Norfolk 25 Bargain Hunt


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Norfolk 25

Firemen take on the police in another edition of the antiques challenge. Catherine Southon's firemen give her a lift, while policewomen keep James Braxton in check.


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Hello. Let's meet today's teams.

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For the Reds, naturally in red, it's firemen, Terry and Olly.

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-Hi, guys.

-Hi, Tim.

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And for the front view of the police girls, it's Donna and Rachel.

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Hello, hello, hello.

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Let's go bargain hunting!

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Let them down, let them down.

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We're at the outskirts of Norwich at the Norfolk Show Ground.

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It's a busy old fair which means we're going to have a busy old show.

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The policewomen won't lose their man today, oh, no!

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You keep wandering away from me and I'm not having it.

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They're cuffing James Braxton.

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While the firemen have just the thing to lift Catherine Southon's spirits.

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And someone's left their mark on this beautiful manor, but can you guess who? We'll find out later.

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For now, let's meet the teams.

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And here they all are. Back on terra firma, thank goodness.

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Now, Terry, when did you first meet Olly?

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I met Olly at Wattisham Air Field Fire Service, a defence fire service

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about two years ago and he was put on to Red Watch.

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-Was he?

-Yes.

-But tell me, because it'll be confusing people,

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you are firemen but you're attached to the Ministry of Defence.

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-MoD, yes.

-Right, but all the basic training and everything is the same?

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Except you're specialists in more military related things?

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Yes. Firm related, we are.

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Yes. Now, Terry, you get up to the odd practical joke, don't you?

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Obviously, Tim, I'm not going to admit to anything on TV.

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-No.

-Because I always say it isn't me.

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No, quite. So what sort of practical jokes happen but don't have anything to do with you?

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I've got up one morning and gone to the toilet

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and blackened it with boot polish.

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The milkman turned up early and he then went to the toilet and got a black ring on his rear.

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-But at least you didn't do any Superglue or anything.

-No, no, no.

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Quite. Now, you raise a lot of money for charity, don't you?

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We do, we try, yes. We always try to raise a bit of money for charity.

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There have been occasions when you've gone that extra mile.

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That's right, Tim, I assume you're talking about my Full Monty strip that I did when I was in the RAF.

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-Oh, yes. Everything off, like?

-Well, we were spared a little bit

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of dignity, they provided us with a little thong and it looked like

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it was made out of a pair of Y-fronts and stained with teabags to make it look skin-coloured.

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The policewomen look absolutely horrified.

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Anyway, how do you think you're going to get on today on Bargain Hunt? Do you think you'll do well?

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Yes, I think we will. We're a good team, aren't we, B'ner?

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-He's called Terry, why do you call him B'ner?

-That all I know him as,

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-he's probably better at explaining the nickname.

-Why are you called B'ner?

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For ten years I worked in a factory which used to have pigs and we used to bone the pigs out.

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I've been called B'ner from training.

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-B'ner is like Boner.

-Boner, yes, Boner!

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-Boner?

-Boner! Come here, Boner!

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And you had to take all your kit off?

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-No, he did, I didn't.

-Oh, he did.

-I was too big for that job.

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Good for you. I think you're going to do terribly well.

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Rachel, attention here, girl.

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How did you two meet then?

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-We met through work, didn't we? About a year-and-a-half ago.

-Yes.

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Yes, and is that in the force then?

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Yes, we work for a Safer Neighbourhood team, that's in Wotton, a little village.

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Norfolk Police.

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-Now, Donna, your husband's also in the police?

-He is, yes.

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And how did you meet him?

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I was working in Surrey at the time and I came to Newmarket

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on a girls' night out and we got rather drunk.

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Walked to go get a burger at the end of the night and he was stood there

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on his own, so we went over and I asked him for his phone number.

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-You thought I won't have a burger, I'll have a bloke.

-I'll have a copper!

-I'll have a copper!

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-Were you a policewoman yourself at the time?

-Oh, no.

-Oh, you weren't?

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-No, no, no.

-Right.

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-I asked for his phone number and he said no so I went and gave him my phone number.

-And he was on duty?

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-Yes, so he wouldn't take my phone number.

-No, naturally.

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So I gave him mine and then some woman collapsed in the nightclub

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so he had to run over and deal with her but I was a bit drunk so we got our burger and went home.

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And then he text me and we met up from then.

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Really? And it was caramba, was it? Brilliant.

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-So have you girls got any tactics today?

-Yes.

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Well, I think we're going to handcuff our team so they can't actually go out and buy anything.

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They've already picked you up, haven't they?

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You might just as well tie them up.

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What a programme we'll have today! Anyway, here's the £300 apiece, yes?

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Thank you.

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You know the rules, your experts await, and off you go.

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And very, very, very good luck.

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Oh, dear!

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So they have their money, they have an hour on the clock, they need to find three items.

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But have they got a plan?

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Spend as little as we can and make the biggest profits we can.

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Anything that looks nice.

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OK, so this is going to be a challenge, isn't it?

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-Yes, definitely.

-I've got a better plan.

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-I think we should shout "fire".

-Fire.

-Fire.

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Clear the area and then we've got our choice... Let's go!

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Come on, we've got no time to lose.

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No tomfoolery.

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What do you think of spoons?

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-No.

-You always see a lot of spoons on there. Ghastly.

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Fire!

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Very good. So what date is this one?

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-Maybe we need to ask Terry, he's a bit older.

-Yeah, he's a bit older.

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Oh, it's going to rain.

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And a bit of blue and white.

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Yeah, I was looking at those, thinking these are nice.

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-They're the serving dishes.

-Some of those funny...

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they have those big sort of thing so gravy goes in there.

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-Yeah.

-You'd use a big serving spoon.

-There's no marking on

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-that one, is there?

-Oh, yes, there is.

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-Impress, Spode.

-What's Spode?

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Spode is Staffordshire.

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Right.

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-Still rings, so it's fine.

-Excuse me?

