Derby Bargain Hunt


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Antiques challenge. The teams at the fair in Derby impress experts Kate Bliss and David Harper with some super speedy decisions. Presenter Tim Wonnacot visits Hatfield House.


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Transcript


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Today we're in a centre of edu-macation,

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but we've taken a day off our studies to go bargain hunting!

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Today, we're at Derby University,

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home to academics and today to Jaguar Antiques fairs, so I hope

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our teams have done their revision if they're serious about winning.

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Each team, as usual, will get £300 and one hour to go shopping for three items to sell on

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later at auction and, hopefully, make a load of money.

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Coming up today, the Reds impress Kate with their decision-making techniques.

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One, two, three.

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-Oh, no!

-We have it.

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OK, let's have it, please.

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But not all their items are quite what they seem.

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-Now, guess what that is?

-Is a plant pot?

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And the auctioneer tried his hardest.

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It's lost a lot of money! Get them out of a hole. Oh, no!

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That's all for a later. But first...

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Whichever team makes the most profit wins.

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Knowledge, of course, counts and let's hope the teams have got lots of it and let's go and meet them.

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Today, we have the amazing Red duo of mother and son, with Andrew and Hillary.

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Welcome. And for the Blues good friends, Lydia and Marley.

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Welcome. Now, you two as a mother and son combo are going to be the most amazing team?

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-I hope so.

-Definitely.

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Yes! It says here that Andrew is going to be very good for bargaining

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and Hillary is going to be good at ensuring a profit.

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-I hope so.

-Yes.

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You ought to be all right at this, Hillary.

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Yes, I am an accountant, so I do know how profits, in theory, are calculated.

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Whether we'll be so lucky today I don't know, but I hope so.

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-And in your spare time you like to go tap dancing?

-Indeed, I do.

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-Have you got your tap shoes?

-I didn't bring them, sorry.

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-Bring them to the auction, that would be fun.

-If you would like me to, OK.

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-Andrew, you're a great fan of dancing too.

-I am, but no particular form.

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-I just bust loose.

-Oh, do you?

-Oh, yes.

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-But you are musical, aren't you?

-I'm the lead guitarist of a band.

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What's the name?

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-It's The Backfire Effect.

-I love the name.

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No, we don't!

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And what do you do when you're not getting your groove in?

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I'm a student at Northampton University. I'm going to become a primary school teacher.

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And is this a vocation that kind of came at you all of a sudden or have you always wanted to do it?

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I did work experience at my old primary school when I was 16

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and then I was going to be a computer games designer, but then after a year, as Mum would say,

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bit of an epiphany, I said, "I want to be a primary school teacher."

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-So, off I went to Northampton and here I am.

-I think you're going to do very well today.

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How do you two know each other?

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I met Marley in a club.

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We were a little bit drunk and dancing to Stevie Wonder.

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After that, I go to a lot of car boot sales

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and Marley had never been, so I took him. Now we're boot buddies.

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Boot buddies, that sounds such fun.

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-You're both students?

-Yes.

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And what are you studying, Lydia?

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I did my degree in fashion and I'm now studying at Derby University to do my teaching qualification.

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Brilliant. So, we're on your campus?

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-Yeah.

-This is familiar territory.

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-It's home!

-That's funny for you! So, you're passionate about fashion.

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You want to start your own fashion business?

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Yeah. It's going to be an internet business. It's going to basically be vintage clothes

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that are customised and altered to fit the modern figure.

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I think that's rather a cunning plan, girl. So, where are you working at the moment?

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I'm working at a hat shop and I've got a little present for you.

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Great! What's in your box?

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-It is...

-I don't believe this! Look!

-A rollable Panama hat. I'll put this on the floor.

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You knew this was going to be my favourite!

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Oh, I knew. We've seen you in your hat.

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Lydia, tell me about these, because they're very special.

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It's a Fair Trade rollable Panama and it's a leno weave

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and this one is a more circular weave, so it's more durable.

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So, you've brought me something really fab, which I shall wear a lot, yes.

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Now, Marley, what are you studying, mate?

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I'm studying cultural studies and music here at Derby Uni, as well.

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What do you intend doing when you finish?

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I think I'm going to go on to do a PGCE and do primary school music teaching.

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It was an epiphany, like yours, that I wanted to do that.

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Now, you've got quite an unusual name, Marley, so just talk us through all your names.

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Well, my first name is Marley, and that's named after

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the late Bob Marley, and my middle name is Starsky.

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So, is Starsky related to what was on the television at about the time that you were born?

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-Yes, it was.

-Starsky and Hutch.

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Anyway, we've got most interesting teams today, but here comes the money moment. £300 apiece.

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-Thank you.

-You know the rules, your experts await and off you go and very good luck.

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So, our teams today may be well and truly learned, but I fancy they're

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still going to need a helping hand from their experts.

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For the Reds, Kate Bliss. She's well versed in the Victorian era.

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And for the Blues, David Harper,

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who's an expert when it comes to glassware.

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Talking of which, it's time to turn the hourglass and get the shopping underway.

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Well, there's loads to look at.

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Is there anything you're looking out for?

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Nothing at all. Absolutely...

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-We are a completely blank canvas,

-Please guide us.

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-You're looking a bit frightened, like rabbits in the headlights.

-Yes!

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I'm sure it'll be fun.

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-But we still don't know what we're doing.

-Let's get started.

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Let's go and have a look down there.

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The Reds may be feeling nervous, but are the Blues feeling the same?

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-My gosh, this is like home from home for you two, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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Yeah, I only live two seconds away.

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-We walked in and it was no time at all.

-And you're raring to go?

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-Yeah.

-You've got your stopwatch?

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-I have.

-OK, let's go.

-Ready.

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Hang on, I've spotted something.

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-What's that?

-It's, like, proper old opera glasses.

-Opera glasses!

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You see quite a lot of opera glasses

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and these are particularly nice because of this handle.

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-Is that ivory?

-I think it's mother-of-pearl.

-It is mother-of-pearl, Andrew.

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The nice thing about these is, look, we've got a name around here.

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Chevalier is the name, so that is rather nice having the name around there.

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And you've got this lovely handle.

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If you just look at this...

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-That looks like rope.

-Yes, it does.

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There's string on there and then this gilt metal has been tooled

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and engraved and mother-of-pearl on the handle as well.

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-Does it work?

-Have a look, have a look.

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Oh, yes. That's brilliant.

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-May I?

-There you go.

