Kingston 16 Bargain Hunt


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Kingston 16

An Israeli vase and a Coldstream Guards tunic are among the items chosen by the bargain hunters - but will they make a profit when they are sold at auction?


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LineFromTo

-There you are!

-PHONE RINGS

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My telephone's ringing? Not my phone. Whose phone?

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-PHONE RINGS

-Look at this! I can't be doing with this.

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Let's go Bargain Hunting!

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Today, we've pulled into Old London Road in Kingston

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in Surrey.

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We may be in the heart of the Home Counties here

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but are our contestants going to be feeling at home?

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The reds are relying heavily on Philip Serrell

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to point them in the right direction.

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-We can make a decision later.

-Make a decision?

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That's the last thing we want on this programme.

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While David Barby takes control of the haggling

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to give the Blues an edge.

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What did they say, David? They've come down from 88 to £40.

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My goodness.

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But will different tactics help them make a profit at auction?

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Oh, my goodness.

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-Hello, everyone.

-Hi.

-Hello, Tim.

-Lovely to see you.

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So, Kelvin, how did you two meet?

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I like to tell people I met Jean walking the streets of Soho.

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-Oh, Lord.

-In 1976.

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-She doesn't look like that type of girl.

-I'm not!

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-I'm not.

-This always raises people's eyebrows but she was a policewoman at the time.

-Ah!

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-And I was a young policeman.

-Were you?

-Yes.

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It could be classified as an act of God, really, Kelvin.

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-What do you do now?

-I'm actually a vicar now.

-Well, there you go.

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-This is what I'm talking about - God and acts of his.

-Yes.

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I'm the vicar of St Paul's in Stratford, E15,

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and I have the honour to be the chaplain for the Olympic park construction workforce.

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All of which is happening round the corner.

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I'm closer to it than we are to the traffic lights out the front,

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-so it's a fantastic role.

-Yes.

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-Now, Jean, you're no longer a policewoman, either?

-No.

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I've gone through a few jobs

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but what I actually do, if you was to ask me what I am, is an author.

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-Are you?

-Yes, I am.

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I'm an author and you can probably tell that I'm a native Londoner, East Ender.

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I did have a suspicion.

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I'm an East Ender, born and bred within the sound of Bow Bells,

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and I now write Victorian women's fiction based round East London,

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in all the streets where I grew up.

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So will you be going for Victorian things today?

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Might do, might do. I don't know what we're going for.

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I like pictures. I'm quite visual, so I do like paintings.

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But I think we're going to rely heavily on our expert,

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basically because we haven't got a clue what we're doing.

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Well, that is brutally frank, isn't it?

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-Anyway, very good luck.

-Thank you.

-Lovely.

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Well, Chris and Ros, how did you two meet?

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Well, it was during the 1966 World Cup series

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and my sister, who's my identical twin,

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was going out with her future husband

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and Chris was a friend of his family.

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I think my brother-in-law must have been very complimentary about my sister

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-because Chris's reaction was, "Any more at home like her?"

-Yes, quite.

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And of course, actually, there was more at home.

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It's such a good line if a bloke says, you know,

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"Got any more like that at home?"

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and then from behind the screen an identical twin appears.

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-Now, Chris, you're retired...

-Yes.

-..but you keep yourself busy

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-with some extreme activities, don't you?

-I decided that...

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Everybody makes New Year's resolutions

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and then by January 4th they've all gone by the by,

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so I thought of something different one year.

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Instead of a New Year resolution I decided to do either something new

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that I'd never done before or go somewhere I'd never been to every month.

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-Every month?

-And that year, I did several quite interesting things.

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I flew in a two-seater aircraft and had a go at driving it.

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I went in a helicopter for the first time

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and we visited several places, the Caribbean and Prague,

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which is somewhere I'd always wanted to go.

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-A rare old series of treats, anyway.

-Yeah, it was good.

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-Are you keen on antiques and objects? Do you collect?

-Not really.

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We're more interested in modern collectables.

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-We're fairly minimalist. We don't...

-Have clutter.

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We don't but we are interested in more modern things.

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We like good design, jewellery, that sort of thing.

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Chris is interested in architecture and we like Art Deco.

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Well, there'll be plenty of that about at the antiques centre

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-for you to pounce on.

