Numbers QI XL


Numbers

Sandi Toksvig runs the numbers with Colin Lane, Sarah Millican, Noel Fielding and Alan Davies.


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Transcript


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CHEERING AND APPLAUSE

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Hey!

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How nice!

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How lovely.

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Good evening.

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And welcome to QI, for a show all about numbers.

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Tonight, we will cross the divide and go forth and multiply,

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and in addition, we will subtract lots of points from Alan.

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So... LAUGHTER

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Let's meet our four fine figures. The rational Colin Lane...

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-CHEERING AND APPLAUSE

-Thank you.

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..the complex Sarah Millican...

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CHEERING AND APPLAUSE

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..the imaginary Noel Fielding...

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CHEERING AND APPLAUSE

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..and the extremely random Alan Davies.

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CHEERING AND APPLAUSE

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So, if they would like to grab my attention,

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they can count on their buzzers and Colin goes...

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# One, two, three, four, five. #

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Sarah goes...

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# Five, four, three, two, one. #

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-That's pretty good.

-Ah, that's very good. Noel goes...

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# Two, four, six, eight. #

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And Alan goes...

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# ABC, ABC. #

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LAUGHTER

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So, here is question one.

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Which is the loneliest number?

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# Three, four, five. #

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-Yes?

-One?

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No.

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It's the obvious one, but it's not that one.

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So, maybe two is the loneliest number,

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because it's next to the one that gets talked about the most.

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And do you know what?

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I would make that entirely a correct answer

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if it wasn't so horribly wrong. No.

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-ALAN:

-Three is the magic number.

-Three is the magic number.

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Well, I've never tried, but so they say.

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LAUGHTER

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-NOEL:

-Is it 13, cos it's quite unlucky,

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so the other numbers don't want to go near it?

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LAUGHTER

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-OK, so it is an unpopular number.

-Nought.

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-No, it's quite a high number. So, there's a mathematician...

-100.

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-You're going in the right direction. NOEL:

-And 14.

-200.

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-No, we're not going to play this higher or lower.

-101.

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-79.

-102, 103, 104...110.

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-Yes!

-110?

-It's 110.

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-110.

-Alan gets the point.

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CHEERING AND APPLAUSE

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So, now...

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Now, I don't speak now for the rest of the evening.

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Yep, that's it.

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So, there's a mathematician called Alex Bellos

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and he wanted to find the world's favourite number.

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So, he asked a lot of people and 30,023 people responded.

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And the lowest whole number that nobody chose was 110.

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-It was everybody's least favourite number. AUDIENCE:

-Aw.

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So, QI has adopted it as our favourite number.

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-Yay!

-Yes.

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APPLAUSE

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That was a very, very lukewarm round of applause.

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You prefer number seven, don't you?

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CHEERING

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OK, well, why might you prefer number seven?

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That's a really interesting thing.

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-NOEL:

-Is it the lucky number?

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-It's the world's favourite number.

-Oh.

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That is the one that Alex Bellos discovered most people preferred.

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And, in fact, there was a National Lottery draw

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which rather bore this out.

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The 23rd of March 2016,

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five of the six numbers were multiples of seven, OK?

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So, there was 7, 14, 21, 35, and 42,

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and the other one was 41

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and so many people chose them,

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you got more money from matching four numbers

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than you did from matching five.

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So, four numbers you got £51 and five right you got £15.

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When you were talking about a threesome,

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I was trying to work out if I've had a sevensome.

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A sevensome?

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I think I have.

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I haven't.

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I have.

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If you can count your pets then I probably have.

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LAUGHTER DROWNS SPEECH

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Doesn't count if they're sleeping on the bed at the time,

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that doesn't count.

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Anyway, moving on. Now, have a look at these different numbers.

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So, number one, anybody know what that one is

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-right there in the middle? COLIN:

-Er...

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-The hieroglyph.

-I'm not good on hieroglyphics.

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Pass.

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So, what were you saying, Colin? You were making a noise.

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-You were just making the noise?

-I was just making a noise.

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-What was the noise?

-Err.

-Yeah. So, that's...

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-Weirdly, it's quite close to the correct answer.

-Is it?

-Yes.

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It's a man holding his hands up,

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and he's most likely called either Huh, or Huuh,

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or huh-huh-huh-huuuh.

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The thing is, there are no vowels in hieroglyphs

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and we don't know how it's pronounced,

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but it's going to be some kind of vowely-H sound,

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and he represents a million for the Egyptians.

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-Oh.

-I think he's just going like, "I've no idea how many."

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I think he's lost his keys.

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Someone went, "Do you know where your keys are?"

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And he went, "I don't know."

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They're on your elbows, mate.

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He basically represents infinity because to the Egyptians

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a million is a very large, undefined number.

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A bit like the way we use myriad so myriad actually means 10,000

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but that isn't how we use it.

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We use it as a symbol for something huge.

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The Egyptians also had a symbol for 10,000 but it's just that.

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A bent finger is 10,000 in...

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So, if I ever go to you, "You owe me..."

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-COLIN:

-So, if you say something in parentheses...

-Oh.

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..then you also owe me 40,000.

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-Yes.

-Yes.

-Or you're doing shadow rabbits.

-Yes!

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-Either way, it's a fun evening ahead.

-Yeah.

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Let's have a look at the other ones that we've got,

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other than our Egyptian.

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So, the eye, anybody know what the eye is, another pictogram?

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Well, because I'm from Australia,

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is it just a weird kind of Sydney Harbour Bridge, perhaps?

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-Oh, I like that.

-It could be.

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-Yes.

-I'll go for five.

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No, it's four, three.

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--1.

-Hmm, hmm, hmm.

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-Two.

-Zero.

-Yeah!

-Zero?

-Zero!

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-Zero, very good. NOEL:

-Zero?

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It looks like I'm working you today.

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It's the Mayan number zero.

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Why didn't they just write zero, the Mayans?

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Oh, because they were very busy doing a lot of clever things

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-for us to find later.

-Oh.

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They had the concept of zero by about 30 BC,

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at which time the Romans and the Greeks didn't bother with it.

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-Couldn't be arsed.

-They didn't have a number zero.

-Why's it eye shaped?

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It looks like the eye's got prison bars over it.

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Like they've outlawed looking.

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No, the Greeks didn't bother with it, cos maths was more geometry for them,

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so the zero didn't make any sense.

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In fact, we don't get the zero in Europe until about the 13th century.

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Before that, couldn't be arsed.

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Let's have another look. OK, number three there.