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-It's really good, actually. I like this.

-I think those are fun. Now, the price here is 55,

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which I don't think is too bad.

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At auction these could make anything from £20 to £40, £50.

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-Worst scenario...

-55 is over the odds?

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It is. What do you think about buying these?

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We've got to get them to a good price...

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We have. Why don't I go and have a chat with the stallholder?

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-Have a look and see if there's anything else you fancy.

-No problem.

-OK.

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So, the Reds seem to have shaken their nerves already.

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Now, Lydia seems to know more than she's letting on about this antiques lark.

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Is that majolica over there?

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Oh, I say! You know, you know much more than you pretend.

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-Marley, are you worried here?

-I am.

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She was saying she doesn't know about antiques,

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but where does majolica come from, then?

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Oh, I don't know. I just recognised it because it's sort of the lobster

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on the plate, cos of these little bits.

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It is majolica and a good maker would be Minton.

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-There's no make on there, so it could be continental.

-OK.

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-But 295? She'd have to reduce it by about 195 to make us want to buy it, wouldn't she?

-Yeah.

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But well spotted, though.

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OK, we could come back to that maybe at the end.

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David seems quite impressed by Lydia's keen eye.

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What about those opera glasses the Reds spotted?

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-Hey, guys, guess what?

-What?

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He's been very, very kind.

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There is a slight dent on the back - do you see that? - which I noticed and I've pointed out to her.

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-Right.

-And for that reason she's come down to 35.

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-Brill.

-What do you think?

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In your hands.

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You're not sure are you, Hillary?

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-I'm not certain, but if you go with them...

-I wouldn't use them.

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No, I wouldn't use them and it's being practical is something that uses and that we make a profit.

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-I'd quite like them, to be honest, and then you can have free reign over the other one.

-OK.

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You really pounced on them, didn't you?

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Yeah, it's shiny! Drawn to shiny objects.

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I think they're quite fun and for 35, I don't think that's too bad.

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-I think, yes.

-Yeah?

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-OK.

-To the opera!

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So, six minutes in and the Reds have bought the first thing they've seen.

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Some might call that a risky move.

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And the Blues have spotted something.

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-I thought that was chess there, but obviously not.

-That dog?

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You like the doggie?

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Sometimes things just shout out at you.

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-I can't say...

-He's got a nice expression.

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-He has got a nice expression.

-A dog lover might like it.

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-Exactly.

-Oh, I really like him, actually.

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Well, I do like him. It's Delft, so Delft is a Dutch brand of pottery and Delft began manufacturing

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in the 15th or 16th century and they were trying to emulate the Chinese

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porcelain which was absolutely fine and beautiful and this was

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-about the best we could ever get, which was basically pottery...

-With a cheap glaze.

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Yeah, really thick, chunky and really brittle.

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-You can see the damage on his paws there.

-Yeah.

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We think he's a wine jug?

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OWNER: That was the description, yes.

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Well, I think I would actually try him with wine, if I owned him.

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-He's very nice.

-Because of his expression

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-someone will fall in love with him.

-I think you're right...

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It's the kind of thing two people might really fall in love with and you'll get one of them.

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-That's true.

-Price-wise, what's the absolute best?

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Well, I was looking for around 100,

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-but I'm open to offers.

-85?

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Yes, that's fine.

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Thanks very much. Are you happy, Marley?

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I'm happy with that. I love how it's drawn on.

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It's really childlike, not too professional looking.

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Well, I'm happy, too!

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He's not smiling, but we'll take it!

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At least the Blues are smiling.

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So, that's one-all. These teams don't hang about!

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Here's the jewellery box that I was telling you about.

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Lovely red leather and with this handle on the top.

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Open it up and it's got that nice interior.

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Oh, you can see the scissors and the mark of the needle and other sewing implements stored in there.

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That's what originally would have been there. You've got the little tray

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-and then the fittings for jewellery.

-Oh, yes.

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And you've got little trays for your trinkets, your necklaces.

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So, when would that date from?

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Well, I would say Edwardian. Do you like that?

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I asked my Brownies what I should get and they said go for

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a jewellery box and stuff to keep your jewellery in, so that would fit that, but it doesn't quite...

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It wouldn't be my personal taste. Would it make a profit?

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-Well, that's marked at £52.

-That's a lot of money.

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A bit dear for something in that condition.

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Let's ask the stallholder and see what they think.

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-OK.

-Excuse me, madam. Hi, your jewellery box, what can you do on the price for us?

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You've got it marked at 52.

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I could do it for 32, if that's a help.

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32.

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-That is better.

-It is better. Perhaps come back to it?

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There's always the chance that somebody else might buy it.

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We like it, don't take it personally. It's nice.

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I will knock the two pounds off and come down to 30.

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I'm teetering on a no at the moment.

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-I'm teetering on a yes.

-Oh, no!

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Should we do Rock, Paper, Scissors?

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Go on, then.

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One, two, three!

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-I've never seen this done.

-One, two, three!

-Oh, no!

-We have it.

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OK, let's have it, please.

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-£30?

-£30.

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-I think we go up there next, what do you think?

-OK.

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-Let's do it.

-Now, we've only had 15 minutes, guys, we've got two items!

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-We're doing really well.

-Come on!

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The Reds certainly know how to make a decision

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and over with the Blues something's grabbed Lydia's attention.

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-Is that a water filter? My dad's got a...

-A spirit barrel.

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-Oh, a spirit barrel.

-It looks like Doulton.

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It's that kind of salt glaze brown work. Let's have a look.

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Look on the bottom.

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It's not stamped Doulton, but it's got that look.

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It's strange that this... Would that have had anything written on it?

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It's a copy of a crest, isn't it? Do you read Latin, Marley?

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-No, unfortunately.

-No?

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So, as spirit barrel, so that would be where your tap would come out.

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What spirit would you put in?

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A cheap one.

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You go for quantity, I think, not quality.

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-Too expensive.

-Yeah.

-It's probably 1880.

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-Do you fancy it?

-Do you, Marley?

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I think because it's salt glaze it's quite interesting, but it's not...

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Sometimes you get the nice little tigery-looking bits in salt glaze, don't you?

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-But it looks quite...

-Do you really?

-Do you know what I mean?

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I don't, but you're teaching me!

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You know too much, you do.

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My dad likes salt glazed things and sometimes you get sort of a drippy looking...

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Ah, right! I know what you mean.

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That is almost like slip ware.

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-Right.

