Ardingly 30 Bargain Hunt


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Ardingly 30

The antiques challenge comes from Ardingly, where the red team spend much faster than the blue team, and there is a little divine intervention thrown in for good measure.


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LineFromTo

They do say that you can choose your friends but not your family.

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Well, that's not true today.

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'We've got a mother who chose her daughter. Which is which?

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'And a father who chose his son.'

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So let's go bargain hunting!

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The Ardingly Antiques and Collectors Fair is absolutely huge,

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so our teams are going to have to put their skates on.

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Fortunately for me, I've got one of these babies. Bye!

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'On today's show, the Red Team keep Mark happy.'

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-I'll take all the blame.

-OK.

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I love you! I love that you take all the blame!

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'Blue Team worry Catherine.'

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Do you really like that? Or are you just getting a bit desperate?

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'And it's nerves all round at the auction.'

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Oh, dear, it's looking gloomy.

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-Please!

-'But all that's to come. First, let's meet our teams.'

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-Welcome, everyone.

-ALL: Hello!

-Lovely to see you.

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Now, Zozo, you're here with your mum and you're very, very close.

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-Yes, we do everything together. We can read each other's minds.

-Almost.

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-Almost.

-Well, you're like two peas in a pod, I have to say. You love amateur dramatics.

-Yes.

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-Thus, you're on Bargain Hunt, the biggest screen in the world for am-dram.

-Yes.

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What sort of roles do you like to play?

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I've done a variety of roles. Lots of musicals.

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I've been a member of my local pop choir, which my mum helped set up,

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and we've done concerts together on stages with 700-odd people.

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-Is that very nerve-racking?

-Extremely.

-I bet it is.

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What tactics will you two chickens be up to today?

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-Trying to get something unusual.

-And listen to our expert.

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-Yeah.

-Good. Thank you very much for joining us. Now, boys.

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You've got all sorts of supernatural powers on your side today, haven't you?

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Well, I hope so. I mean, I'm actually rector of Godalming, so I'm a Church of England vicar.

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-Ah.

-And I'm hoping for a bit of divine inspiration today.

-Fingers crossed.

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Well, it will be interesting to see whether any of this stuff around you

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will bring you luck today, because you're keen on the supernatural, too.

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-I've had one or two strange experiences.

-Like what?

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On one occasion, literally, a sound of the organ in my parish church back in the Midlands,

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years ago, and when trying to detect who was playing that organ, couldn't find anyone at all.

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That is spooky, isn't it? Luke, you have a pretty interesting job, too.

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I do. It's very different from my dad. I am a rock and pop drummer. I'm a musician.

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What attracted you to the drums?

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From a very early age, I was always interested in drumming.

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-One of my earliest memories is playing on my cousin's drum kit. I was about three.

-Hammering away.

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So the day that a letter came home from my school to my parents saying,

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"Does your son or daughter want to learn how to play the drums?" I was on it straightaway.

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What are your tactics today?

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I've always had the tactic that if you don't spend too much,

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-you can't lose too much.

-Oh.

-However...

-Yes?

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-You don't often get given £300 to go and spend at your leisure, so we'll probably...

-Blow the lot?

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-He's always expecting money from me, though!

-THEY LAUGH

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I'm quite interested in something of a more spiritual and enlightening nature,

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-so I'm looking for something...

-That's going to make a profit.

-Which will also make a profit!

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-OK, very good luck. Now the money moment. You get £300 apiece. There it is.

-Thank you.

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You know the rules. Your experts await and off you go! Very, very, very good luck.

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Ooh, lordy.

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'Playing happy families with our teams today

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'we have Mark Stacey

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'and Catherine Southon.

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-'And the rules.'

-The wackier, the better.

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'One hour to find three items and a total of £300 to spend.'

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So what are we looking for?

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Jewellery.

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A kind of story or it's got an aura.

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-Ornamental stuff, ceramics.

-Something a little bit quirky.

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-But no Toby jugs.

-No Toby jugs? So even if I find a bargain Toby jug...

-No, no, no.

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OK, let's go bargain hunting.

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'Oi, Southon! That's my line!'

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How much are you?

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-It's a good, purposeful stride.

-Was it?

-Yes.

-On a mission.

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That's fun, isn't it? It's an inkwell in the form of a melon.

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-The bowl's quite interesting.

-Yes.

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Shall we move along? THEY LAUGH

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'Well, there's plenty here to excite Mervyn.

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'But it's Luke who's been grabbed by the ecclesiasticals.'

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-Oh, wow! Can I have a look at this?

-Absolutely.

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-Oh, my goodness. Luke, that's one for you.

-One for you.

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-And one for you.

-And something for me. Indeed.

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Yes. The trouble is, it's a bit damaged, isn't it, really,

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-which is suppose is not unusual.

-Very damaged. The paint's flaking off.

-Yeah.

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I mean, is there a market for this kind of thing, other than people like me?

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-Not a great market, I fear.

-Ohh. All right.

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What about the biscuit tin? I just noticed that.

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-I like that.

-That's probably out of our budget.

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-Is it worth asking the price of that?

-100.

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-Is it Huntley and Palmer?

-Yeah.

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The tops you have to watch on those. They get very discoloured on the top.

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-Quite good condition.

-Yeah. It's quite nice.

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-And that's not too bad.

-You can still read...

-You can still read the titles.

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That's what I need. Self help. SHE LAUGHS

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-It's quite quirky, isn't it?

-That's in quite good condition.

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-How old is it?

-I would've thought that's 1910 or something.

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-It's 1905, 1910.

-Well, you wanted something quirky and you don't get much quirkier than this.

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What's your ab-ab-absolute best on that?

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-I can't go lower than 100. A few years ago, those tins were making 200 quid.

-Yeah.

