Kedleston 3 Bargain Hunt


Kedleston 3

Antiques challenge. A mother-and-son team take on a mother-and-daughter in Kedleston. On a visit to Cambridge's Fitzwilliam Museum, Tim uncovers a Dutch masterpiece.


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Transcript


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Pre-title tease, take one.

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This is what we call a pre-title tease.

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Do you feel suitably titled and teased?

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If so, let's go bargain hunting.

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Let me introduce you to some yummy mummies and their kids -

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Carol with her boy, Andrew, and Sandy with her daughter, Melody.

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But where are we?

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We're at the Jaguar Antiques Fair at Kedleston Hall.

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Our teams have been fed and watered

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and are ready for the off.

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'Ah. Sandy and Melody are dawdling. What's going on, Jonathan?'

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It's my fault, actually, that we're running late.

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Right, blinkers on now. Thank you. We may well come back.

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We haven't bought a single thing yet.

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'Carol and Andrew bring a smile to Mark Stacey's face.'

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We're ahead of schedule. Normally, we're frantic.

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I think we're on a winning streak.

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'It sounds as if he's got the appetite for a win - or cake.'

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-We'll get the fondant fancies later.

-That'll be good.

-Shall we go here?

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'Anyway, it's time to meet those teams.'

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-Hi, everybody. Lovely to see you.

-EVERYONE: Hello.

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-Carol, you've got some interesting artefacts.

-Yes.

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Some odd things have been passed down the family. I accept them.

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Everybody else says, "No thank you." We have a desk.

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The two front legs are emu legs.

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-Really?

-Which was put together by a Great Uncle Duncan from the Scottish line.

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What did he do? Kill an emu and rip its legs off?

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-And stick it on a desk?

-We hope not. It's not terribly PC nowadays.

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People either love it or hate it.

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It's a weird thing. I've never heard of that. When do you think it was put together?

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In the 19th century. We had relatives in the Antipodes.

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We have an idea that they sent them back

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-and thought, "What shall I do with a pair of emu legs?"

-I'll make a desk!

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-Brilliant. Andrew, your career has taken an interesting path.

-Yeah. I originally studied languages.

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But I've been moving towards Chinese medicine,

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so I practise acupuncture and massage now.

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Professionally? You're at it?

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-Yeah.

-I saw something on Bargain Hunt the other day.

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A massive Chinese figure covered in hundreds of little numbered squares,

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which was an old - I think 18th century -

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acupuncturist's dummy, I suppose.

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-Have you ever seen one?

-Oh, yeah. We use them when we're training.

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You can buy a large ear with all the points marked on, hands and feet.

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-Do you feel squeamish, sticking these needles in your customers?

-You get used to it.

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It's quite good fun, actually, after a while. Yes.

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I think you'll be well qualified to do well on Bargain Hunt.

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-I bet the blues are quaking in their boots.

-Yes!

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-Melody, what do you do, darling?

-I'm a police officer.

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-'Ello, 'ello. Are you really?

-Yes.

-Gosh!

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Are you on the beat?

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-What policing do you do?

-At the moment, I'm office bound.

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I'm normally a response officer. You ring 999.

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-We're the guys that turn up.

-You've got other ambitions, yes?

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My ultimate ambition is to be a Mountie, a Canadian Mountie!

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-I think the hat and the jacket would suit me.

-Yeah. Very good.

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Would you seriously emigrate to Canada to get on a horse and be a policewoman?

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-Yes. Tomorrow, if I could.

-Well, there we are. Ha-ha.

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Sandy, you're attached, also, to animals, but not particularly the four-legged type.

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-No. I had a bird, a parrot called Beep...

-Called what?

-Beep.

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-What happens when you have Beep in the house?

-He has a shower with me every morning.

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-Does he?

-He has to have the same bubbles.

-He showers with you?

-Yes.

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-How does THAT work?

-He sits on my head

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-and I rub bubbles on him!

-This is seriously strange, you know.

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-What happened to Beep, then?

-When I moved into a flat,

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he had to go to an aviary, a bird sanctuary.

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-No good having a parrot in a flat?

-No. It's too restricted.

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-Yes...

-BIRDS SQUAWKING

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Talking about birds, we seem to have a bit of an Alfred Hitchcock moment.

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Do you think they're related to Beep?

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There's something strange happening, but that's rather lovely.

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How are you two going to get on today?

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All right, as long as we don't have an argument!

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-What are you going for?

-I'm going to look for the unusual.

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-Something different.

-Something wacky?

-Yes. Hopefully.

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-Is that going to go with your personality or what?

-Yes. I hope.

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I think this is going to be an interesting show.

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Here we go. £300 apiece.

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Your experts await. You know the rules so off you go.

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And very, very, very good luck.

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You know the expression "away with the fairies".

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Now we're away with the birds.

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So, they have their money and one hour to find three items.

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What are they after?

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Ceramics.

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-I like glass.

-We like glass.

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-I like pictures and art.

-Silver.

