Shepton Mallet 6 Bargain Hunt


Shepton Mallet 6

Antiques challenge. Experts Philip Serrell and Anita Manning lead the teams on a hunt in Shepton Mallet. Tim Wonnacott finds inspiration at the John Soane Museum.


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Transcript


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It's 12.15 at the BBC. Let's go Bargain Hunting!

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Our teams will need a healthy appetite if they're going to taste victory today.

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They're given £300 and an hour to buy three objects.

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How's this for starters?

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I like a bit of duck pate, me!

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What do you mean, you disagree?

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Coming up today the Blues know what they don't want.

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No, move away from the Murano.

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And the Reds don't know what they do want.

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I don't like it so much as to make a quick decision.

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Who's going to win today? It's anyone's guess.

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Minus 15.

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-Hello, everyone.

-Hello.

-So for the Red Team, we've got Nick and Mary,

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-husband and wife. You two have been associated for a few years now, haven't you?

-48 years!

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-That's a pretty good innings, isn't it?

-Yeah.

-Not bad, is it?

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So how did it all happen? Where did you meet?

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Well, we come from the Medway Towns in Kent, and we used to go dancing at a place called the Pav.

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-And Mick always had a girlfriend. Remember, he was 16 at the time.

-Yes.

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And you knew that he would also go through them at a fair rate, and at this dance

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-I knew that the last one he danced with or the last one that he met would be the one he took home.

-Ah!

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I saw the other one that he fancied and I just stood in the way. And so he asked me out.

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-Once you'd got your teeth into him, though, you knew he was a good man, right?

-A good man.

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-You were not going to give up.

-No!

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So, Mick, tell me about your career before you became a Red Team Bargain Hunter.

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I went out to sell to main painting contractors.

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But you were actually the golden boy in that business, weren't you?

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I had my moments. I won quite a few bits and pieces, yeah.

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But you could be known to doze off, yeah?

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LAUGHTER

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Very much so. We was in a sales conference and the eyes shut.

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-And, of course, with the eyes shut, the snoring started...

-Oh, dear!

-They stopped the conference to wake me up!

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Really?

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-It was that good?

-Yes.

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Now, as well as being a silver-tongued salesman, you're also incredibly creative.

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Yes, I used to do a lot of stained glass.

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And are you as creative as Mick, Mary?

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It says here that you're a tart with a heart!

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Well, I think...

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-I mean...

-Well...

-Is this a professional role of yours?

-Well, I don't know!

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What do you think? No, when I was doing am dram,

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-I always got the parts where it was a tart with a heart!

-Yes.

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-Really, you're just a little actress, aren't you?

-Oh, I am, darling!

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-I think you're going to do very, very well on Bargain Hunt.

-Thank you.

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How lovely. Now...so how did you two boys meet?

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We met about five years ago. I was recently moved to Bath,

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and waiting at the bus stop and he started talking to me.

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-Ever since, he's been known in my phone now as Bus Stop Boy as his nickname.

-Oh, how sweet!

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-Now, Robin, what's your day job?

-Er...graphic designer.

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Tell us about this design, because a lot of people don't know what graphic design is.

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It's a funny word. In the good old days, it was kind of colouring in, but now computers have come into it.

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I design for branding, marketing... I'd quite like a go at sorting out Bargain Hunt...!

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-But that's another day...

-You think our logo's not up to it?

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-Yeah, it could with a bit of pulling in to the 21st century!

-Hey, steady!

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This is a programme about antiques, you know!

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So, David, tell us about the rational part of your job.

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I'm the practice manager for a firm of architects.

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So I have to be the rational one in amongst twenty-something emotional, creative types,

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so they take a lot of cajoling and bullying to keep them in line!

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So you're the man that strictly controls all these activities?

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I do. I look after all of the payroll and the accounts and...

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Everything from toilet roll to payroll I look after.

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-If it's not architectural, it's down to me.

-Payroll to toilet roll!

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Super! So this Bargain Hunt lark is going to be like a piece of cake, isn't it?

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-It's going to be a walk in the park for you.

-It's going to be a laugh.

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You've only got to find three items with £300 to make a profit...

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I mean, you run 25 architects! I mean, you should be quaking in your boots, you two!

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-Anyway, the money moment. Very, very good luck. £300 apiece all round, yes?

-Yes.

-That's your 300.

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You know the rules! Your experts await and off you go! Very, very good luck!

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I've a funny feeling that one of our teams today won't need their expert!

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Leading the charge for the Red Team is Philip Serrell.

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And full steam ahead

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with the Blues is Anita Manning... my captain!

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-So, have we got a plan?

-Well, the plan...

-Other than sit out here in the sun and drink gin.

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-I think the plan is to rely on you, really, Phil.

-That's it, we are doomed!

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Both of you are involved in design and the arts,

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-and I would think that you are looking for cutting-edge stuff.

-Yes.

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-I'm interested in sort of pewter...

-Yeah.

-Small bits of silver.

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-20th century?

-Yep!

-Yeah.

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-Wacky?

-Yeah.

-Maybe.

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-Right, let's go and have a look this way.

-OK.

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Let's go with Anita!

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A confident bunch, but how long will that last?

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Blimey, the Blues have spotted something already!

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-The Sooty xylophone.

-Yes.

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In its original box.

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-Uh-huh. In good condition.

-What do you reckon?

-Look at these lovely colours.

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HE PICKS OUT A TUNE

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Nobody likes a show-off, Robin!

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-He's a man of many talents!

-And look! A songbook!

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-Right.

-What do you reckon?

-Let's have a look.

-I think that it's great fun.

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-It's great fun and there will be a market for it.

-Shall we get an idea of the price?

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-How much is the wee xylophone?

-45 with the Sooty and Sweep.

-With the Sooty and Sweep?

-Yeah.

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-Can they play a tune?

-I don't know. I think they're a bit too old!

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Can Sooty hold a tune?

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-They're the originals from the programme.

-Hi, team!

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I don't think they're the originals, but I think they're pretty good.

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I think these are lovely! Hold them up, hold them up!

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-Oh, there's a look, there's a look.

-Yeah.