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I have to say, I haven't seen one in a saleroom for quite a while.

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The other thing you have to be careful of is the condition.

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It's a bit worn on this side. But this side is very good and the front... Could we say 95?

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-95, please.

-No, honestly, I think 100 is fine.

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-OK.

-OK.

-Well, you both like it, don't you?

-Yes, we both like it.

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And if it makes a huge profit, I'll take the biscuit.

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THEY LAUGH

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-Goodness me.

-What do you think?

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-I think put it down, that's what I think.

-OK.

-'Spoilsport!'

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-Is it old?

-Yeah, it's getting on for 100 years old.

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-Bent, as well.

-I beg your pardon! THEY LAUGH

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You don't strike me as compact type men, men that you see with a compact.

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Luke uses it but he doesn't tell anyone. He keeps it silent.

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-That's pretty.

-Is that a tea caddy?

-It is a tea caddy, yes.

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It's a single tea caddy and it's got these nice little roundels.

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This mahogany would've been quite red and this would've been bright green and this would've been bright gold.

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Bit of bling. It's probably out of our budget.

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-190.

-Ohh. It's a lovely object. You're picking quality, girls,

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But I don't think we can afford it, really, because we've spent 100. So we'll put that down.

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But I have just noticed this. Isn't he lovely?

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A sleeping pig. It's got something on here which I can't quite read.

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But I've seen this exact model carved in ivory

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-and they make over £1,000.

-Oh, right.

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But I'm afraid he's not for us, he's a bit damaged. It's a shame because I like that.

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-It's not easy, this, is it?

-No.

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-You're kind of spoilt for choice but then...

-This is it.

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It's like looking for a needle in a haystack.

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-Look at these glass eyes.

-Ohh!

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Once I sold 2,000 of them for £17,500.

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-Really?

-Yeah. And I think it was an artist that bought them. Excuse me.

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-Are these your glass eyes?

-Aye.

-Aye, aye!

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-How much are they?

-500.

-Right.

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-That's quite unusual.

-This is a little inkwell, isn't it?

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It's quite nice detailing, isn't it? Quite nice quality detailing there.

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-Do you think it's quite old?

-I think, looking at the style of it,

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it's from that sort of aesthetic period, so around about 1870, something like this.

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-Would you say that?

-Yeah, I would think so.

-I like the blue.

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-You like the blue against the brass.

-It offsets against the gold quite well.

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-It's very decorative.

-I really like it.

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-Do you really like it?

-I do.

-You like it, as well?

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-Do they sell quite well?

-It really does depend. It's 155.

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I think, if I was estimating on that at auction,

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I would've probably said

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around about the 80 to 120 mark, maybe 100 to 150.

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-I would certainly like to see that reduced if we can.

-Definitely.

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-What's your best price on that?

-125.

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-120 and I'll give you a kiss?

-No, no, no.

-No?

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-From both of us? All three of us?

-Steady on! Ooh!

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I don't think you're going to get there.

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-You know, it's right near the bone.

-It think it's a good quality object so I think it's worth a punt.

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-Shake his hand.

-Definitely. Thank you!

-Thank you.

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-And you've missed out on the kiss. THEY LAUGH

-'Not from you, surely.'

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-Coming up to half an hour and we haven't bought a single item.

-OK.

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-No pressure.

-No pressure.

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We want that something special. Maybe we're looking too hard. I don't know.

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-What's that underneath?

-Burlington.

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Is it quirky enough for you? Interesting enough?

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-75 you've got to spend.

-Yes.

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-But you've got to leave me a little something.

-We will, we promise.

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I'm not sure I believe you. Come on. We've got to get a third item.

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'So while the Reds casually browse

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-'and the Blues frantically search...'

-Throw yourself into the stalls.

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'..I've got my eyes on the sky.'

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I want you to imagine that you're a pigeon.

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And there's one thing that pigeons like to do when they're hungry, to find a friend.

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And if they could see another pigeon to land close to to have a chat,

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that's exactly what they do.

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Now, we've got our Freda, the decoy pigeon,

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sitting beside me, looking very seductive.

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And any friendly pigeon going by would think,

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"There's a Freda down there, I'm going to land and be sociable."

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Marvellous thing, nature, isn't it?

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Anyway, the idea with these decoys is that you set them out in the field

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and the hunter waits for the real birds to come down to the decoy

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and then he goes "bang, bang" and, hey presto, there's supper.

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But our Freda has got one particularly attractive feature.

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And that is that she is fitted with an electric motor up her bottom.

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This electric motor is stamped Bassett-Lowke

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and Bassett-Lowke, in the 1930s, made electric motors for toy steam trains.

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The hunter would be set up behind that hedge, he'd have a long piece of wire coming from our Freda

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and a battery behind the hedge, and he'd simply put the two terminals together and look what happens!

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-HE LAUGHS

-Look at that!

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Freda's going absolutely bonkers!

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So the pigeon coming out of the sky, he sees this little lot going on on the ground

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and he thinks, "Bingo! I'm in here!"

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So this is like a top-of-the-range example

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of pigeon lure-dom.

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The problem was that it never took off.

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They were expensive, the batteries ran down quickly

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and quite frankly, the static decoy set out in the field worked almost as well.

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And as a result, this type of motorised automaton decoy is extremely rare.

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So what's it worth? In a sporting gun sale along with the accessories,

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I think the estimate would be £300 to £500.

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And, wow, it could soar, I reckon, to as much as 800.

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Coo! Coo-coo!

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'Look. Pigeons everywhere.'

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-Cos they're quite realistic, those little silver pigeons.

-Quite unusual.

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-So it's cheap, then?

-It's 220.

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-THEY LAUGH

-We're moving.

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Now, I'm interested in this one,

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-because I could preach, I could put that on my pulpit....