-Absolutely.

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What about the money moment? Here it is.

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-There you go, chaps.

-Thank you.

-£300 apiece.

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You know the rules, your experts await and off you go

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and very, very, very good luck.

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Well, well, well, well...

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well, well, well.

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OK, teams, your one hour on the clock starts now.

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-What do you think of this?

-It's a nutcracker.

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It's a squirrel.

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-Do you do confessionals?

-How bad are you?

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I wouldn't mind a word later, if that's all right.

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-How long have we got?

-Not long enough.

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I wouldn't call that minimalist.

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-It's hideous.

-That's exactly what I said.

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-Do you like a nice little table?

-I do, actually.

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That glass table.

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-Oh, the glass table?

-Yeah.

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I thought you meant this one.

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-No. I can see that that's really struck a chord.

-Yeah.

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-Did you see it by the face, did you?

-Oh, goodness.

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Looks like you've got your work cut out today, Phil.

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No, that's the lid. It's a slide-on lid.

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Oh, that's fine, it's not broken, then, is it?

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Kelvin and Jean have spotted something they like

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and Phil's determined not to let this opportunity slip away.

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-I'd like to have a look at that, my love, please.

-OK.

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But he's got his own idea of what they should buy.

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So here we've got an Edwardian mahogany tray, OK?

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With a shaped gallery border

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and these normally get damaged in one way or another

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and this dates to about 1900, 1920 and it's priced at £65.

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If you could get that for 30 quid, that would be OK.

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So that's our first... Let's put it down here.

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I think this is absolutely lovely but I'm a sucker for these things.

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It's this little mahogany box with a sliding cover.

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But it's just a little artist's paint box.

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So you've got your watercolours here.

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I shouldn't think it's ever been used.

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They're a bit broken but that's about it.

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There is damage. That's probably shrinkage rather than anything else.

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-How old would that be?

-I would guess that that's 1895, 1900.

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-Isn't it lovely?

-I just think it's a nice thing.

-I want it.

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-It's somebody else wanting it is the issue.

-That's right.

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We need to get a price on that, OK?

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This is Tunbridge ware

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and if you can imagine a bundle of different coloured matchsticks

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all tied together and then they just slice the top off

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and inlay them into here.

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These are probably little sewing boxes

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and this one is priced at £32

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and that one is priced at £45.

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So it's 75 quid the two.

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I was thinking if you could get those two for £20 or £30,

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-that would be worth considering.

-That's very pretty, that one.

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-I love the tray.

-The tray's nice.

-Do you?

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-And the paint box.

-The paint box is lovely.

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-What about the two little boxes?

-Erm...

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It depends what we can get them for, really,

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because that's the ultimate aim of it.

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Let's take these to the lady and ask her to look for me.

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-We can make a decision later.

-Make a decision?

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That's the last thing we want on this programme.

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Absolutely! Making decisions is the last thing we need -

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if you want to lose Bargain Hunt, that is.

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At least the Blues have decided they like the look of this £48 brooch.

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-That looks good.

-That looks nice.

-Oh, look, there's a mark. Danish.

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Sterling silver by Carl Ove Frydenberg.

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But it's Scandinavian, which I think is quite interesting.

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We're interested in Scandinavian jewellery.

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Does it matter that it hasn't got a hallmark on it?

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Well, it's stamped there. That's what you'd expect to find.

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I'm not being too bold but let's see what it looks like on a blue ground.

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-That looks good.

-Doesn't that look stunning?

-Yes?

-Really, I...

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If you could see a mirror to see that.

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-Is there a mirror around?

-There's one just up here.

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Oh, right. OK.

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-Oh, yes.

-Doesn't that look absolutely stunning?

-Yeah.

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-What do we think about the price?

-I'll see if I can get it down.

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-Do you really like that?

-I do. I do like that. Do you, Chris?

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-If we can get it down a bit.

-OK, let's see what I can do.

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There's a lot of wheeling and dealing going on today.

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They've said we can have the lot for £135

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and that's rock bottom, finished, there is no more, that's the end of that.

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OK. I really like the paint box. That's a really nice object.

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It's something I'd want to own.

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-Do you want to buy it all?

-I like the tray.

-I like the tray.

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I notice it's got the gluing...

