North Lake District Country Tracks


North Lake District

Liz Bonnin explores the Lake District. She starts her journey in Whinlatter Forest, travels through Keswick, and finishes at a pudding club in Ambleside.


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Transcript


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Today I'm on a journey through the Lake District,

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one of the world's most spectacular landscapes.

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I start my travels in the North Lakes,

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over 2,500 feet above sea level, in Whinlatter Forest.

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That was so cool. I felled a tree.

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I'll travel to Keswick to learn how a pencil factory

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helped keep Second World War RAF pilots safe behind enemy lines.

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Is that the compass? Oh, my gosh, it is so tiny.

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I'll meet the photographer

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whose collaboration with writer Alfred Wainwright

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immortalised this amazing scenery...

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The landscape has been here

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for hundreds of thousands of years, untouched,

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and I really do try to avoid photographing man's hand upon the landscape.

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..and end my journey

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indulging in any pudding lover's fantasy in Ambleside.

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That looks yummy.

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OK, so it's nothing...

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I'd just eat that with a spoon, Lucy.

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Along the way, I'll be looking back at the best of the BBC's rural programmes

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from this part of the country.

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This is Country Tracks.

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The Lake District was one of the first areas in the UK

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to be given National Park status.

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Here, you can find England's highest mountain and its deepest lake.

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Its vistas have inspired paintings by Constable

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and words by Wordsworth.

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I've come to Whinlatter

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to get a taste of the only true mountain forest in England.

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Whinlatter Forest rises to 2,591 feet above sea level,

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giving spectacular views of the Lake District, and on to Scotland.

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Now it was originally planted after the First World War,

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in order to replenish the dwindling timber supplies in the UK.

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Now back then, the main objective was to grow the most productive tree species possible,

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offering very little diversity for wildlife.

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But by the 1970s, the Forestry Commission decided to change the way they managed this forest.

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Hiya, Nathan.

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'I'm meeting ranger Nathan Fox, to find out why.'

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So, Nathan, why was the decision taken to change the management of this forest?

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The remit changed, really.

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These are public forests and we need to manage them for public benefit,

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so the emphasis on timber production reduced,

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and the emphasis on more wildlife conservation and public facilities obviously increased.

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That's a lovely thing to hear, so what exactly is the scale of this change?

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I mean, how big is the forest for managing?

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Whinlatter is a very big forest, obviously.

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It's about 3,000 acres in size, and forestry's obviously quite a long-term thing.

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So we've got a bit of work to do before we reach our ultimate goal.

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It's a work in progress.

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What are you doing with this particular patch of it?

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The whole area's going to be clear-felled

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and it's going to be replanted, but not with the same type of species

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but with a different type of species to give a bit more diversity.

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Cool. OK. How do you tackle such a big forest?

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I mean, how do you cut this down efficiently?

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Historically, it was done by axes, then it was done by saws.

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-That's hard work.

-Then, it was done by chainsaws, but we've do something different with it now.

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-Where is it?

-Just round here. I'm going to let you see.

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-Hi, Dave.

-Hiya, Nathan.

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-Liz, this is my colleague, Dave.

-Hello.

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-This is Liz.

-Very nice to meet you.

-How are you, love?

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-You have got the best toy in the world.

-I've leave you in Dave's capable hands.

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Thanks a million.

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Wow, how many trees do you get through with this baby?

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It'll do 250 trees a day.

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-Not too shabby.

-No, that's right.

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How come the wood's all separated into different piles?

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We're cutting that many different products out of the tree.

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The first piece is a saw log, what we call a nice, green saw log, a big, chunky log.

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-Used for timber?

-Yeah, timber industry. So, we cut that one first,

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then as you start getting down the tree, towards pallet wood.

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Then as we get further down, if it's got any bends or twists in it,

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we cut pulp wood, which is for paper and cardboard.

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-So nothing's wasted.

-Nothing at all.

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-That's good news. Can I see it in action?

-You can indeed, yeah. You'll have to jump up.

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-Can I go up there with you?

-Yes.

-Awesome! I'm going to leave my rucksack here.

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Now, where can I stand, Dave?

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-Squeeze in there if you can.

-Okey-dokey, no worries.

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Not much room in these cabs. All right?

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-Yeah, yeah.

-Are you in?

-Yes.

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It's an incredible-looking piece of kit. It really is.

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That's the felling head there.

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Oh, look at that!

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Got feed rollers that feed the tree through,

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and as you feed the trees through, there's knives, these pieces here.

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-Yeah, yeah. Whoa! You wouldn't want to be caught between those.

-No.

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Oh, my God. That's incredible. That's better than any Transformer I've ever seen.

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HE LAUGHS

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Basically, this is your length. These are diameters.

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So when I saw this tree off now, it'll zero itself.

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When I feed the tree through, it'll optimise what it can get.

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-Would you like to have a go?

-Oh! Are you kidding me?

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I can position it so you can fell a tree, if you like.

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-Oh, my gosh! Yes please. Seriously?

-Yes.

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Dave, you are amazing. Thank you so much, I would so love to try and have a go.

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-All you need to do is...

-Yes.

-..press this little button here.

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-Yeah, and that's it?

-That's it.

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OK. Here we go.

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That's it. We just pull that lever back and feed the tree through...

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..like that.

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That was so cool! I felled a tree!

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You cut a tree down.

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There is still a lot of work to be done in this part of the forest,

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but some areas are already geared up for the public.

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Adam Henson saddled up to try out the bike trails.

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You obviously love it up here. What makes you so passionate about it?

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Look where we are, first of all.

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The views are spectacular, and even better on a bike.

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It's just a great place to live and work.

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And the trail itself?

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It's been advertised as putting the mountain back into mountain biking, and it really has.

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We're on one of the biggest, highest mountain trails in England.

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Not only have you got the views,

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but you've got amazing descents and just huge amounts of fun.

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It's graded red. That's like skiing, I suppose, is it?

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Yeah. We start off with green, blue, red and black, so it's second-highest.

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You need to know your stuff, but most people do.

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-I suppose we ought to give it a go.

-Absolutely.

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The trail's 19 kilometres long and takes about two hours.

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For a novice rider like me, it's pretty tricky.

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-Rich, that's quite technical stuff, isn't it? Quite tricky some of that.

-Good fun though.

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Now, going down past some of those tree roots, my back tyre was slipping out

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and I - well, I nearly fell off.

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That does happen. Often, if front wheel goes, your back wheel's going to follow,

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so either avoid it altogether, stay clear of it, or if you can, front-wheel lift,

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and your back wheel will follow, and you clear it.

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OK. Try the next bit, shall we?

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Happy days, let's go.

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The trail was getting tougher and the mist was closing in.

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Whoa, Adam, slow down.

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Got a bit of a technical feature to look at.

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So what we need to do here, is look past the puddle.

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So where you look is where you're going to go.

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As the front wheel drops down, push the bike away from you.

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That gets the bike over the technical feature quite quickly.