-There's no sand.

-Exactly!

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-So I could have as long as I wanted!

-That's very good, yes.

-Please, no!

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-Anything here?

-No.

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THEY LAUGH

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-Very Indiana Jones.

-I like that.

-I like that.

-'Finally!'

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Yes, a thread that's been woven into all these different shapes, it's called filigree work.

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-It's just really nice. And it's got these semi-precious stones on it.

-Yes.

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And it's all on brass. So it's just like a jewellery casket.

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-That's a heck of a price you've got on that.

-I know.

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-You've got 165 on this. What can you do?

-145.

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I think that's still a bit... To me, it's more 100, 120.

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-Can you come down a bit more?

-135?

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-130? 120?

-OK, 130. That is it.

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-Ah.

-What do you think?

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-I don't know.

-You won't see another on the fair like that.

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All I can say to you is it is very unusual.

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-Shall we go for it, then?

-Let's go for it! Let's do this!

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-You sure?

-Yes.

-You said you wanted to let your hair down.

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-Yes!

-And spend lots.

-Why not?

-Go for it.

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'Good decision, Blues. And you're finally out of the gates.

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'But watch out. Yvonne and Zozo are nearing the finish.'

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-This caught my eye.

-Oh, right.

-1873.

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-Lovely colour, isn't it?

-Mm. Matches our inkwell.

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Yes, I suppose it does.

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-Do these sell well?

-Well, they are a limited market, I have to say.

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-But I just think it's a lovely, big harvest mug.

-I like that.

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And anything with a name and a title on it is...

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-Chip on there.

-Yes. I don't know if that is a chip.

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-Feel it. It's been glazed, I think.

-Yes.

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-But it has to be cheap.

-Yeah.

-To leave you money.

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-I'm wondering where the dealer is. He's disappeared. Is he behind you?

-Yep.

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-Let's go and ask him.

-You go and ask him.

-Excuse me.

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78.

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-Do you really like that? Or are you just getting...

-It's just different.

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Are you just getting a bit desperate? THEY LAUGH

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I'm getting a bit nervous. There's so much here, it's overwhelming.

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But in terms of what to actually get which I'm interested in,

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but also we think will sell, that's the problem.

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It's 120. Would someone have that?

0:16:010:16:04

-I don't think, in the fine arts sale.

-In the fine arts, it's not...

-A shower tap! Aghh!

0:16:040:16:10

-What did he say?

-He said 65.

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65.

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-My gut feeling is, I'd want it for about 50.

-Yeah, definitely.

0:16:160:16:22

-I'd pay 50 for it, I wouldn't pay 65.

-Do you want to offer him 50?

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-As a one-off offer.

-Yes.

-And if not, we'll carry on looking.

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Cos we are getting a little bit concerned on time.

0:16:300:16:33

-'Really? You've got ages left!'

-Would you take 50 for it?

0:16:330:16:38

Er, I'd take 55.

0:16:380:16:40

-It would have to be 50, really.

-Give us your money!

-50 cash.

0:16:400:16:44

-You're happy with it for 50?

-Yeah.

-Happy?

-Yeah, definitely.

0:16:440:16:47

-You won't shout at me at the saleroom? "I didn't want that!"

-No, no.

-We'll take all the blame.

0:16:470:16:51

I love you! I love that you take all the blame!

0:16:510:16:55

'Right, girls, that's you all sewn up. Blues? Are you feeling the heat?'

0:16:550:17:00

A thermometer. That's actually quite nice.

0:17:050:17:09

It is. It's also 195.

0:17:090:17:12

That's a very heavy price. What can you do on that?

0:17:120:17:16

170.

0:17:160:17:17

-I think if we could do it for 130.

-I knew you'd say that. No way.

0:17:170:17:22

-Can you come down a bit more?

-We're running out of money, you see?

-160 and that would be it.

0:17:230:17:28

-Where's Mervyn? Mervyn.

-Oh, wow.

-What do you think about that?

0:17:280:17:32

-I like that.

-I'd say that's probably early 19th century.

-Oh, really?

0:17:320:17:37

-And it's ivory.

-I mean, I remember, once upon a time, these making £300 to £400.

0:17:370:17:43

-But...

-We like that.

-..in more of a specialist sale.

-Couldn't have been too long ago.

0:17:430:17:49

You say the nicest things!

0:17:490:17:52

-I don't know. What do you think?

-We've only got 170 left.

0:17:520:17:56

-How much have we got left?

-170, isn't it?

0:17:560:17:58

-Have we really?

-Yeah, it will be.

-Yeah.

-Your maths is better than mine.

0:17:580:18:03

-Oh, my word! I'm picking up too expensive things.

-Mm.

0:18:030:18:07

We've still got to buy another object.

0:18:070:18:10

-If we bought that...

-If you could do 150, that'd help us out so much.

-All right, 150.

0:18:100:18:14

-Ohh!

-You're good! He's good!

0:18:140:18:18

-You go first.

-'So are the Reds, Catherine. They finished ages ago!'

0:18:180:18:23

You're going to take me.

0:18:240:18:26

'Two down, only one to go.'

0:18:260:18:29

You've got to buy an item for, like, £15, really.

0:18:290:18:33

-How much was that tambourine?

-Oh, dear.

0:18:330:18:36

Five minutes to find one object.

0:18:360:18:39

Should we just sort of separate? I think we're going to have to.

0:18:390:18:42

-That's mine and that's yours.

-No, you can't do that!

-Yes, I can!

0:18:460:18:50

-No, you can't.

-Yes, I can!

-'Break it up, girls!'

0:18:500:18:54

Go on, your go.

0:18:540:18:55

-Oh, my goodness!

-Have you found anything?

0:18:550:18:58

-Come on.