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We'll try and see what we can find. There's plenty of choice.

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-We can let go of each other now.

-LAUGHTER

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'Maybe they don't want to, Jonathan, eh? Ha-ha.'

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-I quite like that.

-Which?

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-Oh, the cake stand.

-< For the camera, please.

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Oh, it folds up! That's good!

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It might be worth thinking about. We'll get the fondant fancies later.

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'You keep your fondant fancies to yourself, Stacey.

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'Right, pussycats, what have you found?

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'A lesser spotted snow leopard.'

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-How much?

-< 250.

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That'll wipe out all our money in one go!

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-Is this wood?

-Er...

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Can I have a look at your snuffbox?

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'Melody and Sandy could be here all day. What are Carol and Andrew up to?'

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Mdina glass, from the isle of Malta.

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-Very Mediterranean. How much is it?

-It hasn't got a price on.

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-Oh, it's free!

-£10.

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It's nice that it's got the label.

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It looks as if it's a '70s or '80s label. It's got a bit of age to it.

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-Do you think it would make a profit?

-Well, it's not very much.

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In a general sale, there's going to be a market for it.

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How about nine, cos...? < No way!

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Come on. Dig deep!

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-Shall we go for that?

-I think so.

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We're going to spend the first of our purchases with you, madam.

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-Did we say £9?

-< £10.

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-She is mean, isn't she?

-It's just not on, really!

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'Red buy number one, all done at £10.

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'The blues...

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'..still on the first stall.'

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-I like pretty things.

-I do.

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-I'm a complete magpie.

-Anything sparkly and pretty.

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It's very easy to lose time.

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It's my fault that we're running so late.

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Right. Blinkers on now.

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Thank you. We may well come back.

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-We haven't bought a single thing yet.

-I know.

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Let's get our shopping heads on.

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-This is quite pretty.

-What is that? Is that a lacquered box?

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There's a lot of work in that,

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if you look at the design of it.

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It's cloisonne. It's on a wooden base. This is brass, I'd imagine.

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-It's been filled, has it?

-Yes. It's been filled with wire work.

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The hinges are all quite nice. You've got to be aware of chips.

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It's quite an elegant little box. It's probably 20th century.

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-The design is rather appealing.

-I wonder how much it is.

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-I don't know. Should we...?

-Let's ask.

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How much is this?

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160. >

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-Oh, no. We may have to put that back.

-We'll have to put that back.

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'160 might be too much, eh? How about something cheaper?'

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That's rather grand. It's a plated set.

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It's nice quality, with all the beading and a nice handle,

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the reeded handle, which matches in with this.

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-It hasn't had anything put on the...

-The cartouches. No. Which is nice.

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We've got the milk jug, the two-handled sugar bowl.

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This is the teapot, again, with all the matching design.

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I like the details around here.

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The coffee pot I think is lovely as well.

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How old do you think it is?

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I would say, stylistically, it's probably around 1870, 1880.

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-How much is it?

-£150.

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If that was silver, we'd be adding noughts to that!

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It is nice. I'm quite impressed that it's in its original box.

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-Is that the best price?

-This is the lady it belongs to, so ask her.

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It's a family heirloom. It was Grandma's!

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-Look at the nose growing!

-120.

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< Perhaps if we could offer 100...

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-I'd take 100.

-I think that's not bad.

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-Would you be happy with 100?

-I like it a lot.

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I like the fact you've got the box.

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We've got a nice gilt handle on there, showing sign of wear.

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The box must be worth £20 or £30.

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At least.

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'That's buy number two for a ton. Mark must be happy.'

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I can't believe it. We're ahead of schedule. Normally, we're frantic.

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We've got over half an hour left, so it's time to be leisurely.

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We've still got the box in mind. I think we're on a winning streak.

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'And on a streak of nothing bought so far -

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'the blues.'

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-Will it need a lot of work on it?

-Not particularly.

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They're not designed for comfort. They're for the porter to sit on.

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You don't want him to sit on it for too long.

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I suppose it's fitting in the modern home now.

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People are mixing up styles and bringing wood back in.

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-I like that.

-This is probably later.

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-I can see that.

-I mean, this brass nail work.

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-So it's not...

-The chair would be nice without the bit in the middle.

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It's very typically Victorian from about 18..70 - 1860, 1870.

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-More 1870, probably. They said they'd do 40 for us?

-Yes.

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-Do you like it?

-I like it. Don't you?

-Not really.

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-It's not my thing.

-Are you going to get it?

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I think £40 is a fair price for it. I like mahogany. I like wood.

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-I

-like wood.

-We should have more of it in the home now.

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-I'd be very happy for you guys to buy it.

-OK.

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-You're going to say, "£40, thank you very much"?

-Yes.

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Number one under the belt 35 minutes into the game.

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'At last! They finally got their feet wet with a buy.

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'I have just the thing to dry them off.'

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It's a lovely day today, but the weather isn't always quite so hot.

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One thing that I just cannot abide

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if I go out on a wet day, is having wet feet.