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They look like a pair of Muppets... no, puppets.

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I think they're great fun.

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It's a wee bit expensive...

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-£40. That's it.

-40?

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And what you've got is not just the xylophone, but you've got Sooty and Sweep,

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and I would say that they are... they have a bit of age about them as well.

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They are marked Chad Valley Toys. Yeah, they are...

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-Have we got labels on them?

-They've got labels on them.

-What do you think, boys?

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-It's up to you.

-Let's do it!

-Let's go for it.

-We can't leave them alone. They'll be lonely!

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You big softies!

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It looks like the Reds could do with a bit of that magic themselves.

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How much is your trunk out the front?

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Which trunk is that?

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-Your S Lowe trunk.

-£30.

-£20.

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-He's offering 20.

-No, I'm not yet. They've got to have a look at it, but I think that's quite fair.

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It's going to be 30.

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Hold you horses, Phil!

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Do you like that...? Listen, we're getting ourselves all disjointed.

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-Go and grab your man. There's a little trunk out there, an elm trunk.

-Yeah.

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I haven't looked at it too closely, but £30 doesn't strike me as being that dear.

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They're the sort of thing that make serviceable coffee tables and the like.

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-Have a look at it and see what you think.

-So, right at the front?

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It's the one on the right there, and I'll have another trawl through here.

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Elm? Are you sure?

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-What's the wood, Phil?

-It looks like it's elm.

-It's elm. Did you say elm?

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-I think that elm's probably oak, isn't it?

-I thought so!

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-So is oak worth more than elm?

-No.

-It's the other way round.

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Why's that, then? I always thought oak was the wood of the...

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To be truthful to you, it just depends...

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When they talk about property, the most important thing is location, location, location,

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and in timber the most important thing is colour, colour, colour.

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Surely, it's price, price, price, isn't it?

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An elm can come up a beautiful colour.

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-Do you both like it? That's the important thing.

-What sort of age is it?

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It's probably 1920s, I would think, something like that.

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It's got a use as a toy box, it's got a use as a coffee table... it's quite a trendy thing,

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but at the end of the day, you've got to like it, because it isn't me that's buying.

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-How much did he say initially was the price?

-£30.

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- How did we get on? - Very rude, but he said it could be 25.

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-£25.

-If the guy will let us have it for 25, then, that's...

-It would stand at the top of the stairs

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-and be used as something. There's got to be a few quid in it.

-It's not going to earn you a fortune,

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but the way I look at this is the worst it can do is lose you a tenner.

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-And the most it can do is make you £20-£25.

-Yeah.

-Okey-doke.

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Well, Mick really likes it, so...

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-Sounds like the job's done, then.

-I think so.

-I think so.

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All right, then. Well, we better just pay the man, hadn't we?

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-Timers for playing chess.

-That's really unusual.

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You press that and then make your move... and then the other guy presses that.

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-What's it made of, Anita?

-Bakelite.

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-I would say that's '30s, '40s.

-OK.

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-Let's have a look at the back.

-Has it got anything on it?

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-It just has a registration number.

-What's on the bottom?

-Nothing.

-Nothing there?

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Let's look at... There's a maker's name there.

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-It looks Russian.

-Foreign.

-Uh-huh.

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-Well, the Russians were great chess players.

-I quite like it.

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-I do like it, I like it too.

-I like the style of it.

-Do you think it works?

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- Does this work? - Yes, it does.

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-The chess timer.

-And how much is it?

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- 65. - 65.

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I really like this a lot.

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I like the style, I like the simplicity of it.

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-It's quite art deco, isn't it?

-Yeah.

-It's got a Russian art deco look,

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-you know, it does look Russian.

-All the lettering on this is fantastic.

-Will you go 50?

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-Yeah.

-Yeah? 50.

-I think it's a great item.

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- Can we have it for 45? - No.

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You're pushing your luck, boys!

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I think 50's a very good price!

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-You have taken him down from 65.

-That's true.

-Will they make a profit at auction?

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I think they'll make a profit. I would expect those to go at over 100.

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-You're kidding? Really?

-£50! Brilliant! Thank you very much.

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What a salesman!

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Isn't it lovely when they buy something they like?

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-I really like it, it's great.

-Yes! That's smashing.

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Now, I've got just the thing for a day like today...

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Oh, I do love relaxing out in the sunshine, don't you?

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The dodgy thing in this country, though, is finding out what the weather's up to.

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Nowadays, we just tune into the BBC any old time of day and it gives you a weather forecast.

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But back in 1870, you had to depend on one of these jokers.

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That's if you were rich enough to own one in your house.

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This thing would sit on your mantelpiece,

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and, as you can see, it's decoratively framed in a rosewood case

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that then sits on this classic plinth.

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Now, if I slip the movement out,

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you can see that it's nicely made of solid brass...

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and it contains an aneroid movement,

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a type of barometer, invented in the early 19th century with a vacuum chamber,

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so that when the atmospheric pressure change takes place,

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the chamber expands or contracts,

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it moves this indicator across the range of change,

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fair, very dry, stormy, etcetera,

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enabling you to make your prediction.

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This thing does have one problem, though.

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This dial is incredibly dirty. If you look at that, it's grey, right?

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In the middle, you get a semblance of what it ought to look like, which is bright silvery.

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It's been in a room, probably a gaslit room,

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which makes the most terrible fug,

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and it's that fug which has discoloured the silvered surface on the front of the barometer.

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But that is no problem to me. Why?

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Because I know a barometer restorer who's capable of cleaning that

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and presenting me with a perfectly silvered dial and it'll cost me £20.

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What's it worth once I've spent the £20 on it?

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I would think between 300 and 400.

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What would it cost you in this state in the fair today?

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You're not going to believe this,

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but it could be yours for £30.

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Now...I feel the pressure rising!

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You have been wonderful, you've bought wonderful items!

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And I hope that the auctioneer thinks that they're wonderful as well!

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Oh-oh, here we go.

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-And he's just got a silly, daft look on his face, doesn't he?

-Yes!

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-Well, it looks very familiar to me, actually! Take your choice!

-Poor hippo!

