27:12

-Actually, Alex, I think that is impossible.

-Is it?

0:27:120:27:16

I've learned nothing on the show, have I?

0:27:160:27:18

Well, I think Leon and Honey have had a blast.

0:27:180:27:21

They found out that astrophysics isn't all rocket science,

0:27:210:27:24

and they've had an astronomically good time doing astronaut training.

0:27:240:27:28

You know, I reckon they've both got stellar careers ahead of them.

0:27:280:27:31

ROCKETS BOOM Don't go!

0:27:310:27:33

Wait for me!

0:27:330:27:34

Ironically, they probably didn't have enough space. Hah.

0:27:350:27:38

Anyway, I'd better go. Don't want to miss me bus.

0:27:380:27:40

Ever fancied going into space? Well come join Alex Riley and rookies Honey and Leon as they get an out-of-this-world experience! They work with space scientists who make and test equipment that actually gets sent out into the universe. They examine never-before-seen images of the sun and then head to Belgium to visit the Euro Space Centre. They are put through their paces by astronaut Pedro Duque, and even simulate a shuttle launch as part of their astronaut training. But the big question is, will Honey and Leon still want to work in space after they've been all over the workplace?


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