-No, no, keep looking!

0:18:580:19:01

Oh, yes, I can see it.

0:19:010:19:04

-Huge profit at the auction.

-Ohh!

0:19:040:19:07

-Got anything here for sort of £15? Something interesting?

-A nice bargain for 15 quid.

0:19:140:19:18

We've literally got one minute left and not very much money.

0:19:180:19:22

-How much is the prayer wheel?

-20.

-Luke.

-Yep?

0:19:220:19:25

-A what?

-Shall we say a prayer? It's a prayer wheel.

0:19:250:19:28

Tibetan. Buddhist prayer wheel.

0:19:280:19:32

-I'm with you on that...

-I'm not fussy.

0:19:320:19:35

-Can we say 15 quid?

-15?

-I will do it 15.

0:19:350:19:38

Brilliant! You are kind! I'll say a prayer for you.

0:19:380:19:41

-Thank you very much.

-I think we need to say a prayer for the whole thing.

0:19:410:19:45

-You basically...

-Don't break it.

-You swing it around with your prayers.

0:19:450:19:50

# Hallelujah

0:19:500:19:52

'Divine intervention at last!

0:19:520:19:55

'Now, while I find those Reds, let's remind ourselves what they bought.

0:19:550:19:59

'They sprinted off the blocks with a Huntley and Palmer biscuit tin.

0:20:010:20:05

'Then swiftly signed a deal over the ink stand.'

0:20:080:20:11

Sometimes, those French and English things made in that Japanese style

0:20:110:20:16

can be extremely desirable.

0:20:160:20:18

'And finished up with a cobalt blue harvest mug.'

0:20:180:20:22

So, have you been instigating your daughter to spend all the money?

0:20:250:20:28

-Just a little bit.

-Yeah, pushing her along, I'd say.

0:20:280:20:31

-Was that good fun, though?

-I really enjoyed it.

-Good.

-Really good.

0:20:310:20:35

-How much did you finish up spending?

-£275.

0:20:350:20:38

-Have you got £25 of leftover lolly?

-Yep.

-Very nice.

0:20:380:20:41

-Which is your favourite piece?

-I think the inkwell.

0:20:410:20:47

-The inkwell's your favourite? What about you?

-Same.

0:20:470:20:50

-Is it?

-Yep.

-Right, fine. £25 goes to you, Mark.

0:20:500:20:53

-Not bad.

-Not a lot of money there.

-Not a lot, but I'm pleased with what they bought.

0:20:530:20:57

-They've got a very good eye, these two.

-Yes. Sharp as razors, eh?

0:20:570:21:01

-Anyway, good luck, everybody.

-Thank you.

-Why don't we remind ourselves of exactly what the Blues bought?

0:21:010:21:07

'The Blue Team finally found a jewelled casket

0:21:070:21:11

'to get them underway.

0:21:110:21:13

'With the temperature rising, they bought an ivory thermometer

0:21:130:21:16

'for £150.

0:21:160:21:19

'And in the dying seconds, their prayers were answered

0:21:190:21:22

'by a Tibetan wheel.'

0:21:220:21:25

To be saved by a prayer wheel is just a strange turn of fate, isn't it?

0:21:260:21:31

Well, it was indeed. It was just there.

0:21:310:21:33

-It was the hand of God, I think.

-Absolutely.

0:21:330:21:36

-Talking about the hand of God, who's got the leftover lolly?

-Ohh, that would be me.

0:21:360:21:40

-You've got the collection money? Very good.

-Five whole pounds.

-This is a joke.

0:21:400:21:44

Well, I'm afraid, Catherine, that's all I've got to present you with.

0:21:440:21:48

It's a challenge to go out and find a bonus buy that's going to make a profit for these two for £5.

0:21:480:21:53

-How do you feel about that?

-I think I've got to work a miracle.

0:21:530:21:57

-Oh, dear.

-I don't feel very confident, Tim.

-Don't you?

-No.

0:21:570:22:00

-I will try.

-We've got faith in you.

-I'll do my best.

0:22:000:22:04

'Good luck, Catherine. £5, eh?

0:22:040:22:07

'Well, while the experts shop, I'm off to London.'

0:22:070:22:11

Welcome to Ranger's House.

0:22:210:22:24

It's located next door to Greenwich Park

0:22:240:22:26

and it contains the remains of one man's collection of treasures.

0:22:260:22:33

'Julius Wernher made his fortune digging up diamonds in South Africa at the turn of the century.

0:22:330:22:38

'He bought himself an array of treasures with the proceeds.'

0:22:380:22:43

# A kiss on the hand may be quite continental

0:22:430:22:48

# But diamonds are a girl's best friend

0:22:480:22:52

# A kiss may be grand...

0:22:530:22:55

The jewellery collected by Wernher comprised some 115 cast and chased gold

0:22:550:23:01

bejewelled and enamelled pieces

0:23:010:23:05

dating from the second century BC right up to the 18th century

0:23:050:23:09

and I've been allowed to make a selection

0:23:090:23:11

of four pieces of this early jewellery to show you down here in the drawing room.

0:23:110:23:18

Now, the oldest piece out of this group is probably this fellow,

0:23:180:23:22

the diamond ring. And if you look at that,

0:23:220:23:25

it's encrusted with diamonds, but stones that don't look quite like

0:23:250:23:30

the diamonds we see today.

0:23:300:23:32

That's because the modern diamond is displayed in the claw

0:23:320:23:36

and is cut differently

0:23:360:23:38

so that the light reflects off more surfaces above and below.

0:23:380:23:42

But in the old days, and we're talking about 1580 for the ring,

0:23:420:23:46

the diamonds were set flat.

0:23:460:23:49

As you see behind, there's no light coming in from the back area.