-You know, when the colours run you get that iridescence in it.

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-Yeah, yeah. And a sort of...

-Yeah.

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Maybe if it had some writing on, because it's blank it kind of takes away from its personality.

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That would give it more interest and value, so well spotted.

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-Shall we leave it?

-Yeah.

-All right.

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We can just put Derby on it and hope nobody notices.

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-Derby Bargain Hunt 2009.

-Chisel it in!

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The Reds are going local and looking at plates.

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-That's quite a nice plate.

-Heart-shaped.

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-Do you like that?

-Vaguely.

-What does it say?

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-It's just Derby. It's before Royal Crown Derby.

-So that's quite old, then?

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It's got the iron red mark on the back.

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You're smiling and thinking, "I really don't like this."

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I wouldn't give it house room, sorry. No!

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What about you, Andrew? Do you like it?

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It doesn't jump out at me.

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Sorry.

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Let's move on, shall we(?)

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Onward for the Reds. The Blues, however, have changed their minds

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and are on their way to buying the barrel.

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Is that a problem for you, 50 quid?

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I'll check with my business partner. Yes, we'll burn on that.

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Well, I think they'll be happy with that, you two?

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-Marley, are you sure?

-Yeah.

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I think it's a go for you. 50 quid?

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-I think we might do all right and if we don't it's an interesting item, as well.

-It is.

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-Thanks very much.

-It's an absolute pleasure.

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They're just knocking out the deals today, so just over 20 minutes down and that's two buys each.

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This was just on the stall here and I've just spotted it and whisked it away.

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-Now, guess what that is?

-Is it a plant pot?

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It could be a Roman oil dish of some sort, I don't know.

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-Some sort of reservoir.

-I'll tell you exactly what it is.

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-Go on, then.

-It's a dog bowl.

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-A dog bowl!

-That would be why I wouldn't know.

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-Are you dog lovers?

-No.

-I'm allergic to them.

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Well, because these were used quite a lot, late 19th century, these were often broken.

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-Right.

-Let me tell you a bit about it.

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No factory marks on the bottom whatsoever.

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-No.

-But it is stoneware.

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-Yes.

-It's salt glazed and it's got this lovely raised frieze,

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-can you see, all the way round?

-It seems a little bit cracked along the edge.

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There's a little crack there in the mouldings, not in the bowl itself and that was done in the manufacturers -

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what we call a firing crack. You wouldn't class it as damage, as such.

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-Right.

-And it looks typically like the stoneware produced

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by Royal Doulton, you've heard of Doulton in Staffordshire?

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-Yes.

-But there was a little factory not far from here in Chesterfield

0:15:500:15:55

called Brampton and I think this is possibly a Brampton stoneware piece.

0:15:550:16:00

-That's really interesting.

-It is.

-And practical.

-Exactly!

0:16:000:16:03

-I'm thinking of you with your practicalities and it's definitely made to be used.

-Yes.

0:16:030:16:09

-How much?

-I've managed to negotiate 75 for you guys.

-75.

0:16:090:16:13

You're quite excited about it.

0:16:130:16:15

I am, I am.

0:16:150:16:17

I'm excited if she's excited.

0:16:180:16:20

-So, I'm excited if you're excited that she's excited and I'm excited.

-Are we going too fast, though?

0:16:200:16:26

It's our third item and we're only about half an hour in.

0:16:260:16:29

-Yeah.

-Let's do it.

-OK.

-Let's do it.

0:16:290:16:31

-Right.

-Are you sure, now?

-Yes.

0:16:310:16:33

We'll shake on it.

0:16:330:16:35

OK.

0:16:350:16:37

So, all three items picked in only half an hour.

0:16:380:16:41

That must be a record!

0:16:410:16:42

But will they have wished that they had shopped around when it comes to the auction?

0:16:420:16:47

Over with the Blues, there's no stopping that Lydia.

0:16:470:16:49

What is it then, Lydia, that you like about that?

0:16:490:16:52

I liked the little bird on it and I liked the colours. I think it's quite nice.

0:16:520:16:56

-Well, really, that is the only reason to buy anything because you buy it because you like it.

-Yeah.

0:16:560:17:01

It's probably Tibetan and it's something that might hold oil or perfume or snuff.

0:17:010:17:06

Now, why do you think it's got chains on it?

0:17:060:17:08

To have it around your neck?

0:17:080:17:10

Well, you could do. You could do but, of course, the Tibetans wear robes,

0:17:100:17:14

traditionally, without pockets, similar to the Japanese, and so

0:17:140:17:17

they would have the robe tied and anything like snuff or purses would have to be connected to a belt.

0:17:170:17:23

So, it would simply hang on their body and jingle jangle around and whenever you fancied a bit of

0:17:230:17:28

-snuff or improving your aroma with a bit of perfume you would take a little and off you go again.

-Brill!

0:17:280:17:33

It's probably bone on the background there and then inlaid with some metal.

0:17:330:17:37

-How old do you think it is?

-Probably early 20th century.

0:17:370:17:40

It might be knocking on 100 years old.

0:17:400:17:42

Do you think it would do well at auction?

0:17:420:17:44

Well, I don't think so, because, again, we're going to a general sale,

0:17:440:17:48

so it might be lost on people. Unless you really want to go for it.

0:17:480:17:51

I do like it. I could see you wearing that, Marley.

0:17:510:17:54

I'd wear it around my neck.

0:17:540:17:55

Or in your hair!

0:17:560:17:58

I find it really interesting.

0:17:580:18:00

I like the carvings and the different colours.

0:18:000:18:02

Well, I mean, it's not expensive, is it? 49 quid.

0:18:020:18:05

How much do you reckon it's worth maybe at auction?

0:18:050:18:08

Well, this is the exciting thing, about auction.

0:18:080:18:10

Who on earth knows? So, what do you reckon?

0:18:100:18:13

-It does look really interesting.

-How much do you reckon you'd pay for it?

0:18:130:18:16

About 35.

0:18:160:18:17

-That would be OK, wouldn't it? Try a bit more. I'd try 30 and see what they say.

-OK.

0:18:170:18:22

OK. Go on, we'll leave it to you.

0:18:220:18:24

Off you go.

0:18:240:18:26

-Hiya, could we get this for 30?

-Would you be happy at that?

0:18:260:18:30

I'd be happy at 30, definitely.

0:18:300:18:31

It's a nice little object.

0:18:310:18:33

-Here he comes.

-Now, how much then?

0:18:330:18:35

-What did you get it for?