-Age?

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Mid-early 1840s, something like that.

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How much are you after for that?

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-I'm asking 55.

-Are you?

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Which I think is a good price.

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Yeah, it's a good price, isn't it?

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What's the very, very best you'd do for two lovely ladies?

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-42.

-42, what do you reckon?

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40, you've got a deal, come on.

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£40, come on. Go on, all right.

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Lovely, thank you. Thank you.

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First one bought and very handy shelter.

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How prophetic, James. The heavens have opened.

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-Now, have our firemen got their hands on a damp squib?

-How much is it?

-£10, I think.

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I think it's cracked right the way through.

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-Let's have a look.

-Yes, it's cracked right the way through.

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-Well spotted. We don't want to buy anything which is...

-OK, shall we head off?

-Head off.

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Can we have an umbrella, please?

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-Bubbly, isn't it?

-Now, there's Donna and Rachel, but where's James?

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-Ah, having a chinwag.

-He lived with a boxer and they didn't get on

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-because he has quirky ways about him.

-Did he?

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That's interesting.

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-Where is he now?

-Come on.

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Hold on. James, come here.

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-What about this bowl as well?

-'Ello, 'ello.

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You keep wandering away from me and I'm not having it. Come on.

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-Excellent, excellent.

-Come on, this way.

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-Come on, watch my bowl.

-Haven't been this excited in years.

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James seems to like dominant women. What about the firemen?

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Does she appeal to you?

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Come here often, love?

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Can we just go and have a look at this? I've passed this one.

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-I like the cups.

-It's not Lalique.

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It's not Lalique but I still like it.

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It's a ceiling light, a sort of bowl.

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They sometimes called a bowl.

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It's got nice definition, pressed glass, undamaged

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and quite a sort of trendy item. Typical sort of '30s.

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-No, not for me.

-You don't like that?

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-No, no.

-I wouldn't pay 45.

-You don't like that?

-No.

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-No.

-God, these handcuffs are beginning to hurt a bit.

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Can you release me now?

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Are these standard issue?

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-No, they're not.

-"Made in China!"

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No wonder he's smiling. Now, have our firemen found anything job appropriate?

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What about our nice bucket?

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I know, that's what made me think of it, I saw your bucket.

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I've got two firemen here, you see.

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It's got a hole in it, hasn't it?

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-There's a hole in my bucket...

-Down there. Oh, no.

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It's had a load of coal in it.

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-£45.

-£45? No.

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See that polished up. I ain't winding no-one up here, see this polished up.

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Polish the brass up.

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And all this done in black, in one of your silly centres, you're talking about £150.

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-And I ain't winding you up.

-It's quite suitable for us, you know, a bucket. Yeah, go on.

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-You've go to have a bucket, I suppose.

-Shake on it?

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Do you really, really want this?

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-Is it that bad?

-We're trusting this guy here.

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He's got an honest face. What do you reckon, Olly?

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OK, let's have a look at this.

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I mean, I suppose it's quite decorative.

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You can see there, all the copper, that will clean up.

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-It's very badly scratched and discoloured.

-How old is it?

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But then that's its appeal.

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It's entirely up to you, chaps.

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Give me £38 cash and you've got it.

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-We'll find you £38.

-Shake his hand, Olly.

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-I want to see you on telly doing that.

-Deal.

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-Sure?

-Yes, we're buying it.

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OK. First item, hurrah!

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-Hurrah.

-Thank you, cheers.

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Are you happy about that bucket, Catherine?

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I just mentioned 18th century leather fire bucket,

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next thing I know, we've got a 20th century copper bucket.

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Am I happy? Not that happy but you never know.

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Very modern though, isn't it? Too modern.

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You'd need a certain type of house.

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-I quite like this.

-Oh, my word.

-Rubbish, is it?

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-Why do you like that?

-Will anyone be happy?

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I can imagine my wife putting things in the top of it.

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You've got to stop imagining your wife in whatever and start thinking about profits.

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-Start listening to Catherine.

-Mm, I wonder if he will.

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Now, the girls have spotted something.

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Look at that. It's only £50.

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Can I sit on this?

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Is it all right to...

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Oh, Rachel!

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Oh, look. That's nice, I like that.

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What's that?

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We like this.

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-Invalid's chair.

-Yeah.

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-How much is that?

-£50.

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That's what it says on the sticker. What do you think, James?

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I think it's marvellous.

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I could've searched all over this fair and I wouldn't have found anything as remarkable as that.

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Is that a good thing?

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The jury's out!

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-See if he'll take 30, girls.

-OK.

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-We're going to give a bit of Bargain Hunt magic here and try to do a deal.

-Right.

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-One of the arms has come a bit loose.

-I don't want them to buy it.

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Would you give 25?

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I'll take 40.

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-25.

-No.

-28?

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-30.

-£30, James.

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Oh, my goodness.

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No, I think it's a bit of fun.

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It's a traditional Bargain Hunt lot.

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-It's a bit of fun, isn't it?

-£30?

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-£30. Lovely.

-Thank you very much.

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Thank you. Fantastic.

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Oh, my thing's come out.

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Oh, gawd.

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Well, the Blues have found their chair and thankfully, I've found mine.

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Oh, this is very nice, isn't it?

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To be able to have five minutes to relax and for a change

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not just to sit down but to lie down and relax.

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I mean, put your feet up pukka style.

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And where would you have to go to find a chair like this?

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Well, actually, only just around the corner in the fair.

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You have to admit that this chair looks just like a contemporary or modern deckchair, doesn't it?

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Except in this example, we've got these lovely, long,

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swooping arms which enable you to hook up your legs

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and truly get down there and relax.

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It was made around 1880-1910, just at the end

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of the last days of the British Raj,

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and it was made for an Anglo-Indian planter

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and this isn't a deckchair, it's a verandah chair.

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It's the chair that the planter, when he comes back at the end of his long day

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supervising the tea plantation, down you go like that, look at that,

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get your feet up like that and he'd go....order up a drink.