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Go easy on the brakes and just enjoy it.

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What happens if I slip off into the trees?

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First of all, you won't.

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It's all about confidence. If you think about falling, you will fall.

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-Don't think about falling.

-OK. Let's give it a go. I'm feeling confident!

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ADAM LAUGHS

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It might not look much, but when you're on a bike

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with a hefty drop next to you,

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it's a different story.

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Well, Adam, what do you reckon, then?

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it's just great. I'm loving it. Really, really good.

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-Thanks for all the tips. It's fantastic.

-No problem.

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Don't let me hold you up, you crack on and I'll just make my own way down.

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-OK.

-Nice to see you.

-See you later.

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The Whinlatter mountain forest is owned by the Forestry Commission,

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so I wanted to find out about their input into the trail.

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-Hi, how are you doing?

-Hi, how are you doing?

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It's a brilliant trail. Adrian, how did this come about?

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Well, about five years ago, we were inundated with self-built trails

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within the forest, and that's groups of people

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coming in and building their own trail.

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So the Forestry Commission here at Whinlatter thought, "Well, it's about time we did something,"

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and created a trail that was purpose-built and sustainable.

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How does it fit in with the wildlife?

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That's why a lot of people have been coming here in the past.

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The Bassenthwaite ospreys are in the area, there's a red squirrel reserve here.

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We've got a good population of roe deer.

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So we wouldn't develop something that was unsustainable or detrimental to that either.

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MUSIC: "Kitty Jay" by Seth Lakeman

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One of the great things about this trail is the absolutely stunning views.

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You can see right off across the Lake District and even into Scotland,

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and Keswick's 1,600 feet down in the valley.

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The last kilometre of the trail is specially designed for disabled mountain bikers.

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The bikes have four wheels instead of two, and the momentum is gained

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by the gradient they ride on, rather than through pedalling.

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So I caught up with these rough riders, who tow each other up on a quad bike,

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to get their take on the mountain biking experience.

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Dave, how did this trail come about?

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We approached the Forestry Commission, you know, with our club,

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and asked, basically, that any future trails that are built,

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that they could bear us in mind

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when they come to the construction of them.

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It's worked out quite well.

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It's a first attempt, so it's not brilliant because we're all learning.

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The Forestry Commission are learning and we're learning as well,

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but hopefully with a few tweaks it's going to run a little bit faster and be a little bit better for us.

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The only prohibitive thing about this, if me and Dave

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are riding we can never ride together,

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because either he's towing me or I'm towing him.

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If there's an up lift service, where we can both get a tow behind, we can just come up

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to the top like this, and ride together, which is the next stage.

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We just want to be like everybody else, chuck our bikes in the back of the car,

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come out, and take part without having to bring a trailer and a quad,

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and all that infrastructure, but at the moment that's the starting off and developing.

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That's really what we wanted to do initially, is just be part of the

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mountain biking family, rather than sort of separating in any way, you know.

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And you, when you're going down, you get pretty extreme, you talk about air time.

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Yeah, you know, you can jump them. You know, they're not quite as, you know,

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you can't take the impact with your legs like a normal rider can.

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So what tends to happen is it lands and it will get a rebound kick,

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which can get quite out of hand at times.

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But particularly when you get a good jump, with a good landing transition,

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you can land smoothly and ride away.

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That sounds quite extreme! Are you not worried about hurting yourself?

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Yes!

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-Are you?

-Yes and no.

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I still want an adrenaline rush.

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Obviously, self preservation kicks in at some stage, but you can't do

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an extreme sport and be constantly afraid of what might happen.

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Being a wheelchair user, people think, you know, you're disabled

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and you're doing an extreme sport, are you mad?

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But why should I not try it any more than an able-bodied person?

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You know, you might fall off a bike and get injured, same might happen to me.

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It's a slightly different bike but it's the same risks involved.

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In some ways you could sort of see it as, well, I'm in a wheelchair, how much worse can it get?

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Although you don't tend to say that to people!

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and I reckon the more popular this sport becomes, trails like the ones

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they've got here really are going to come into their own for people of all abilities.

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For me, I think it's high time I got that well-deserved pint!

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Whinlatter's mountain bike trails. As well as these bike trails for visitors,

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something else has benefited from the changes to the forest

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The flora and fauna. Barbara Thompson is my guide.

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Barbara, immediately, all around me I can see a very different landscape

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from the one I've just been in.

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Talk to me about the kind of trees that are here then.

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Well, you can see over there, a mosaic of different trees,

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different ages, different species.

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Some of them are conifer, larches, spruce. Some pine in there.

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But there's also some clear fell and some deciduous stuff.

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So you've got a whole range of different trees.

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We've got them in sort of species pens. Each pen is then felled.

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But that, of course, then opens up a whole new place

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where you've got young trees coming up, young deciduous trees coming up.

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And, of course, that means you've got lots of margins for wildlife then.

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-OK.

-And different sorts of plants coming up.

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OK, so what kind of wildlife can you find?

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What we've got at the moment, of course, is red squirrel.

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They particularly like mature pines with the pine cones on the edges.

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We've also got small animals. Voles, little mice, bank voles

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-and you have the bigger predators like weasels and stoats coming in.

-Fantastic.

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And then you have your big predators on top like buzzards coming in,

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sparrowhawks, occasionally a goshawk coming in

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and they'll be taking all those little animals in the food chain.

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Fantastic. What about ospreys then?

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Well, ospreys are exclusively fish eaters

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so what they like best are these native pine trees we have up here,

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which is our only native pine tree, the Scots pine.

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That's what they like nesting in because it has a big, broad open top to it.

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So this is very different and a big improvement on the original forest.

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Of course, I'm seeing lots of wild plants, some blackberries there.

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-Oh yes, they're just ripening up nicely, aren't they?

-Amazing. There's only one that looks a bit ripe.

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Now, if you have a look over there, we've got some wood sage.

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-What, this stuff here?

-This stuff here, yeah.

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This is a very interesting one because it's our only native sage.

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You can put it in stews but it's very bitter to eat.

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The Romans brought the Mediterranean sage across

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and it went quite out of fashion then.

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If you have a look here, Liz, there are two different sorts of heather.

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This has been completely eradicated underneath the conifers

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but now we've cleared it again, it's coming up.

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This is the more common Scottish heather.

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It's the one I recognise. What is this one?

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This one's bell heather.

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If you have a look here, you'll see each little flower is like a little ringing bell in there.

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It's so cute.

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So, this is indigenous heather but it was completely eradicated

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because of the old way the forest was planted?

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When you put the conifers in, that would shade out all this sort of thing.

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So, just letting a little bit of light in and it just seems to come up

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-from perhaps ancient seed that was there beforehand.

-Fantastic.

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It's also quite nice in the fact that at this time of year

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-it will make a very pleasant golden dye out of the tips.

-Really?

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You are a fountain on knowledge, Barbara.

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Beautiful. Great to see it here.