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If you don't like wet feet, you're going to like this gadget.

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In its original case, this is called the Ronning footwear dryer.

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What I think's amazing

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is that these footwear dryers are in their original wrapping

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and are as good as new.

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There you go, look. Isn't that super?

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Aluminium soles.

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Says "Made in London".

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This runs on an 8-watt principle.

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Stick them into your wet wellington boots,

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plug them in to a light fitting or a socket.

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In fact, bung a plug on the end, put them into your wet boots right now

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and, hey presto, you'd be as warm as toast.

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But just look at the condition.

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These have never been used.

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They're a little collectable

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from either just before or just after the Second World War.

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They could be 1938. More likely to be, perhaps, around 1950.

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So what are they worth? £50, I hear you say. No.

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£20? No.

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Actually, you could buy them off a stall up there today for £3.

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Now, THAT is toastingly good.

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'With only ten minutes of shopping time left, our teams had better pick up their heels.

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'Oi! Melody, Sandy, have you got the measure of this programme yet?'

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That's quite nice. Are they weights?

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They are, and the unusual thing is that they are all there. >

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Usually, the little foil ones, >

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first puff of breeze and they're gone.

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Those are all there and all genuine. >

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I quite like that.

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It's probably about 1880s.

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I'd date it turn of the century, by the box. >

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Well, I like it.

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So, for them to survive intact... >

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£40 is a generous offer. I think, let's...

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-Have a cruise around, come back and see the lady.

-I'm sure we will.

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Thank you.

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'Both teams are boxing clever. Can they get that knock-down price?'

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-We need a decision.

-Let's check the price of the box with that lady.

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-And then...

-If she's not there, let's leg it into the tent.

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-We're back. Any joy?

-Yes.

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She said, for you, and while it's you, £100.

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Ooh.

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-Now, that's...

-I think a much nicer figure would be 80.

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-80?

-Cash?

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-£90.

-85?

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Would you take 85?

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Come on. 85.

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-Let's go with it. Shall we go with it, And?

-Yeah.

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-At 85?

-Yes.

-Thank you very much.

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'Reds, you are done.

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'Blues, I'll have two items in ten minutes, please.'

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We haven't got a lot of time.

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-I would probably go for it.

-I like that.

-Is that a brooch?

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-A brooch, yeah.

-It's £130.

-Can we have a look at that, please?

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-The shovel and the...?

-The miner's tools.

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Yeah. It's unusual.

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Why I always look at these things is because novelties sell.

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You get more money than gold value for a novelty.

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On the back of the shovel, you can see a fitting for a brooch.

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-So it's not in original condition.

-Will that devalue it?

-Yes. Course.

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Everything in original condition is what people want.

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It's interesting. What's the best price for that?

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-115. >

-115.

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-Would we make any anything?

-Profit?

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At 15-carat gold, the gold's worth £90.

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-It's a touch on top, so, yes, probably will.

-We haven't got long.

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-I hope my box hasn't gone.

-Do you want the box?

-Yeah.

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If you go and do that, get that sorted out,

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maybe we can have a look at a few more bits and pieces, come back.

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We do then need to make a decision on one more object. So off you go.

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-Thank you.

-Good luck.

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Right, I want that box.

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-I told you I'd have my way!

-I like a lady who knows her own mind.

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We will have the box at £40, please.

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'One deal done and is that another?'

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-£110?

-That's my very best.

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Thank you. We've got four minutes left.

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-And everything's nice and tickety-boo.

-Yay!

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-We'll have that one.

-We'll have it, please.

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Tickety-boo indeed, Jonathan.

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Now the shopping's over, how much leftover lolly will be given to the experts to find their Bonus Buy?

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First up, the reds.

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'Mother and son Carol and Andrew swooped on this Mdina vase.'

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-That's Mdina.

-I thought it was Mdina.

-From Malta.

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That's rather grand.

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'Mark spotted the silver-plated tea set.

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'And after a lot of dithering, they plumped for the Japanese box.'

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I'm very impressed. You got three very interesting things. Well done.

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Well done, indeed. Excuse me butting in.

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We're at the leftover lolly moment,

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where you're going to give me the money that you didn't spend.

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-You spent £195.

-Yeah.

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So I'd like £105 of leftover lolly. Andrew's got that. Perfect.

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Mark, this is your big moment. £105. You can seriously save their bacon.

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Or ruin the show, depending on how you get on.

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-It's a lot of money.

-I'll do my best. A big responsibility.

-It is.

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Very good luck. Why don't we check out what the blues bought, eh?

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'Mother and daughter Sandy and Melody bought their first item,

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'a Victorian hall chair.'

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Number one under the belt, 35 minutes into the game.

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'Melody went for the pharmaceutical weights.'

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I quite like that.

0:19:360:19:38

'Their final buy was the gold digger's shovel and pick brooch.'

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-Well, we got there.

-Yes.

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-Record time!

-What's this about record time? I love records.