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What does a magnificent late 19th century teak verandah chair like this cost you?

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It could be yours for 60 notes.

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It's a bargain.

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Back in the buzz of the fair, Terry's a bit of a worry.

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Terry is always wandering off. He just keeps going off on a tangent.

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They keep picking up glass, modern glass.

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I think he's gone again, actually.

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No such worries about the Blues though.

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-That is nice.

-Oh, yeah, that's nice.

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Quite heavy as well.

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-That's really nice.

-Somebody's spent some work staining it, haven't they?

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It's nice though, isn't it?

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So it's an octagon.

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-Just like that.

-That is nice, actually.

-How much would you say for something like that?

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I don't know, sort of 50 quid? Something like that.

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The table? 45.

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And what's your best offers you can do on that?

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I'll do you it for 35.

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35. I think that's a no-brainer.

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Would you let us have it for 30?

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-Oh, blimey!

-Yeah.

-Yeah? All right, then. Lovely.

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Thank you! Love it. That's great!

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I think I could learn something here!

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Too late now, James, you've finished your shop.

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The Reds, meanwhile, have only one bargain, and they're starting to panic.

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-Shall we go inside? If so, it's that way.

-Let's go.

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We've got 15 minutes to buy two items.

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-Should be some more stuff in here.

-Right!

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We're really pushed for time. We've got no time at all.

0:15:390:15:42

It's impossible to keep track of these guys.

0:15:510:15:56

I don't want to worry you, Catherine, but look, Terry's spotted some more glass!

0:15:560:16:01

-What make is this?

-Murano.

-Murano?

0:16:010:16:04

What price would you take on that? Best price.

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-40 on each.

-I quite like that one, actually.

0:16:060:16:09

Could you sell one for 35 for us?

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Yeah, I could do that one for 35.

0:16:110:16:13

-This one?

-Yeah.

-I'll buy that.

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-What?!

-I don't rate me mates, OK?

0:16:150:16:18

-Oh, my goodness!

-It's on my head.

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You might lose your head, Terry.

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-Stand by.

-What have you found?

0:16:250:16:27

Actually, I've bought it.

0:16:270:16:29

-What?

-Just a vase.

0:16:290:16:31

"Just a vase"?

0:16:310:16:33

I was desperate, because we were running out of time.

0:16:330:16:36

-Trust me.

-Right.

-I like it.

0:16:360:16:39

Right, OK. Can you just hold this for me for five minutes?

0:16:390:16:42

-How you doing?

-Oh, you're friends! Oh, big discounts, then.

0:16:420:16:45

-I went to school with him.

-Oh, good.

0:16:450:16:47

Oh, well, you've got to give him a discount.

0:16:470:16:50

We'll come back in one minute.

0:16:500:16:53

-I've never sold anything like that in my life.

-I have.

0:16:530:16:55

-What make is it again?

-Murano.

-Murano.

-Oh, it's Murano.

0:16:550:16:58

-What makes you think...

-£35?

-Right, OK. But it's not very old.

0:16:580:17:02

-For 35, all right, are we?

-What price was it?

0:17:020:17:04

-40.

-I mean, it's very striking.

0:17:040:17:07

It's a beautiful ink blue.

0:17:070:17:08

I like the colour.

0:17:080:17:10

-We'll do that.

-OK.

0:17:100:17:12

-So that's our second item, yeah? Do you agree, Olly?

-Well, you've bought it.

0:17:120:17:16

-He bought it.

-I have never, ever had two like you before.

0:17:160:17:19

I don't know where we are, what we've bought, I don't know how much we've spent.

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It's just gone whoosh!

0:17:240:17:25

Welcome to our company!

0:17:250:17:27

I just... Do you know what I need? A gin and tonic. That's what I need.

0:17:290:17:32

We've got seven minutes, and I'll buy you one.

0:17:320:17:35

Right, after seven minutes promise me you will buy me a gin and tonic.

0:17:350:17:38

Make mine a double!

0:17:380:17:40

Now, I want to show you something. Right, what do you think about this?

0:17:420:17:48

A bottle stopper. I quite like it.

0:17:480:17:50

Quite cute. Is it real silver?

0:17:500:17:53

No, it's not real silver. Well, it's silver plated.

0:17:530:17:56

It's by WMF, so a German maker.

0:17:560:17:59

This one was probably about 1920, something like that, in date.

0:17:590:18:03

They're asking £45, but as you went to school together...

0:18:030:18:08

-Yeah, we went to school together.

-Bestest buds.

0:18:080:18:10

Bestest mates. Imagine that, Roggie?

0:18:100:18:14

35.

0:18:140:18:15

A bit lower than that.

0:18:150:18:17

Yeah, 35 and that's it.

0:18:170:18:19

-Just have a little look for a minute.

-32.

-Let's have a look.

-Does he ever stop?

0:18:190:18:23

Will you, boss? 32?

0:18:230:18:25

Go on, 32 will be fine.

0:18:250:18:26

-Thank you very much.

-Do you want a couple of minutes to look?

0:18:260:18:30

No, I'm happy with that if you are.

0:18:300:18:32

-I want a gin and tonic. Don't you?

-You want a gin and tonic as well?

0:18:320:18:35

You probably want a gin and tonic after this!

0:18:350:18:38

I think everyone deserves a gin and tonic after that!

0:18:380:18:42

Now the shopping's over, the leftover lolly will be handed to the experts to buy their bonus buys.

0:18:420:18:47

First up, the Reds.

0:18:470:18:50

Firemen Terry and Olly bought a fire bucket for £38.

0:18:540:18:59

And Terry went off on his own to buy a glass vase for £35.

0:18:590:19:04

And finally, Catherine found the bottle stopper from heaven for 32.

0:19:040:19:09

-You two are probably actually the worst team I've ever had.

-Worst?

0:19:120:19:17

Terence, you're a shocker, running off like that. What did you mean by doing that?