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-What? What? What?

-The boar's head!

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Anybody you know?

0:13:220:13:24

-Hello, Philip!

-Cheeky monkeys!

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He's not a "boar"!

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Hang on! There's something fishy going on now.

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I mean, it's sort of pretty ugly, isn't it?

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You can say that again!

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-Well, it's certainly weird!

-But is it a good age?

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I don't know, is the truthful answer. I've never seen anything like it before.

0:13:400:13:43

Er... A lot of these open up and become...they're sort of Japanese almost like pill containers.

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But, I mean, that... Is that mother-of-pearl?

0:13:510:13:53

-It's abalone shell, isn't it?

-It's the same principle, it's the inside of a shell.

-So this is Japanese?

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-Probably, I would think. Asian, at least, isn't it?

-I think it's probably more Chinese than Japanese.

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-Yeah.

-And how old do you think that is?

-It's probably 40, 50 years.

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-So, really it's mid-century?

-So it's 1960s, then?

-So it's not... Sadly. I mean, that's interesting, yeah?

0:14:090:14:15

-Yeah.

-Thank you very much.

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Famous last words! I think the Reds need to get on their bike!

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We've nearly got half the time gone. So we need to make a policy decision which is either...

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we go in this door here, which I suspect might be a little bit more expensive

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or we...I can't see whether that's a car park down there or more stalls. Which would you like to do?

0:14:310:14:38

Well, bearing in mind we'd like to look for some silver or pewter...

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-Let's go, then.

-Inside would be a good bet.

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Well, this all looks nice. I'm sure they won't have any trouble finding something pretty in here,

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do you?

0:14:530:14:55

-What about a glass eye?

-No, thank you.

-Do you not think that's cool?

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What?

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You keep your eye on the bargains, Phil!

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Look at these semaphore flags here, and there's a map of every single one.

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-I'm not sure they're very old, though.

-Interesting, interesting, but...

-But not...

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-Not for us.

-Not today!

-Not today, darlings!

0:15:160:15:20

I'm kind of thinking a really nice plate or a really nice bit of glass or jewellery...

0:15:230:15:29

We could go inside...if you wish...

0:15:290:15:33

-Yeah, let's go and have a look inside.

-This is all a bit samey.

-Yeah.

0:15:330:15:37

That's Newlyn School, I would suggest.

0:15:430:15:47

Is that Newlyn School, sir? Is this your stall?

0:15:470:15:50

-Yeah, but it's not marked, but it is Newlyn.

-How much is it?

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It is...70.

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What's the best you could do it for?

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I could it for 65.

0:15:570:16:00

-Do you want to have a look at it?

-Mmm.

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I like that. I mean, these fish are typical of Newlyn.

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-Fish! Again!

-But the issue is there's no Newlyn mark on it.

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-And that's...

-The thing that would sell it.

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It's going to make a difference of £100 almost in terms of value.

0:16:170:16:21

-That's the annoying thing with Newlyn.

-What's the very, very best,

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finito, def, there-is-no-more, God-help-us price?

0:16:240:16:28

The very, very best would be 60.

0:16:280:16:31

£55?

0:16:310:16:32

I can't go that low. 58. And that's the absolute...

0:16:320:16:36

I'd rather actually you buy something that you really, really liked.

0:16:360:16:39

You're up against it timewise. You really like that.

0:16:390:16:43

-And...

-That's fine, then. Let's go for it.

0:16:430:16:47

I think that, in terms of auction, it's got to make £40 or £50 minimum,

0:16:470:16:52

-and if you have a result it could make £100-£120.

-Yeah.

0:16:520:16:56

-Mick, if it makes you happy, that's fine.

-I'll go for that, please.

0:16:570:17:01

Thank you very much indeed.

0:17:010:17:02

-Now, this is a piece of Orrefors glass.

-OK.

0:17:050:17:09

It's not terribly old, but Orrefors is one of the best glassmakers.

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-And it's quite a sweet little piece.

-It's quite cute.

-Uh-huh.

0:17:140:17:18

-Tell me what you think.

-Any damage?

0:17:180:17:20

-It's quite heavy. I've kind of got a good feeling that it might do quite well at auction.

-Uh-huh.

0:17:200:17:26

It's a glass bear, not a crystal ball!

0:17:260:17:28

-I can see that doing 30...35...

-I just think people will like it.

-She's got 38 on it.

0:17:280:17:34

-If we can get it under 30, we'd be all right.

-Yeah. Do you like it? You're not convinced.

0:17:340:17:39

-Have a wee hold of it.

-Can I feel the weight?

-Yeah.

0:17:390:17:42

-It is quite heavy.

-It's quite a good heavy weight,

0:17:420:17:44

-that's always positive.

-Do you know, I can see it kind of in a kid's bedroom.

0:17:440:17:47

-Uh-huh.

-It's kind of quite nursery. If we can get it under the 30, then we might be all right.

0:17:470:17:52

-Uh-huh.

-I could see it getting that sort of price.

-It all depends on the price. We're fighting time now,

0:17:520:17:58

so what I think you should do... you're not convinced.

0:17:580:18:01

-Put it down, we'll have a quick look, we'll give ourselves so many minutes...

-And maybe come back.

0:18:010:18:06

-That's a good fallback position.

-That OK?

-Yeah.

-I'm agreed.

-Let's go!

0:18:060:18:12

Don't give it too many minutes, Blues!

0:18:120:18:16

-What about the animals? Is there anything there...

-They're lovely,

0:18:160:18:18

but they'll be a lot of money.

0:18:180:18:20

Their Worcester's ugly and it'll be out of our price range.

0:18:200:18:23

I'm conscious of our time here, guys.

0:18:230:18:26

-You like that, do you?

-I don't like it so much as to make a quick decision.

0:18:260:18:30

Or any decision, Mary, perhaps?

0:18:300:18:32

-Come on, Mary! You've got to pick something.

-The pressure's on you, my love!

0:18:320:18:35

Time's going on, but I think we're in trouble.

0:18:350:18:39

Well, you're not the only ones. The Blues are struggling too.

0:18:390:18:43

-Has that got any age to it, though?