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Can we offer him 70 quid for that and that?

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WOMAN: 90 on those two.

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What about 80? If he did it for 80, it's a deal.

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If you do it for 80, we've got a deal on that.

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Yeah, thanks a lot, Paul.

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Right, bye.

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-Yeah. He won't eat tonight.

-He's a gentleman, tell him.

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-I'll pray for him.

-Bye, bye.

-He might need it.

-80.

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So these two are £40 each, £80 the two.

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We've got a bit of an option now.

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We can either take them... We'll leave them here for now

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but we can either put them in the auction as one lot

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or as two lots at £40 each.

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Decisions, decisions.

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But, Phil, you are persuading Kelvin and Jean to bend the rules a tad.

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Why don't we just call it one lot and get on with the shopping,

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like the Blue team?

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-David, we're having a look at these vases...

-Yes?

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..which we quite like, actually.

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But there's a slight amount of damage round the top.

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-Is that damage or...?

-Yes, it's worn down.

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-How much was the brooch?

-They're coming back.

-OK.

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-Maybe we could do a deal on the two?

-Is it from the same cabinet?

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-Maybe, maybe, maybe we could.

-Yes.

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-I think these are rather... How much are these at?

-28.

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Oh. This will be a record if you buy two in a few minutes.

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At this rate, it would be a miracle

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if you bought anything at all, David.

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That's interesting. That's hallmarked silver.

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This is a little lady's compact and you've got a mirror, there.

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And I guess, you might even have had a band across there

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and it might even have had cigarettes there.

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-I quite like that.

-What year is it?

-It is Chester, 1915.

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-That's quite early, then.

-By Curran and Charles.

-The mirror's not broken?

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I don't think so. I'll have a look in a second.

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It's nice to touch, though, isn't it? It's a nice feel to it.

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I mean, that's £65. You haven't asked me the 64,000 question yet -

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what's it going to make?

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-I think it's £30 to £50, so...

-If we can get it down.

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That would be really good. Do you want to ask?

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-You're looking at 30 as a starting price?

-Offer her 30

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-and then don't be surprised if she hits you.

-That's nice.

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-So that's why you're sending me?

-Exactly.

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Hello. Hiya. We've found a nice little something here

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-but clearly, we're going to ask you the big question, aren't we?

-Right.

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-Could we have that for 30?

-Ooh. I'm going to have to phone the dealer.

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We're all different dealers here, so we can't make decisions,

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-so if you'd give me five minutes.

-That's lovely.

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-I've left the men there, I don't know how brave that is of me.

-Thank you.

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-Right, £40.

-Oh, right.

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£40. They've come down £8.

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-It sounds a lot, doesn't it?

-It sounds a lot.

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And these, £20.

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-From 28.

-28.

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David, I've just noticed a little chip on the edge of that fluting.

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Can you see that?

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Mm. Right.

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What do you think? Should we still go for them or...?

0:12:550:12:58

I know we said we'd go for the two items.

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I really think we should probably hold back on these.

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It's up to you to tell me but we could put these in abeyance

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and come back to them.

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-I think...

-If we've got time to do that.

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-You have got plenty of time.

-I think maybe take that, though.

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OK. Take the piece of jewellery and then we'll come back on these.

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-Yeah.

-Yes, that's sound advice.

-That's very sensible.

-OK.

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Very sensible.

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Well, there's a lot of bet hedging going on today.

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The Blues have got their first item and the cranberry vases in reserve.

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-Hi, there.

-Hi.

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Right, well, we've spoken to the dealer

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and it cost him quite a bit of money,

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so the best he can do for you is going to be 45.

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45.

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Are we going to buy that thing at 45 quid?

0:13:430:13:45

-Well, I think so.

-I think so as well.

-Yeah.

-I think so.

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At last! They've decided on their second item

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and this is something I found the other day.

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What do you make of this object?

0:13:580:14:01

It's quite clearly a cannon on its trunnion

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but what's going on here?

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The thing to notice in particular

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and the bit that gets my pulses racing

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is this bit of casting on the top,

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which is cast with some initials which read VOC.

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And if you found a piece of Chinese porcelain, for example,

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that was monogrammed VOC,

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you would know that it had come as a result of the activity

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of the United East India Company of Holland.