0:19:170:19:21

Oh, well, I just panicked and bought the vase.

0:19:210:19:24

-Did you?

-Yes, I did.

-And the bucket.

-And the bucket.

0:19:240:19:27

No, Olly bought the bucket.

0:19:270:19:28

I'm getting the blame for the bucket.

0:19:280:19:30

You wait till you see the film.

0:19:300:19:32

Well, I've heard about the hole in the bucket. Why does a fireman buy a bucket with a hole in it?

0:19:320:19:36

It's going to be our worst nightmare when the lads at work see this hole in the bucket!

0:19:360:19:41

I know! That's what I mean - your professional reputation's on the line here.

0:19:410:19:45

Anyway, how much did you spend overall, Ol?

0:19:450:19:47

We spent £105.

0:19:470:19:49

£105. Well, that's pathetic, too.

0:19:490:19:51

£105 is pathetic! £105!

0:19:510:19:55

£195 of leftover lolly, please. Who's got that?

0:19:550:19:59

-You've got that, Ols?

-I haven't got it!

-You've got it.

0:19:590:20:02

I see exactly what you mean.

0:20:020:20:04

Thank you very much!

0:20:040:20:05

That's all there. Hand on heart.

0:20:050:20:07

Anyway, your girl now has got £195, and she, hopefully, will go and blow the lot.

0:20:070:20:11

-Are you going to do that, Catherine?

-I've got to do something to pick up this team, because

0:20:110:20:16

it's all going to go horribly wrong otherwise!

0:20:160:20:18

I think it's gone pear-shaped already!

0:20:180:20:20

-Anyway, good luck, Catherine. Good luck, chaps.

-Thank you!

0:20:200:20:23

Why don't we find out what the Blue team bought, eh?

0:20:230:20:26

Policewomen Donna and Rachel collared this Spode meat dish

0:20:260:20:31

for £40.

0:20:310:20:33

Then they seized this invalid's chair for 30 and gave it a ticket.

0:20:330:20:38

And they were arrested by the octagonal table at the same price.

0:20:380:20:42

-Very, very tough negotiating.

-It was.

0:20:450:20:49

Now, Jim, I'm sorry to interrupt you, but I've seen you've got two very satisfied customers here.

0:20:490:20:54

-Yeah, they're very good. Very good. Very focused, these two.

-And have you seen better grins in your life?

0:20:540:20:59

-No!

-She's very pleased.

-They're winning grins.

-Winning grins?

0:20:590:21:02

-Yes.

-You've invested in this table. You're happy with this?

0:21:020:21:06

-Yeah. Love it.

-Definitely.

0:21:060:21:07

I said to the girls they'll have a price of around £50,

0:21:070:21:10

and the lady comes out with 45,

0:21:100:21:13

Donna gets her in a sort of full arm lock, and the poor lady

0:21:130:21:18

sort of concedes at 30!

0:21:180:21:19

Well, that seems pretty good, doesn't it?

0:21:190:21:22

It's quite clean and ready to go.

0:21:220:21:23

So, that's 30 of your pounds. What did you spend overall?

0:21:230:21:27

-What's the total?

-£100.

0:21:270:21:28

-What, on the lot?

-Yes.

-Oh, no!

0:21:280:21:31

-£100 on the lot?

-Yes!

0:21:310:21:33

-Dear, oh, dear.

-Bargains.

0:21:330:21:35

Traditional Bargain Hunt bargains, I would say!

0:21:350:21:38

OK, fine. Well, this is exciting.

0:21:380:21:40

£200 of leftover lolly, please.

0:21:400:21:41

-Who's got that?

-Donna.

0:21:410:21:43

Nicely tucked away, darling. Thank you very much.

0:21:430:21:45

-There we are.

-'Ello, 'ello, 'ello! There we go.

-Lovely.

0:21:450:21:48

200, then, Jimmy. Happy about that?

0:21:480:21:50

-Yeah, very happy. Yes!

-Well, you ought to be.

0:21:500:21:53

Yeah, I think I can go and buy a Norfolk terrier.

0:21:530:21:56

You're going to be able to buy most of this fair!

0:21:560:21:58

Anyway, good luck with that. Good luck with that, girls.

0:21:580:22:01

-Thank you!

-We're going to shove off now to the gorgeous Melford Hall.

0:22:010:22:05

Ever heard of it? Well, you'll find out about it any minute now.

0:22:050:22:08

Melford Hall sits in the heart of Suffolk and is the ancestral home of the Hyde-Parker family.

0:22:110:22:18

Not very many houses these days have a visitors' book, but this place sure does.

0:22:180:22:25

And I have to tell you, it's rather special.

0:22:250:22:28

On the face of it, the visitors' book doesn't look all that special, does it?

0:22:350:22:39

OK, fine, it's leather and it's been embossed or raised with the family's coat of arms.

0:22:390:22:46

Open it up and it starts with the title of the house, Melford Hall, and the date, October 1912.

0:22:460:22:53

List of visitors. Nothing very special, until you get to page two, and who do we find?

0:22:530:23:00

Beatrix Potter, with Mr Todd and Jemima Puddleduck.

0:23:000:23:06

Beatrix Potter was a cousin of Ethel Leach,

0:23:080:23:11

wife of Sir William Hyde-Parker.

0:23:110:23:13

Cousin Beattie became a regular visitor and would often sketch

0:23:130:23:18

the house and its grounds.

0:23:180:23:21

And to entertain the children at mealtimes, Beatrix Potter devised

0:23:210:23:27

what I guess must be a pretty novel, if not unique, form of place card.

0:23:270:23:33

Here she's taken a simple rectangle of paper,

0:23:330:23:37

she's cut it with those slits there, so that an additional

0:23:370:23:41

slip of paper with the child's name could be inserted there.

0:23:410:23:46

And then in pen and ink and watercolour,

0:23:460:23:49

she does Jemima Puddleduck with the question,

0:23:490:23:53

"Who sits here?"