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Two to the power of 74,207,281 minus one.

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Is it going to be the highest prime number or something?

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It is. The largest prime number. You are on fire tonight.

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CHEERING AND APPLAUSE

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It's a Mersenne prime.

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It is the largest one they've ever discovered

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and it was discovered, obviously, by a computer.

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Dr Curtis Cooper at the University of Central Missouri

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set the computer off and then there was a glitch and an e-mail saying,

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"We found it! We found it!" went unnoticed for months

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-until they discovered it by accident.

-It went into spam?

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It went into spam, yes!

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It contains 228,388,618 digits in total.

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It's basically 2x2x2 74 million times...

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-Wow.

-..minus one.

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That's my lucky number.

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But it's impossible to believe these things, isn't it,

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that it's not divisible by anything at all?

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-That's...

-That's absolutely mind-blowing.

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-Mind-blowing, isn't it, that that's a prime number?

-Yeah.

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So, the next one, number four there, eight billion and 85.

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Any thoughts what that might be?

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-That's a huge number, isn't it?

-Bacteria on your person?

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Oh, gross me out.

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LAUGHTER

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Bacteria within your person?

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SANDI AND SARAH GROAN

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Bacteria trying to get out of your person.

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I've honestly never felt so filthy.

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So, if you were to write out all the numbers from one to ten billion

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in words and organise them into alphabetical order,

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this is the very first one that would be an odd number.

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And that is because eight is the very first number alphabetically.

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It begins with E.

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Also, all the numbers beginning with eight

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have to come before the next number, which would be 11.

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So, it goes eight, eight billion, eight billion and eight,

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eight billion and 18, eight billion and 80, eight billion and 88,

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eight billion and 85,

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so, it's the very first one that is an odd number.

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OK, would it be a problem if you just explained that again?

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Did you wish to take the news with you to Australia?

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Look what I brought back from England,

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this amazing piece of information, that I still don't understand.

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-NOEL:

-I'm trying to work out a face that I can do that would be

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as if I did understand that.

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Were you good at maths at school, Noel?

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-No, terrible.

-Why do you think that is?

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Cos I wasn't good at it either.

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It didn't make sense to me.

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You know that whole thing, a minus and a minus is a plus,

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you know this is a thing?

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So I used to say, "I don't have four sheep

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"and you DON'T give me four sheep,

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"how is it I've got eight sheep suddenly running around?"

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APPLAUSE

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How have you got eight sheep

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-and who on earth put them into alphabetical order?

-Yes!

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LAUGHTER DROWNS SPEECH

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What about you, Colin? Did you do well at school?

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-Well, I was bullied at school.

-Oh!

-Yes.

-Everybody.

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-AUDIENCE:

-Aww.

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A kid stole my lunch and gave me a wedgie

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and then I decided to give up teaching, so...

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APPLAUSE

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I like that. My very last school report,

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you're supposed to get a nice one at the end

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to send you off into the world and it just said,

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"Sandra has a tendency to overdramatise."

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Let's have a look back at the ones we have left in our number cloud.

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142,857.

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If I tell you it's a cyclic number, does that mean anything to you?

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-No, is it to do with bicycles?

-Oh, I like that.

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"How many bicycles in Paris?" that kind of thing.

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No. So, if you take this number

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and you multiply it by any number between one and six,

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the answer will always be an anagram of the original number.

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-AUDIENCE:

-Ooh.

-So, it will just keep all those numbers.

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Look there, times two, times three, times four.

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-Good noise!

-Yeah.

-"Ooh.

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"We don't understand, but we're going to make a noise."

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This is the beginnings of subjugation.

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This number is an anagram of the other numbers.

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"Ooh, numbers."

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When you get to the magic number seven,

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you can see it doesn't work any more. It only works from one to six.

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-Extraordinary.

-Let's have a look at the number 43.

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Anybody know about the number 43?

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What I say my age is.

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-Just joking.

-Are you older or younger?

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-I'm older, yes.

-See, I was being polite.

-Yes, thank you.

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Boys don't mind about their age, do they?

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-Do boys mind about their age?

-They pretend that they...

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-You're shaking your head.

-I don't mind about my age.

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-I don't mind about mine.

-I'm 38 and proud.

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-Nothing wrong with that.

-I'd no idea. A year older than me.

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LAUGHTER

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The 43 goes to Friern Barnet.

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-Does it?

-Yep.

-It's a bus?

-It's a bus.

-To you it's a bus number.

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It's a Frobenius number. I'm not helping, am I?

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-No.

-They didn't even give you an "Ooh".

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I'm going to explain it in terms of McDonald's, OK?

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So, this is a mathematical problem posed by a German

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called Ferdinand Frobenius in the early 20th century.

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Let's say it's Chicken McNuggets.

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They are only sold in multiples of six, nine and 20.

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And 43 is the largest number of McNuggets it's impossible to buy.

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You could get 41, because you could have 20 and nine and six and six.

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You could have 42 because you could have four lots of nine and a six.

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You could have 44, because you could have four lots of six and a 20.

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You cannot buy 43 McNuggets.

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You'd have to throw some away.

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Not even if you know Ronald McDonald?

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No.

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Now for question number two which is aptly about number twos.

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What can we do about the international poo shortage?

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-# Three, two, one. #

-Yes, Sarah.

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-We could all get IBS.

-Oh.

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I hadn't even thought of that.

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-That man in the picture's very pleased with his.

-Yeah.

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He's going to need some cream on after that, I reckon.

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Too much or too little poo?

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Too little.

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-Is it animal as opposed to human, though?

-Yes, it is.

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-So, why might that be a problem?

-Fertilisation.

-Farmers.

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-It is fertilisation, it is.

-Yeah.

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-It isn't so much farmers but it is fertilisation.

-Right.

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So, the death of lots of the Earth's large animals,

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it's had a knock-on effect on the smaller species

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due to a worldwide lack of excrement

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and it is really extraordinary because the natural fertilisation

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which you would find on land with animal faeces,

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it is dropped to 8% of what it was at the end of the last ice age.

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-They're just not... COLIN:

-So, it's just animal number twos?

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-Yeah.

-So we can't do our bit? We...

-Well, I don't...

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No.

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It's kind of you to offer but I don't know about Australia

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but they have laws here and...

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APPLAUSE

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And I thought you were going to be different.

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Oh, I am different but you haven't looked closely enough.

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So, we need animal poo and in the oceans it's even worse.

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So, faecal nutrients in the ocean are estimated at only 5%

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of what they were historically.