0:23:490:23:53

And sometimes they introduced foil underneath the cut stone

0:23:530:23:58

so that the light, when it hits the top of the stone,

0:23:580:24:00

does shine back at you, giving you this impressive bling-type finish.

0:24:000:24:06

Old lizard face, on the other side, which is another pendant,

0:24:060:24:11

is encrusted in little chips of fiery opals.

0:24:110:24:15

We tend to think of opals being commonly available today

0:24:150:24:20

following the opening of the opal mines in Australia,

0:24:200:24:23

but in the old days, opals would've been much, much rarer.

0:24:230:24:28

What got early collectors of jewellery really excited

0:24:280:24:33

was when they came across a piece that looked like this.

0:24:330:24:36

That pendant is so stunning and so spectacular

0:24:360:24:42

because of the pearl element. The body of this girl

0:24:420:24:46

is, in fact, a deformed pearl.

0:24:460:24:49

The piece of jewellery was made in the 17th century

0:24:490:24:53

and if you look at her head, it's been cast and chased in gold

0:24:530:24:57

and it's quite obviously a girl's head.

0:24:570:25:00

But the body itself could very easily resemble a torso.

0:25:000:25:05

She's got breasts, she's got a tummy,

0:25:050:25:08

and you have a semblance of how her dolphin-like tail

0:25:080:25:13

might be tucked up here on one side.

0:25:130:25:17

The best bit of all, though, has to be this skull pendant.

0:25:170:25:20

It looks like a miniature skull, doesn't it? He's even got teeth.

0:25:200:25:24

But if I give it a gentle tweak, you see it opens up

0:25:240:25:29

and inside we've got a scene that shows the baptism of Christ.

0:25:290:25:33

The purpose of this little fellow is as a pomander,

0:25:330:25:37

and originally when it was made, around 1620, it would have contained

0:25:370:25:41

a little slab of perfume so that when you were wandering around

0:25:410:25:46

and there was a nasty smell about, and believe you me, there were lots of smells in the streets,

0:25:460:25:51

you'd simply reach for your pomander, which would be hanging on a chain around your neck,

0:25:510:25:56

and stick it under your nostrils to take away the evil smells.

0:25:560:25:59

The big question today is, of course,

0:25:590:26:02

will our teams be able to smell a profit over at the auction?

0:26:020:26:06

'Auctioneer Michael Roberts at the Canterbury Auction Galleries

0:26:060:26:11

'is playing host to us today and I can't wait to see what our experts bought.

0:26:110:26:17

'They only had £30 between them.'

0:26:170:26:21

Yvonne and Zozo, this is your moment.

0:26:210:26:23

£275 you spent. You gave £25 to Mark Stacey to find your bonus buy.

0:26:230:26:28

-What did you find, Mark?

-Something small, Tim.

0:26:280:26:31

But I think very nice. It's a little porcelain cream jug.

0:26:310:26:35

It's not marked, but it reminds me of something like Goss or early Belleek

0:26:350:26:39

because the quality is very nice.

0:26:390:26:42

They called it King Charles, but I think it comes from a suit of cards. It looks like the jack to me.

0:26:420:26:48

-Yes.

-But I just thought the quality was very nice and it did cost me the £25

0:26:480:26:52

-but I thought it was rather sweet.

-I like that.

0:26:520:26:55

-Would you say he's two-faced?

-Ooh!

-THEY LAUGH

0:26:550:26:59

-I hope he makes double the profit.

-No shame!

0:26:590:27:03

Do you think it's going to make a profit?

0:27:030:27:05

Well, I'd love it to make £35, £40.

0:27:050:27:07

So maybe a working profit. Not a huge profit but maybe a working one if people get carried away a bit.

0:27:070:27:12

OK. Well, you don't pick it now, you pick it later, after the sale of your first three items.

0:27:120:27:18

But let's, for the audience at home, find out what the auctioneer thinks about Mark's little jug.

0:27:180:27:23

-Morning, Michael.

-Morning.

-Lovely to be here. Now, what do you make of that?

0:27:230:27:29

Not a great deal. I think possibly the least said, the better.

0:27:290:27:32

It's of no great quality. In the manner of perhaps Belleek,

0:27:320:27:36

maybe Goss, late 19th century slip cast type thing,

0:27:360:27:41

-but no name, no value.

-So, you're being very polite, but it's rubbish.

0:27:410:27:46

-Absolutely.

-OK, fine. I quite agree with you. It looks like...

0:27:460:27:50

When I was a child, you threw three stones at a coconut

0:27:500:27:53

and if you hit it, they gave you one of those.

0:27:530:27:56

-There we are.

-It's a fairground type object.

-Absolutely.

-I think.

0:27:560:28:00

Our estimate is, optimistically, £20 to £30.

0:28:000:28:03

You're a lovely lot, I tell you. That's pure charity, that is.

0:28:030:28:08

Now, Zoe and Yvonne, their first item is the Huntley and Palmer's biscuit tin.

0:28:080:28:13

-How do you rate that?

-Well, it's OK. It's physically sound.

0:28:130:28:18

Not the most exciting. The famous one is the garden scene with the nude figures,

0:28:180:28:24

-that's what everyone raves about and you see articles about it.

-What do you think value-wise?

0:28:240:28:29

-Our estimate is £50 to £70.

-They paid £100.

0:28:290:28:31

-OK.

-Could get there, couldn't it?

-It could do with the internet.

0:28:310:28:34

-Next is the inkwell.

-Yes.

-With this slightly oddball Chinaman squatting on the top,

0:28:340:28:41

-but it certainly ain't Chinese, is it?

-No, it's French.

0:28:410:28:44

It's nice quality and a bit of Eastern influence there with the Chinese style.

0:28:440:28:49

-Would've been part of a larger set.

-Yes, with a blotter and a pen rack.