0:23:530:23:56

How charming's that?

0:23:560:23:57

Can you believe this?

0:24:060:24:08

Auntie Beattie, which is how Beatrix Potter was referred to

0:24:080:24:13

by her young cousins, used to sleep in this bed

0:24:130:24:17

when she came to Melford.

0:24:170:24:19

When she's lying in that bed,

0:24:190:24:21

she's thinking about her stories, and she painted this little picture,

0:24:210:24:26

guess what, in this bed,

0:24:260:24:28

except instead of her lying in the bed, it's her old friend, Ratty.

0:24:280:24:34

There he is, look, underneath his duvet

0:24:340:24:37

with his great long tail sticking out underneath.

0:24:370:24:40

I mean, this is a facsimile of the original, but how lovely is that?

0:24:400:24:46

This thing, however, is no facsimile.

0:24:460:24:50

This would have been originally made probably in Germany or France.

0:24:500:24:54

It's a blond mohair duck, except that Beatrix Potter, when visiting,

0:24:540:25:00

made up this costume and transformed the toy duck into Jemima Puddleduck.

0:25:000:25:07

How charming is that?

0:25:070:25:10

Well, almost as charming as dedicating your books

0:25:100:25:15

to the cousins, because here are the three Hyde-Parker children,

0:25:150:25:18

in particular the gorgeous little girl in the middle

0:25:180:25:22

with her long tresses, who's Stephanie.

0:25:220:25:25

And when it came to dedicating the title page for her book

0:25:250:25:30

Mr Jeremy Fisher, who does she do it but "For Stephanie, from Cousin B"?

0:25:300:25:37

Charming, isn't it?

0:25:370:25:39

The big question is today, of course, is it going to be

0:25:390:25:42

child's play for our teams over at the auction?

0:25:420:25:45

See ya!

0:25:450:25:47

Well, it's a treat to have trotted into Norfolk

0:26:010:26:04

to TW Gaze auction room in Diss to be with Elizabeth Talbot. Elizabeth!

0:26:040:26:09

-Hello. Nice to see you again.

-Very nice to see you, too.

-Thank you.

0:26:090:26:13

First up, then, Terry and Olly, our firemen, not surprisingly,

0:26:130:26:16

-went first off with a bucket.

-A bucket. But when that bucket's

-got a hole in it...

-Well, yes.

0:26:160:26:22

It was once a grand piece, wasn't it?

0:26:220:26:24

I mean, it's very much from the Arts and Crafts period, almost.

0:26:240:26:27

I can see it having had something about it.

0:26:270:26:30

What makes me smile is somebody's had an attempt to polish, just to see what was under all the surface.

0:26:300:26:35

They're given it the wire wool.

0:26:350:26:37

But I think it needs a little more TLC to bring it back to its full potential.

0:26:370:26:43

It's got something about it, you're quite right.

0:26:430:26:46

-So, how much, do you think?

-£40 to £60.

0:26:460:26:49

-Well, they'll be delighted. They only paid £38.

-That seems very fair.

0:26:490:26:52

For a fireman! Good.

0:26:520:26:55

Next is the Murano so-called blue trumpet-type vase.

0:26:550:26:59

Mm, yes. I have doubts about the attribution to Murano being specific.

0:26:590:27:04

It's not a wizard, to me. It's just blue glass, isn't it?

0:27:040:27:07

It's large enough to be of a decorative nature that will strike a pose in a nice interior.

0:27:070:27:12

Having said that, we do quite like it, and we have got a good market

0:27:120:27:16

for modern glass, so we have rated it reasonably highly. About £60 to £80?

0:27:160:27:22

-No?!

-Yeah.

0:27:220:27:24

-Really?

-Yeah.

0:27:240:27:25

You're hinting that I might live to regret that one.

0:27:270:27:30

It's just they paid £35.

0:27:300:27:32

-Their last item I think has got a bit of potential, which is this little stopper.

-Yes.

0:27:320:27:36

It's quite an amusing little object.

0:27:360:27:39

Well, it's both practical and amusing, and I think it's the sort of thing which

0:27:390:27:43

country folk might buy as a stocking filler for someone, even if they didn't use it,

0:27:430:27:47

because the subject, whether it's a dog or a fox, is a good,

0:27:470:27:51

aesthetic sort of image, and they like those sort of things round here.

0:27:510:27:55

-Yes. So, what's your estimate?

-We think £30 to £40.

0:27:550:27:57

-Great. £32 paid.

-Right.

-So, all round,

0:27:570:28:00

I think our firemen have managed to spend £105 quite wisely.

0:28:000:28:05

Well, we hope so, yes, absolutely. A good cross section, yes.

0:28:050:28:08

So, for a change, they probably won't need their bonus buy,

0:28:080:28:12

but let's go and have a look at it anyway.

0:28:120:28:14

OK, Tel, OK, Ol, this is out moment for Bonus Buy Land, all right?

0:28:140:28:18

You gave Catherine Southon £195 of leftover lolly,

0:28:180:28:22

an enormous amount of money.

0:28:220:28:24

Did she spend the lot? Catherine?

0:28:240:28:26

This is what I bought. Are you ready?

0:28:260:28:28

Excited, yeah.

0:28:280:28:30

It might not look much like this, but open it up, and look at that.

0:28:300:28:34

It is a beautiful set of perfume bottles, a gentleman's set.

0:28:340:28:40

Isn't that lovely? Look at all the different colours.

0:28:400:28:43

I think they're absolutely beautiful.

0:28:430:28:46

I've seen that colour blue somewhere else on our buys.

0:28:460:28:49

1930s Art Deco, and I paid £70 for it.

0:28:490:28:56

-£70?

-Yeah.

-Is there substantial profit there?

0:28:560:28:59

-I think you're going to make a profit on that, cos it's a very smart piece.

-Food for thought.

0:28:590:29:03

-Food for thought, yeah.

-Mm!

-Well done, chaps.