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If you think there's been a decline in the number of whales

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and it was always thought that would cause the number of krill

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to increase because, of course,

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that krill is the very thing that they eat,

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that hasn't materialised because the poo from the whales

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that fertilises the plants that the krill eats

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is no longer there in the quantities that it was.

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And it's called trophic cascade, it's the process by which

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a top predator helps the rest of the ecosystem.

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92% less poo than there was at the end of the ice age?

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Yeah, on the land.

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-And 95% in the ocean.

-Wow.

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Now, here's a really crap link.

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I'm making some of this up as I go along.

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What do these things have in common?

0:14:400:14:42

-So, we've got some die.

-Die.

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Clearly an English church

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cos there's something half-timbered about it.

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-A lava lamp, some neon and...

-Eminem.

-..Eminem.

-Eminem.

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So, what have they got in common?

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It's the odd one out. It is an odd one out round?

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It's quite a random thing.

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Is it anything to do with where they originated or something like that?

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-No, they use...

-Did you say the word random?

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-Is it to do with random.

-Is it because they're random?

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They're all ways of generating random numbers.

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So the easiest one is the tossing of the dice,

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that's probably one of the oldest ways of creating random numbers.

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People have been doing it forever.

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Assuming the dice is not loaded in any way

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then you will get a random number.

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Computers can't actually generate random numbers,

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they do everything by a pattern. It's sort of a pseudorandom thing.

0:15:210:15:24

Say you used a computer to pick lottery numbers,

0:15:240:15:26

if you knew the pattern, you'd be able to cheat.

0:15:260:15:28

They don't actually do it.

0:15:280:15:29

But you need tables of random numbers,

0:15:290:15:31

they're very useful in statistics

0:15:310:15:32

but you can't roll tens of thousands of dice,

0:15:320:15:34

that would be ridiculous.

0:15:340:15:36

The very first table which was in 1927 was created by taking

0:15:360:15:38

the middle digits from the area measurements

0:15:380:15:40

of 41,600 English churches.

0:15:400:15:44

Then there was a company called Lavarand in 1996

0:15:440:15:47

and they took pictures of lava lamps

0:15:470:15:50

and they extracted the data from those photos

0:15:500:15:52

and they used that to generate random numbers.

0:15:520:15:54

So all the things that we were looking at

0:15:540:15:56

were to do with the generation of random numbers.

0:15:560:15:58

And the rapper, there was a guy at Florida State University,

0:15:580:16:01

George Marsaglia,

0:16:010:16:02

and he created a list of 4.8 billion randomly produced noughts and ones

0:16:020:16:07

by taking a number of rap songs and turning them into digital files.

0:16:070:16:10

So, these are all... I know. I mean, that he's got the time.

0:16:100:16:14

Yes.

0:16:140:16:15

Why isn't the dice just enough for these people?

0:16:150:16:17

Presumably because you need millions of numbers

0:16:170:16:19

rather than just, "Ooh, it's a six."

0:16:190:16:22

-It's not all about board games, I've just realised.

-No.

0:16:230:16:27

In the past, they used to use the random selection

0:16:270:16:29

as a way of making political appointments.

0:16:290:16:31

They used to use something called sortition and what it is,

0:16:310:16:33

it's random selection, which I quite like.

0:16:330:16:35

People have just suggested it for the House of Lords in this country.

0:16:350:16:38

It might be you or it might be a member of the audience

0:16:380:16:40

-or it might be you.

-That's the old Plato thing, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:16:400:16:43

Chosen against his will because he was the best candidate.

0:16:430:16:47

-Yeah.

-The philosopher king.

0:16:470:16:49

Here it would be probably David Beckham or someone.

0:16:490:16:52

I suppose we use it a bit, we use it for jury service, don't we?

0:16:530:16:56

And the Venetians, for years and years and years,

0:16:560:16:58

they used drawing of lots to select the Doge.

0:16:580:17:00

There were nine stages of drawing lots,

0:17:000:17:02

fantastically complicated system but carried on for about 500 years

0:17:020:17:07

and it was semi-random but the idea was that it helped people through

0:17:070:17:11

who are not just the people with money

0:17:110:17:12

or people who were good at demagoguery or that kind of thing.

0:17:120:17:15

So, anyway, let's go forth and multiply with our fourth question.

0:17:150:17:19

How did the Danish government convince its citizens to multiply?

0:17:190:17:22

This is one of my Randy Scandies.

0:17:220:17:25

You mean...

0:17:260:17:27

-Actually?

-I do mean that.

0:17:270:17:29

Was it financial incentives?

0:17:290:17:31

-There were incentives.

-We all need incentives anyway, don't we?

0:17:310:17:34

What, to procreate?

0:17:340:17:36

Just, you know, the bit before that, as well.

0:17:360:17:38

Right. I'm fine, but OK.

0:17:380:17:40

Incentivise me.

0:17:420:17:44

I can narrow it down. It's actually a place called Thisted,

0:17:440:17:48

which is in Jutland, so the mainland, the bit that sticks out from Germany.

0:17:480:17:51

What happened? 2015, the local authorities were going to close down

0:17:510:17:54

the local school and everybody

0:17:540:17:56

was very upset in the local area so they struck a deal that the people

0:17:560:18:00

would procreate as much as possible if they kept the school

0:18:000:18:04

and the leisure facilities open.

0:18:040:18:06

Nothing says "I'm bringing sexy back" like a council memo.

0:18:060:18:10

Did they all do it? Did they all have to have kids?

0:18:120:18:14

Well, as many as possible. They were encouraged to have kids.

0:18:140:18:16

I have to say, it's a lovely place, Thisted.

0:18:160:18:18

Not a lot to do. Number three on their own website of things to do

0:18:180:18:22

in the area is visit the candle shop.

0:18:220:18:25

Sexy candles for around the bath.

0:18:280:18:31

There's been lots of times before, Britain has had its own panics

0:18:310:18:34

about falling populations because of the war and contraception and so on.

0:18:340:18:37

So, in 1921, the Daily Express

0:18:370:18:39

ran a competition to find Britain's largest family.

0:18:390:18:43

The News of the World offered a free tea tray

0:18:430:18:47

to any mother who gave birth to her tenth child.

0:18:470:18:51

Don't want your bloody tea tray, I'll take your head off with it.

0:18:510:18:54

And the French still give medals for having large families.

0:18:560:18:59

That's still a thing. The Medaille de la Famille Francaise.

0:18:590:19:02

How many kids for bronze? What do you reckon?

0:19:020:19:04

-Six.