-I got it for 35.

0:18:350:18:37

-And you're happy?

-Yeah, I'm happy.

0:18:370:18:39

-Lydia, are you happy?

-Very happy.

0:18:390:18:41

I'm happy because you've bought your items. Cup of tea time.

0:18:410:18:44

-Waay!

-Let's go.

0:18:440:18:45

With some great negotiating skills from Marley,

0:18:480:18:50

the Blues have got their final item and all in a record 45 minutes.

0:18:500:18:55

Let's hope they haven't been too hasty.

0:18:550:18:57

Our teams have been out there making some difficult decisions

0:18:570:19:00

during the shopping, but it doesn't finish right now.

0:19:000:19:04

Any leftover lolly will be given to their expert

0:19:040:19:07

to go and find a mystery bonus buy that will be revealed to the teams at the auction.

0:19:070:19:14

If they take the bonus buy and it makes a profit they get to keep it.

0:19:140:19:17

If it makes a loss, well, it's not so happy.

0:19:170:19:20

Anyway, let's remind ourselves what the Reds bought.

0:19:200:19:23

Andrew didn't want to go solo

0:19:240:19:26

and convince the others to buy the French opera glasses.

0:19:260:19:30

It may have taken Paper, Scissor, Stone to decide, but they plumped

0:19:310:19:35

for the Edwardian red leather box for £30.

0:19:350:19:38

And Kate convinced them that they would be

0:19:380:19:40

in the money with the 19th century stoneware dog bowl.

0:19:400:19:43

Well, that was quite a zany shopping choosing method, wasn't it?

0:19:440:19:49

-Different.

-Scissors, Paper, Stone.

0:19:490:19:52

-If you don't know what on earth you're doing, why not play games?

-Quite right.

0:19:520:19:55

But tell me, Hillary, which is your favourite piece?

0:19:550:19:58

With hindsight, I might not personally have chosen any of them, but actually...

0:19:580:20:04

Charming that is, isn't it?

0:20:040:20:05

I'll go with the jewellery box for the Brownies, yes.

0:20:050:20:09

-Andrew, which is your favourite piece?

-My opera glasses. I'm very proud of them.

0:20:090:20:13

Which piece is going to bring the biggest profit in your prediction as a chartered accountant?

0:20:130:20:18

-I sincerely hope the dog dish as that's what the expert recommended.

-All right.

0:20:180:20:22

-We'll keep an eye...

-No pressure!

-..on the balance sheet.

0:20:220:20:25

-And what about you, Andrew?

-I'm sticking with my opera glasses.

0:20:250:20:29

I think they'll be fantastic.

0:20:290:20:30

Well, you spent an average £140, all right?

0:20:300:20:33

I'd like £160 of leftover lolly.

0:20:330:20:35

-There you go, Mum, check it out.

-OK, Andrew gives it to his mother who probably counts it.

0:20:350:20:39

Thank you very much.

0:20:390:20:41

-£160 going across to KB.

-Thank you very much.

0:20:410:20:44

You've had a testing time with these professionals!

0:20:440:20:47

-I really did.

-I know!

0:20:470:20:49

Andrew, I sense, is a bit more of a gambler, but Hillary is very -

0:20:490:20:53

how shall we say? - more discerning and she insisted on something practical, so I have my instructions.

0:20:530:20:59

-Quite right, too.

-And we trust you.

-We do.

-Well, good luck with that.

-Thank you.

0:20:590:21:04

Let's remind ourselves what the Reds are up against by reminding ourselves what the Blues bought.

0:21:040:21:09

The Blues were barking mad about the blue dog Delft wine holder at £85.

0:21:110:21:15

They still fancied a tipple

0:21:170:21:19

and bought the 1880s stoneware liquor barrel.

0:21:190:21:21

And Lydia thought it would look good in Marley's hair -

0:21:220:21:25

the Tibetan snuff or perfume bottle.

0:21:250:21:27

Lydia, your knowledge certainly pulled off that.

0:21:280:21:31

-Well, hopefully, yeah.

-Yes. Now, which is your favourite piece?

0:21:310:21:35

Oh, I like the Delft dog.

0:21:350:21:36

-It was a wine container.

-What about you, Marley?

0:21:360:21:39

-I've got high hopes for the Tibetan snuff box.

-Have you? Why?

0:21:390:21:42

It's just really interesting looking and I'm pretty sure

0:21:420:21:45

that it's going to get a lot. Everyone thinks it's not, but...

0:21:450:21:49

-So, it's your favourite and is it your prediction for the most profit, too?

-Yes.

0:21:490:21:53

Is it? A double whammy on that, which is great.

0:21:530:21:55

What about you, Lydia?

0:21:550:21:57

The dog. We're quite opposite. I've got low hopes for the snuff box.

0:21:570:22:01

What, you don't like the snuff box?

0:22:010:22:03

-No.

-No. Oh, well, we shall find out.

0:22:030:22:06

What fun! You spent 170, which is good.

0:22:060:22:08

I'd like 130 of leftover lolly, thank you, for David Harper.

0:22:080:22:11

-Thank you, Tim.

-That's quite a lot.

0:22:110:22:13

-130 for a bonus buy.

-I've got a few things in mind, but I'm going to keep the suspense.

0:22:130:22:17

In other words, I haven't got a clue of what it's going to be!

0:22:170:22:20

-Well, that's extraordinarily honest.

-Thank you.

-And very good luck. For me, I'm heading off

0:22:200:22:25

somewhere absolutely spectacular and it's called Hatfield House.

0:22:250:22:28

We're leaving our modern venue

0:22:310:22:33

and heading south to look at an historic collection.

0:22:330:22:37

I've come about 20 miles from London to a house that's positioned with

0:22:370:22:41

easy access for royal and political activities.

0:22:410:22:45

And it's called Hatfield House.

0:22:450:22:48

It's the Tudor monarchy that Hatfield is most associated with, in particular, Elizabeth I.

0:22:480:22:55

She lived in the old palace, of which only a quarter remains.

0:22:550:22:58

In 1607, the first Earl of Salisbury started to build Hatfield House

0:22:580:23:05

and it's remained in the family ever since.

0:23:050:23:08

After 13 generations living at Hatfield House, there are really large collections still in situ.

0:23:090:23:16

And what do you do if you've got a family collection of 10,000 books?

0:23:160:23:20

You built a socking great library!

0:23:200:23:23

Which is exactly what the Cecils did here.