0:29:030:29:07

But for the viewers at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Catherine's little set.

0:29:070:29:12

Now, there, Elizabeth.

0:29:120:29:14

-Oh!

-A little something to tickle you.

0:29:140:29:16

That is lovely. And they're all different colours.

0:29:160:29:19

-Look at that!

-Now, I like that. I think that's very, very nice.

0:29:190:29:24

When's the last time you saw one with different-colour bottles in?

0:29:240:29:27

When's the last time you saw one with four bottles and in such good condition of any colour?

0:29:270:29:31

-Quite extraordinary, really.

-Yeah.

-It's lovely.

0:29:310:29:34

-And in its day, to have a bit of tanned red leather inside...

-Mm!

0:29:340:29:40

Chic as chic could be, but within a brown leather outer that's, as you say, in pretty good nick...

0:29:400:29:47

Ooh, good, well. Well done, Catherine Southon, I say.

0:29:470:29:50

This is a bit of a bonus buy with potential, perhaps.

0:29:500:29:53

How much do you think it might bring?

0:29:530:29:55

We're hoping for between 100 and £150 because

0:29:550:29:57

that's quite a rare opportunity for people.

0:29:570:30:00

I think you're absolutely spot-on.

0:30:000:30:03

-She paid £70 so it's a bonus buy with legs.

-Yes.

0:30:030:30:06

If the team decide to go with it.

0:30:060:30:09

Now, that's it for the Reds.

0:30:090:30:11

Now for the Blues. Donna and Kebab, I mean Donna and Rachel!

0:30:110:30:15

And first up for them is the meat dish.

0:30:150:30:18

Yes. I like this.

0:30:180:30:20

Which is chunky, isn't it?

0:30:200:30:22

I like the fact it's got the double wells in it.

0:30:220:30:25

-Often everything gravitates to one end.

-Yes.

0:30:250:30:28

You can have oil down one end and blood down the other.

0:30:280:30:32

Oh, Tim! But, no, again, a good make, a good period.

0:30:320:30:38

It's not a rare, rare pattern but it's not the most obvious.

0:30:380:30:41

It's not just a normal willow pattern.

0:30:410:30:43

It's a little bit fuzzy if you're going to be critical

0:30:430:30:46

about the transfer, but as a piece it's in good condition.

0:30:460:30:49

-I mean, it's a belter for the turkey.

-Yes, it is.

0:30:490:30:52

I think that's very nice. Yes, I do.

0:30:520:30:54

Perfect. How much in the old money department?

0:30:540:30:57

Well, about 50 to £70.

0:30:570:30:58

-£40 paid.

-Well, I think they should do that fine.

0:30:580:31:01

-Next up is the invalid's chair.

-Yes.

0:31:010:31:03

As a bit of social history, I would imagine

0:31:030:31:07

it's kind of post-First World War, when there are literally millions of servicemen returning disabled.

0:31:070:31:14

There's something emotive about this.

0:31:140:31:16

Yes. We do see quite a few chairs of various designs and ages.

0:31:160:31:22

It's a tricky market at the moment.

0:31:220:31:24

We're finding them difficult to place

0:31:240:31:27

and I think it's because that's quite a big chair to take up room.

0:31:270:31:31

-It's a chunky thing.

-Yeah, it is. Museums are often interested.

0:31:310:31:35

So it isn't terribly commercial although it might pull the heartstrings a bit.

0:31:350:31:39

-I rather agree with you. So, how much then?

-We think about 40 to £50 on that.

0:31:390:31:43

Yeah, it's difficult, isn't it? £30, they paid. I mean, only £30.

0:31:430:31:47

Well, in the interests of the game they probably will be all right

0:31:470:31:50

but not a tearaway success.

0:31:500:31:52

-It's not going to run away.

-Well, we hope not anyway!

0:31:520:31:56

It's braked! Lastly is the octagonal hardwood table.

0:31:560:32:00

-Fairly standard piece, aren't they?

-They are standard.

0:32:000:32:03

Good use of carving over the whole surface so it's a little more ornate than some examples.

0:32:030:32:08

People do like them, I think, because they're quite versatile.

0:32:080:32:11

So although they're not a rarity, there seems to be a sort of steady demand for them.

0:32:110:32:16

-Again, nothing too extraordinary.

-Yes. So don't get carried away?

-No.

0:32:160:32:19

Would you be able to improve on £30, do you think?

0:32:190:32:22

Marginally. If we sort of put 40 to 60 as a sort of guide on that one.

0:32:220:32:26

Good. Well, there seem to be one or two holes in this team's opportunity

0:32:260:32:31

so they may need their bonus buy, so let's go and have a look at it.

0:32:310:32:35

So, Donna and Rachel, you spent a miserable £100.

0:32:350:32:38

-You gave him the 200 notes. Did he spend all the 200, James?

-Of course not.

0:32:380:32:42

-Here we are.

-Ah.

-It's a rather nice ceiling light.

0:32:420:32:48

There we are. A sort of 1920s, 1930s, possibly more to the '30s.

0:32:480:32:53

Very fashionable.

0:32:530:32:55

Lots of '30s houses around, lots of people wanting to do them up in a similar manner.

0:32:550:33:00

And £35.

0:33:000:33:02

Ooh, happy days, bargain!

0:33:020:33:04

I think they're overwrought with enthusiasm, aren't they?

0:33:040:33:08

Do you want to handle the goods or not?

0:33:080:33:10

-Yeah, come on, take it.

-Why not.

-All right?

0:33:100:33:12

Do like it, Rachel?

0:33:120:33:14

-Yes.

-Sort of.

-Yeah, sort of.

-What about you, Don?

0:33:140:33:17

It's not to my taste. But I could see it in an older house.

0:33:170:33:21

-Yes.

-Yeah.

0:33:210:33:23

Good. Quite frankly, girls, you don't have to like it.

0:33:230:33:26

But you might be in such a desperate position that you have to have it a bit later on.