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-Early?

-Actually, we finished quite late.

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Four minutes to go. We were still relaxed at the fourth minute.

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-Was it fun?

-It was brilliant fun.

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Your eye shadow is just the job for this weather!

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I bet you got some bargains. Just fluttered those.

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-Of course. I just smiled sweetly.

-That's the look!

0:20:140:20:18

How much did you spend overall, Ma?

0:20:180:20:22

About £190.

0:20:220:20:24

Who's got the £110 of leftover lolly, then?

0:20:240:20:27

You don't like this.

0:20:270:20:29

It's like taking blood from a stone, I tell you!

0:20:290:20:33

-There we go, Jonathan, £110. That's a lot of money.

-It's quite a lot.

0:20:330:20:38

-Are you going to be safe with it? Do you need a police escort?

-Yeah!

0:20:380:20:43

-One or two, I don't mind.

-You're always greedy, aren't you?

0:20:430:20:48

Have a great time.

0:20:480:20:50

'I'm sure he will, but so will I,

0:20:500:20:53

'at the Fitzwilliam museum in Cambridge.

0:20:530:20:57

'It's got everything from Egyptian artefacts, ancient armour,

0:20:570:21:04

'porcelain from around the world, to walls covered with masterpieces.'

0:21:040:21:09

The thing I like about museums

0:21:090:21:11

is the hidden treasures that are often sitting inside.

0:21:110:21:16

If you look at this cabinet, which dates from the 1640s

0:21:160:21:21

and was made in the Low Countries around Antwerp,

0:21:210:21:25

on the face of it, it looks incredibly dull.

0:21:250:21:28

Fine, it's a nice example of 17th-century cabinet work,

0:21:280:21:33

but there's nothing spectacular about it.

0:21:330:21:36

And what's it doing in this gallery full of old master paintings?

0:21:360:21:42

Well, surprise, surprise. The secret lies inside.

0:21:420:21:46

If I lift up the lid, you can see a long rectangular oil painting.

0:21:460:21:54

If I open the doors on either side,

0:21:540:21:57

lo and behold,

0:21:570:21:59

there is a spectacular array of art.

0:21:590:22:03

It's a rich person's box, made to contain precious items.

0:22:030:22:08

These paintings were painted at the time the cabinet was made

0:22:080:22:13

in Antwerp around 1640 or so.

0:22:130:22:18

They tell the parable of the prodigal son from the New Testament.

0:22:180:22:23

The large panel on this side shows the prodigal son

0:22:230:22:27

in all his 17th-century dandy clothing

0:22:270:22:31

saying goodbye to his father and mother.

0:22:310:22:35

This is not the gap year of the time.

0:22:350:22:39

This is the boy shoving off for ever with his share of the family cash.

0:22:390:22:45

The far panel on this side shows the boy

0:22:450:22:48

getting up to all sorts of nonsense.

0:22:480:22:51

He's at a table laden with food and drink.

0:22:510:22:55

He's got not one, but two birds.

0:22:550:22:59

There's a naughty boy, a pickpocket, picking his pocket

0:22:590:23:04

while he's having a great time.

0:23:040:23:06

There's no fun to be had without music

0:23:060:23:09

and there are two musicians in the background.

0:23:090:23:13

All of this costs money and, of course,

0:23:130:23:16

the prodigal son runs out of cash and goes through some hard times.

0:23:160:23:21

Here we've got the boy being driven out of a pub

0:23:210:23:25

cos he can't pay his debts.

0:23:250:23:27

He has to earn some money.

0:23:270:23:29

You see him here as a swineherd, droving pigs up the road.

0:23:290:23:36

In the end, he realises the error of his ways.

0:23:360:23:40

He returns home and his father,

0:23:400:23:43

with great generosity, embraces him and welcomes home the prodigal son.

0:23:430:23:49

The elder son, who stayed behind doing the work is not too pleased,

0:23:510:23:55

but his father says to him, "You have me all the time.

0:23:550:24:00

"And everything that I have is yours."

0:24:000:24:04

The central panel shows the old couple, the father and mother,

0:24:040:24:09

at the end of an avenue of trees.

0:24:090:24:12

The figure in the distance is the prodigal son returning.

0:24:120:24:16

Even this panel contains a secret.

0:24:160:24:19

If I pull on the key, this architectural section opens up,

0:24:190:24:25

and we've got yet another delight.

0:24:250:24:28

A little trompe l'oeil, a trick of the eye, and if you look inside,

0:24:280:24:32

you see it's lined with mirrors and ivory columns.

0:24:320:24:37

At the far end, there's a vertical wall pointing towards us.

0:24:370:24:41

If you align your face appropriately on one side or the other,

0:24:410:24:46

you can see two pictures of a lady and gentleman

0:24:460:24:51

on that vertical wall.

0:24:510:24:53

The reflection of those pictures is shown in the mirror

0:24:530:24:57

to give you yet another form of entertainment.

0:24:570:25:01

In short, this Antwerp cabinet is an absolute peach.