-Four to five. Silver, six to seven.

0:19:040:19:07

Gold, eight plus.

0:19:070:19:09

I thought you said 45, for a second there.

0:19:090:19:12

There is so much wrong with that picture, I can't begin.

0:19:120:19:16

-Go on.

-Why are they creating a human bench for their two children?

0:19:160:19:20

-That is worrying.

-Have they glued their heads together?

0:19:200:19:23

Maybe they're ventriloquists and that's how they hold their toy.

0:19:230:19:28

Just used to holding people like that.

0:19:280:19:31

Now, how many great nights out can you have in a single week in Wales?

0:19:330:19:37

-Seven.

-Seven.

-It's not seven.

0:19:390:19:42

-Six.

-Eight.

0:19:420:19:43

Eight. The Welsh word for a week "wythnos"

0:19:430:19:45

translates as eight nights.

0:19:450:19:47

If you start counting a week on a Sunday night

0:19:470:19:49

and you finish on a Sunday night, which is how they used to do it,

0:19:490:19:51

-that's eight nights.

-But then that's wrong.

0:19:510:19:55

-Did nobody put them straight?

-It's wrong to us now.

0:19:550:19:57

I mean, lots of things have changed.

0:19:570:19:59

So, in old English, the day used to begin at sunset

0:19:590:20:01

so what was Wednesday night to an Anglo-Saxon

0:20:010:20:03

would be Tuesday night to us now, so that's changed.

0:20:030:20:06

And in some Muslim countries, for example,

0:20:060:20:08

where Friday is the holy day, you have a Friday, Saturday weekend,

0:20:080:20:11

the working week then starts on a Sunday.

0:20:110:20:13

Where can you get your hair done on a Sunday three in the afternoon?

0:20:130:20:17

That's a very good point.

0:20:190:20:21

And whose diary is that?

0:20:220:20:24

Because I'm having lunch with them.

0:20:240:20:26

-They can drive, that's nice.

-I know.

0:20:280:20:30

Well, I think if they had any manners,

0:20:300:20:31

-they'd get their hair done before they had lunch with you.

-Yes.

0:20:310:20:35

Or it means that two days after lunch with Sandi,

0:20:350:20:37

you better get your hair done.

0:20:370:20:39

-NOEL:

-She's a messy eater.

0:20:410:20:42

Anybody know what half of a fortnight is?

0:20:450:20:48

Imagine Jane Austen, for example. Jane Austen?

0:20:480:20:50

I'm not familiar with Jane Austen.

0:20:500:20:52

It's a sennight.

0:20:520:20:53

There's a lovely bit in Pride And Prejudice

0:20:530:20:55

where Mr Collins says he will trespass on your hospitality

0:20:550:20:58

from Monday, November 18th to the Saturday sennight following.

0:20:580:21:02

Do people still talk like that?

0:21:020:21:04

We should bring those things back, don't you think?

0:21:040:21:06

Mind you, wouldn't your heart fill with horror

0:21:060:21:07

if somebody's coming to stay for a sennight?

0:21:070:21:10

-How long is that again?

-Seven nights.

0:21:110:21:14

How long are you staying for?

0:21:140:21:15

I'm staying four nights which, traditionally,

0:21:180:21:21

it should only be three nights, something about fish or something?

0:21:210:21:24

-You shouldn't stay...

-It's Dickens, I think.

0:21:240:21:26

He said that fish and overnight guests are exactly the same,

0:21:260:21:28

-they both go off after three days.

-Yes.

0:21:280:21:30

Originally he was referring to Hans Christian Andersen,

0:21:300:21:33

who apparently was staying with him

0:21:330:21:34

and was a truly terrible house guest.

0:21:340:21:36

What if you put your guest in the fridge?

0:21:360:21:38

Oh!

0:21:380:21:40

-Or freezer, even.

-Yes, that's...

-Could last three months, then,

0:21:400:21:43

or, you know, ten years, like we all do.

0:21:430:21:45

Eight nights on the town in Wales makes for a long, long week.

0:21:460:21:49

Now, here's something nice.

0:21:490:21:52

Cake. You've each got a cake and a knife.

0:21:520:21:56

And here is the challenge.

0:21:560:21:58

I want you to cut two pieces of exactly equal size.

0:21:580:22:02

Now, you can use three cuts to do it, but in such a way

0:22:020:22:05

that the cake is still moist for you to have some more tomorrow.

0:22:050:22:08

What would be the best way of cutting it?

0:22:080:22:11

Could the cake stay moist in my tummy?

0:22:110:22:13

-Because then you just half it.

-Then you could just half it. No.

0:22:130:22:16

So, the idea is that there is cake for tomorrow.

0:22:160:22:18

So, we're going to start with Alan and Colin first.

0:22:180:22:21

-What is your...?

-Well, my theory is that we cut through the middle.

0:22:210:22:26

-OK.

-This is going to be difficult, but we're going to do it.

0:22:260:22:29

-Right.

-And then, we take the top off.

0:22:290:22:33

-OK.

-Yes.

0:22:330:22:35

And we eat the bottom bit.

0:22:350:22:38

You're going to eat the whole of the bottom bit?

0:22:380:22:40

But that's quite a large piece of cake, isn't it?

0:22:400:22:43

Yeah, yeah.

0:22:430:22:45

We're two men in our 30s, we love cake.

0:22:450:22:47

Take the top of. Colin will remove the bottom of the cake.

0:22:500:22:53

Then put the top back down again.

0:22:550:22:57

That's moist for tomorrow and then we cut this... place that there,

0:22:570:23:01

we cut completely in half, like that.

0:23:010:23:04

-Two equal pieces.

-Wow, that's very good.

0:23:040:23:07

APPLAUSE

0:23:070:23:09

Do you think anybody who likes the filling is going to be mildly disappointed?

0:23:140:23:18

So, let's go over to...

0:23:200:23:21

-I've got an idea.

-No, do it with the cake!

0:23:210:23:23

-I'm just going to draw it first.

-Oh, fine.

-Is that OK?

0:23:230:23:26

-Yes, darling, you do what you like.

-Yeah.

0:23:260:23:28

LAUGHTER

0:23:280:23:30

What if we cut it like, in a way that we could...back together?

0:23:300:23:35

We cut like a bit out of here and a bit out of here

0:23:350:23:38

and then just smush...

0:23:380:23:39

Yeah, just...

0:23:390:23:41

That would be better, wouldn't it?

0:23:410:23:43

-Do you want to do it?

-That was a shambles, what they did.