0:23:230:23:26

All the usual suspects can be found on these shelves -

0:23:260:23:30

religious tracts, political speeches, poetry.

0:23:300:23:35

But originally this space was simply a reception room,

0:23:350:23:39

but in the 18th century they converted it into a library

0:23:390:23:42

by installing all the lower ranks of shelves,

0:23:420:23:46

but by the 1870s they were crammed full, so they trotted off to France,

0:23:460:23:51

bought these brilliant cast bronze balustrades to make up this balcony

0:23:510:23:56

and then they filled the upper part with shelves, which are now full of books.

0:23:560:24:02

Do you want to have a look at the view from up here?

0:24:020:24:04

Great, isn't it?

0:24:040:24:06

And if you were enjoying your time in this library,

0:24:060:24:09

the peace and quiet, well, you might just snuggle down.

0:24:090:24:13

Cor. And what could be more comfy than this?

0:24:170:24:20

Why is this suite of leather-covered library furniture quite so fab to sit in?

0:24:200:24:27

Well, it's been built in a proportion for men, primarily.

0:24:270:24:31

You've got long seats and comfortable arms that keep your elbows up.

0:24:310:24:37

Men, when they get to a certain age, tend to spread a little, therefore

0:24:370:24:41

they need a more generous seat to plant themselves on.

0:24:410:24:45

There is one question I have to ask you, is your settee at home

0:24:450:24:49

going to look quite as good as this settee after 220 years?

0:24:490:24:54

I think probably not, because most of this suite of furniture

0:24:540:24:59

were made by a firm called Beckwith and France,

0:24:590:25:03

cabinet makers and upholsterers late in the 18th century, and if you look at the frame

0:25:030:25:09

you can see that the reeding here in oak is reflected

0:25:090:25:14

in the reeding on the legs and on these lovely

0:25:140:25:17

brass Georgian castors, centred by a rolled section of leather,

0:25:170:25:23

so typical of that Georgian construction.

0:25:230:25:25

Beckwith and France were extremely successful in their trade but,

0:25:250:25:30

by and large, they were upholsterers as well as makers,

0:25:300:25:34

and if you look at a leather pad like this, you can see

0:25:340:25:39

quite how it came about because inside this pad it's stuffed with horsehair

0:25:390:25:45

and then it's buttoned by inserting a button into a pocket with the cord between it,

0:25:450:25:51

pulling it slightly taught, that gives it this lovely crinkled and overall comfort effect.

0:25:510:25:59

All these pieces have been relatively recently reupholstered, within the last 20 years,

0:25:590:26:04

and apparently it took no less than 189 skins

0:26:040:26:10

from the imported Nigerian goats to cover the suite.

0:26:100:26:14

Goatskin because it's more pliant and it takes on this gorgeous colour more easily.

0:26:140:26:19

The big question is today, how sweet are things going to be for our teams over at the auction?

0:26:190:26:26

-Well, it's great to be at Banford's Auction House in Derby with James Lewis.

-Welcome.

0:26:390:26:44

Very kind. Now, our teams today, Hillary and Andrew, their first item are the opera glasses.

0:26:440:26:49

Yeah, slightly concerned about that.

0:26:490:26:51

-A bit of cord wrapped around the handle.

-This area?

0:26:510:26:54

-Yeah.

-Yeah, they'd not have string on a luxury product like that in 1900, would they?

0:26:540:26:58

I reckon there's been a little section of mother-of-pearl that's

0:26:580:27:02

been broken and they've applied that cord to make it tie in with the bag.

0:27:020:27:06

-But they're quite collectable.

-They are, yes.

0:27:060:27:08

What do you think it's worth in that state, then, with its rough bag and later-strung handle?

0:27:080:27:14

Yeah, I don't know. Around £40 to £60, you think?

0:27:140:27:16

-Do you reckon?

-Yeah.

-£35 they paid.

0:27:160:27:18

-Oh, that's good.

-Not too bad.

0:27:180:27:20

What about this jewellery box?

0:27:200:27:21

-I like that. I like the leather ones with that sort of very slightly-worn gilt.

-Yes.

0:27:210:27:26

So, it's got a good look to it.

0:27:260:27:27

-Yeah, I like that.

-OK, how much?

-£25 to £35.

0:27:270:27:30

-They paid £30.

-Oh, looking... Yeah.

-Yes.

0:27:300:27:33

-Good so far.

-Not too bad.

0:27:330:27:35

-Good. And now the dog bowl.

-Yeah, I saw that coming.

0:27:350:27:39

-You saw that coming.

-It's not a dog bowl.

-It's not a dog bowl?

0:27:390:27:43

No, it's made in Denby, so only about ten or 15 miles up the road.

0:27:430:27:46

We sold this about eight weeks ago and we thought about what could it be. Could it be a dog bowl?

0:27:460:27:51

So, we took it up to Denby, we showed it to the curator of the museum and it could be one of two things.

0:27:510:27:57

It is the base of either a large smoking stand or a water filter.

0:27:570:28:01

So, it would have a domed base, then a cylindrical section here for tobacco, another section on top

0:28:010:28:06

for cigarettes, or the water filter would just be a cylindrical section on the top with a cover.

0:28:060:28:11

So, that would make this worth £75, would it?

0:28:110:28:14

Sort of. These smoker's stands or water coolers make around £60

0:28:140:28:18

-to £80 complete, so the base of one is worth a fiver.

-Oh, dear.

0:28:180:28:22

Kate Bliss is going to be less than blissful about this, I can tell you.

0:28:220:28:26

-Sorry, Kate.

-So, about a fiver, then?

-I do.

-That's a disaster.

0:28:260:28:29

They're going to need their bonus buy. Let's have a look at it.

0:28:290:28:33

Now, Andrew and Hillary, you spent £140,

0:28:340:28:36

-gave Kate £160.

-We did.

-What did she spend it on?

0:28:360:28:40

Well, I spent it on a little piece of Derby.

0:28:400:28:44

-Now, I know you like functional things, Hillary.

-That's right.

0:28:440:28:47

This is what's known as a little tea bowl and saucer

0:28:470:28:51

and it would have been for drinking tea in the 18th century.

0:28:510:28:56

-Is that why it doesn't have a handle?

-That's right.

0:28:560:28:59

That's exactly how they were made, after the Chinese design in the 18th century. Have a look.

0:28:590:29:04

-You have the tea bowl.

-They hold it like that?

-Exactly that.