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Barbara, what would you say are the main advantages of managing a forest in this way?

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Well, I suppose it's because of the total diversity of the place.

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-As you can see, you've got lots of different ages of trees.

-Yeah.

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Most of those are conifers so they'll be going for wood pulp or timber,

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so you're getting an income from that.

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You've got clear spaces where you'll get wildlife coming up.

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As the trees grow up, you'll get different wildlife coming in.

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It's opened it up so you can see these magnificent views

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and, of course, it's just wonderful for people.

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It's really great to see the transformation of the forest here.

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And it's not only the fells and forest getting a new lease of life.

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When Griff Rhys Jones visited,

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he went underground to check out a slate mine rescued from closure.

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Mark Weir has single-handedly resurrected this relic of Cumbrian industry.

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In the 1980s, the mine was closed down.

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'But Mark's grandfather, who had worked in the mine all his life,'

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always dreamed that it would open again.

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After his death, Mark risked everything and bought it.

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The only problem was that Mark, a former helicopter pilot,

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didn't know the first thing about slate mining.

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I'd never been underground in a mine

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till I actually walked through here for the first time,

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and I hadn't been underground as I bought it.

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Isn't that weird?

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But Mark has been transformed into a slate expert like his grandfather,

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having taught himself the skills.

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-I know this is a good bit of slate because it rings like a bell.

-Right.

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So all I would want to do now is hit it in the middle of the middle.

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I just tap it.

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And because it's gone thin on me...

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It's amazing how, with just that knock,

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you've ended up with something as finished as that,

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as beautiful a surface as that.

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'It looked easy enough so I thought I'd have a crack.'

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-Are you a practical sort of guy?

-Not really, no, but I'll have a go.

0:19:180:19:22

-At almost anything, I'll have a go at it.

-OK.

0:19:220:19:24

-Go into the middle there and a slight tap.

-Into the middle?

0:19:240:19:27

-In the middle there like that.

-How hard am I going to hit this?

0:19:270:19:30

-A nice, swift strike.

-OK.

0:19:300:19:34

Now, I'll probably...

0:19:340:19:36

-And again. You're committed now, Griff.

-Am I? OK.

0:19:390:19:42

You just nicely tap it through.

0:19:420:19:45

-Gently, gently?

-Yeah.

0:19:450:19:47

Gently, gently.

0:19:470:19:49

That's gone through. There's definitely something coming off.

0:19:550:19:58

-Look at that! I mean, it's not perfect.

-No, it isn't.

0:19:580:20:01

No, it's not a tile, so much as a...

0:20:010:20:05

Well, it is a cheeseboard.

0:20:050:20:07

Or possibly it could do in my garden, couldn't it, really?

0:20:070:20:11

It didn't take me that long.

0:20:110:20:14

'After I'd ruined a perfectly good bit of slate for him,'

0:20:140:20:18

Mark took me up the mountain to find the green gold, as slate is called.

0:20:180:20:23

When Mark bought the mine, it was derelict.

0:20:240:20:27

He had 11 miles of tunnels, many of which were blocked or unsafe.

0:20:270:20:31

And he had no money to employ anyone to help him.

0:20:310:20:35

In getting it back to a workable state, he was completely on his own.

0:20:350:20:40

Look at this.

0:20:410:20:43

Wow!

0:20:440:20:45

Isn't that fantastic?

0:20:450:20:48

When I first started, for the first three years

0:20:480:20:52

I used to do seven days a week

0:20:520:20:54

and two 24-hours shifts mixed between that week, every week.

0:20:540:20:59

-You would work here at night on your own?

-Yeah.

0:20:590:21:04

-But did you hate the mountain then?

-I did. I hated every bit of it.

0:21:040:21:09

So what drove you on?

0:21:090:21:11

Basically, I bought a mine and it wasn't doing anything

0:21:110:21:15

and I was going to lose everything.

0:21:150:21:17

So my great idea of being truly grit and all the rest of it

0:21:170:21:21

and I lose everything, genuinely was on the horizon.

0:21:210:21:24

I was going to lose the lot and the only thing that kept us going,

0:21:240:21:29

the only get-out that I could,

0:21:290:21:31

was to basically work and work and work and work

0:21:310:21:35

until I saw the green gold of Honister.

0:21:350:21:37

But the days and nights of toil paid off

0:21:390:21:43

and now Honister Slate Mine employs 40 people

0:21:430:21:46

and produces 10,000 tonnes of slate a year for building companies in Cumbria and beyond.

0:21:460:21:51

Mark hasn't just been busy extracting slate.

0:21:560:21:58

He also has a project he hopes will leave a legacy to this Cumbrian industry.

0:21:580:22:04

Deep in the mountain we came to an astonishing slate cave.

0:22:070:22:13

-What's your plan here?

-I'm creating an amphitheatre.

0:22:130:22:15

A monument to the people that lived and died.

0:22:150:22:18

So you'll put in seats and a stage?

0:22:180:22:22

Yeah, in rock form. Yeah.

0:22:220:22:26

-That's a huge amount of work to do.

-It is. This is my home.

0:22:260:22:31

This is my inspiration.

0:22:310:22:34

This is my piece to carry on after my time.

0:22:340:22:39

If Mark's inspiration becomes a reality,

0:22:400:22:43

the slate amphitheatre will be a place of congregation.

0:22:430:22:47

Visitors will be able to sit right inside the mountain

0:22:470:22:50

and feel its might and beauty.

0:22:500:22:53

Since that interview was recorded, Mark Weir has sadly passed away

0:22:530:22:59

but Honister Slate Mine remains as his legacy

0:22:590:23:02

and continues to play an important role in this lakeland community.

0:23:020:23:07

Leaving the mountains of Whinlatter behind,

0:23:070:23:09

I'm heading south to the popular town of Keswick.

0:23:090:23:12

People first started visiting Keswick during the Victorian period

0:23:130:23:17

inspired by the area's close connection with writers

0:23:170:23:21

such as Coleridge, Ruskin and Wordsworth

0:23:210:23:24

and also because of its popularity with artists like Constable and Turner.

0:23:240:23:28

Today, this is a thriving tourist town

0:23:280:23:31

but very few people actually know about one of its major industries.

0:23:310:23:36

In 1500, a local shepherd discovered a strange black material in the roots of an upturned tree.

0:23:360:23:43

That material was actually graphite

0:23:430:23:46

and thus began the pencil-making industry right here in Keswick.

0:23:460:23:50

The local graphite was mined out in the early 1800s

0:23:540:23:58

but the pencil industry here in Keswick survives today.

0:23:580:24:02

750,000 pencils are produced here every week,

0:24:050:24:08

exported to no less than 72 countries.

0:24:080:24:12

These days, production is largely automated.

0:24:140:24:16

It's a far cry from the early days of mass production

0:24:160:24:20

here in the Lake District.

0:24:200:24:21

The first factory opened in 1832

0:24:250:24:27

and back then it was a dirty, labour-intensive industry

0:24:270:24:31

employing hundreds of local people.