-I don't think so.

0:18:430:18:47

-And what you've got is quite a nice quality replica.

-Right.

0:18:470:18:51

If it was the original one, you couldn't afford it.

0:18:510:18:53

-What about your Murano?

-They're horrendous. Move away from the Murano!

0:18:530:18:59

Go on, say what you really think, David!

0:18:590:19:02

We're going to cut it down to the wire.

0:19:020:19:04

Yeah, you realise that's going to happen.

0:19:040:19:06

Everybody watches this at home and doesn't realise quite how quickly the time goes.

0:19:060:19:11

There's some stuff.

0:19:120:19:13

Oh, here's a lot of stuff.

0:19:130:19:14

Oh...but it's all the good stuff.

0:19:140:19:17

Do you mean antiques, Robin?

0:19:170:19:19

-Guys, we've got about three minutes left now, so...

-OK.

0:19:200:19:23

Aaargh!

0:19:230:19:24

It's time for those Plan Bs, teams!

0:19:240:19:28

-Is there anything we've seen so far that you really like?

-Only the expensive stuff.

0:19:280:19:32

-Anita, I've got a really good feeling about the teddy bear.

-Uh-huh.

0:19:320:19:36

-It was...

-Did you like the fish?

-It was unusual.

0:19:360:19:38

Go buy it, girl!

0:19:380:19:40

-We could say...

-£25.

-20.

0:19:400:19:44

-20?

-Oh!

-Just go for it!

-You're quite racy! She's good!

0:19:440:19:48

-Shall I do a runner? Go down and ask the lady?

-You'll come back, won't you?

-Yeah, I will come back!

0:19:490:19:53

-So shall I run?

-We'll come round that way anyway, I expect.

0:19:530:19:57

Run! You've got less than a minute!

0:19:570:20:00

-We've been having a think about this one.

-Could you do that for 20?

0:20:000:20:03

What have we got on it?

0:20:030:20:05

If you could do it for 20...

0:20:050:20:07

-it would make these boys... my boys...

-Very happy boys.

-It's our last object.

-..Very happy!

0:20:070:20:12

-I think you remember me from before.

-I do.

0:20:130:20:16

I'm in a pickle!

0:20:160:20:18

-The guys have had their things, and I'm desperate to find something really interesting.

-OK.

0:20:180:20:23

-I loved the fish!

-I think I told you 50 I would do on that one.

0:20:230:20:27

I'll tell you what I'll do. You give me 21, I'll do it.

0:20:270:20:32

-Aw!

-Thank you very much.

-That's wonderful!

-OK?

0:20:320:20:36

Could you come down on that a little bit for me? Please!

0:20:360:20:40

-You're pushing me a bit now.

-Oh, I'm so...

-45. 45, and that is it!

0:20:400:20:43

Phew! They're all done!

0:20:430:20:45

Thank you!

0:20:450:20:47

Oh, I'm so grateful, thank you!

0:20:470:20:48

Hang on, where's my kiss?

0:20:480:20:50

-There's a lot of love today!

-I know.

0:20:510:20:54

And that's your lot! You thought all that lot looked easy?

0:20:540:20:59

Well, shame on you! Let's remind ourselves what the Reds bought.

0:20:590:21:03

Was Phil thinking outside the box with the oak coffee table?

0:21:040:21:09

Next, they spent their coppers on the Newlyn-style candle holder.

0:21:100:21:15

And, finally, will Mary's abalone fish be good bait for the bidders?

0:21:170:21:22

-Thanks ever so much. We're so grateful to you.

-Mary, you were quite chilled there, weren't you?

0:21:250:21:30

Why, pray, are you thanking him so much? For what, that's what I want to know.

0:21:300:21:35

-It's the nerves, Tim!

-It was the nerves.

-He had to cope with a dose of nerves with Mary, you see.

0:21:350:21:40

-It's the effect I have on women.

-Is that what it is?

0:21:400:21:43

I mean, Mary, bless her... The trouble is, Tim, everybody at home watches this,

0:21:430:21:47

and they think their hour is just you go in and you buy that in the first 20 minutes,

0:21:470:21:51

and that in the next 20 minutes and that...and it doesn't work that way!

0:21:510:21:54

No. You've used up pretty well every second of your allotted time, I have to say! You've gone to the wire!

0:21:540:21:59

Now...which is your favourite piece, Mary?

0:21:590:22:03

-My favourite piece is an articulated fish.

-Is it?

0:22:030:22:07

-What about you, Mick?

-Well, I'm hoping it's Newlyn, but it's the copper candlestick.

0:22:070:22:11

-Which may not be Newlyn.

-It may not be.

-Lovely! And you spent about £127, didn't you?

0:22:110:22:16

-128, actually.

-Very good. And I would like £172, please.

0:22:160:22:20

That's absolutely right. I have it here for you.

0:22:200:22:22

You got that? That's a wodge, isn't it? And that goes straight to you, Philip Serrell.

0:22:220:22:26

-Now, what are you going to do with that?

-You think I know?

0:22:260:22:30

No, there is a plan!

0:22:300:22:31

-Oh?

-It's just I don't know what it is yet!

0:22:310:22:34

All right, then. Well, I'll leave you to go and negotiate with that, all right? Excellent.

0:22:340:22:39

Super! So why don't we remind ourselves of what the Blue Team has bought, eh?

0:22:390:22:44

"What's that, Sooty?" "A bargain at £40."

0:22:470:22:50

Might it be checkmate at the auction with the Russian chess timer?

0:22:510:22:56

A bear for the Blues.

0:22:570:23:00

£21 bought them a piece of Orrefors glass.

0:23:000:23:03

-We might be OK. We'll keep our fingers crossed.

-Yeah.

0:23:050:23:07

I should be crossing more than your fingers if I were you with this lot!

0:23:070:23:12

-How much did you spend?

-111.

-£111? It's just pathetic!

0:23:120:23:16

It was hard to spend that much!

0:23:160:23:18

You're grown men! £110!

0:23:180:23:21

-Which is your favourite piece, Rob?

-Sooty and Sweep.