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The United East India Company, for a couple of hundred years,

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produced for Holland and the Low Countries unbelievable riches

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and on board their ships were, of course, weapons

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to defend themselves and to attack other people -

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cannon just like this.

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So why would you produce a miniature cannon like this

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at that period?

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Is perfectly possible to set up a little toy cannon like this,

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fill it with black powder as if you were loading a real cannon

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and mount it underneath a magnifying glass,

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so that when the sun reaches high noon,

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the hot rays of the sun

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would be concentrated on that little touch hole

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and if it was filled with black powder, it would go pop,

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announcing that it was high noon.

0:15:250:15:27

So what's it worth? Well, if it's genuine and 17th century,

0:15:270:15:32

it could be worth as much as £1,500 to £2,000.

0:15:320:15:36

If it's a 20th century reproduction, then maybe £200-£300.

0:15:360:15:42

What would it cost you here today in Kingston?

0:15:420:15:46

Well, it could be yours for 60 smackers.

0:15:460:15:49

Boom, boom!

0:15:490:15:51

-We're doing well. You've got two objects in 30 minutes.

-Right.

-Right.

0:15:560:16:00

That's doing very well, I'd say.

0:16:000:16:02

Right, we need to find something else.

0:16:020:16:05

Ooh, I wonder what David, who's a fan of early Moorcroft,

0:16:050:16:09

thinks of this vase.

0:16:090:16:10

It's not my cup of tea, to be honest. I can't relate to it.

0:16:100:16:13

-No.

-No.

-But what I find fascinating

0:16:130:16:17

is that you have this very smooth ivory ground pot

0:16:170:16:21

and then this incredible sort of glaze

0:16:210:16:25

which is textured and has been allowed to run.

0:16:250:16:27

-I think that's quite clever.

-It's quite nice.

0:16:270:16:30

-And we've got...

-"Hand-painted by Daz."

0:16:300:16:33

-Dan or Daz?

-Dan.

0:16:330:16:35

Erm, but it's the price that's worrying me

0:16:350:16:39

-because I think...

-At £88.

-..that's a lot of money.

0:16:390:16:41

-I think it's a lot of money.

-I wonder if we stand to make a profit.

0:16:410:16:45

I have seen these go up for sale at auction

0:16:450:16:48

-and they make not very much.

-No.

0:16:480:16:52

-Well...

-I'm going to go and see.

0:16:520:16:54

Yes, off you go again, David.

0:16:540:16:57

I've found this. I think it's quite nice.

0:16:580:17:00

I don't know what you think about it.

0:17:000:17:02

Obviously the buttons aren't right because they should be brass

0:17:020:17:06

but all the embroidery seems to be OK.

0:17:060:17:09

Let's just take this off.

0:17:090:17:11

-Er...

-The buttons have gone.

0:17:130:17:15

-I think somebody's cut them off and flogged them.

-Yeah.

0:17:150:17:19

It's priced up at £58. I mean, to me, it's £20 to £40.

0:17:190:17:23

-Why do you like it?

-I like it, oddly enough...

0:17:230:17:27

I like military uniforms anyway - what woman doesn't?

0:17:270:17:31

But the point being that the hero in the current book I'm writing

0:17:310:17:35

-is in the Coldstream Guards.

-Really?

-He's a captain.

0:17:350:17:38

-This is a Coldstream Guards uniform.

-So you have no option.

0:17:380:17:41

And, more importantly, he's in the Red team.

0:17:410:17:44

-He's in the Red team, that's true.

-All right. You want this, yeah?

0:17:440:17:49

Let's give it a chance.

0:17:490:17:50

That lady's going to be sick to death of me. Let's have a word.

0:17:500:17:54

She'll be glad to see the back of us altogether.

0:17:540:17:57

-All right?

-Er, well...

0:17:570:17:59

She'll probably be glad to see the back of both teams

0:17:590:18:03

because the Blues have just been haggling as well.

0:18:030:18:06

-Well...

-What did they say, David?

0:18:060:18:09

-They've come down from 88 to £40.

-Oh, my goodness.

0:18:090:18:12

-Now, does that mean they're anxious to sell?

-Yes.

0:18:140:18:17

-Well, that's a lot more reasonable.

-It makes a difference, doesn't it?

0:18:170:18:21

It does make a difference.