0:24:310:24:34

But it was in between these two eras

0:24:370:24:39

that this factory was responsible for a unique product.

0:24:390:24:43

I've come to the museum built on the site of the original factory

0:24:450:24:48

to find out about a secret operation that was going on

0:24:480:24:51

right here during the Second World War.

0:24:510:24:55

I've worked in the museum for three years.

0:24:550:24:57

Keswick is well known for the pencil-making industry

0:24:570:25:00

but there was a big secret that was kept during the Second World War.

0:25:000:25:04

-What was it?

-There was a gentleman called Charles Fraser Smith.

0:25:040:25:07

He came from the government in 1941

0:25:070:25:10

to challenge our technical managers to create a pencil

0:25:100:25:14

with a map and a compass inside.

0:25:140:25:16

For use in the Second World War?

0:25:160:25:17

It was. It was given to RAF airmen in standard issue kits

0:25:170:25:23

and to POWs as well.

0:25:230:25:25

Oh, my gosh, so escape maps and stuff like that?

0:25:250:25:29

The maps inside held pictures of Germany

0:25:290:25:32

and they were coded between 101 to 104.

0:25:320:25:35

How on earth did they make this pencil then?

0:25:350:25:38

-First off, they created the pencil as normal.

-Yeah.

0:25:380:25:41

Then they drilled out the inside.

0:25:410:25:44

-Right, OK.

-To about halfway, three quarters.

0:25:440:25:47

So there's still some pencil here, so they can write. Amazing.

0:25:470:25:51

So, it's hollowed out and then what happens?

0:25:510:25:53

-They would insert a map into the centre, like so.

-Oh, right, OK.

0:25:530:25:57

-Nicely bound up.

-Yeah. Then a compass was inserted on top.

0:25:570:26:02

Is that the compass? Oh, my gosh, it is so tiny.

0:26:020:26:05

-Oh, look, it's amazing. Brilliant. So you put the compass...

-On top.

0:26:050:26:09

And then you put a metal ferrule on top.

0:26:090:26:11

-Which is normal to have on a pencil anyway?

-Yep. To help hold the rubber on top of the end.

-Great.

0:26:110:26:16

And it would look like a normal pencil.

0:26:160:26:18

How many people actually knew about these special pencils

0:26:180:26:22

because it was a well-kept secret, wasn't it?

0:26:220:26:24

-It was. Only six members of management knew about it.

-Really?

0:26:240:26:29

-Yeah, the factory workers created the pencil fully as normal.

-OK.

0:26:290:26:33

And then after work hours,

0:26:330:26:36

the management would come in on nights and drill out

0:26:360:26:39

the three-quarter length of pencil, insert the maps, the compasses,

0:26:390:26:43

then put everything in boxes on the shelves ready to be shipped.

0:26:430:26:47

-It was a small number of people who knew, to make sure the secret never got out.

-Yeah.

0:26:470:26:51

-So do we know whether Germany ever found out about our amazing secret pencils?

-We don't.

0:26:510:26:56

Unfortunately, due to the Official Secrets Act,

0:26:560:26:59

all records were destroyed after being made,

0:26:590:27:02

so we don't know how many were made, how many actually left

0:27:020:27:05

or if they're actually still in people's attics or bedrooms.

0:27:050:27:09

Absolutely genius, though. What a great thing to display here.

0:27:090:27:12

The remarkable story of the secret wartime pencil,

0:27:170:27:20

designed to save pilots' lives behind enemy lines

0:27:200:27:24

and produced right here in Keswick.

0:27:240:27:26

Exploring the Lake District's industrial heritage

0:27:280:27:31

is one good reason for visiting this beautiful part of the world

0:27:310:27:35

but, for most people, the biggest draw continues to be the wilderness

0:27:350:27:38

and the water.

0:27:380:27:40

Lots of people come to the Lake District to soak up the tranquillity,

0:27:400:27:44

stretch their legs and generally take it easy.

0:27:440:27:46

But if you prefer a bit more action and you don't mind getting wet,

0:27:460:27:50

there is an alternative way of exploring this countryside.

0:27:500:27:53

Right, arms crossed, wriggle wriggle. Go!

0:27:530:27:56

Cumbria is bidding to become the UK's adventure capital

0:27:560:28:00

and ghyll scrambling is shaping up to be one of the most popular,

0:28:000:28:03

if not unique, activities here in the Lakes.

0:28:030:28:06

Earlier on, I caught up with local instructor, John Wady.

0:28:090:28:12

He's been running ghyll scrambling courses here for the past nine years.

0:28:120:28:16

Many of them take place at Stoneycroft Ghyll.

0:28:160:28:19

So, John, why is ghyll scrambling the next big thing?

0:28:190:28:23

It's for people who have tried the traditional outdoor activities

0:28:230:28:27

and want to get closer to nature.

0:28:270:28:29

In the unique way the Lake District was formed through volcanic action and glaciation,

0:28:290:28:33

it's left us with many of these really steep mountain streams

0:28:330:28:37

which are the perfect venue for ghyll scrambling.

0:28:370:28:40

'And, unlike many sports, you can do this come rain or shine.

0:28:400:28:44

'I'm taking part with seven others.'

0:28:440:28:46

Quick, get me in the water!

0:28:460:28:47

I don't know what I'm expecting but I'm scared to death.

0:28:500:28:54

Just to give you an idea of how chilly this water is,

0:28:540:28:57

there's icicles hanging above us.

0:28:570:29:00

Guys, we're all wearing wetsuits.

0:29:000:29:02

The only way for a wetsuit to work is if it's wet.

0:29:020:29:05

The clue's in the name, so have a seat.

0:29:050:29:07

THEY LAUGH

0:29:070:29:09

-I love it!

-That's it.

-Have a seat.

-There we go, well done.

0:29:090:29:12

Get your legs up there, hands in the air.

0:29:120:29:15

Do yourselves a favour, put them in the water! Splash!

0:29:150:29:18

Have some of that!

0:29:180:29:20

'We're aiming to get through a kilometre of the ghyll. Here goes.'

0:29:200:29:24

-Arms in, wiggle, wiggle!

-If it's a full on adrenaline rush you're after,

0:29:240:29:28

this won't disappoint. Suddenly, sliding down a rocky landscape

0:29:280:29:32

feels like the most natural thing in the world.

0:29:320:29:35

This is so bizarre

0:29:350:29:36

because you'd never believe that it would fit you so naturally.

0:29:360:29:40

It's like you're in a theme park cos you're going down all these slides.

0:29:400:29:43

So where does the term "ghyll scrambling" originate?

0:29:430:29:47

The scrambling is using your hands and feet to move your body along.

0:29:480:29:52

A ghyll is just a local word for a steep mountain stream

0:29:520:29:55

from the old Vikings,

0:29:550:29:57

cos the Vikings had many settlements in this area.

0:29:570:30:00

'Well, I'm pacing myself, as it's about to get even tougher.'