0:23:210:23:24

-What's your fave?

-The chess timer.

-The chess timer?

-Yeah.

0:23:240:23:28

-OK, lovely. So who's got the leftover lolly?

-I've got the dosh.

-So, 110... That's an awful lot!

0:23:280:23:33

-How much is all that, then?

-189.

-189.

0:23:330:23:35

You've done the math already? No wonder you run the architects, I tell you! 189!

0:23:350:23:40

£189, then, coming your way, Anita Manning. Have you got a plan?

0:23:400:23:45

Well, really just to spend as much of it as I can!

0:23:450:23:48

They want me to buy something stupendous, big, beautiful and expensive!

0:23:480:23:54

And blow the lot, I hope! Bye-bye, Anita. Good luck, chaps.

0:23:540:23:58

I'm heading off somewhere incredibly intellectual. We're going a stride or two east from Shepton Mallet.

0:23:580:24:04

We're going to Lincoln's Inn Fields and I can't wait to show you it!

0:24:040:24:09

Which buildings spring to mind when you think of London?

0:24:150:24:19

St Paul's Cathedral?

0:24:190:24:21

Buckingham Palace?

0:24:210:24:22

The Gherkin?

0:24:220:24:24

12-14 Lincoln's Inn Fields?

0:24:240:24:28

No? Well, these three houses were knocked together 200 years ago

0:24:290:24:35

to create a home for the architect Sir John Soane.

0:24:350:24:38

And not content with owning three buildings, he filled his house with over a hundred more...

0:24:380:24:44

all in model form.

0:24:440:24:46

The first model that Soane bought

0:24:500:24:52

was this fellow, which is made out of cork,

0:24:520:24:56

which he acquired in 1804.

0:24:560:24:59

It shows the Temple of Vesta at Tivoli.

0:24:590:25:03

The colour and texture of the cork almost perfectly replicate old stone.

0:25:030:25:10

This sort of model is referred to as a "tourist piece",

0:25:100:25:16

simply because if the milawdy are going to Italy,

0:25:160:25:20

doing their grand tour for a year or two or three,

0:25:200:25:24

they want to bring back models of examples of buildings that they've seen.

0:25:240:25:30

If you're thinking that this is an ancient ruin, you'd be wrong.

0:25:300:25:34

It's an artist's impression of Soane's most famous building, the Bank of England,

0:25:340:25:38

painted to show both the interior and exterior space.

0:25:380:25:42

And just look how complicated all those spaces are.

0:25:440:25:49

You see it there in the bird's-eye view

0:25:490:25:51

and here in plan section,

0:25:510:25:54

the rather more traditional way of looking at an architect's design.

0:25:540:26:00

Soane, however, was very keen on the use of models.

0:26:000:26:05

And here we have a magnificent model that was created for him

0:26:050:26:11

for the proposed design for a building called Tyringham

0:26:110:26:15

for a banker called William Pride. Soane understood that the use of a model

0:26:150:26:22

enabled him to sell his services.

0:26:220:26:24

It's all very well having the arrangement on a plan,

0:26:240:26:29

but for the client who doesn't understand the plan,

0:26:290:26:32

how much better to see what his building's going to look like

0:26:320:26:36

in a beautifully constructed, fully-to-scale sense,

0:26:360:26:40

which is what this type of cedar model gives you.

0:26:400:26:44

If we were able to take Tyringham apart, the roof would be removed,

0:26:440:26:50

and we'd be able to reveal exactly the arrangement of rooms and staircases,

0:26:500:26:55

which, if you look very carefully through these windows, you can more or less make out.

0:26:550:27:01

Of course the big question today is who is going to be our model team over at the auction?

0:27:010:27:07

Today our teams are vying for victory at Lawrences Saleroom with auctioneer Richard Kay.

0:27:070:27:14

Now, let's see if Phil can come up with a star bargain.

0:27:140:27:17

Now, Mick and Mary, you spent a miserable £128,

0:27:190:27:21

you gave Philip Serrell £172... What did he spend it on? Philip?

0:27:210:27:27

Bowls.

0:27:270:27:29

-Ooh!

-Oh!

-I bought those at £35.

-Oh, wow!

-They're beautiful, aren't they?

0:27:290:27:34

-They're carpet bowls.

-Are they a full set?

-Yes, absolutely, a set of four...

0:27:340:27:39

and there's the jack. And you've got four pairs.

0:27:390:27:42

-How old are they, Phil?

-I would think they're probably 1930s,

0:27:420:27:46

-perhaps a little later, but I just thought they were really nice.

-They are nice.

-Very snazzy.

0:27:460:27:50

-What sort of profit do you think they're going to make?

-I think they'll make £30-£50.

0:27:500:27:55

-Really?

-And 35 is what you paid, yeah?

-That's good.

-That's a good prediction.

0:27:550:27:59

-Nice little box.

-I like the colours.

-And velvet-lined, looks all good.

0:27:590:28:04

-What colour is the velvet inside?

-It is a lovely rose pink!

0:28:040:28:07

-To go with the rose-pink team!

-Oh, yeah!

0:28:070:28:11

Anyway, there you go! You've got your prediction. You don't decide right now, you decide later

0:28:110:28:16

after the sale of your first three items,

0:28:160:28:19

but let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Philips's bowls.

0:28:190:28:23

Well, Richard, for a change, these look as if they've been played with.

0:28:240:28:27

They do, which is what they're meant for, of course. They were designed to be played with,

0:28:270:28:31

-and I like to think that these would have given hours of recreation in an Edwardian parlour...

-Yes.

0:28:310:28:35

..On a wet afternoon. I think they are Edwardian in date, 1900-1920 sort of period, perhaps.

0:28:350:28:41

They do show signs of their age, but that's rather appealing for these sorts of things,

0:28:410:28:46

because somebody who buys them might feel that they too could play with them,

0:28:460:28:49

-rather than have to arrange them because they're frightened of spoiling them.

-Yeah.

0:28:490:28:52

-All complete with the jack as well.

-Yeah.

-Rather a nice little set.

0:28:520:28:56

-How much?

-£15-£25, I should think.