0:25:010:25:05

The big question today is, over at the auction

0:25:050:25:09

with our parents and children, are any of the children going to be provident or prodigal or both?

0:25:090:25:17

'While I was at Cambridge,

0:25:170:25:19

'our experts have been hunting for their Bonus Buys.

0:25:190:25:23

'Mark is particularly excited about his.

0:25:230:25:26

'Whatever can it be?'

0:25:260:25:28

Andrew and Carol, you rather brilliantly spent £195.

0:25:350:25:38

You gave £105 to Mark Stacey to go and invest on your behalf.

0:25:380:25:44

What did you come up with?

0:25:440:25:46

A small glass plate.

0:25:460:25:48

-Hm.

-Ah.

0:25:480:25:50

I found it really tricky. I wanted to buy something of nice quality.

0:25:500:25:55

It's one of my favourite glass designers, Rene Lalique. Made about 1925, a fairly ordinary pattern.

0:25:550:26:01

-It's dandelion leaves.

-Yes.

-In frosted glass. I think it's lovely.

0:26:010:26:06

It's signed, in perfect condition and I paid a lot of money for it.

0:26:060:26:11

-Oh!

-£75.

-Oh, well...

-Which is quite a lot.

0:26:110:26:15

What do you think it might make?

0:26:150:26:18

On a good day, we might make a fiver or tenner on it.

0:26:180:26:22

But Lalique is a name and sometimes people get carried away. It's often one of the nicer pieces in the sale.

0:26:220:26:29

I think you've got a hit here, Mark. I think you've got a couple,

0:26:290:26:34

mother and son, who think this is good.

0:26:340:26:37

Nice to span the generations like this. It's what Lalique does.

0:26:370:26:42

Don't decide now. You decide after the sale of your first three items.

0:26:420:26:47

For the viewers at home, let's see what the auctioneeress thinks about Mark's little plate.

0:26:470:26:53

How nice is this, to be at Bamfords auction house

0:26:530:26:58

-with Annabel Lewis.

-Hello.

-Lovely to see you.

-Thank you.

0:26:580:27:02

-That's nice, isn't it?

-Yes. Nice bit of Lalique.

0:27:020:27:05

Common pattern. Always sells well in the auction.

0:27:050:27:09

Fairly standardised prices, though, for this type of thing.

0:27:090:27:13

That's the raised R Lalique mark, which is a later mark.

0:27:130:27:18

-It is.

-Is that '30s?

-Probably 1930s. 25, 30.

0:27:180:27:22

Mark paid £75 for that. Do you think he'll get his money back?

0:27:220:27:27

Our estimate was 50 to 70. Hopefully, it will make the top end.

0:27:270:27:32

Well, let's be positive.

0:27:320:27:35

The next item is this Mdina glass.

0:27:350:27:39

-It's not a paperweight. It's a vase.

-Just a little tourist vase, I think.

0:27:390:27:45

-Go to Malta, buy one of these. Difficult to sell?

-Very difficult.

0:27:450:27:50

We wouldn't normally have that as a single lot.

0:27:500:27:55

Minimum bid, it's not worthy of putting in.

0:27:550:27:58

What's it worth, then? £5 or £10?

0:27:580:28:01

-£10 on a good day.

-Well, they paid £10.

-So...

0:28:010:28:04

You might struggle with that. The next item is visually exciting.

0:28:040:28:09

-Mm.

-The plated tea set. Unfortunately, incomplete.

0:28:090:28:14

With the box, you think it's going to be better than what it is.

0:28:140:28:18

It's a very good quality plated one but missing a piece,

0:28:180:28:22

so who's going to want three pieces without the fourth?

0:28:220:28:26

-Who's going to want a plated tea set?

-Yes.

-If it's silver, it's another matter, isn't it?

0:28:260:28:33

I think that's going to be awkward. What estimate have you put on it?

0:28:330:28:37

-£60 to £100.

-£100 paid so they're not so far off.

0:28:370:28:40

-You might be able to tempt somebody.

-Yes. Hopefully.

-Ha-ha.

0:28:400:28:45

This little shocker intrigues me.

0:28:450:28:48

Cos it's just a straightforward late piece of cloisonne.

0:28:480:28:52

It is. Probably a cigarette box or table box.

0:28:520:28:56

Again, tourist quality, I think, so worth VERY little.

0:28:560:29:00

-£30 to £50 or something.

-On a good day?

0:29:000:29:04

-On a good day. Yes.

-£85 they paid.

-Far too much!

0:29:040:29:08

I'd have thought you'd be lucky to get £20 for it.

0:29:080:29:12

I don't think it'll get anywhere near £85.

0:29:120:29:15

Now, that's it for the reds. Next, the blues, Melody and Sandy.

0:29:150:29:21

-They bought the hall chair.

-Not a bad example.

0:29:210:29:25

-It has got that extra studding and decoration.

-Yes.

0:29:250:29:29

It's never my favourite type of piece of furniture.