0:30:000:30:04

-This is the first of the dives on the ghyll...

-What?!

0:30:040:30:07

-..So we're thinking swimming pool, a racing dive's coming up.

-Really?

0:30:070:30:11

-Yeah. So...

-So you go on your belly?

-On your belly, yeah.

0:30:110:30:14

We're looking for the best belly flop going. There's an award at the end of the ghyll.

0:30:140:30:19

It looks painful but it's too exhilarating to notice the bumps.

0:30:200:30:24

And can you scramble through any part of the Lake District?

0:30:280:30:32

Obviously, some ghylls are just too steep to be safe.

0:30:320:30:35

You'd have to use rocks and rock-climbing ropes and techniques

0:30:350:30:38

to protect them. But there's 20, 30 ghylls like this

0:30:380:30:43

that can be used really easily by anyone of average ability.

0:30:430:30:47

They've had ghyll scramblers as young as six here.

0:30:470:30:51

Some of these jumps are just incredible.

0:30:510:30:53

If you're brave enough, it's an ideal opportunity to face your fears.

0:30:530:30:57

How are we feeling?

0:30:570:30:59

-I just don't want to do it.

-You don't want to do it! Bless you!

0:30:590:31:02

-You'll be all right.

-Turn round.

-Just go for it.

-Go! Yeah!

0:31:020:31:07

I tell you what, she's a brave girl. Here we go. It is a bit slippy

0:31:070:31:10

and it looks like a very long way down.

0:31:100:31:13

-Happy?

-Go for it!

-On three.

0:31:130:31:16

One, two, three...

0:31:160:31:18

It's been great fun. Loved the jumps and the slides. It's been excellent.

0:31:230:31:27

It's great experience to weather when you're in the water.

0:31:290:31:32

It's been cold, it's been wet but it's been brilliant.

0:31:340:31:37

'I'm feeling a bit battered now but I don't want to get left behind.'

0:31:380:31:42

Woo-hoo!

0:31:420:31:44

Continuing my journey through the Lake District,

0:31:490:31:52

I've arrived at the beautiful Rydal Water.

0:31:520:31:54

The Lake District has been immortalised

0:32:110:32:14

by countless poets and other literary giants.

0:32:140:32:17

But in recent history, one name has become synonymous with this area

0:32:170:32:21

and that name is Alfred Wainwright.

0:32:210:32:24

Wainwright became known for his famous pictorial guides to the Lakeland Fells,

0:32:240:32:29

which he compiled between 1952 and 1966.

0:32:290:32:32

I'm on my way to meet photographer Derry Brabbs,

0:32:350:32:38

who spent nearly a decade working closely with Wainwright

0:32:380:32:42

on seven illustrated walking guides.

0:32:420:32:44

-Hello, Derry.

-Good morning.

-Sorry to disturb you. How are you getting on?

0:32:440:32:48

-On a day like today, getting on famously.

-Gosh, I'm not surprised.

0:32:480:32:52

What are you focusing on now? Can I look?

0:32:520:32:55

I've been trying to get a photograph

0:32:550:32:57

of that beautiful boathouse on the other side of Rydal Water

0:32:570:33:00

but I might have to come back later in the day

0:33:000:33:03

when the sun's moved round further.

0:33:030:33:05

-You've photographed this place many times with Wainwright?

-Absolutely, yes.

0:33:050:33:09

Tell me a bit about how you got to work with him.

0:33:090:33:12

Almost by accident. I was wanting to do a book on the Pennine Way

0:33:120:33:15

and somebody at the publishers suggested Wainwright

0:33:150:33:18

because he'd already done his famous pocket guide to the Pennine Way.

0:33:180:33:23

But he said before he would do the book on the Pennine Way,

0:33:230:33:26

he said I had to do one on the Lakeland mountains for him.

0:33:260:33:30

The only problem was that I'd never climbed a Lakeland Fell and suffer from vertigo.

0:33:300:33:34

So, in terms of a job description, it wasn't ideal.

0:33:340:33:37

When it comes to photography, how much experience did you have

0:33:370:33:40

and how much did you learn from Wainwright himself?

0:33:400:33:43

I was a novice at the game so it took me a couple of books with him

0:33:430:33:47

before I started to feel comfortable and know my surroundings

0:33:470:33:51

and also get to grips with the extraordinary microclimate that is the Lakeland Fells.

0:33:510:33:56

What are the top tips about capturing, first of all, that incredible mountain

0:33:560:34:00

and also a body of water like this? What do you need?

0:34:000:34:04

Really and truly, the best time for photography is as soon as you can after sunrise

0:34:040:34:09

and just before sunset.

0:34:090:34:11

When the sun's at a low angle, you get rich colours, textures, shadows,

0:34:110:34:15

and it transforms the landscape into a three-dimensional picture

0:34:150:34:19

rather than, as the sun gets higher later on in the day,

0:34:190:34:22

you lose all those wonderful textures and shadows.

0:34:220:34:26

To me, skies are an integral part of the landscape,

0:34:260:34:28

inasmuch as the reflection in the lake is important,

0:34:280:34:32

because that adds another dimension.

0:34:320:34:34

If you're doing a wide-angled picture of a landscape,

0:34:340:34:37

you've got almost half the image is sky.

0:34:370:34:39

And if you're exposing for the darkness of the trees and the water,

0:34:390:34:43

-then it means that inevitably the sky will become bleached out.

-OK.

0:34:430:34:47

Use a graduated filter and it reduces the exposure

0:34:470:34:51

that you need in the sky.

0:34:510:34:52

You can either hold it across the lens like that or you can buy filter holders.

0:34:520:34:57

We're going to focus in on those rugged rocks

0:34:570:35:00

because the sun is directly on them, there's a lovely pebbled...

0:35:000:35:03

Is there a man at the very top dressed in red up there? Look.

0:35:030:35:07

-The top of the mound on the right.

-It's entirely possible.

0:35:070:35:11

-That's a brave person.

-It doesn't look so bad from up there,

0:35:110:35:15

but when you're looking down here...

0:35:150:35:18

and you realise just how much effort is going to be required

0:35:180:35:21

to get to the summit.

0:35:210:35:22

This is why we have heavy tripods, because your heart rate goes so fast

0:35:220:35:26

you could never hold a camera still in a month of Sundays!

0:35:260:35:29

You will find that if you get just a bit more height,

0:35:290:35:32

you can see so much more in the landscape and the whole perspective changes so much.

0:35:320:35:36

-You're not going to make me climb that?

-No. But I can take you to a famous viewpoint

0:35:360:35:40

called Loughrigg Terrace, which has stunning views back over Rydal Water and also over Grasmere.

0:35:400:35:46

-Let's do it.

-Tally-ho!

-Feeling brave.

-Yep.

0:35:460:35:49

-Can you manage with that?

-Yes, absolutely. I'm used to it.

0:35:490:35:53

-Well, sorry it was a bit of a climb...