0:23:430:23:46

-The smushing doesn't sound good.

-I reckon we have to do this first.

0:23:470:23:50

-Do you think?

-Yeah, go on.

-COLIN:

-That's good.

0:23:500:23:52

-AUDIENCE:

-Oh!

-NOEL:

-No?

0:23:520:23:54

Shush now. Shush, shush, shush now.

0:23:540:23:56

The audience are trying to be helpful, but are not.

0:23:560:23:58

-Well, they are. They are being helpful.

-OK. Go for it, Sarah.

0:23:580:24:01

OK. So...

0:24:010:24:03

-Oh, it's tough.

-Delicious is what you're looking for.

0:24:030:24:06

LAUGHTER

0:24:060:24:08

-And then, that.

-You've just drawn Pac-Man.

0:24:080:24:10

That doesn't make any sense.

0:24:100:24:11

So, take out your pieces.

0:24:110:24:13

These are our pieces.

0:24:130:24:16

Noel, were you calling US a shambles?

0:24:190:24:21

Is that what you were saying? There you go.

0:24:210:24:25

APPLAUSE

0:24:250:24:27

So, there is a mathematical way of doing it.

0:24:320:24:35

There was a man called Francis Galton. An extraordinary fellow.

0:24:350:24:38

He was an explorer and he was the very first person to come up with the idea

0:24:380:24:41

of a weather map and he was also slightly obsessed with the idea

0:24:410:24:44

of sharing a Christmas cake with his wife in an even manner.

0:24:440:24:47

So, what he did was he wrote a long treaties on the subject,

0:24:470:24:50

which he sent to Nature magazine.

0:24:500:24:52

You were absolutely heading in the right direction.

0:24:520:24:54

What you do is you cut it right down the middle like this

0:24:540:24:57

and then you pull out the entire centre piece.

0:24:570:24:59

-Ah, that was it!

-That's only two cuts though.

0:24:590:25:02

Wait, I haven't finished. You pull out the whole thing like this

0:25:020:25:05

and then you cut that one in half, so then you have two pieces.

0:25:050:25:09

-We were nearly there.

-You were very nearly there.

0:25:090:25:11

You have two pieces of cake like that and then you simply push

0:25:110:25:14

the cake back together.

0:25:140:25:16

Looks very similar to ours.

0:25:170:25:19

-Are you writing that down now, Noel?

-Yeah, I am.

-Yeah.

0:25:230:25:26

So, only if there's two people though. I mean, what if...?

0:25:260:25:29

-There's usually 19.

-Then usually the whole cake gets eaten, I think.

0:25:290:25:32

It's not really a problem.

0:25:320:25:34

The same with two with me, to be honest.

0:25:340:25:37

There's actually a branch of mathematics called fair cake-cutting

0:25:370:25:40

which is about optimising the division of resources.

0:25:400:25:43

In Chinese economics, they talk about cake theory

0:25:430:25:45

and it's slightly different because the debate is whether

0:25:450:25:48

it's more important to divide the cake fairly

0:25:480:25:51

or to bake a bigger cake.

0:25:510:25:53

So, that's how you can halve your cake and eat it.

0:25:560:25:59

But now to a question about wrong numbers.

0:25:590:26:02

Where's the worst place in the world for nuisance calls?

0:26:020:26:06

LAUGHTER

0:26:060:26:09

That is a great picture.

0:26:090:26:11

Do you not think you thought more carefully about making

0:26:110:26:13

a phone call when you had to dial it one number at a time?

0:26:130:26:16

If you had to dial someone who had lots of eights and nines in it,

0:26:160:26:19

-sometimes you wouldn't bother.

-You just couldn't be arsed.

0:26:190:26:21

I actually did that, I bought a retro phone

0:26:210:26:24

-because I liked the look of it.

-Yeah.

-And after about a week,

0:26:240:26:26

-I went, "Oh, this is killing me."

-Yeah.

0:26:260:26:29

It's so boring.

0:26:290:26:31

When I was a child, we had a holiday home in the country in Denmark

0:26:320:26:35

-and there were so few...

-Ooh!

-Yes.

0:26:350:26:37

There were so few telephones that our number was seven.

0:26:380:26:41

Really?

0:26:410:26:42

A woman used to put the calls through and then listen in

0:26:460:26:48

and you knew that.

0:26:480:26:50

You could hear her breathing.

0:26:500:26:52

So did you ever get people ringing up and then just go,

0:26:520:26:55

"I think you've got the wrong number"?

0:26:550:26:57

-Yes. "You want number nine."

-"I wanted six."

-Yes.

-"I wanted six."

0:26:570:27:00

Easily done.

0:27:000:27:01

Worst place in the world for nuisance calls.

0:27:010:27:03

-What do you reckon?

-I know what that call is,

0:27:030:27:05

someone's saying there's a poo shortage,

0:27:050:27:07

you haven't got anything in your nappy, have you?

0:27:070:27:11

-COLIN:

-I can help out. Constantly.

0:27:110:27:13

Just working on it now.

0:27:130:27:14

Wouldn't it be the country with the most people in?

0:27:140:27:16

No, ironically, the place with the fewest telephones for a short while.

0:27:160:27:20

So, it's the Pacific island of Niue.

0:27:200:27:23

It looks fab, doesn't it?

0:27:230:27:25

Niue. So, in the early '90s, people were constantly woken up

0:27:250:27:28

by heavy breathers because the country was the home of an extremely

0:27:280:27:32

lucrative sex line business and people often used

0:27:320:27:36

to dial the wrong number.

0:27:360:27:38

There were only 387 telephones on the island and the phone numbers

0:27:380:27:42

only had four digits so people were often misdialling.

0:27:420:27:45

So, this is people ringing the wrong number and expecting a sex line?

0:27:450:27:48

-Yes.

-So, if they're already heavy breathing, they've started already.

0:27:480:27:53

I didn't know this.

0:27:530:27:54

Maybe it was just a helpline for asthma, people with asthma.

0:27:550:27:59

Nothing sexual. That guy's trying to ring nine people at the same time.

0:28:020:28:05

That's not going to work.

0:28:050:28:07

I once picked up the phone and somebody said,

0:28:070:28:09

"You're supposed to be a fax!"

0:28:090:28:10

And you think, "I have no idea what to say back to them."

0:28:100:28:14

-Beep.

-Yeah.