0:28:490:28:54

-Absolutely, the whole lot.

-How much for that one?

0:28:540:28:57

-Our estimate is £70 to £100.

-£125 they paid.

0:28:570:29:00

-Right.

-Gosh. And their last item is this cobalt blue mug.

-Yep.

0:29:000:29:07

-Looks a bit grubby to me.

-Yeah, it is, but it's actually quite a nice thing, named and dated at the front,

0:29:070:29:13

and in good condition, it would be worth a bit of money.

0:29:130:29:16

However, it has been completely restored and internally you can see over-painting, which has cracked.

0:29:160:29:22

-Oh, dear.

-So it's not something that's going to sell terribly well.

0:29:220:29:27

They paid £50. How does that rate?

0:29:270:29:29

-Our estimate is £60 to £80.

-Oh, well, not too bad, then.

0:29:290:29:32

-Yeah.

-It's better than the tin and the inkwell. Good.

0:29:320:29:36

So, that's it for the Reds. Now for the Blues, Mervyn and Luke.

0:29:360:29:40

Their first item is this filigree gem-encrusted casket.

0:29:400:29:46

-Ooh. Not a good start.

-Right.

0:29:460:29:49

-I mean, it looks a bit better, perhaps, than it is.

-Yeah.

0:29:490:29:53

It looks quite nice, but it's a souvenir thing, really. Internally, it's fairly plain.

0:29:530:30:00

-And rough.

-Yeah. The filigree element is applied as a sheet over the top.

0:30:000:30:05

-Yes.

-There's no damage to any of these stones but there's no great value to it.

0:30:050:30:10

The problem with this is, it's trying to be incredibly important,

0:30:100:30:13

when, in fact, it's a bit of tourist wear. Somebody got off a cruise liner,

0:30:130:30:17

they toddled 200, 300 yards, they saw this in 1968, they thought it was marvellous

0:30:170:30:25

and they invested at least 100 denary for it.

0:30:250:30:29

-So how do you estimate that?

-Our estimate is £20 to £30.

0:30:290:30:33

-Our guys paid £130.

-Right.

-Well, it's got the look.

-Oh, yes.

0:30:330:30:37

I can see somebody in the auction maybe getting carried away

0:30:370:30:41

and paying £50 or £80 for it, but £130 plus?

0:30:410:30:44

I don't think so.

0:30:440:30:46

-Next up, we've got this thermometer.

-Yes.

-In ivory.

0:30:460:30:50

Yeah. It's not a bad thing, this one, actually.

0:30:500:30:54

Good quality, ornamentally turned ivory.

0:30:540:30:56

And, yeah, it's in fairly good condition, really.

0:30:560:31:01

-Lovely. How much?

-£70 to £100.

-£150 they paid.

-Right, OK.

0:31:010:31:06

-Well, strangely enough, I can see that perhaps making £150.

-Yeah.

0:31:060:31:09

If somebody pays £150 for that, they are getting a genuine piece

0:31:090:31:13

of mid to late 19th century turner's art.

0:31:130:31:18

Now, I think this team might need to say their prayers, so how about the prayer wheel?

0:31:180:31:24

Well, it's just as well they bought it, really.

0:31:240:31:27

Yeah, it... I know not a lot about it, but I do know that it's not very good quality.

0:31:270:31:32

Erm, consequently, our estimate isn't very high.

0:31:320:31:36

-What is your estimate?

-£20 to £30.

-That's OK. £15 they paid.

-OK.

0:31:360:31:40

-And if they can buy a prayer with it, then all the better.

-Well, quite.

0:31:400:31:44

The whole thing's a bit of a wing and a prayer if you ask me.

0:31:440:31:48

They're definitely going to need their bonus buy so let's have a butchers at it.

0:31:480:31:53

OK, boys, you spent £295. You gave Catherine a miserable £5 note.

0:31:530:31:59

-You seem to have got something rather substantial.

-I have!

0:31:590:32:02

I have for £5. I mean, this was mission impossible, but I think I did rather well.

0:32:020:32:09

-What do you think of that?

-Oh, wow!

0:32:090:32:11

-It's... It's a lot bigger than I was expecting a £5 item to be.

-It's fabulous.

0:32:110:32:18

It's this 1950s Samsonite, so a nice make, simulated leather vanity case.

0:32:180:32:24

You can see that it's rather nice inside. We've got a mirror and little pockets.

0:32:240:32:28

-I mean, for £5...

-That's really good!

-I'm impressed.

0:32:280:32:32

That's fantastic. That would just about contain your makeup, Luke.

0:32:320:32:36

-Yeah, that's really, really nice.

-Is there any money in it?

0:32:360:32:39

-Yes, anything else?

-I did actually see a little...

0:32:390:32:42

Oh, even the keys!

0:32:420:32:45

-I mean, gosh.

-Just out of interest,

0:32:450:32:48

the fact that the label's on it, would that actually add value?

0:32:480:32:52

I think it makes it a little bit more interesting.

0:32:520:32:54

I mean, he wanted £30 for it,

0:32:540:32:57

-so I had to work very, very hard.

-You got him down to £5 from £30?

0:32:570:33:02

Gosh. You should go shopping with me. What do you think, Catherine?

0:33:020:33:06

-Do you think we'll make a little bit on that?

-You will definitely make a profit on this.

0:33:060:33:11

-Well done.

-Very clever of you, Catherine. Thank you for that.

0:33:110:33:14

But for the audience at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Catherine's case.

0:33:140:33:19

-Michael, you'll not remember BOAC, will you?

-No.

0:33:190:33:22

-That's what British Airways was before it became British Airways.

-Right.

0:33:220:33:26

-So it's a lovely label.

-Yes, that's probably the best thing about it.