0:28:560:28:59

£35 paid by Philip Serrell. Mark you, he's a very cunning monkey that Philip Serrell at this.

0:28:590:29:05

I don't doubt that and he may be rewarded with a surprise there, yes.

0:29:050:29:09

-Anyway, we start off today with this little coffer...

-Yeah.

0:29:090:29:12

Described curiously as a coffee table, though I suppose you could use it for anything, couldn't you?

0:29:120:29:17

I suppose that is the most obvious use for it.

0:29:170:29:19

It's got a sort of functional seafarer's look about it, hasn't it?

0:29:190:29:22

-Yes.

-As though it was used once to carry things around in, but now will sit in the middle of someone's floor,

0:29:220:29:29

with a tray on it, or a television or something like that. It's got a sort of modern practical application.

0:29:290:29:34

-How much?

-£30-£50.

0:29:340:29:36

-Great. £25 they paid.

-That's very reasonable.

-Very natural, isn't it?

-Yes, I think it is.

-Next up...

0:29:360:29:41

is this rather fishy chamber stick, which is fun, isn't it?

0:29:410:29:46

It is, and it's nicely made. You know, people do like to see items, small items that show evidence

0:29:460:29:52

-of the craftsmanship that went into them.

-Yes.

0:29:520:29:55

And that is nicely made, front and back.

0:29:550:29:57

It's got a sort of honest artisan finish to it.

0:29:570:30:01

It would be nice to think that it came from Cornwall.

0:30:010:30:06

It could have come from any of the other schools that worked with copper around the country

0:30:060:30:11

in the early part of the 20th century. Without a name on it or anything to identify it regionally,

0:30:110:30:16

it's something of a lost soul as far as its research is concerned.

0:30:160:30:21

I'm not quite sure what "sole" looks like, actually!

0:30:210:30:23

-It looks more like a seahorse...

-A plaice!

-Yes. Good. Estimate?

0:30:230:30:28

£20-£40, but I think it's a nice little thing. Tell me what they paid.

0:30:280:30:33

-£58.

-58. Well, it's a little more than I think it would make at auction, but not a bad price.

0:30:330:30:37

Quite. And, lastly, continuing the aquatic theme,

0:30:370:30:42

-we've got the articulated abalone-shell veneered fish.

-Yes.

0:30:420:30:47

These were pretty much the stock-in trade of the promenade souvenir seller in the Mediterranean,

0:30:470:30:55

and still are, I believe. I don't think they're difficult to find. It's nicely made.

0:30:550:30:59

Is it going to be a dead fish in the water at the auction?

0:30:590:31:02

I don't know. I suppose it might be up to £20 or so.

0:31:020:31:06

-£45 they paid.

-45? That seems like plenty for it as far as its auction prospects are concerned.

0:31:060:31:11

-A strong fishy smell about that one.

-Yes, absolutely.

0:31:110:31:13

Anyway, that's it for the Reds. Now for the Blues. Robin and David.

0:31:130:31:17

-Robin went bonkers with these puppets.

-Well, these take me back.

-Do they?

-I had some myself

0:31:170:31:23

-when I was five or six years old.

-No?

-Went to see Harry Corbett with Sooty and Sweep.

-You never did?

0:31:230:31:28

I did, at the Pier Theatre in Bournemouth in the late '60s.

0:31:280:31:31

-Good Lord!

-And thought that these sort of puppets were the most desirable kind of toy you could have,

0:31:310:31:37

but these ones are somewhat careworn.

0:31:370:31:40

-They've been up and down the pier a few times?

-They have.

0:31:400:31:43

And they've been at the bottom of the toy box for quite a long time as well, I think.

0:31:430:31:47

But they're appealing, evocative. People do like toys that remind them of their childhood.

0:31:470:31:50

What sort of price do you think the group's worth?

0:31:500:31:54

Well, I don't know if Sooty and Sweep have the clout they used to have in terms of commercial appeal,

0:31:540:31:59

-so £10-£20.

-OK, fine. £40 they paid.

0:31:590:32:03

I think their sentiment has outweighed their commercial judgment here, if I'm being perfectly frank.

0:32:030:32:09

They've probably done what I'd do and buy them because they remember them.

0:32:090:32:12

Which is absolutely fatal when it comes to reselling.

0:32:120:32:15

-It's a good way to enjoy yourself, not a good way to make money.

-No, quite.

0:32:150:32:19

Next, it's the Russian Bakelite chess scorer.

0:32:190:32:23

That is a combination of four words I never thought I'd hear.

0:32:230:32:26

-Russian Bakelite chess scorer is such a weird object.

-I know.

-I've never seen one. Have you?

0:32:260:32:31

-Never.

-No. And it's got niche appeal, I think.

0:32:310:32:34

I'm not sure how many people are going to be completely besotted with something that's Russian in origin...

0:32:340:32:38

-No.

-..Made of Bakelite and designed to time moves in chess matches.

0:32:380:32:43

-We have a wide range of buyers, but I don't think it extends quite that far.

-No.

0:32:430:32:47

Mark you, there could be nest of Russian chess players somewhere lurking around in Somerset

0:32:470:32:52

-that you know nothing about.

-Let's hope they turn up at auction!

-Let's hope they've got the right moves!

0:32:520:32:56

-What's your estimate?

-For its sheer novelty appeal, £30-£50.

0:32:570:33:00

-Needs to be pretty novel because they paid 50.

-Well, that seems fair enough.

0:33:000:33:05

-Pounds not roubles!

-I'm glad to hear that! They could be pleasantly surprised. It's an unusual thing.

0:33:050:33:10

They've clearly got a Russian theme, because up we come with a bear next.

0:33:100:33:13

A bear, yes. Well, modern piece of Orrefors glass.

0:33:130:33:17

It's nicely made, as this sort of stuff always is.

0:33:170:33:20

And people do like modern glass with a name on it,

0:33:200:33:22

and a factory that they can look up and a model they can probably trace.

0:33:220:33:25

I don't feel it's a piece you would display in your drawing room,

0:33:250:33:30

-as opposed to your bedroom window sill.

-So what's your estimate on our bear here?