0:33:260:33:34

But for the viewers at home,

0:33:340:33:35

let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about James' light fitting.

0:33:350:33:39

-So, Elizabeth?

-Yes.

-That's a pretty standard item, isn't it, actually?

-I quite like it.

0:33:410:33:46

Again, as they go, a lot of good, decorative usage, and it's nice when you hold it up.

0:33:460:33:51

You see the benefit of the light coming through and you can see the decoration from underneath.

0:33:510:33:56

I think that's not too bad. It's quite pleasing.

0:33:560:33:59

-Yes. You're quite right, it's a horse chestnut, isn't it?

-Mmm.

-With its spiky conker.

0:33:590:34:04

So, it's not Lalique but it could be Sabino or one of those other minor jobbies, couldn't it?

0:34:040:34:10

Yes. It's of its type, it's reasonable quality.

0:34:100:34:12

I have seen much worse lampshades and light shades that

0:34:120:34:17

purport to be something exciting and they're not.

0:34:170:34:20

-Got some potential?

-I'd like to think so, yes, indeed.

0:34:200:34:23

-What sort of money do you think?

-50 to £70 on that one.

0:34:230:34:26

OK, £35, James Braxton paid. So that was the right price.

0:34:260:34:30

-Yes, indeed. Yeah, that's fine.

-And if you got fed up with it

0:34:300:34:33

-on the ceiling, you could use it for a fruit bowl.

-You could indeed!

0:34:330:34:37

£55 only. Any advance?

0:34:380:34:43

Here we go, then. And here comes your meat dish, love.

0:34:450:34:47

-Meat dish. Come on, Spode.

-It's not Meatloaf, it's meat dish.

0:34:470:34:51

Mid-nineteenth century, lovely plate, this one. Start me at 50.

0:34:510:34:55

If that doesn't make £100, it's a bad job.

0:34:550:34:58

30, I'll take to start. 30 bid, thank you. 30, I have only.

0:34:580:35:01

It's for nothing. 35, 40, 5, 50, 5, 60, 5, 70.

0:35:010:35:08

70's on my right, at 70.

0:35:080:35:10

75, new bidder.

0:35:100:35:13

See, you're smiling now.>

0:35:130:35:15

75. Any advance on the 75? 80.

0:35:150:35:18

Yes!

0:35:180:35:20

They bought my bowl.

0:35:200:35:22

That is plus 40.

0:35:220:35:23

Yeah? Plus... Ooh!

0:35:230:35:26

Ah! Hot flush!

0:35:260:35:27

Have a quick fan down. Shh, shh, shh, shh.

0:35:270:35:32

The beech and cane Carstairs invalid's chair and wheels there.

0:35:320:35:36

There really is no excuse for this item, is there?

0:35:360:35:39

Start me at £50.

0:35:390:35:41

£50, surely? 30, I'll take.

0:35:410:35:45

-We'll take ten!

-Come on.

0:35:450:35:48

20, I'll take to start.

0:35:480:35:52

Come on, we'll volunteer to push you out if you need to. Come on!

0:35:520:35:55

Ten bid, sir.

0:35:550:35:57

Thank you. A low start at ten.

0:35:570:35:58

Ten only, where's 12? At £10 only.

0:35:580:36:01

Surely worth more, come on.

0:36:010:36:02

Are you all done? All done.

0:36:020:36:06

Gutted.

0:36:060:36:07

-£10.

-It was pretty inevitable, I think.

-£10 from minus...

0:36:070:36:11

You're minus 20 on that, which means you're still plus 20.

0:36:110:36:14

Don't give up. Keep at it.

0:36:140:36:16

The Indian octagonal carved, hardwood table on folding stand.

0:36:160:36:19

Always useful, these ones. Start me at 30.

0:36:190:36:23

£30. 20, I'll take.

0:36:230:36:26

With its folding stand there, 20, surely, anybody? Ten, I've got.

0:36:260:36:30

Ten, I have. Where's 12?

0:36:300:36:31

I don't like the look of this.

0:36:310:36:33

Where's 15? Are you wanting this one as well, sir?

0:36:330:36:35

Oh, you've not spent very much today yet. £12, the gallery. Where's 15?

0:36:350:36:39

15 downstairs.

0:36:390:36:42

18. 20, two. At 22, gallery's bid, and 22, it sells.

0:36:420:36:50

£22 is minus eight, which means you are plus 12.

0:36:500:36:54

-Are we plus 12?

-You are plus 12.

0:36:540:36:57

So that's good, isn't it?

0:36:570:36:59

-Can we go now?

-No, you can't!

0:36:590:37:01

You've got to decide... You've got to decide....

0:37:010:37:04

Do you want to preserve...?

0:37:040:37:05

His ceiling light.

0:37:050:37:08

-Ceiling light. At - how much was it?

-£35. What are you going to do?

0:37:080:37:12

Stick, I think. Stick.

0:37:120:37:14

-Why do you want to stick? You shouldn't be risk-averse.

-Oh, go on then.

0:37:140:37:18

The 1930s-style glass ceiling light there.

0:37:180:37:22

Good detail to this one, start me at £50.

0:37:220:37:26

30 I'll take. Come on, this is pretty.

0:37:260:37:31

-20 bid.

-Rash words!

0:37:310:37:32

£20 only. I'll take two.

0:37:320:37:34

Not sure this is the best advice here, James.

0:37:340:37:38

At £20. Are you all done?

0:37:380:37:40

-What?

-What?!

0:37:400:37:41

I don't believe it. I'm going to kill him!

0:37:440:37:48

I'm going to kill you!

0:37:480:37:49

You are minus £15.

0:37:490:37:52

Minus £15?

0:37:520:37:54

You had 12 before, but that means you're just the minus three.

0:37:540:37:59

Just minus three. That's all. Don't say a word to those beastly boys.

0:37:590:38:04

Those fireman are out of this.

0:38:040:38:06

This £28 little runner at 28.