0:28:140:28:16

So they had a terrible time because people were constantly getting wrong

0:28:170:28:20

numbers and Belgium was another country that ran sex lines

0:28:200:28:23

for quite a while. When they were banned,

0:28:230:28:25

this is the most brilliant thing, they started a new thing,

0:28:250:28:28

which was cookery lines with recipes read

0:28:280:28:30

in the most sexual way possible.

0:28:300:28:32

-They had to read out sexy recipes.

-What's a sexy recipe?

0:28:340:28:37

-Toad in the hole.

-Toad...

0:28:370:28:39

-Toad in the hole!

-Toad in the hole.

0:28:400:28:43

I can't think of anything more exciting, I think.

0:28:430:28:45

I quite fancy a toad in the hole.

0:28:450:28:48

Last time I had that, I had a football under my arm

0:28:490:28:51

and a catapult in my pocket.

0:28:510:28:54

Two weeks ago.

0:28:540:28:55

You used to be able to get toad in the hole followed by spotted dick.

0:28:580:29:01

Yeah.

0:29:010:29:02

-There's a recipe you could read out.

-Yeah.

0:29:020:29:04

So, here's the thing.

0:29:040:29:05

We're going to make our own nuisance call this evening.

0:29:050:29:07

There is a number that anybody can ring in Sweden

0:29:070:29:11

and it's a scheme set up by the country's tourism authority

0:29:110:29:15

to celebrate 250 years of free speech in Sweden

0:29:150:29:18

and it's called Ring a Random Swede, OK?

0:29:180:29:21

It's genuinely a random thing.

0:29:230:29:24

We've no idea who we're going to get.

0:29:240:29:27

We've already pre-selected a question from a member

0:29:270:29:29

of the audience and the question is why do you eat rotten fish?

0:29:290:29:32

Does anybody speak Swedish?

0:29:340:29:36

Here's the marvellous thing about Scandinavians,

0:29:360:29:38

-their English is really coming along.

-OK.

0:29:380:29:41

So, the marvellous sound department are going to put the call through

0:29:480:29:51

now and obviously we'll have to explain what it is we're doing to this person.

0:29:510:29:55

PHONE DIALS

0:29:550:29:56

This whole thing's making me very anxious, I don't know why.

0:30:230:30:26

Is it? Just talking to somebody you don't know?

0:30:260:30:27

Because I think if somebody rang me randomly, I'd be so pissed off.

0:30:270:30:30

-I know, but people have signed up for it.

-Oh, they want it.

0:30:300:30:32

They've signed up to be Random Swede.

0:30:320:30:34

It's not like you just... MAN SPEAKS OWN LANGUAGE

0:30:340:30:36

-Hello.

-Hello.

-Hi, my name is Sandi, I'm ringing from London.

0:30:360:30:40

Who's that?

0:30:400:30:41

Robin. Hi. You're my Random Swede that I'm ringing.

0:30:430:30:47

Is it your first phone call from an English person?

0:30:490:30:51

Oh!

0:30:530:30:55

Well, this is kind of exciting, Robin, because I'm ringing you

0:30:550:30:58

from a live television studio in London.

0:30:580:31:01

You're on the BBC right now, is that OK?

0:31:010:31:05

OK. I tell you what, we'll have a round of applause from our audience.

0:31:080:31:11

Maybe you can hear that.

0:31:110:31:12

APPLAUSE

0:31:120:31:14

So, what do you do, Robin?

0:31:200:31:22

Are you actually in the shop?

0:31:260:31:28

OK. So, we have a question from our audience.

0:31:280:31:31

You may be buying this now, what do I know?

0:31:310:31:34

Why do Swedish people eat rotten fish is the question

0:31:340:31:37

we want to ask you.

0:31:370:31:38

So, what are you going to buy, Robin, for your dinner?

0:31:500:31:52

-Nice, sounds nice.

-Parmesan, that sounds lovely.

0:31:570:31:59

-(Very good English.)

-Yes, very good English.

0:31:590:32:01

Can you ask him how he's going to divide the chicken?

0:32:010:32:04

Yeah.

0:32:040:32:05

-And to keep it moist the next...

-Yeah.

0:32:070:32:09

So here's the thing, Robin...

0:32:100:32:11

ROBIN LAUGHS

0:32:110:32:13

Are you all right if we put this on the BBC?

0:32:150:32:18

OK.

0:32:180:32:20

On BBC Two. It's called QI, do you know QI?

0:32:200:32:23

No.

0:32:250:32:27

You have your own version in Sweden of QI.

0:32:270:32:29

-Intresseklubben.

-Could you ask him...?

-Intresseklubben.

0:32:290:32:32

-Could you ask him what time should he expect us for dinner?

-Yes, so...

0:32:320:32:37

The whole audience wants to come for dinner.

0:32:370:32:39

It was lovely to speak to you, Robin.

0:32:390:32:41

APPLAUSE

0:32:410:32:43

-His English was pretty good.

-That English, coming along, wasn't it?

0:32:480:32:51

Yeah, coming along.

0:32:510:32:53

You'll never meet an unfriendly Swede, that's my view.

0:32:530:32:55

No, darling, that's because they're usually drunk.

0:32:550:32:58

LAUGHTER

0:32:580:32:59

It's a Danish-Swedish thing.

0:32:590:33:00

OK, new question.

0:33:000:33:02

How does it feel to be a 9-ender?

0:33:020:33:04

-Anybody know?

-If you've lost a finger?

0:33:040:33:06

Oh! It's not that.

0:33:070:33:09

It's about our ages.

0:33:090:33:11

Oh, is it if you're sort of 19, 29, 39?

0:33:110:33:13

Yes, it's exactly that.

0:33:130:33:14

They did a study in 2014,

0:33:140:33:16

Adam Alter and Hal E Hershfield of New York University,

0:33:160:33:19

and people who have nine at the end of their age

0:33:190:33:22

are more likely to be looking for purpose in their lives.

0:33:220:33:25

I think the idea is that we see a new decade

0:33:250:33:27

-as a sort of watershed moment.

-A milestone.

0:33:270:33:29

-A milestone, exactly right.

-Yes.

0:33:290:33:30

So, more likely to be registered on dating sites

0:33:300:33:32

looking for extramarital affairs, for example.

0:33:320:33:35

More likely to run a marathon

0:33:350:33:37

or commit suicide.

0:33:370:33:39

I don't think that's an either or, I don't think that's...

0:33:390:33:42

And also to do better in marathons cos they're better motivated.

0:33:420:33:45

And lots of examples,

0:33:450:33:46

Buddha renounced all his possessions when he was 29,

0:33:460:33:48

Agatha Christie published her first book at 29,

0:33:480:33:50

Alexander Graham Bell transmitted his first sentence by telephone

0:33:500:33:53

at 29, so there are lots and lots of examples.