0:29:040:29:08

-That's beautiful.

-It's aged. It's not aged too badly.

0:29:080:29:11

This is a particularly nice example because of the condition, because of the decoration.

0:29:110:29:16

-So, roughly what might go for, do you think?

-Well, I paid £65,

0:29:160:29:19

which I think in the current auction market is probably about right.

0:29:190:29:24

It might make £70 or even £80 with a wind behind it at auction, but I think it is a fair market price.

0:29:240:29:32

You've just got to hope a Derby collector is here,

0:29:320:29:34

-but if you're going to sell Derby, this is the place to do it.

-Exactly.

0:29:340:29:38

Team, you don't decide right now, you decide later. And with Kate's strategic thought in mind here,

0:29:380:29:44

for the audience at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about the tea bowl and saucer.

0:29:440:29:50

-You wouldn't get much tea in that, would you?

-No.

0:29:500:29:53

-Isn't it lovely?

-Lovely pattern

-Yes. 18th century Derby with that wonderful puce mark underneath.

0:29:530:29:58

-I like that a lot.

-Well, we like the fact that you like it a lot, but how much a lot do you like it?

0:29:580:30:05

-£50 to £70.

-£65 Kate paid, so she might be in the money.

0:30:050:30:08

-Yes, she might.

-But not for a huge profit in your view.

-No.

-No. OK, fine.

0:30:080:30:13

Well, that's it for the Reds, now for the Blues. First up is this tin-glaze doggie.

0:30:130:30:18

-Isn't he great?

-I like the revolving head. I think that's fantastic fun. Where do you think it comes from?

0:30:180:30:23

-I thought it might be French.

-French or Dutch, isn't it?

-Yeah.

-I would imagine about 1900,

0:30:230:30:29

-Yeah.

-How much do you think?

0:30:290:30:31

-I should think an auction estimate should be £50 to £80.

-£85 paid.

-Oh, OK.

-£85.

0:30:310:30:36

I might be being a bit mean.

0:30:360:30:38

-Well, of course there are a lot of dog lovers about.

-Yeah.

0:30:380:30:41

The stoneware liquor barrel.

0:30:410:30:43

This is very much a Nottinghamshire/ Derbyshire pottery look, isn't it?

0:30:430:30:47

-This hard, bright, brown, shiny ware.

-Yeah.

0:30:470:30:50

We sell loads of them and they tend to make around £25, £35, when they're chipped.

0:30:500:30:55

Well, that's the point, isn't it?

0:30:550:30:57

It's chipped. They paid £50, so that's going to be tough, isn't it?

0:30:570:31:01

-Yeah, it is.

-Now, to finish their trio we've got something that you're going to get really excited about.

0:31:010:31:07

-Yes.

-I know how much you love modern Tibetan snuff boxes.

0:31:070:31:11

I hate it. It's awful.

0:31:110:31:13

-It's just the most nasty thing.

-There you are, I told you he'd like it!

0:31:130:31:18

But the truth of the matter is, it's worth what, two or three pounds?

0:31:180:31:21

-Five pounds?

-It's awful.

-That type of amount.

-Yes.

-OK. We've got the message.

0:31:210:31:26

-OK.

-Well, I won't tell you that Lydia paid £35 for it.

-Good, good.

-Because it will spoil your day.

0:31:260:31:31

They'll need their bonus buy so let's go have a look at it.

0:31:310:31:34

-So, Lydia and Marley, how are you feeling, all right?

-Good, yeah.

-You're feeling good.

-Confident.

0:31:340:31:39

-Yeah.

-Well, if you cast your mind back, you spent £170, yes?

-Yeah.

0:31:390:31:43

You gave David up £135. Has he blown the lot? That's what we want to know.

0:31:430:31:48

-You've got to guess if I have. A solid silver Chester 1913 letter opener.

-Oh!

0:31:480:31:55

Quite plain, but I think quite sophisticated.

0:31:550:31:59

-I like the little penguin.

-That's why I bought it.

-Yeah.

-It's wacky, isn't it?

-It is pretty wacky.

0:31:590:32:04

-A guy in 1913 would put a picture of his lovely wife in there.

-Or a dog.

0:32:040:32:09

Or a dog, his child, but this guy loved penguins.

0:32:090:32:12

-Now, that fascinates me, Tim!

-Wonky penguins, as well.

-Wonky penguins!

-Yes.

0:32:120:32:16

-"Dawson and Gill" it says on the back.

-That would be the retailer.

0:32:160:32:20

Oh, right. It was made by Gray & Co, I believe.

0:32:200:32:23

But because it was hallmarked in Chester, that makes it slightly rarer, too.

0:32:230:32:27

What do you think, Marley?

0:32:270:32:29

-Is it something that lights your touchpaper?

-Not that much of a fan of it, to be honest.

0:32:290:32:33

-What, of penguins or the thing?

-Everything. It seems really plain. It doesn't seem that special to me.

0:32:330:32:39

-How much did you spend on it?

-50 quid.

-How much?

-£50.

0:32:390:32:43

-50 quid, fine.

-There you go.

-We'll have a think.

-Do.

0:32:430:32:45

I've heard that before!

0:32:450:32:48

-That means I'll never see you again!

-Well, you can p-pick up a p-penguin or not later.

0:32:480:32:52

For the viewers at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about David's little penguin.

0:32:520:32:58

-Well, there's a lovely novelty, look.

-Super.

-Isn't that nice?

-Really nice, isn't it?

0:32:580:33:02

I guess you could use it as a letter opener or a bookmark

0:33:020:33:05

-with that little bit at the top.

-Yeah. I'm not sure about this wacky penguin?

-No.

0:33:050:33:09

-It would be better with a lovely watercolour miniature of a dog or something like that.

-Yes.

0:33:090:33:14

What do you think it's worth?

0:33:140:33:17

-£40 to £60.

-Brilliant. David paid £50.

-Oh, fine.

0:33:170:33:19

So, for a bonus buy, that's quite safe.

0:33:190:33:22

-Yes, yes.

-Like everything else at auction, we live in hopes, don't we?

-We do.

-We do.

0:33:220:33:27

Seven, eight, nine.

0:33:310:33:33

Here we are on the edge of the auctioneering.

0:33:330:33:36

Andrew, how are you feeling? Nervous?

0:33:360:33:38

-Excited.

-Are you?

-Oh, yes.

0:33:380:33:41

That's good. Now, do you regret anything that you bought, Hillary?