0:18:210:18:22

-Shall we go for that?

-I'm very tempted, I'm very tempted.

0:18:220:18:26

-Shall we go for that?

-Yes, I think so.

-OK.

0:18:260:18:28

Well, I'll take it and get it paid for.

0:18:280:18:31

That's more than half price for the vase.

0:18:310:18:34

I wonder if the Reds can do just as well with the tunic?

0:18:340:18:37

-They want to buy it for 30.

-She's a lovely lady, I've heard.

0:18:370:18:41

-That's less than she's paid.

-38?

-40. There we are.

0:18:410:18:44

35. Done.

0:18:440:18:46

"35. Done."

0:18:470:18:50

OK, thanks a lot, Jean. Bye.

0:18:500:18:52

Bye. 35.

0:18:520:18:53

So you've got that for £35, we bought the silver compact for £45,

0:18:530:18:57

-that's 80.

-Indeed.

0:18:570:18:59

Then we've bought the tray for 40

0:18:590:19:00

-and the little wooden artist's box for 40.

-Yeah.

0:19:000:19:05

We'll put those together as one lot, that's another 80,

0:19:050:19:08

-so we've spent 160 quid.

-That's not bad.

0:19:080:19:10

-Are you happy?

-Very.

0:19:100:19:11

Good job, Reds. You've managed to squeeze four items into three lots.

0:19:110:19:15

Let's hope the tactic pays off.

0:19:150:19:17

Ten minutes to go. What do you think?

0:19:170:19:19

Well, what do you think, David? I mean, it's a Zebedee lamp.

0:19:190:19:24

-Well, of course, a bouncing spring.

-Absolutely.

0:19:240:19:27

-How much is it?

-78.

0:19:270:19:30

-I think it's hideous.

-Do you?

-But it's not my scene.

-I know.

0:19:300:19:34

To be honest, it's not my scene.

0:19:340:19:36

Well, I think I like the style, as well.

0:19:360:19:39

It's something we'd have in our house.

0:19:390:19:41

-Would it make money?

-No.

-No.

-Not at that sort of level.

0:19:410:19:45

I think we've got to get it down in price.

0:19:450:19:48

Erm...

0:19:480:19:50

What's the stall? Zebedee lamp.

0:19:510:19:54

Er, what's the stall number?

0:19:540:19:57

-No idea. It's got 10F on the back.

-10F, OK.

0:19:570:20:01

10F on the back of the label.

0:20:010:20:03

That's it, David. Work your magic, like Phil.

0:20:030:20:06

-Are you happy? Have you enjoyed it?

-Yeah. Very much so.

0:20:060:20:09

-Do you want to buy me a tea?

-I will definitely buy you a tea and a bun.

0:20:090:20:13

-Do we look like we need a bun?

-I want a bun.

0:20:130:20:16

Ha-ha! As the Reds go for tea, it's the Blues turn to haggle.

0:20:160:20:21

Shall we have a go, then?

0:20:220:20:23

Well, it's either that or the vases, isn't it?

0:20:240:20:27

-Oh, go on.

-It's more fun with the lamp.

-We prefer the lamp.

0:20:280:20:31

-Yes, OK.

-50, 48.

-OK, David.

-Thank you very much.

0:20:310:20:34

-We'll do 50.

-50.

-Is it too much?

0:20:340:20:37

-It certainly has been a learning curve for me.

-Yes.

0:20:400:20:43

Well done, teams. We've got six lots winging their way to auction.

0:20:430:20:48

Recap time. The Reds first.

0:20:480:20:50

Crafty Mr Serrell put the tray and the watercolour set together

0:20:500:20:54

to make one lot for a total of £80.

0:20:540:20:57

After all that wood,

0:20:580:20:59

the silver compact was a welcome relief for £45.

0:20:590:21:03

Finally, Jean thought finding the Coldstream Guards tunic was fate.

0:21:030:21:09

Hopefully, not a fate worse than death when it goes under the hammer.

0:21:090:21:13

-What happened to your cup of tea?

-He's got to earn his money, first.

0:21:130:21:16

Look, stop passing your responsibility on this tea.

0:21:160:21:19

I want to know how much you spent, exactly.

0:21:190:21:22

-160.

-Did you? 160. That's not a bad total.