0:33:530:33:55

-I started doing stand-up at 29.

-Did you?

-Yeah, yeah.

0:33:550:33:57

Peter Schmeichel won his first Premiership winner's medal at 29

0:33:570:34:02

and this year, his son Kasper

0:34:020:34:05

has won his first Premiership medal at 29.

0:34:050:34:09

-Wow, that's kind of spooky. AUDIENCE:

-Ooh.

0:34:090:34:12

APPLAUSE

0:34:120:34:13

-That is kind of spooky.

-And they're both goalkeepers.

0:34:130:34:16

And they're both Danish.

0:34:160:34:18

Yes, well, there's a Randy Scandi.

0:34:180:34:21

-I've come up with a Randy Scandi!

-Yeah.

0:34:210:34:24

Right, let's play How Many People In The Audience...

0:34:240:34:27

Each of my panellists has got a coloured card

0:34:270:34:30

and the audience also has coloured cards

0:34:300:34:32

and I'm going to get them to stand up and I want you to

0:34:320:34:36

tell me which item on this list relates

0:34:360:34:39

to the number of people who are standing.

0:34:390:34:42

We're going to start with Colin, what colour is your card?

0:34:420:34:44

-Blue.

-So, could all the blue card people stand up, please?

0:34:440:34:50

What do you reckon, Colin?

0:34:500:34:51

-How many people do you think that is?

-Erm...

0:34:510:34:54

It's about 182.

0:34:560:34:58

-OK.

-It's 230 people.

0:34:580:35:02

It took 230 people to do one of these five things.

0:35:020:35:05

Selfie fatalities in 2014.

0:35:050:35:08

It is not. It is something a little bit more substantial.

0:35:080:35:12

-Built the Eiffel Tower.

-Built the Eiffel Tower is absolutely right.

0:35:120:35:15

Built by 230 people in two years.

0:35:150:35:18

Sit back down again and we will come to Sarah.

0:35:180:35:22

What colour is your card?

0:35:220:35:23

-I have red.

-So, could I have the red cards standing, please?

0:35:230:35:26

How many do you think that might be?

0:35:260:35:28

-100, maybe.

-69.

0:35:290:35:31

So, have a look at the list, what do you reckon?

0:35:310:35:35

I think maybe the selfie fatalities.

0:35:350:35:37

You keep going for that one. It isn't that.

0:35:370:35:39

It's the world record number of children born to a single mother.

0:35:390:35:43

No way.

0:35:430:35:45

-What?

-All of you are now related.

0:35:450:35:48

It's a woman called Valentina Vassilyev.

0:35:480:35:51

She had 16 pairs of twins,

0:35:510:35:52

she had seven sets of triplets

0:35:520:35:54

and four sets of quadruplets in 40 years, between 1725 and 1765.

0:35:540:35:59

In total, 27 births.

0:35:590:36:01

Her husband, Feodor Vassilyev,

0:36:010:36:04

went on to have a further 18 children with his second wife.

0:36:040:36:08

So, he left her?! After all of those kids!

0:36:080:36:11

I think she died. I think she died.

0:36:110:36:13

It's unbelievable, isn't it?

0:36:130:36:15

But the way she was having children

0:36:150:36:17

was someone was unscrewing her and they were just getting out...

0:36:170:36:22

But this is a wrong that ought to be righted.

0:36:220:36:23

The Guinness Book of Records describes Valentina

0:36:230:36:25

as the wife of Feodor without mentioning her own name

0:36:250:36:28

and she deserves absolutely her own name as credit.

0:36:280:36:30

-Oh, boo!

-Valentina, she was called.

-Do you know how young she started?

0:36:300:36:34

Well, over 40 years she had the children...

0:36:340:36:35

-Oh, my God.

-..so must've started very young indeed.

0:36:350:36:38

-She was four.

-Yes.

0:36:380:36:40

Let's have a look at yours, Noel. What colour is your card?

0:36:400:36:43

White. Let's have all the white cards stand.

0:36:430:36:47

How many people do you reckon that is?

0:36:470:36:49

-50?

-49, almost exactly right.

0:36:490:36:52

-What does that represent? COLIN:

-(Selfie fatalities.)

0:36:520:36:56

Everybody's gone for the selfie fatalities, what do you reckon?

0:36:560:37:00

QI contestants.

0:37:000:37:02

You should have gone for the selfie fatalities.

0:37:020:37:05

That number of people, very sadly, in 2014, died taking a selfie.

0:37:080:37:12

16 came from a fall, four from a gunshot, one from an animal,

0:37:120:37:16

I don't know what the story is, I've no idea.

0:37:160:37:18

The most common place apparently to die taking a selfie is in India.

0:37:180:37:21

Followed by Russia.

0:37:210:37:23

I tell you what, Alan, why don't you get the whole audience to stand up?

0:37:230:37:26

Everyone, please rise.

0:37:260:37:28

There we are. AUDIENCE RISES NOISILY

0:37:280:37:30

-So, that's the entire audience.

-Oh, I've heard that noise before.

0:37:300:37:34

Turn your back for two seconds.

0:37:380:37:41

625 people is the QI audience.

0:37:410:37:44

I can tell you it represents people who died in a certain way.

0:37:440:37:47

They didn't die together. It was 625 individual incidents.

0:37:470:37:52

-Domestic accidents?

-It's an accident in the home.

0:37:520:37:54

Coming to panel shows?

0:37:540:37:56

The word coming is going to be most...

0:37:590:38:02

No. No!

0:38:020:38:04

-Getting jiggy?

-It's the number of people in 2014

0:38:040:38:07

who died from autoerotic asphyxiation.

0:38:070:38:11

Sit down, you dirty bastards!

0:38:120:38:14

Sorry, I'm confused. I thought for a moment you were all autoerotics.

0:38:170:38:22

That's how to explain the dangers of autoerotic asphyxiation

0:38:220:38:25

using our studio audience.

0:38:250:38:27

All of which talk of hard sums brings us to the insoluble equation

0:38:270:38:32

that is general ignorance. So, fingers on buzzers, please.

0:38:320:38:36

In terms of numbers, which is the most common vertebrate in the world?

0:38:360:38:41

# ABC. #

0:38:410:38:42

-Alan.

-Humans.

0:38:420:38:44

KLAXON

0:38:440:38:46

SLIGHT CHEERING

0:38:460:38:47

We never knew you liked the klaxon!