0:33:410:33:45

-Yes, I do. Yes.

-What?

0:33:450:33:48

-In particular, the dog bowl.

-Which turns out apparently not to be a dog bowl,

0:33:480:33:53

though it looks just like a dog bowl, it feels just like a dog bowl,

0:33:530:33:56

it tastes just like a dog bowl, but in fact it's a bit of something else made of that material.

0:33:560:34:02

-Right.

-But there we are.

0:34:020:34:04

These things happen. Instead of being worth £75 as a dog bowl it might be worth £5 to £10.

0:34:040:34:10

So, I have an apology to make to you two because I'm the one that told you it was a dog bowl.

0:34:100:34:16

-It isn't a dog bowl, or it's found not to be a dog bowl, so I'm afraid...

-That's all right.

0:34:160:34:21

-We should have stood up to you and said no.

-It's much fault ours as it is yours.

-Indeed it is.

0:34:210:34:26

It looks just like a dog bowl. I can be more optimistic I'm glad to say, Andrew,

0:34:260:34:30

-about your opera glasses.

-Oh, lovely.

-Which you paid £35 for. The auctioneer thinks they're good.

0:34:300:34:35

£40 to £60 is his estimate on that, so that's a nice result and here they come.

0:34:350:34:39

The French gilt mental and mother-of-pearl opera glasses

0:34:390:34:43

and I can start the bidding here at £35. 35 and 40.

0:34:430:34:47

-40 with the lady.

-Yes!

0:34:470:34:49

45. 50. And five. 55 now?

0:34:490:34:51

At £50 to the right. 55, do I see?

0:34:510:34:55

At 50. And selling at £50. 55 do I see?

0:34:550:35:00

-Good!

-Whoa!

-£50 plus 15.

0:35:000:35:02

Are you after my job or something?

0:35:020:35:04

-Well, I'm glad you spied that.

-Well done.

-Now the jewellery box.

0:35:040:35:08

Late Victorian Edwardian red Morocco leather box and cover.

0:35:080:35:12

It's got a good country house look to it.

0:35:120:35:14

£20, do I see? At 20. And five now.

0:35:140:35:17

At £20 and five with me. 30.

0:35:170:35:20

Five. 40. It's against you.

0:35:200:35:22

-At 35 and 40 do I see?

-You're in profit.

0:35:220:35:25

35. Absentee bid and selling at 35.

0:35:250:35:28

That's five pounds, which is brilliant.

0:35:280:35:32

Kicked the bucket, which is plus 20.

0:35:320:35:35

You are £20 up. Now, the dog bowl.

0:35:350:35:37

Well, it is whatever you want it to be

0:35:370:35:40

with this dog bowl/water filter base/smoking stand base.

0:35:400:35:43

It's a bit of local salt glaze anyway and I can start the bidding

0:35:430:35:48

at £20 somewhere. 20? Anybody want it at 10?

0:35:480:35:50

£10? Anybody want it?

0:35:500:35:54

-Me?

-It cost a lot of money.

0:35:540:35:56

Get them out of a hole. £10, please?

0:35:560:35:59

Five. Five pounds. I thought we were going to have a Bargain Hunt first.

0:35:590:36:03

At five. No bids at all. Five.

0:36:030:36:05

Six. Seven. Eight. Nine. 10. 12.

0:36:050:36:08

At £10. At 10. And 12 do I see?

0:36:080:36:12

Anybody else?

0:36:120:36:13

-Minus £65.

-Are we?

0:36:130:36:16

-So, very quickly you are overall minus £45.

-Correct.

0:36:160:36:19

OK, minus 45. The accountant looking over my shoulder is able to do the profit and loss just like that.

0:36:190:36:27

So, you are minus £45. Minus £45. What are we going to do about the tea bowl?

0:36:270:36:32

Now, minus £45 is a dirty shame, but it could be a winning score.

0:36:320:36:37

-You don't have to go with the tea bowl. What are you going to do?

-I think we should.

0:36:370:36:43

-I like it.

-I do too. Yes.

-We all like it.

-Yes, please.

-We are in Derby.

0:36:430:36:46

Don't look at me, I'm going to dive into that black hole.

0:36:460:36:50

-You can redeem yourself.

-We trust you!

0:36:500:36:52

-Yes.

-We're going with the bonus buy and here it comes.

0:36:520:36:55

The Derby spirally-fluted tea bowl and saucer.

0:36:550:36:58

A really pretty lot this one, circa 1775, and I've got three bids on it

0:36:580:37:02

and they're all almost identical and £60 is bid.

0:37:020:37:07

-Wow!

-And five do I see?

0:37:070:37:09

At £60. 65. 70. And five.

0:37:090:37:12

-75 by the door. And 80.

-That's good.

0:37:120:37:14

-Well done.

-At £75 to the right.

0:37:140:37:16

And 80 anywhere? At 75.

0:37:160:37:18

All done at £75? At 75.

0:37:180:37:22

Well done, Kate. £75, that's not bad, it's another £10 profit

0:37:220:37:26

-which is brilliant, which means overall you are minus £35.

-Yes!

-Not too bad.

0:37:260:37:31

-That is not too bad, all right?

-Yes.

0:37:310:37:33

So, don't tell the Blues a sausage.

0:37:330:37:37

OK. OK.

0:37:370:37:38

160. 170.

0:37:400:37:41

-Now, Lydia and Marley, have you been talking to the Reds?

-No, we haven't.

0:37:450:37:49

-They're keeping their mouths tightly closed.

-Well and truly zipped.

-Yeah.

0:37:490:37:54

That's the right way - it keeps the competition fair if you don't know how they've got on.

0:37:540:37:59

You won't know whether to go to your bonus buy or any of these vital decisions that are ahead of you.

0:37:590:38:04

It's a long time to wait. Are you feeling nervous?

0:38:040:38:07

-A bit nervous, but quietly confident.

-What about you, Lydia?

0:38:070:38:10

Yeah, we'll have to see.

0:38:100:38:13

The first item, David, is that nice tin-glazed dog vessel with the revolving head,

0:38:130:38:18

-which I have to say I think is a handsome fellow, isn't he?

-Yeah.

0:38:180:38:21

And you paid £85 for it, which is a good price.

0:38:210:38:23

He has put £50 to £80 on it.

0:38:230:38:26

-Wow, right.

-Which I think is a bit scruffy. And it's coming up now.

0:38:260:38:29

We have three commission bids on this lot.