0:33:300:33:35

-Well, I would say £10-£20 for it.

-Would you?

-Yes.

-On a good day or a bad day?

0:33:350:33:39

Well, today, I hope. Whatever that's going to be, good or bad.

0:33:390:33:43

-Well, £21 was the amount.

-21? Well, they're in with a chance.

-They're in with a chance.

0:33:430:33:48

-They only spent £111 and I think that's their strategy.

-Well, I hope it's rewarded.

0:33:480:33:52

And I think they're going to need a bit of spice, so let's go and have a look at it.

0:33:520:33:56

-Now, R and D, Robin and David, you spent £111.

-We did.

0:33:560:34:00

You gave Anita Manning £189. What did she spend all that dosh on?

0:34:000:34:05

-Oh!

-Oh...

-In jewellery, fashion and fad is everything!

0:34:050:34:11

And I'm finding that this type of thing is very popular.

0:34:110:34:16

It's come back. It was great in the 1960s and 1970s,

0:34:160:34:22

-and every Vogue model would wear a Babitz.

-Are they amber?

0:34:220:34:27

-They're coming back now.

-OK.

-So I thought I would spend some money...

0:34:270:34:32

-How much did you spend?

-£110.

0:34:320:34:35

-Blimey!

-From our 189? Well, that's not bad.

-OK. How much do you think that's going to make at auction?

0:34:350:34:41

I think... that we could make a little profit.

0:34:410:34:45

-OK.

-"A little profit"?

-A little profit.

0:34:450:34:48

-So are they real amber?

-It's very difficult to tell.

0:34:480:34:53

-You don't know! You've bought plastic!

-Amberesque!

0:34:530:34:58

-There are lots of different tests. The one that I like...

-Don't you rub it on your teeth?

0:35:000:35:05

-No, that's pearls.

-See if you could get a dinosaur out of it!

0:35:050:35:09

You immerse them in salty water. If they float, they're amber,

0:35:090:35:14

and if they're plastic, they sink.

0:35:140:35:17

The thing is, it doesn't really matter!

0:35:180:35:22

-Right.

-It doesn't matter, because what we have is the look.

0:35:220:35:26

-I love them.

-Beautiful! Well, you can bid for them.

0:35:270:35:31

Sadly, Anita can't bid for them, actually.

0:35:320:35:35

But what do you think, seriously?

0:35:350:35:37

-Are they amber?

-They're on a nice tatty bit of cord, Anita!

0:35:370:35:40

-You just sniffed it.

-They smell of plastic.

-Do they?

0:35:410:35:45

Well, on this happy note, I think we better shuffle off

0:35:460:35:49

and find out what the auctioneer thinks about Anita's little beads.

0:35:490:35:53

Well, here we are, Richard, a little something for your weekend wear.

0:35:550:35:58

You know me too well, Tim. It's exactly what I like to wear.

0:35:580:36:01

But I'm not sure I'd want to wear these, to be honest, because they're described as cherry amber,

0:36:010:36:06

and I'm not convinced that they are made of amber.

0:36:060:36:09

-They don't have any variations within them as you'd expect from a natural stone.

-Right.

0:36:090:36:15

So what you're saying is that the colour is too uniform and you want inclusions,

0:36:150:36:21

-you want, as a natural resinous product...

-That's right.

-It's the oozing of a tree.

0:36:210:36:26

-That's my understanding of amber.

-And it's that element of amber that makes it attractive to collectors.

0:36:260:36:31

They want to see little mummified insects within them. They look as though they might be plastic

0:36:310:36:37

-or synthetic anyway...

-Yeah.

-..I'm afraid.

-OK, this could be a bit of hit, then,

0:36:370:36:41

I'm afraid, for darling Anita.

0:36:410:36:44

Er, what sort of estimate?

0:36:440:36:46

Well, I would have said probably only up to £20 or so, just as a decorative string of beads.

0:36:460:36:52

-£110 she paid.

-Oh, dear!

-That could be a bit of bore, couldn't it?

-I think it could.

0:36:520:36:56

-I think it could.

-Still, you never know! Look on the bright side, eh?

-OK.

-Here comes the auction! Thanks.

0:36:560:37:02

-Mick and Mary, how are you feeling?

-Very well.

-Are you? You relaxed?

0:37:080:37:12

-Mmm...a bit tense, but...

-You done the shoulder exercises?

0:37:120:37:15

-Done everything.

-Yeah? Everything's exercised? Lovely.

0:37:150:37:18

Anyway...first up is the coffee table box and here it comes.

0:37:180:37:22

Lot 98.

0:37:220:37:23

It's an oak metal-banded coffee table or box.

0:37:230:37:26

Bids here start me at 25. £30 is bid.

0:37:270:37:31

£30 is bid.

0:37:310:37:33

35, and I'm out. At 35, it's the lady's bid in front of me.

0:37:330:37:37

At £35. And I'm selling at 35 now.

0:37:370:37:40

-I love it!

-Yes!

-That's a profit of £10.

0:37:400:37:44

It's a brass chamber stick, possibly Newlyn. £20 for it?

0:37:440:37:49

£20. 20 I see. 25. 30?

0:37:490:37:53

5. 40?

0:37:530:37:54

£40. It's to my left at 40. I'm selling at 40.

0:37:540:37:58

At £40, then, for the last time, at 40.

0:37:580:38:02

Oh, dear! £40 is minus 18. I think that's got it that time.

0:38:020:38:05

Overall now, you're minus 8.

0:38:050:38:07

Here comes your old fish, darling.

0:38:070:38:10

I hope I'm wrong here.

0:38:100:38:11

£10 for that.

0:38:110:38:13

£10 for it. £10 I see. Far corner at 10. It's the maiden bid at 10. 12.

0:38:130:38:18

15.

0:38:180:38:19

18.

0:38:190:38:20

18 nearer me now.

0:38:200:38:22

20.

0:38:220:38:23

5. 30. £30 in front of me. Lady's bid at 30.

0:38:230:38:28

I'm selling at £30 now, last time.

0:38:280:38:30

That is minus 15 on that. So, overall, you are minus £23.