-It was a bit.

0:36:000:36:03

..but I think you'll find that the retrospective view

0:36:030:36:06

back to Rydal Water is stunning.

0:36:060:36:08

Ah! That is spectacular! There's the boathouse.

0:36:080:36:12

Exactly, and you can see what I mean by height giving you

0:36:120:36:15

a completely fresh perspective on things.

0:36:150:36:17

We had a wonderful view right down by the lakeside

0:36:170:36:21

but how much more can we see now? The lake itself is set into its context

0:36:210:36:25

and that towering mound of Nab Scar becomes less significant now

0:36:250:36:30

as it's developed into part of a ridge of hills.

0:36:300:36:33

So...this is what we could do.

0:36:330:36:37

And personally, I would probably... In fact, I just have,

0:36:370:36:42

taken quite a tight picture, showing the lake with the boathouse as a predominant feature.

0:36:420:36:47

Oh, right, but not in the centre.

0:36:470:36:49

Not in the centre because it would be off-balance

0:36:490:36:52

with so many islands full of great clumps of trees.

0:36:520:36:55

If I zoom out there and recompose the picture,

0:36:550:36:59

you can see, we've put the lake more in the natural setting

0:36:590:37:03

of the fells that surround it.

0:37:030:37:06

The landscape has been here for hundreds of thousands of years untouched.

0:37:060:37:10

And I really do try and avoid photographing man's hand upon the landscape,

0:37:100:37:15

and so, even though everybody's got a perfect right to be here as well,

0:37:150:37:20

I do try and avoid people, too. A bit like Wainwright.

0:37:200:37:24

Wainwright always said that you should walk by yourself.

0:37:240:37:27

If you wanted to walk with somebody, preferably in single file,

0:37:270:37:31

but if you had to walk with somebody side-by-side, you should not talk.

0:37:310:37:35

-Excuse me while I get this...

-Go on, then.

-Just in case we get the clouds rolling over.

0:37:350:37:40

-True artist, you are.

-It's just too good a day to miss.

-Aw!

0:37:400:37:44

One of Wainwright's most successful books

0:37:570:38:00

details his famous coast-to-coast walk.

0:38:000:38:03

The route he plotted is still listed as one of the most popular walks

0:38:030:38:07

in the world today.

0:38:070:38:09

We join Julia Bradbury as she hikes part of it

0:38:090:38:11

between Kidsty Pike and Haweswater.

0:38:110:38:14

A succession of rolling whale-back summits with few crags or cliffs

0:38:140:38:18

to block the elements.

0:38:180:38:21

And at the very top is a peak I know well.

0:38:220:38:25

High Street, named after the road once built by Roman soldiers

0:38:250:38:29

to carry them north-south across this inhospitable landscape.

0:38:290:38:33

It would be very tempting at this spot just to go straight on

0:38:360:38:40

towards High Street,

0:38:400:38:41

but actually, you need to take this left turn by the cairn.

0:38:410:38:45

We've come all the way down from Patterdale to the Knot.

0:38:450:38:49

There's the left turn there and that's Twopenny Crag.

0:38:490:38:53

That's what you're looking for.

0:38:530:38:55

Take the path branching over Twopenny Crag, named pre-decimalisation.

0:38:570:39:02

Skirting the rim of Riggindale, take Kidsty Pike.

0:39:020:39:07

The route now follows in the steps of the Romans.

0:39:070:39:11

And there I'm afforded my first view of Kidsty Pike,

0:39:120:39:17

just beyond Twopenny Crag here.

0:39:170:39:19

Maintaining an elevation of more than 2,000 feet for several continuous miles,

0:39:230:39:29

this road is a permanent memorial to the skill of surveyors and the endurance of the legions,

0:39:290:39:35

who marched along it in all weathers.

0:39:350:39:39

Here we are. The highest point on the coast-to-coast route.

0:39:430:39:48

Sadly, you can't see either coast from here, even on a clear day

0:39:480:39:54

but there is a real sense of satisfaction.

0:39:540:39:57

Kidsty Pike is a milestone on the journey.

0:39:590:40:03

The last place to offer a final look at the fells of Lakeland,

0:40:030:40:08

among which the past few days have been spent.

0:40:080:40:11

It is a sad farewell. But they have not gone for ever.

0:40:120:40:17

They will await for other visits in the future

0:40:180:40:21

and, unlike so much else, they will not change.

0:40:210:40:26

Say, "So long," not "goodbye".

0:40:260:40:29

St Bees is just a gentle buzz in the memory now.

0:40:310:40:35

But there's still a long way to go.

0:40:380:40:41

There's Haweswater

0:40:410:40:44

and we've got to go beyond that, all the way to Shap.

0:40:440:40:47

The broad, grassy slopes off the summit are a rugged alpine environment

0:40:520:40:56

offering an ever-increasing view into one of the lake's quieter valleys.

0:40:560:41:01

This is my last descent of the lakes and it's a real thigh-burner.

0:41:060:41:11

But it is the most direct route down, down the spine of Kidsty Pike,

0:41:110:41:16

straight into Haweswater.

0:41:160:41:19

This ridge would have once led me to the old valley of Mardale

0:41:260:41:30

and into the lands of Riggindale Farm.

0:41:300:41:32

But as with so many landmarks, it was wiped from existence 70 years ago,

0:41:360:41:40

when Haweswater the lake was engulfed by Haweswater the reservoir.

0:41:400:41:45

There's a certain beauty about the new reservoir

0:41:480:41:50

but nothing like the romantic charm

0:41:500:41:54

of the old valley.

0:41:540:41:57

There was a natural lake along here called Haweswater.

0:41:570:42:02

There used to be little green pastures, farmhouses.

0:42:020:42:06

It was fringed with rowans and birches

0:42:080:42:10

and there were little beaches where the cows could come and stand.

0:42:100:42:15

All that's gone.

0:42:150:42:17

It's sad. If you knew Mardale as it used to be in 1930,

0:42:170:42:21

this is a sad sight.

0:42:210:42:23

The old beauty's gone from it.

0:42:250:42:27

There's the Haweswater Dam, and that is my symbol that I'm truly leaving the lakes behind me.

0:42:310:42:37

Unlike Julia, I'm not ready to leave the lakes behind just yet

0:42:390:42:43

because my journey has now brought me to the town of Ambleside.

0:42:430:42:47

I don't know about you but after a mammoth walk like I've had,

0:42:490:42:53

I always fancy a nice big, fat slice of cake,

0:42:530:42:55

and, from what I hear, this is the perfect place.

0:42:550:42:59

Ambleside is a bustling town full of specialist shops and eateries.

0:42:590:43:04

I'm visiting one of its restaurants to learn the art of baking an exotic pud with a local twist.

0:43:040:43:09

Lucy, it's safe to say you're bit of a cake freak, right?

0:43:090:43:13

-I do like some of the sweet stuff!

-Good stuff! What are we making,

0:43:130:43:16

-cos the ingredients look very interesting?