0:29:290:29:33

Not the late ones, anyway. 18th-century hall chairs are great.

0:29:330:29:38

Those Victorian fellows... Still, they only paid 40.

0:29:380:29:41

-£30 to £50, our estimate.

-So they're right in the middle. That's OK.

0:29:410:29:46

Next is the pharmaceutical weights, which seem to be complete.

0:29:460:29:51

-Yes, but fairly...boring, really. What do you do with it? Who wants it?

-I don't know.

0:29:510:29:58

-It's those scientific instrument collectors...

-Yes.

0:29:580:30:02

..who've got the beam balance and they want weights to go with it.

0:30:020:30:07

-How much?

-20 to 30.

-Oh, dear.

0:30:070:30:09

£40. Moving on very swiftly

0:30:090:30:12

to the last item, which I think is charming. Do you like that?

0:30:120:30:16

I can see its positives but, personally, I would never wear it. It's not my sort of jewellery.

0:30:160:30:22

-Not unless you were married to a miner.

-No!

0:30:220:30:26

-But it has got that prospector's gold type feel to it.

-It has.

0:30:260:30:32

You've got a nugget. You've got other bits of nugget on the shovel.

0:30:320:30:40

The pick itself has a bit of gold implanted.

0:30:400:30:44

-Somebody's crafted that well.

-They have. Yes.

0:30:440:30:47

It has lost its pin on the back.

0:30:470:30:51

It has got a bit of solder, which devalues it slightly.

0:30:510:30:55

I've only put £60 to £90 on it because of that.

0:30:550:30:59

They paid 110. I've a funny feeling it may do better than we think.

0:30:590:31:04

Then I have funny feelings all the time.

0:31:040:31:07

-Yes.

-Anyway, to be certain, let's have a look at their Bonus Buy.

0:31:070:31:12

Melody and Sandy, you spent £190.

0:31:130:31:17

You gave £110 of leftover lolly to JP. What did you spend it on, JP?

0:31:170:31:22

-LAUGHTER

-Just trying to deceive you!

0:31:250:31:28

-A little silver spoon.

-It's cute.

0:31:280:31:31

It IS cute.

0:31:310:31:33

I do admire this sort of thing when it's handmade.

0:31:330:31:37

It's Continental silver with a lower purity than sterling.

0:31:370:31:41

Nonetheless, it has a silver content.

0:31:410:31:44

The handle of it, you can see that it's been cut. It's a bit wobbly.

0:31:440:31:49

It's the way it's been depicted. A beaten bowl. I like all that.

0:31:490:31:55

It tops off with a finial and a cabochon garnet. A pretty thing.

0:31:550:32:00

I didn't spend a lot of money on it.

0:32:000:32:03

-Out of my £110, I spent 30.

-Oh, right.

0:32:030:32:07

It is a bit speculative. It's not a great investment.

0:32:070:32:11

-I think it's really sweet.

-Is there a profit?

-I thought you'd ask that.

0:32:110:32:16

I haven't ploughed the full budget into it.

0:32:160:32:19

If I'd put £110, you'd be worried. At £30 it's worth a punt.

0:32:190:32:23

If it sells for 15, you've lost 15. If it sells for 45, you've made 15.

0:32:230:32:28

It's in that...

0:32:280:32:30

-A gambling one, this one.

-Are the buyers going to be queuing up?

0:32:300:32:34

-Of course they will.

-It's what you have to decide, you gorgeous girls. I'll leave you to cogitate.

0:32:340:32:41

Meanwhile, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Jonathan's little spoon.

0:32:410:32:47

-There we go.

-Oh, dear.

-Small is supposed to be beautiful.

0:32:490:32:53

-It's not worth an awful lot.

-Is it 900 standard?

0:32:530:32:56

-Yeah. 900.

-It's Continental somewhere.

0:32:560:33:00

It's got this little cabochon stone.

0:33:000:33:03

-That's probably the best bit.

-It is.

0:33:030:33:06

-Is it worth a £10 note?

-Could be. 15 to 20.

0:33:060:33:10

£30 paid by Jonathan. He's optimistic. We're all optimistic.

0:33:100:33:14

-Yes. Hopefully.

-Thank you very much, Annabel.

0:33:140:33:18

18, 20, two, 25 in front. 28?

0:33:190:33:23

At £25. Eight, is it? At 25...

0:33:240:33:28

-Andrew and Carol, how are you feeling?

-Y-yeah.

0:33:300:33:33

Cautiously optimistic. We'll see.

0:33:330:33:36

First up is the Mdina glass jug vase.

0:33:360:33:41

839 is the Mdina glass globular vase. £10 please for it?

0:33:410:33:46

Ten. Ten for the Mdina. £10 for it? Got to be worth £10.

0:33:460:33:51

Ten is bid, thank you. 12 for it? 12?

0:33:510:33:55

< Make it 12, anyone...? It's worth more than that.

0:33:550:33:58

..£10? It is, then, maiden bid at ten.