0:38:300:38:36

You're £23 down the proverbial. What are you going to do?

0:38:360:38:39

-Are you going to go with Phil and his old bowls or not?

-I think we ought to.

-I like them.

0:38:390:38:43

You don't have to. Minus 23 is potentially a winning score.

0:38:430:38:47

-But if you fancy them...

-I think we'll go for the bowls.

-Going to go for the bowls?

-Yeah.

0:38:470:38:51

OK, we're going with the bonus bowls, here they come.

0:38:510:38:54

Lot 106 is this set of turned wooden carpet bowls.

0:38:540:38:59

Rather a nice set. £45 is bid. £45 I have.

0:39:010:39:06

At £45. It's a commission bid at 45.

0:39:060:39:09

50? £50 now. At £50 it's on commission.

0:39:090:39:12

At 50. And I'm selling at £50. At 50.

0:39:120:39:16

-£50. Well done.

-Can I give you a kiss, Philip?

0:39:160:39:18

That's plus £15.

0:39:180:39:21

-Anyway, bad luck, you're minus £8. But minus £8...

-That's a relief.

-..Is not a spit, I tell you!

0:39:210:39:27

-No shame in that.

-Well done, you.

-That's excellent.

0:39:270:39:29

Anyway, don't tell the Blues a thing, all right? Not a word!

0:39:290:39:33

Perfect!

0:39:330:39:34

First lot up, then, are the puppets.

0:39:390:39:41

122, the Chad Valley Sooty and Sweep puppets and the xylophone.

0:39:410:39:47

£10 for them?

0:39:470:39:48

-Oh, he's struggling.

-Oh, no!

0:39:480:39:52

5, then? £5 for them?

0:39:520:39:54

- 5 is bid. - Anita!

0:39:540:39:57

£8 now. 10.

0:39:570:39:58

£10. It's the lady's bid, seated at 10.

0:39:580:40:01

-I'm selling at 10.

-The lady has it.

-Selling at 10.

0:40:010:40:04

Bad luck, chaps. Now, here comes the Bakelite Russian chess timer.

0:40:040:40:10

£30 for this. £30 is bid. Quickly at 30.

0:40:100:40:12

Can I see 5? 35.

0:40:120:40:15

40. 5? 50?

0:40:150:40:17

£50. Nearer the counter at 50. Selling at 50.

0:40:170:40:21

Last time at £50, all done.

0:40:210:40:24

-What do you say?

-Yes!

-Not bad, not bad!

-Now, here comes the bear.

0:40:240:40:28

Lot 124 is an Orrefors glass bear ornament. £10 for that, if you will.

0:40:280:40:34

£10 for it to start. £10 anywhere?

0:40:340:40:38

5, then? £5? 5 is bid quickly. Can I say 8?

0:40:380:40:41

8. 10. 12.

0:40:410:40:44

£12, lady's bid seated at 12. I'm selling at 12, all done at 12.

0:40:440:40:49

-Last time.

-Aw!

-Bad luck. Minus 9.

0:40:490:40:52

-You are minus 39, chaps, minus 39.

-That's OK.

0:40:520:40:56

So, chaps, what are you going to do about the cherry amber look-alike beads?

0:40:560:40:59

-The plastic beads?

-I don't think so.

-Not going with that?

-We'll leave them, Tim.

0:40:590:41:04

-I'm not convinced they're amber.

-Sorry, Anita.

-It's OK, boys.

0:41:040:41:08

You're not going for the Bonus Buy. Anita paid £110.

0:41:080:41:11

I have to tell you that the auctioneer's estimate is £10-£20.

0:41:110:41:14

-On the beads?

-Yeah. You're not going with them, though.

-No.

-But we're going to sell them anyway.

0:41:140:41:18

Cherry amber beads, so described, lot 130.

0:41:180:41:22

£10 for them?

0:41:220:41:25

You bidding? £10 is bid. £10. Maiden bid at 10.

0:41:250:41:29

12. 15.

0:41:290:41:32

18.

0:41:320:41:33

20. You're in a line. Are you bidding, sir?

0:41:330:41:36

£20, lady's bid at 20.

0:41:360:41:39

Any more? £20. It's yours at 20 and I'm selling. 25?

0:41:390:41:43

-Brilliant, Anita!

-Look at your face!

0:41:430:41:47

40. £40. Lady's bid at 40. Selling at 40 now, last time at 40.

0:41:470:41:53

-I thought those beads might have got more, Anita!

-Minus £70 on those!

0:41:530:41:58

You did well, boys, to preserve your cash.

0:41:580:42:01

-Anyway, your score is minus £39, and don't say a word to the Reds, right?

-OK.

0:42:010:42:05

Well, what fun we've had today. Have we been chatting at all?

0:42:100:42:13

-ALL: No!

-Inter-team chatting?

0:42:130:42:15

Well, sadly, all programmes have to have a runners-up,

0:42:150:42:19

and our runners-up today are the Blues!

0:42:190:42:22

-Oh, no!

-Aw!

0:42:220:42:24

Yep!

0:42:240:42:26

-You've managed to lose £39, lads.

-That's OK.

0:42:260:42:29

-And your smartest move was not going with the amber beads!

-Yeah!

-Funnily enough!

0:42:290:42:33

Which would have lost you another 70! But there it is. Minus £39 is a perfectly respectable score...

0:42:330:42:40

Don't laugh!

0:42:400:42:42

Just look at their smiling faces!

0:42:420:42:44

-They have had a lovely time and it's been great having you on the show.

-Thank you.

0:42:440:42:48

But the victors today got incredibly close to taking home folding money!

0:42:480:42:52

-But didn't!

-But, overall, your score is minus 8 and there's nothing to be ashamed of about that.

0:42:520:42:58

-We've had a fantastic show! Join us soon for some more Bargain Hunting, yes?

-Yes!

0:42:580:43:03

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:070:43:11

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:110:43:15

Experts Philip Serrell and Anita Manning lead the teams on a hunt for the perfect bargain in Shepton Mallet.

Tim Wonnacott finds the model of architectural inspiration at the John Soane Museum.


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