-We've got some quite nice ingredients.

0:43:160:43:20

We're sort of settling into autumn and winter

0:43:200:43:24

I'm making a Cumberland Rum Nicky but with a bit of a difference,

0:43:240:43:27

cos we're using some Grasmere Gingerbread crumbs as well.

0:43:270:43:30

-This stuff?

-That's the stuff.

0:43:300:43:32

This has got the secret recipe that nobody can find out. Is that right?

0:43:320:43:36

Yeah. That's the way things should be occasionally.

0:43:360:43:39

-It smells like coming home. It's so gorgeous.

-Yes.

-It's divine.

0:43:390:43:42

And you won't be telling me what's in it?

0:43:420:43:45

-No, I can't tell you cos even I don't know!

-Rubbish!

0:43:450:43:47

Even I can't find that out. It's locked in a vault.

0:43:470:43:50

Usually, the Rum Nicky doesn't have this in it but we're adding...

0:43:500:43:53

No, but I'm putting that in because we like to play around with some of the recipes.

0:43:530:43:57

And we use it a lot on tops of mince pies and things like that,

0:43:570:44:00

and it's lovely on apple crumble, tart and...

0:44:000:44:03

-Gorgeous.

-Yeah, it's good.

-OK, what do we have to do first?

0:44:030:44:06

First of all, we've already lined our pastry case here

0:44:060:44:10

with some gorgeous pastry

0:44:100:44:12

into which there is icing sugar and zest of oranges.

0:44:120:44:16

-Mmm.

-Can you smell that?

-Yes. It smells really orange-y, gorgeous.

0:44:170:44:21

-That's a sweet pastry base.

-Nice.

0:44:210:44:22

Now we're going to actually cream together our butter and brown sugar.

0:44:220:44:27

Do you want to have a go at doing that?

0:44:270:44:29

Lucy, I have never made a cake in my life.

0:44:290:44:31

Is that really bad?

0:44:310:44:32

No. But there's always a first time for everything.

0:44:320:44:35

Use nice softened butter. That's really good.

0:44:350:44:39

-You just literally...

-Work it.

0:44:390:44:41

..working the butter and sugar together.

0:44:410:44:44

Eventually it becomes nice and pale.

0:44:440:44:46

That's wonderful, that's really good.

0:44:460:44:49

Now we're going to add a bit of the good stuff here which...

0:44:490:44:53

-Rum.

-Rum.

-What kind of rum?

0:44:530:44:55

This is just dark rum.

0:44:550:44:57

So, you wouldn't use white rum?

0:44:570:44:59

No, the dark rum gives it a nice flavour and also

0:44:590:45:03

you've got to remember the origins of this particular style of dessert.

0:45:030:45:09

Tell me about the origin of this, actually.

0:45:090:45:12

Well, the northwest, and particularly Whitehaven

0:45:120:45:16

were very much the spice capital of the North.

0:45:160:45:19

We have things like ginger, dates, the rum, the sugar,

0:45:190:45:26

everything you could possibly need,

0:45:260:45:29

coming in from the West Indies.

0:45:290:45:32

We used to trade with them.

0:45:320:45:33

So we would have all this stuff, guess what they got?

0:45:330:45:36

-What?

-Wool.

-That's rubbish.

0:45:360:45:38

-I think we got the better deal.

-That's a rubbish trade-off.

-That's the ginger syrup.

0:45:380:45:43

Ginger syrup. What kind of ginger is that?

0:45:430:45:45

This is just stem ginger. So, it's nice.

0:45:450:45:49

-My dad used to love this.

-I love it.

0:45:490:45:52

-This is good fun.

-Now, we've got a nice, creamy mixture there.

0:45:520:45:56

-Put that to one side.

-OK.

0:45:560:45:58

Now we need to mix all these drier ingredients together.

0:45:580:46:01

It's very easy. Here we've got some dates.

0:46:010:46:05

I'm going to tip those in like that, aren't they gorgeous?

0:46:050:46:08

-They are.

-Can you smell those?

-It all smells divine.

0:46:080:46:11

It's really nice and comforting.

0:46:110:46:14

We've got some nice plump raisins here which are lovely,

0:46:140:46:18

which go into there and mix in.

0:46:180:46:20

-Yes.

-The ginger.

-I love it.

0:46:200:46:22

Finally, we'll have to grate some apple now.

0:46:220:46:25

Do you use the skin of the apple or just the flesh?

0:46:250:46:28

I tend to put the skin in as well. But you can do whatever.

0:46:280:46:31

I'm going to put the skin in

0:46:310:46:32

because I like it and we've washed it.

0:46:320:46:34

-How much apple would you use?

-I use the whole apple.

0:46:340:46:38

-Grand.

-So we go straight through into it.

0:46:380:46:40

-All right?

-It's nice and juicy.

-Absolutely.

0:46:400:46:43

It will add a nice bit of liquid together with it.

0:46:430:46:45

So, we're going to go right the way down.

0:46:450:46:48

And then we are going to put this mixture,

0:46:480:46:51

we are going to mix it all up together.

0:46:510:46:53

So, we'll put that to one side.

0:46:530:46:56

OK, I'm going to mix this with my hands.

0:46:560:46:58

All right? Hands came before implements.

0:46:580:47:01

I'm happy to do that.

0:47:010:47:03

See how that nicely...

0:47:030:47:05

Straight on to the floor, that's good(!)

0:47:050:47:07

-It's nicely glistening up.

-That looks yummy.

0:47:070:47:11

-OK, so it's nothing...

-I would just eat that with a spoon, Lucy.

0:47:110:47:14

Well, you could do.

0:47:140:47:15

It's very like mincemeat type of thing, isn't it?

0:47:150:47:18

-It's that sort of filling.

-Great stuff.

0:47:180:47:21

We'll get our nice, little pastry base.

0:47:210:47:23

Don't worry that it's not all... Can you see?

0:47:230:47:25

I mean, this one is a loose-bottomed one.

0:47:250:47:28

Don't worry that it's not neat. People get very fanatical about...

0:47:280:47:32

I prefer food that looks rustic and rough than really, really neat.

0:47:320:47:36

Yes. A lot of it's about... We do eat with our eyes,

0:47:360:47:39

so you need to make sure that it's got some nice textures with it.

0:47:390:47:44

-And it's not slapped on the plate.

-Fair enough.

0:47:440:47:47

-That looks great.

-That's all going on to the top there.

0:47:470:47:50

So, that looks nice,

0:47:500:47:53

you can see that you've got a nice, even spread of the mixture.

0:47:530:47:57

-All right.

-Then we're going to put that...

0:47:570:48:00

just spread that out on the top, really.

0:48:000:48:02

OK.

0:48:020:48:03

As that cooks, that's going to melt through into it.

0:48:030:48:10

So you can get that right out.

0:48:100:48:12

Not much left to lick, but they say you're never too old to lick the bowl,

0:48:120:48:16

-I already thought of that.