0:33:260:33:31

Nice label. Samsonite cabin bag.

0:33:310:33:35

-There we are. Right.

-It's all stained, look.

0:33:360:33:39

With a mirror inside. It's been used.

0:33:390:33:43

All made of plastic with metal mounts. It's not something of any great shakes, really.

0:33:430:33:49

-What's strange about this stuff is that it's evocative of an era.

-Yeah.

0:33:490:33:53

It's all about nostalgia. And if you don't feel nostalgic about it

0:33:530:33:58

because it's not really your era, which is fair enough...

0:33:580:34:02

The person who is going to feel nostalgic about it is somebody who did fly first in 1962

0:34:020:34:08

and think, "That's the type of luggage I used to have."

0:34:080:34:10

-And I must say, it's quite clever. Looks like leather.

-Yes, it does.

0:34:100:34:14

But it's just plastic throughout. Anyway, what do you think it might bring?

0:34:140:34:18

-I think it's around £20 to £30.

-You think it's going to take off.

0:34:180:34:22

-Well, within that limited area.

-She paid just £5 for it.

0:34:220:34:25

-OK.

-You have to admit, for £5, that's not too bad.

-It's not.

0:34:250:34:30

-Good luck on the rostrum.

-Thank you.

0:34:300:34:33

What do you know about the Archduchess Maria Theresa?

0:34:390:34:44

Not much? Well, you could come to a sale here in Canterbury and learn a lot more about her.

0:34:440:34:51

Because what we've got here is a pair of reverse paintings on glass

0:34:510:34:56

of the Archduchess herself and her hubby, Francis.

0:34:560:35:00

And we see her here in quite a naive portrait.

0:35:000:35:04

This would not have been painted by a court painter,

0:35:040:35:08

it would've been painted by a man who was a gifted amateur.

0:35:080:35:12

He might have painted pub signs.

0:35:120:35:15

But he's patriotic. He loves his queen.

0:35:150:35:18

And he's inscribed underneath, Maria Theresa imperat, empress,

0:35:180:35:25

of Hung, Hungary, and Bohemia.

0:35:250:35:28

She acceded in about 1740

0:35:280:35:32

and she died in about 1780.

0:35:320:35:35

So her time in power spans a crucial mid-18th century period.

0:35:350:35:42

But how do you create an image like this?

0:35:420:35:45

Well, you start off with a plain sheet of glass

0:35:450:35:48

and instead of painting on the surface, which is what you do with an ordinary oil painting,

0:35:480:35:54

you paint it from behind.

0:35:540:35:56

So it's not complicated, really, setting out your image from behind,

0:35:560:36:00

but it's a bit like painting on a shop window.

0:36:000:36:04

And it's rather beautifully done.

0:36:040:36:06

The colours have remained bright and clear

0:36:060:36:09

because, after all, no dust or pollution can get at the surface of that paint

0:36:090:36:14

because the surface of the paint is frozen for all time against a sheet of glass.

0:36:140:36:20

And as long as the backs don't get too bashed,

0:36:200:36:23

here we've got some pretty rotten old brown paper which is protecting it,

0:36:230:36:28

as long as the backs don't get bashed, you'll still have

0:36:280:36:31

a bright and breezy image like that

0:36:310:36:34

a cool 260 years after they were painted.

0:36:340:36:38

Charming, aren't they?

0:36:380:36:41

What are they worth? Well, according to the auction estimate,

0:36:410:36:44

all this European history could be yours for £120 to £160.

0:36:440:36:51

Apparently.

0:36:510:36:52

This is it. Oooh!

0:36:580:37:01

-Here's your tin.

-A Huntley and Palmer book pattern biscuit tin.

0:37:010:37:05

Starting at £70 on commission and looking for £80.

0:37:050:37:09

-£70 we've got.

-The biscuit tin here. £80, anyone?

0:37:090:37:13

-Must have this. £80.

-Where's the tinternet.

0:37:140:37:18

-I will sell on commission at £70.

-Oh, no.

0:37:180:37:21

We're going to burst into tears.

0:37:210:37:23

Minus 30. Now, here he goes.

0:37:230:37:26

The French brass square ink stand, Eastern design.

0:37:260:37:29

-50. Anyone, £50?

-Oh, dear.

0:37:290:37:33

-Looking gloomy.

-£50 I'm bid, thank you.

-Come on.

0:37:330:37:35

£60 where? I have 50. Looking for 60. Any more?

0:37:350:37:39

-Come on.

-If not, 50 it is.

0:37:390:37:41

Yes? 50 and selling.

0:37:410:37:43

-Bad luck.

-That is minus £75.

0:37:430:37:46

246 is the Staffordshire pottery mug with the name and date on the front.

0:37:460:37:51

Who'll start me at £40? 40?

0:37:510:37:54

Lot 246, £40 now. Anyone?

0:37:540:37:57

-£40?

-This isn't going well.

-It's not at all, is it?

0:37:580:38:01

£30 now. 30. Let's see a bid. Who's 40? Any more?

0:38:010:38:05

-If not, 30 and selling.

-That's minus 125.

0:38:050:38:09

-God.

-Minus 125.

0:38:090:38:12

What are you going to do about the two-faced jug, then?

0:38:120:38:15

-I think we'll go for it.

-We trust Mark.

0:38:150:38:18

-You what?

-We trust Mark.

-After that? Bad!

0:38:180:38:22

We'll have a go and here it comes.

0:38:220:38:24

250 is the white glazed porcelain jug modelled with two faces.

0:38:240:38:28

-Who'll start me at £10?

-Come on!

-£10 I'm bid. 20.

0:38:280:38:31

30. No. £20. Looking for £30 now.

0:38:310:38:34

30. 40?

0:38:340:38:36

No? £30. Who's 40? Any more?