0:38:290:38:32

This is the Delft tin-glaze pottery jar and cover

0:38:320:38:35

of the little dog sitting there begging.

0:38:350:38:37

Begging to be bought.

0:38:370:38:40

And where shall we start it? Well, I've got one bid of £80 to start.

0:38:400:38:44

-Come on, James.

-85 now.

-Go for it.

0:38:440:38:46

-£85 now. At five do I see?

-Come on.

0:38:460:38:48

-That's £80 and five anywhere? 85. 90. 95.

-Go on!

0:38:480:38:53

No. At £90. With me at 90. It's against you at the back of the room.

0:38:530:38:58

At £90 are we all sure?

0:38:580:39:01

-A profit is a profit.

-It's true.

0:39:010:39:03

A profit's a profit. You are five pounds up on that.

0:39:030:39:06

I told you it was a good one. Now, your stoneware barrel.

0:39:060:39:10

Treacle-glazed stoneware liquor barrel and £20 starts it.

0:39:100:39:14

-20 and two now. At £20 and two do I see?

-Come on.

0:39:140:39:18

At £20 and two is it? 22, front row. 25 and 28 for you. 28 has it.

0:39:180:39:23

-Front row at £28. Anybody else?

-Man!

-At £28.

-No!

0:39:230:39:29

That's 28. You're two shy of 30, which means you're minus 22.

0:39:290:39:35

-We've saved the best for last!

-This will bring it all back.

-It's minus 22.

0:39:350:39:39

-Oh, yeah, the Tibetan thing!

-Which means you're minus £17 overall.

0:39:390:39:42

-OK, lot 677.

-OK, here comes Tibetan.

0:39:420:39:45

Is this Eastern white metal perfume bottle or snuff.

0:39:450:39:48

Where shall we start this? £25 for it? 20, then?

0:39:480:39:54

-Anybody want it at ten?

-Uh-oh.

0:39:540:39:55

-What?

-Five. Five pounds bid. By the door at five. And eight do I see?

0:39:550:40:00

Eight. 10. At £10 by the door. At 10 and 12 do I see?

0:40:000:40:03

-It's not looking good.

-That's awful.

0:40:030:40:06

Are we all done at 10? Oh, dear.

0:40:060:40:09

£10 is minus £25.

0:40:110:40:13

So, that's 17, 37, 42.

0:40:130:40:18

Minus £42, OK? Minus £42.

0:40:180:40:22

Let's hope the Reds didn't do so well!

0:40:220:40:25

Now, listen, minus £42 could be a winning score, all right?

0:40:250:40:28

-You have to think carefully now what to do here.

-Oh, yeah, because we've got the...

0:40:280:40:32

You're not going to go home with a lump of profit. £42 down the drain.

0:40:320:40:36

It could be a winning score or you can chance it, risk it for a biscuit, pick up a penguin

0:40:360:40:43

and, you know, run on with it. What do you think?

0:40:430:40:46

-Me might as well.

-Do it, yeah.

-Go with the penguin.

-Going to go with the penguin?

0:40:460:40:50

-Yeah.

-OK? Certain?

-Yeah.

-We're going with the bonus buy and here it comes.

0:40:500:40:54

The George V silver letter opener with a little penguin at the end

0:40:540:40:58

and it's hallmarked for Chester 1913

0:40:580:41:00

and I can start the bidding here at £30 and five anywhere? 35. 40.

0:41:000:41:06

-Do you like it?

-I love it.

-50.

-Yes!

-Do you want 55?

0:41:060:41:10

-At £50. 55 now? 55.

-Yes!

0:41:100:41:12

60. At £60. Still with me at 60.

0:41:120:41:16

65 anywhere?

0:41:160:41:18

Come on, James.

0:41:180:41:19

Go on, James!

0:41:190:41:21

-At 60. It's not me, it's that one! Go on, one more. No.

-Aw!

0:41:210:41:29

It's a good lot this one. And selling at £60.

0:41:290:41:32

£60 is a £10 profit. Good boy.

0:41:320:41:36

-That's knocked a bit off...

-Yeah, our losses!

0:41:360:41:38

Minus £32. You're minus £32. It could be a winning score. You made a right decision there.

0:41:380:41:44

Your man delivered the goods and what more could you ask?

0:41:440:41:47

This could be a winning score, so don't chat to the Reds, all right?

0:41:470:41:50

-Yeah.

-Lips sealed up.

0:41:500:41:52

60.

0:41:540:41:55

Well, how exciting is this?

0:41:580:42:01

This is a competition that is almost too close to call.

0:42:010:42:05

-No!

-There's three pounds between the teams.

-No!

0:42:050:42:10

They haven't been talking to each other and they don't know where they're up to, do you?

0:42:100:42:15

-No.

-No.

-There's three pounds between them. Each team went with the bonus buy

0:42:150:42:19

and each team made a profit of £10

0:42:190:42:22

-and the team that is marginally behind are the Reds.

-Hurrah!

0:42:220:42:29

-But there is only three pounds in it.

-That's amazing!

0:42:290:42:33

It is amazing, isn't it?

0:42:330:42:35

-I think number one star is Andrew with his brilliant opera glasses making a profit of £15...

-Well done.

0:42:350:42:41

-..which is good.

-Yes.

0:42:410:42:42

-And you have been a great team. I hope you've enjoyed it.

-It's been lovely.

-It's been great fun.

0:42:420:42:47

Lovely having you on the programme. The winners, well done!

0:42:470:42:51

-You made a nice profit on your Delft wine holder.

-Yeah.

-The little dog dog.

0:42:510:42:56

-Made a nice profit on the penguin letter opener.

-Thank you, David.

-That's all right.

0:42:560:43:00

Overall you are minus £32, so very sadly

0:43:000:43:03

-you're not going home with any pound notes in your pocket.

-That's OK.

0:43:030:43:06

But you can wear the mantle with pride as the victors today on Bargain Hunt.

0:43:060:43:11

-I hope you've had a great time. We have. Join us soon for some more bargain hunting, yes?

-Yes!

0:43:110:43:17

For more information about Bargain Hunt,

0:43:190:43:22

including how the programme was made, visit the website at bbc.co.uk/lifestyle

0:43:220:43:26

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:360:43:38

The teams at the fair in Derby do not mess around, and impress experts Kate Bliss and David Harper with some super speedy decisions. Not everything is as it seems at auction though for the mysterious dog bowl.

Presenter Tim Wonnacot takes a trip down south to visit Hatfield House.