0:33:580:34:02

Wiped its face. No profit, no loss. No shame. No gain.

0:34:020:34:06

Silver-plated teapot, hot water jug in the chest. Nice group there.

0:34:060:34:12

£60 for it, please? 60's bid. Five. 70. Five.

0:34:120:34:17

80. Five. 90. Five. 100.

0:34:170:34:21

And five? 105? It's at £100. Five.

0:34:210:34:25

110. 120. 130? That's 120 then.

0:34:250:34:29

At £120. Are you all done at 120?

0:34:290:34:33

Well done, Mark. You spotted that. That's a considerable achievement.

0:34:350:34:39

Now...

0:34:390:34:41

The rectangular cloisonne casket, Japanese one.

0:34:410:34:46

£30 please for it? 30?

0:34:460:34:48

< 30 anywhere...? We worked hard to get this one!

0:34:480:34:52

..32. 35. 38.

0:34:520:34:54

At £35 right at the back. Eight is it? 38...

0:34:540:34:58

Ooh, yes!

0:34:580:35:00

..40. And two? 42 with the cap? At £40. 42. 45?

0:35:000:35:04

At 42, then, right at the back. In the cap at 42...

0:35:040:35:10

That's minus £43.

0:35:100:35:14

-Which is minus £23 overall.

-It's not that bad.

0:35:140:35:19

-It's quite a good score.

-In this game, that's not bad.

0:35:190:35:24

What are you going to do about the Bonus Buy? Ring-fence the minus 23 or risk it

0:35:240:35:30

for the £75 Lalique jobby?

0:35:300:35:32

We both liked it. Yeah.

0:35:320:35:34

-Go with it.

-Yeah.

-Go with Mark's choice.

0:35:340:35:38

It is a lovely thing, isn't it?

0:35:380:35:40

845 is the Lalique circular dish

0:35:400:35:43

circa 1925, and we have bids on commission here.

0:35:430:35:48

-< It starts with me at £55...

-Come on. A bit more.

0:35:480:35:53

,,60? It's at £55 on commission. 60 anywhere?

0:35:530:35:57

Surely? At 55. 60...?

0:35:570:35:59

Come on!

0:35:590:36:02

..£55 on commission. Are you all done? At £55.

0:36:020:36:06

-Oh, dear.

-Never mind.

-I'm sorry.

-I don't understand that.

0:36:060:36:10

-That should have done a bit more.

-Minus £20.

0:36:100:36:13

I'm afraid to say, minus £43

0:36:130:36:15

-is the overall score, which could be a winning score.

-It could be.

0:36:150:36:20

-So don't say a word to the blues.

-OK.

-Thank you very much.

0:36:200:36:23

'Before the blues sold their items,

0:36:290:36:31

'I'd like to shine some light on something I found in the saleroom.'

0:36:310:36:36

If you went on your holidays in 1930 to Cornwall,

0:36:420:36:46

what might you bring back as a souvenir?

0:36:460:36:49

Possibly, one of these fellows.

0:36:490:36:52

A local product made out of something called serpentine marble,

0:36:520:36:57

except it's not a true marble, it's polished granite.

0:36:570:37:01

Somewhere around Land's End they'd have picked up a lump of rock like this,

0:37:010:37:07

all rough on the outside, spun it on a lathe

0:37:070:37:11

so that it finishes up with these perfect tapering forms,

0:37:110:37:15

and the lantern-like projection on top,

0:37:150:37:19

where the light would have been hidden.

0:37:190:37:22

Don't ask me which lighthouse this represents.

0:37:220:37:26

Doesn't really matter whether it exactly looks like a lighthouse.

0:37:260:37:31

If you were on your holidays, you'd buy this as a lovely reminder of a smashing time in Cornwall.

0:37:310:37:38

It is great, isn't it?

0:37:380:37:40

Next year, you popped off to Cornwall

0:37:400:37:42

and you bought another one

0:37:420:37:45

of these fellows, very, very nice.

0:37:450:37:47

You're getting a bit more prosperous

0:37:470:37:50

so the next year you bring back another lighthouse.

0:37:500:37:54

These things are getting bigger, you're doing better and better.

0:37:540:37:59

By the time you'd been there five years, you're getting a bit bored

0:37:590:38:03

but decide on your ultimate trip to Cornwall to buy the sixth,

0:38:030:38:08

which is even bigger.

0:38:080:38:10

What are you going to get in the sale today

0:38:100:38:14

for all six, because they're lotted in one lot?

0:38:140:38:18

833 is six serpentine lighthouse paperweights.

0:38:180:38:22

Two bids here. £45 is bid.

0:38:220:38:24

45 and 50. 50 for them? 50? 50. Five.

0:38:240:38:28

60. 60 takes it. Five is it? At £60 now. In the room at 60...

0:38:280:38:36

£10 each.

0:38:360:38:38

-So, Melody and Sandy, have you been chatting to the reds?

-No.

-No.