0:38:360:38:39

30, looking for 40.

0:38:390:38:41

If not, 30 and selling. It's yours.

0:38:410:38:43

£5 profit. Well, that's great, isn't it?

0:38:430:38:46

-Well done.

-Overall, girls, you are minus 120.

0:38:460:38:52

That might be a winning score if everything goes the same way for the Blues.

0:38:520:38:57

Next up are the paintings on glass.

0:39:050:39:08

I rather fancy these, you know? Morning.

0:39:080:39:11

But will anybody else recognise them? They seem to be leaving,

0:39:110:39:14

-Start on commission at £200.

-£200!

-Start me at 210.

0:39:140:39:18

210 where? 200 on commission. Looking for 10.

0:39:180:39:21

210. 220. 230 now. Any more?

0:39:210:39:25

At 220 and selling, then. All done.

0:39:250:39:27

£220. The Archduchess would be delighted.

0:39:270:39:31

-How's it for you, Luke?

-Really exciting. I want to know what's going to happen.

0:39:370:39:41

Here comes the filigree casket.

0:39:410:39:44

Stone topped casket with applied filigree work. Who'll start at £10?

0:39:440:39:48

£10 where? Lot 266. £10. 10 I'm bid.

0:39:480:39:53

20. 30. No. Keep all your jewels.

0:39:530:39:56

-20. Looking for 30 now.

-Come on!

-At £20 I will sell.

0:39:560:40:00

-Come on!

-Please!

-Looking for 30. 20 and selling.

0:40:000:40:03

-There we are.

-£20. That was pretty swift.

0:40:030:40:06

Minus 110. That's a big hit, isn't it?

0:40:060:40:10

We've got a long way to go.

0:40:100:40:12

Ivory desk thermometer. Lot 267.

0:40:120:40:16

Who's £50? £50 on commission. Who's 60 now?

0:40:160:40:19

60, the ivory thermometer here. 60 on the internet.

0:40:190:40:23

-Yes?

-Two bidders on the internet. This could take forever. Stand by.

0:40:230:40:28

It's gone a bit crazy on the net. We're onto 180, are we?

0:40:280:40:32

-180!

-Yes!

-Look at that, guys!

-Yes!

0:40:320:40:35

Makes up for the last lot.

0:40:350:40:38

-At 200. And 10?

-Look at that!

-No?

0:40:380:40:41

-At £200 on the internet.

-Come on.

-Looking for 10.

-A bit more!

0:40:410:40:45

-220.

-Come on, keep going.

-Looking for 30. 230 now.

0:40:450:40:49

If not, 220, I will sell.

0:40:490:40:52

-At 220 and selling.

-Is it not carrying on?

0:40:520:40:54

220. Yes! That is so good!

0:40:540:40:57

268, this is a Tibetan embossed copper prayer wheel.

0:40:570:41:01

£10, the prayer wheel. £10 I'm bid. Thank you. Who's 20?

0:41:010:41:05

£20 now. Any more?

0:41:050:41:08

-If not, £10 it will sell.

-Oh, dear, £10. Terribly quick.

0:41:080:41:12

Minus £5. You're minus £45 overall.

0:41:120:41:15

You're minus £45, boys.

0:41:150:41:17

What are you going to do about the suitcase? You going with it or not?

0:41:170:41:21

-I think definitely.

-We're going with the suitcase, the bonus buy.

0:41:210:41:25

Lot 272 is this Samsonite brown leather vanity case.

0:41:250:41:29

Who'll start me at £10? £10 I'm bid.

0:41:290:41:31

Who's 20? £20 now.

0:41:310:41:34

-20 on the telephone.

-Ooh!

-20, thank you.

0:41:340:41:37

30. 40?

0:41:370:41:39

50. No?

0:41:390:41:41

-Go on! Go on! Go on!

-Come on!

0:41:410:41:45

We have an international bidder on the phone. £40. Looking for 50 now.

0:41:450:41:48

-At 40 and selling.

-One more. Ohh. £40.

0:41:480:41:52

That's plus £35. Well done, Catherine.

0:41:520:41:56

You were minus £45, which means overall you're minus 10.

0:41:560:41:59

-Ohh!

-Well, that's the way it goes.

-So exciting, that.

0:41:590:42:03

Well, well, well. Such excitement the like of which we haven't seen for years.

0:42:080:42:15

So, you have no idea that one team has done disastrously badly

0:42:150:42:20

and the other has done really rather well.

0:42:200:42:23

-No, you have no idea about that?

-ALL: No.

0:42:230:42:25

-Well, unfortunately, the disaster movie starts over here.

-Oh, no.

0:42:250:42:30

It's bad luck, isn't it? Minus £120.

0:42:300:42:34

The only glimmer on your horizon was the two-faced jug,

0:42:340:42:38

very cleverly found by Mark, which made you a £5 profit.

0:42:380:42:42

But what I love about this team is they're so giggly. Mother and daughter all having a great time.

0:42:420:42:47

Cos it's not the result that really counts. Unless you happen to be the winners, in which case it counts.

0:42:470:42:53

Well done, chaps. Your overall score after all that

0:42:530:42:57

is minus £10, so you're not going home with money,

0:42:570:42:59

but nevertheless, you're most certainly the winners and it's been the most splendid show.

0:42:590:43:04

-Thank you very much. Join us soon for some more bargain hunting, yes?

-ALL: Yes!

0:43:040:43:08

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:080:43:12

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:120:43:16

.

0:43:160:43:16

The antiques challenge comes from Ardingly Antiques Fair, where the red team spend much faster than the blue team, and there is a little divine intervention thrown in for good measure. Along for the ride are experts Mark Stacey and Catherine Southon, while Tim Wonnacott trots up the road to London's impressive Ranger's House.