0:38:090:38:11

Now Terry and Noel, how you feeling?

0:38:180:38:20

A little bit nervous now we're getting near the end.

0:38:200:38:23

Yes, because you've been pretty cocky.

0:38:230:38:25

We've been giving the girls a lot of stick.

0:38:250:38:27

You've been giving everybody a lot of stick!

0:38:270:38:29

You're not big brave firemen for nothing.

0:38:290:38:31

Anyway, first lot up is your coal bucket, and here it comes.

0:38:310:38:35

The copper and white metal bucket in the Art Nouveau style there.

0:38:350:38:38

Start here at £10.

0:38:380:38:40

Oh. Not that much interest.

0:38:400:38:42

I'll take 12. 12. 15. 18. 20.

0:38:420:38:45

-22. 25. £25.

-I don't like this.

0:38:450:38:51

Hole in our bucket!

0:38:510:38:53

£25. That's leaky. Minus 13.

0:38:530:38:56

Oh, Tim.

0:38:560:38:59

We have the 1950s Murano-style vase there.

0:38:590:39:02

Lovely shade of blue this one.

0:39:020:39:04

Start me at 30. Come on. £30 sir.

0:39:040:39:08

Thank you. Straight in at 30.

0:39:080:39:09

I'll take two. At 30 only. Where are you?

0:39:090:39:12

At 32, gallery.

0:39:120:39:14

-Come on.

-35. 38.

0:39:140:39:18

40. 2.

0:39:190:39:21

45.

0:39:210:39:24

45 is downstairs, at 45 the front, at 45 now, may I say eight?

0:39:240:39:27

At £45 now on the vase, a lovely vase at 45 all done?

0:39:270:39:32

Well done, Terry. That's very sound.

0:39:320:39:36

That is plus 10.

0:39:360:39:37

That is plus ten, which means overall you're minus £3, that's all.

0:39:370:39:41

We've got to scrape this back.

0:39:410:39:44

The 1920s WMF German bottle stopper.

0:39:440:39:46

A lovely item, this one here, starting at £22. £22 bid.

0:39:460:39:51

-We need a bit more.

-28. 30. 2.

0:39:510:39:53

35. 38. 40. 2. 45. 48.

0:39:530:39:56

With me at 48. Now 50 may I say?

0:39:560:40:00

It's £48 here, looking for 50. Lovely item at £48.

0:40:000:40:03

Come on a bit more. Oh, well.

0:40:030:40:07

We got a little bit of profit.

0:40:070:40:09

£48 is plus 16.

0:40:090:40:12

Plus 16 minus three is plus 13.

0:40:120:40:15

You have £13 in the bank. That is remarkable, isn't it.

0:40:150:40:19

What are you going to do about the scent bottles?

0:40:190:40:21

Are you going to back Catherine and go with these fellas or not?

0:40:210:40:25

-I trust Catherine.

-We trust Catherine.

0:40:250:40:27

-You're going to do it?

-Yeah.

-You're going to go with the bonus buy.

0:40:270:40:30

Gentleman's leather case with perfume bottles.

0:40:300:40:33

-Art Deco in style.

-Very rare.

0:40:330:40:36

This one here starts at £50. £50 on the set there, at 50.

0:40:360:40:40

I'll take 5.

0:40:400:40:41

On the set of bottles 5 and 60, 5 and 70, 5 and 80.

0:40:410:40:46

80, with me at 80. A good quality item, at £80 surely worth more.

0:40:460:40:51

At 85. 90. 5. 100. 110.

0:40:510:40:55

120. Where's 30?

0:40:550:40:57

At £120. Case and bottles at 120.

0:40:570:41:03

-Yes!

-£120.

0:41:030:41:07

That is brilliant, isn't it. That's plus 50.

0:41:070:41:09

That's plus 50 before you started, plus the 13 is plus 63.

0:41:090:41:13

-Great.

-Now I know this is going to be difficult for you to keep your mouth

0:41:130:41:17

shut, but don't tell the Blues a thing.

0:41:170:41:20

-So, teams, been chatting amongst yourselves?

-No.

-No.

0:41:300:41:32

-So the emergency services have not been colluding.

-No.

0:41:320:41:37

-No.

-Well, I'm delighted cos that's what we don't want you to do

0:41:370:41:40

just so that you've got the excitement of this

0:41:400:41:42

final moment of discovering who is ahead and who is slightly behind.

0:41:420:41:47

And the team that's slightly behind today, I am afraid are the police.

0:41:470:41:51

YAY!

0:41:510:41:54

Don't get too cocky about it because they've only lost by losing £3, which is not so much.

0:41:540:42:01

In fairness, they were well in profit before they

0:42:010:42:05

had their bonus buy debacle, which didn't help them on their way.

0:42:050:42:08

-Sorry, girls.

-Nevertheless girls, you have been great competitors, and have you enjoyed it?

0:42:080:42:14

-Yes, we've had a great time.

-Donna, you've had a good time?

0:42:140:42:17

-Yes, loved it.

-It's been good fun, hasn't it.

-Yes.

0:42:170:42:19

But the victors today, thank you very much, behave boys!

0:42:190:42:25

By taking home £63 I have to say, there we go.

0:42:250:42:30

There's your 63.

0:42:300:42:33

It was entirely down to your very good buying skills, Catherine.

0:42:330:42:36

Thank you, Tim.

0:42:360:42:38

If I ever have a fire I do hope you come round.

0:42:380:42:41

We've had great fun. Join us soon for more bargain hunting, yes?

0:42:430:42:48

ALL: Yes!

0:42:460:42:48

Subtitles by Red Bee Media

0:42:530:42:56

E-mail subtitling@bbc.co.uk

0:42:560:42:59

The fire service takes on the police in another edition of the antiques challenge. Catherine Southon's firemen give her a lift, while policewomen keep James Braxton in check. Tim Wonnacott, meanwhile, is chasing the tales of Beatrix Potter.