0:38:380:38:42

-You don't know how they got on?

-No.

-Good.

0:38:420:38:45

-Melody, you liked those scales, didn't you?

-Yes.

0:38:450:38:49

-How excited are you feeling?

-I'm really excited.

0:38:490:38:53

Look at those eyes fluttering! Green eyes today.

0:38:530:38:57

£20 to £30 is her estimate on your scales, which is pretty miserable.

0:38:570:39:02

They're complete, ready to go. I don't understand £20 to £30.

0:39:020:39:07

You paid £40. I think you'll make a small profit. Ought to make £50.

0:39:070:39:12

First lot is your hall chair, Sandy.

0:39:120:39:16

861 is the Victorian mahogany hall chair, circa 1860.

0:39:160:39:21

£30 is bid on commission. And two?

0:39:210:39:24

32. 35. 38...

0:39:240:39:27

Go on!

0:39:270:39:28

..42, is it? >

0:39:280:39:30

At £40, still on commission. Two is it? At 40...

0:39:300:39:35

-Wiped its face, Sandy. £40.

-She built it up and it stopped!

0:39:350:39:39

Look out. Here come your weights.

0:39:390:39:41

A set of late 19th century brass and alloy gram weights.

0:39:410:39:46

£20 for the gram weights? 20? £20? 20's bid.

0:39:460:39:50

22? 22. 25? 25.

0:39:500:39:54

28? 28. And 30? At £28, lady's bid. 30 is it?

0:39:540:40:00

At £28. Are you all done?

0:40:000:40:02

I can't believe it! £28 is minus 12. Now, the brooch.

0:40:020:40:07

I do hope this does well.

0:40:070:40:09

Four bids on this. It starts with me at £65.

0:40:090:40:15

And 70? 70 for the brooch? 70 is it? At £65.

0:40:150:40:18

70 anywhere? 70. Five. 80.

0:40:180:40:22

Five. 90? 90 for it? It's £85. 90, is it?

0:40:220:40:26

-At £85...

-Don't like the sound of this.

0:40:260:40:30

£85 is 15 short. It's minus £25.

0:40:320:40:36

-What can I say?

-That's gold weight. It scraps at that.

0:40:360:40:40

-That's a dreadful result.

-You're minus 37.

0:40:400:40:44

No new shoes for me, then!

0:40:440:40:47

Minus 37, that could be a winning score. Don't despair.

0:40:470:40:51

-What are you going to do about that spoon?

-Go for it.

0:40:510:40:55

-You sure?

-Yes.

-You are such a lovely couple!

0:40:550:40:58

Aren't they gorgeous?

0:40:580:41:01

You're going with the Bonus Buy and here it comes.

0:41:010:41:04

The Continental Arts and Crafts silver spoon.

0:41:040:41:08

A nice cabochon on the end. £10 for it.

0:41:080:41:12

Ten, surely? For the cabochon spoon. Arts and Crafts silver one.

0:41:120:41:16

At £10? Anybody wants it? £10.

0:41:160:41:19

£10 is bid. 12 for it?

0:41:190:41:22

£10, then. Maiden bid. 12 is it? >

0:41:220:41:25

At £10. Are you all done at ten?

0:41:250:41:29

BANGS GAVEL

0:41:290:41:31

If I had a gun I'd shoot myself.

0:41:310:41:33

-SANDY LAUGHS

-I wouldn't go that far.

0:41:330:41:37

Minus 57. OK. That's not so bad.

0:41:370:41:39

LAUGHTER He says!

0:41:390:41:43

Stiffen up, girls. Don't say a word to the reds.

0:41:430:41:46

All will be revealed as to who has won today's competition in a moment.

0:41:460:41:51

-Well...

-GIGGLING

0:42:000:42:02

This has been a bit of a turn-up.

0:42:020:42:04

-Have you been talking at all?

-EVERYONE: No!

0:42:040:42:08

You have no idea exactly how badly everybody's done?

0:42:080:42:12

Because everybody has done particularly badly today.

0:42:130:42:18

Anyway, overall, the runners-up are the blues.

0:42:180:42:22

Ah!

0:42:220:42:24

Hooray!

0:42:240:42:26

Not by much. Minus £57.

0:42:260:42:28

Minus £57, that's not too bad.

0:42:280:42:31

Because the reds managed to lose only £43.

0:42:310:42:35

LAUGHTER

0:42:350:42:37

There ain't much in it. Have you had a nice time?

0:42:370:42:40

-Yes.

-Great.

0:42:400:42:42

We've loved having you family teams with us. Join us soon for some more bargain hunting. Yes?

0:42:420:42:49

Yes!

0:42:490:42:50

-Mind your crutch!

-LAUGHTER

0:42:500:42:53

Subtitling by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:070:43:10

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:100:43:14

A mother-and-son team take on a mother-and-daughter but which team will end up with a family fortune?

On a visit to Cambridge's Fitzwilliam Museum, Tim Wonnacott uncovers a Dutch masterpiece.


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