-No.

0:21:220:21:25

-Can I have the £140 of leftover lolly, please?

-There you go.

0:21:250:21:29

Jolly good. So, P Serrell, there you go. There's your cash, matey.

0:21:290:21:33

I think it's time for a measured view on this.

0:21:330:21:37

-Oh, that's enigmatic, isn't it? That could be a hint.

-It could.

0:21:370:21:40

Anyway, good luck, Phil. Why don't we check out what the Blues bought?

0:21:400:21:44

They started their journey into the not-so-distant past

0:21:460:21:49

with this 1950s Danish brooch for £40.

0:21:490:21:54

They moved up a decade to the 1960s and paid another 40

0:21:540:21:57

for this hideous vase.

0:21:570:21:59

David's words, not mine.

0:21:590:22:01

But I do have to agree.

0:22:010:22:02

And finally, the 1970s made an appearance for £50

0:22:020:22:06

when they went for the spiral-based Zebedee lamp.

0:22:060:22:10

You seem to have been having a good bonding up session, you lot.

0:22:100:22:13

-You don't half take your time.

-I know.

-It was very difficult.

0:22:130:22:16

-Is she always like this?

-Well...

-I can't make up my mind.

0:22:160:22:20

-Well, there's so much choice, it's absolutely true.

-It's amazing.

0:22:200:22:24

-How much did you spend overall?

-It's £130.

-Is that all?

0:22:240:22:28

-£130.

-Yeah.

-Pretty pathetic.

0:22:280:22:30

-So can I have £170 of leftover lolly?

-Of course.

0:22:300:22:32

-There you go.

-170 of leftover lolly.

0:22:320:22:34

-There's a fine pile of money there for you, David.

-Indeed.

0:22:340:22:38

I'm very interested to hear him say "the horrible vase".

0:22:380:22:41

That was my opinion but I tried to put it more politely.

0:22:410:22:44

Well, that's typical of you, David.

0:22:450:22:47

Very good luck finding your bonus buy. Good luck, team.

0:22:470:22:50

Meanwhile, we're off somewhere splendiferous.

0:22:500:22:52

Today, I'm visiting Dyrham Park near Bath,

0:22:550:22:59

which was built and furnished by William Blathwayt

0:22:590:23:02

in the 17th century.

0:23:020:23:05

Blathwayt's peers described him as being dull and pedantic.

0:23:090:23:14

Well, there's certainly nothing dull about his house.

0:23:140:23:17

Oh, no. This is the Great Hall,

0:23:170:23:21

where important guests would have been received,

0:23:210:23:24

which would have hosted balls and lovely musical evenings.

0:23:240:23:29

William Blathwayt was an avid collector

0:23:330:23:37

and also a bibliophile,

0:23:370:23:39

so it's not surprising that he had a considerable library here at Dyrham,

0:23:390:23:45

part of which he kept in these book presses.

0:23:450:23:49

Originally, books were not stored vertically,

0:23:490:23:53

they were stored horizontally, literally sitting on shelves.

0:23:530:23:57

The books were stacked one on top of the other,

0:23:570:24:00

presumably to keep them flat,

0:24:000:24:02

and it wasn't until the 17th century

0:24:020:24:06

that books tended to morph into the vertical.

0:24:060:24:09

One of these book presses dates to 1920

0:24:090:24:14

because the family decided then

0:24:140:24:16

that they were going to sell one to the V&A,

0:24:160:24:18

which is there to this day,

0:24:190:24:21

and they had a reproduction made,

0:24:210:24:24

an exact replica, by Malletts of Bath.

0:24:240:24:28

So how do you tell, Tim, the difference

0:24:280:24:31

between the 1923 production and the 17th century original?

0:24:310:24:35

Well, Tim, as so often when dating antique furniture

0:24:350:24:39

it is a question of colour.

0:24:390:24:41

Now, if you look at that exquisitely carved acanthus cornice,

0:24:410:24:47

carved out of the solid oak, it has a sort of nut brown colour to it.

0:24:470:24:53

And when Malletts constructed the 1920s reproduction,

0:24:530:24:57

whilst they got the carving exactly right

0:24:570:25:01

running around the top of the cornice,

0:25:010:25:03

if you look at the colour, it has that kind of golden oak colour.