-You already thought about that?

0:48:160:48:19

You weren't going to... Yeah, look at that!

0:48:190:48:21

No, no, no, that's not going on the cake.

0:48:210:48:23

-Is that nice?

-It's so good.

0:48:230:48:26

-Yeah...

-Good.

0:48:260:48:27

This is the bit where we make it a little bit different.

0:48:290:48:32

Normally, you would take some more of the pastry and lattice it over.

0:48:320:48:38

We're still going to do that,

0:48:380:48:39

but we are going to take some of these crumbs.

0:48:390:48:42

If you can't get hold of the Grasmere gingerbread,

0:48:420:48:46

then use ginger biscuits finely chopped.

0:48:460:48:48

Feel how a course that is.

0:48:480:48:50

-There's a nice piece there, you could eat that.

-Go on, them.

0:48:500:48:53

It's quite different, isn't it?

0:48:530:48:55

It is not like a Ginger Nut.

0:48:550:48:58

It is so much nicer.

0:48:580:49:00

It's heaven.

0:49:000:49:01

I'm going to literally just put a couple of, well,

0:49:010:49:04

three lines of ginger crumbs.

0:49:040:49:07

And the pastry will be across it?

0:49:070:49:09

-The pastry, I'm going to lattice across it.

-Cool.

0:49:090:49:12

-So, there we go.

-Fun!

0:49:230:49:25

There we are, that is your very own

0:49:250:49:27

Cumberland Grasmere gingerbread Rum Nicky.

0:49:270:49:31

-Awesome. And how long in the oven?

-About 40 minutes.

0:49:310:49:35

And we're actually going to serve that up tonight.

0:49:350:49:38

-We are.

-For pudding night.

0:49:380:49:39

It better be OK, but with your guidance,

0:49:390:49:42

-I have no worries whatsoever.

-It'll be fine.

0:49:420:49:44

It'll be absolutely fine.

0:49:440:49:46

It has to be fine because I don't have one I made earlier.

0:49:460:49:49

No pressure.

0:49:490:49:50

Don't drop it, don't drop it, don't drop it. Right, then.

0:49:500:49:55

40 minutes in this oven

0:49:550:49:57

and this Rum Nicky should be edible and acceptable for all

0:49:570:50:02

the pudding fanatics at Lucy's pudding night in her restaurant.

0:50:020:50:06

Fingers crossed.

0:50:060:50:08

But before that, here's the Country Tracks weather for the week ahead.

0:50:080:50:11

.

0:52:490:52:57

Today, I have been on a journey through the Lake District.

0:53:050:53:08

I began in the North Lakes,

0:53:080:53:10

in England's only true of mountain forest at Whinlatter.

0:53:100:53:13

I travelled to Keswick and learned how a pencil factory played

0:53:130:53:17

a key role keeping RAF pilots safe behind enemy lines

0:53:170:53:21

in the Second World War.

0:53:210:53:22

Then I spent the afternoon with a photographer whose collaboration

0:53:220:53:26

with Alfred Wainwright helped record the area's magnificent scenery.

0:53:260:53:30

Now I'm ending my journey in the town of Ambleside.

0:53:300:53:33

Right, the moment of truth.

0:53:330:53:37

It's actually not looking too bad.

0:53:370:53:40

Wow! Look at that.

0:53:400:53:43

OK. Look at that.

0:53:430:53:47

It actually smells amazing, but I've got to serve this up

0:53:470:53:50

to everyone in that restaurant, so hopefully they will like it.

0:53:500:53:54

Because you know what they say, the proof of the pudding and all that.

0:53:540:53:58

Each month, Lucy's restaurant celebrates all things sweet

0:54:040:54:07

with a night exclusively devoted to puddings.

0:54:070:54:11

From a list of 11 deserts,

0:54:130:54:15

each customer gets to choose six to feast on.

0:54:150:54:18

My very own Rum Nicky is high on that list

0:54:210:54:23

and I want to discover how it's going down with the dessert aficionados

0:54:230:54:28

before getting stuck into six delicious puddings myself.

0:54:280:54:32

Hello, did you order Rum Nicky?

0:54:330:54:35

There you go.

0:54:350:54:37

Now, I made that with my own fair hands

0:54:370:54:39

and I would love you to tell me what you think of it.

0:54:390:54:42

-What's the sauce?

-It's a rum butter.

0:54:420:54:46

-That's really nice.

-Really?

0:54:490:54:52

-It's really rich.

-Awesome! Awesome.

0:54:520:54:53

What's the sauce again...?

0:54:530:54:56

That is really nice.

0:55:020:55:04

-Is that the kind of dessert you usually eat?

-Not really, no.

0:55:040:55:08

-I'm more of a chocolate person...

-Yeah.

0:55:080:55:10

..more often than not. But I am a big fan of rum, so...

0:55:100:55:14

-Mmm.

-Mm-hmm? Yeah? You sure?

0:55:140:55:17

-Smooth.

-Smooth?

0:55:170:55:19

-And can you taste the rum?

-Yes, you can actually.

0:55:250:55:27

You got a double helping of rum there because

0:55:270:55:30

there's some in the cake and you've got your rum butter to go with it.

0:55:300:55:34

I don't think I'll sleep tonight.

0:55:340:55:36

-The problem is you have to choose 6 from 11.

-Difficult?

0:55:360:55:39

You just have to come back and do the others another time.

0:55:390:55:42

How does this rate compared to the others so far?

0:55:420:55:45

So far, they've all been nice.

0:55:450:55:47

I mean, I like them sweet, but not too sweet.

0:55:470:55:50

Is that too sweet for you, or is that OK?

0:55:500:55:52

Well, I think this one, you can give a little bit of leeway with this one.

0:55:520:55:55

-It's meant to be sweet, but not too sweet.

-Awesome.

0:55:550:55:58

Thank you so much for your feedback. I'll leave you in peace now,

0:55:580:56:02

because it's time for me to try six puddings. Awesome.

0:56:020:56:05

My journey through the Lake District has been inspiring,

0:56:110:56:15

enlightening, educational,

0:56:150:56:17

and above all stupendously beautiful.

0:56:170:56:20

This might be a slightly unusual way to finish it,

0:56:200:56:23

but I'm ready. Bring on my desserts.

0:56:230:56:26

SONG: "Yummy, Yummy, Yummy."

0:56:260:56:28

Does anybody have any liver salts?

0:57:060:57:08

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:57:200:57:23

E-mail [email protected]

0:57:230:57:26

Liz Bonnin enjoys the sights, sounds and tastes of the north Lake District. Liz begins her journey two-and-a-half thousand feet above sea level in Whinlatter Forest, where she tries her hand at tree felling. In Keswick, she learns how a pencil factory helped keep Second World War RAF pilots safe behind enemy lines before meeting a photographer who worked with the great guidebook author, Alfred Wainwright. Finally, Liz spends an evening with the Ambleside pudding club where she tastes no less than six desserts.


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