0:38:470:38:49

We'll get some more. We'll get some more.

0:38:490:38:52

Seven billion humans.

0:38:520:38:53

I can tell you already there are more chickens than there are...

0:38:530:38:56

# ABC. #

0:38:560:38:58

-Chickens.

-Chickens, that should do it.

0:39:010:39:03

KLAXON

0:39:030:39:05

# Three, two, one. #

0:39:100:39:11

-It's not rats?

-No.

0:39:110:39:13

KLAXON

0:39:130:39:15

It's not rats.

0:39:150:39:17

-NOEL:

-I have got it.

-Yes.

0:39:170:39:19

People who died of auto asphyxiation.

0:39:190:39:22

-It's a fish.

-Fish, fish!

0:39:240:39:25

It's a fish called the Bristlemouth and it's tiny.

0:39:250:39:29

It is smaller than your finger but if it opens its mouth up wide

0:39:290:39:32

it's got these incredible needle-like teeth.

0:39:320:39:34

It's an amazing fish. It glows and it eats even smaller creatures,

0:39:340:39:38

which you can see there, called copepods, but they are not vertebrates.

0:39:380:39:41

But this is the largest number of vertebrates in the world.

0:39:410:39:44

They live in the sea between half a mile and three miles down and until

0:39:440:39:48

the 21st-century, so they got the very fine dredging nets,

0:39:480:39:51

we didn't really know how many there were.

0:39:510:39:53

The estimate now is that there are as many as a dozen

0:39:530:39:56

-per square metre of ocean surface.

-Whoa.

0:39:560:39:59

And they disguise themselves as diagrams.

0:39:590:40:01

They do.

0:40:010:40:04

Protandrous, do you know what that means?

0:40:040:40:06

-No.

-They're protandrous. They...

0:40:060:40:07

Like Chrissie Hynde? No.

0:40:070:40:09

-I don't know about that. They're male first hermaphrodites.

-Wow.

0:40:110:40:14

The most common animal in the world is an invertebrate.

0:40:140:40:16

It's the nematode worm.

0:40:160:40:18

Four out of five of all animals is a nematode worm.

0:40:180:40:22

Anything that comes at you like that without any eyes...

0:40:220:40:24

That's why some of us made the life choices we did.

0:40:280:40:31

CHEERING AND APPLAUSE

0:40:310:40:33

What colour bricks did they build Number 10 with?

0:40:380:40:42

-Oh, red ones, surely. They're dirty.

-NOEL:

-White.

0:40:420:40:44

Black.

0:40:440:40:46

KLAXON

0:40:460:40:48

No. Yellow.

0:40:490:40:50

There was lots and lots of pollution and in fact when it was cleaned off

0:40:500:40:53

in the '50s and '60s, they thought, "Oh, we better paint it black

0:40:530:40:56

-"cos everyone's expecting it to be black."

-Oh, no, really?

0:40:560:40:58

And can you see the zero on the ten is slightly askew?

0:40:580:41:01

It's an homage to old number which was always very slightly askew.

0:41:010:41:05

The White House is also made with yellow bricks

0:41:050:41:07

so that is a curious thing,

0:41:070:41:09

they are in fact sandstone underneath all that white paint.

0:41:090:41:12

They may not look it but the White House

0:41:120:41:14

and the front of Number 10 Downing Street

0:41:140:41:15

are both a similar shade of yellow.

0:41:150:41:18

The word noon comes from the word nun, which meant nine,

0:41:180:41:22

so with that in mind, if you had to meet a ninth-century nun

0:41:220:41:25

at noon, what time would you noodle off to the nunnery?

0:41:250:41:29

Noon means nun, which came from nine,

0:41:330:41:36

you're meeting the nun at nine.

0:41:360:41:38

Nun, what time would you meet if you were meeting the nun at noon?

0:41:380:41:40

12?

0:41:400:41:42

KLAXON

0:41:420:41:44

-Nine.

-Yeah. No.

0:41:460:41:48

KLAXON

0:41:480:41:50

There isn't a nun.

0:41:520:41:53

KLAXON

0:41:530:41:55

-Anyone else want to have a go?

-Just call them, instead.

0:41:590:42:01

Until the mid-12th century,

0:42:010:42:03

the word noon meant three o'clock in the afternoon.

0:42:030:42:05

Ah, bollocks.

0:42:050:42:07

You were so winning, as well. You just destroyed your score.

0:42:090:42:13

It goes back to old Christian prayer times,

0:42:130:42:15

so it used to be that the day began at 6am,

0:42:150:42:18

so that was known as the prime or the first hour

0:42:180:42:20

and then you have terces, so the third hour, that would be 9am today.

0:42:200:42:23

-Nonny's the ninth hour.

-That guy in the orange has got my haircut.

0:42:230:42:27

He's praying for a new one.

0:42:290:42:32

"Please, I don't want to be in Cabaret any more!"

0:42:320:42:35

Until the Middle Ages, noon was 3pm and all this talk of time makes me

0:42:380:42:42

realise it must be time for the scores.

0:42:420:42:44

In last place with -41 is Alan.

0:42:440:42:46

APPLAUSE

0:42:460:42:48

It should be Sarah next, but we're going to skip over that

0:42:500:42:53

and we're going to put in third place Colin, with -9.

0:42:530:42:55

-Thank you.

-APPLAUSE

0:42:550:42:58

Thank you. And in second place, Noel, with one point!

0:42:590:43:02

APPLAUSE

0:43:020:43:04

So, Sarah actually got -26, but I was supposed to do a gig for Sarah

0:43:050:43:09

and I let her down by becoming the new host of QI and I couldn't do it,

0:43:090:43:13

so this week's winner, to make up for it, is Sarah Millican!

0:43:130:43:16

APPLAUSE

0:43:160:43:18

That's all from Sarah, Noel, Colin,

0:43:270:43:29

Alan and me. And I leave you with this number-related,

0:43:290:43:32

Neolithic newspaper nugget from the Eastern Evening News.

0:43:320:43:35

When two men stole six sheep from a farm at Mumford,

0:43:350:43:40

they found that they could only get five of them into the back of their van.

0:43:400:43:43

So, the other one had to sit in the cab between the two men.

0:43:430:43:46

But the men had to pass through Watton on their way home.

0:43:460:43:49

Fearing that the sheep sitting in the cab might be conspicuous,

0:43:490:43:53

they disguised it by putting a trilby hat on its head.

0:43:530:43:55

Goodnight.

0:43:560:43:58