0:25:030:25:07

It is a completely different colour to this.

0:25:070:25:10

Now, if you open the door, it's always amusing to look inside

0:25:100:25:15

as the state of the metalwork.

0:25:150:25:18

Because the hinges on these 17th century bookcases

0:25:180:25:22

are interesting.

0:25:220:25:23

If you compare the colour of the wrought iron

0:25:230:25:27

which has come from a blacksmith's forge in the 17th century

0:25:270:25:31

with the 1920s example, it's pretty nearly the same

0:25:310:25:36

and that's because Malletts of Bath will have taken in the 1920s

0:25:360:25:42

the iron to exactly produce a hinge that looks like this

0:25:420:25:47

in the later example.

0:25:470:25:49

But if you shut the door and have a look at the piece of iron

0:25:490:25:54

that's projecting on the outside,

0:25:540:25:56

it is dark and corroded.

0:25:560:25:59

That's because iron is a ferrous metal

0:25:590:26:02

and through the centuries, it gets slightly damp, it rusts,

0:26:020:26:08

it begins to deteriorate and achieves that colour.

0:26:080:26:11

If you look at the outside ironwork on that side...

0:26:120:26:16

It's completely different.

0:26:160:26:18

Quite right.

0:26:180:26:20

And another very obvious difference between the old one and the new one

0:26:200:26:23

is the fact that the old one has two holes on this side

0:26:230:26:28

and on the far side.

0:26:280:26:30

You could take the top part off and simply carry the lower part

0:26:300:26:34

with those outer carrying handles

0:26:340:26:36

and when Malletts of Bath made the copy...

0:26:360:26:39

they never even bothered with the side carrying handle holes.

0:26:400:26:45

The big question today is, of course,

0:26:450:26:47

which of our teams will need carrying in or carrying out

0:26:470:26:52

of the auction house today?

0:26:520:26:54

Some would say there's no better place to be than West Sussex.

0:27:060:27:10

Some would say no better place than Washington and Rupert Toovey's sale room.

0:27:100:27:15

How very kind of you, Tim. It's very nice to have you.

0:27:150:27:18

Now, the Red team, Kelvin and Jean.

0:27:180:27:21

First up, they've got a whacky mixture here

0:27:210:27:24

of a galleried tray and a little watercolouring set.

0:27:240:27:28

-Well, that's an unusual combination, isn't it?

-I've never seen it before.

0:27:280:27:32

I suppose they just came together from the dealer

0:27:320:27:34

and they've run with it.

0:27:340:27:36

-Nice objects both, aren't they?

-Yeah. Not too bad.

0:27:360:27:39

I mean, the tray is a bit dull in the centre.

0:27:390:27:42

That shell is one of those ones you used to buy and put in yourself

0:27:420:27:47

in the shed.

0:27:470:27:49

-And I have seen better watercolouring sets.

-Yes.

0:27:490:27:52

It's a nice look but could do with a bit more substance, couldn't it?

0:27:520:27:57

-Yes. How much, then?

-£30-£40.

-There you are. You see what I mean?

0:27:570:28:02

Anyway, £80 they paid, which is a lot.

0:28:020:28:06

-That is a lot.

-It is a lot. I think you'll be lucky if you get that.

0:28:060:28:09

So that's not so hot.

0:28:090:28:10

What about the silver combo, fag case and power jobby?

0:28:100:28:15

-That's unusual, isn't it?

-It's much more of a collectable object.

0:28:150:28:20

You're going to get a different price.

0:28:200:28:22

And it's hallmarked and it's ready to go. How much?

0:28:220:28:26

-£40-£60.

-£45 paid.

-Oh, good.

-That's a bit more like it.

0:28:260:28:29

So what they make with one, they might lose with the other.

0:28:290:28:32

And if you're sitting at attention,

0:28:320:28:36

you'll snap to with the tunic top,

0:28:360:28:40

which is, in my view, incredibly disappointing

0:28:400:28:43

because it's either been out in the rain for a long time

0:28:430:28:46

or somebody's put it in a washing machine

0:28:460:28:49

-and all the red has dissolved into the cuffs.

-You're quite right.

0:28:490:28:54

-It's awful, isn't it?

-I'm afraid it is a bit sad.

0:28:540:28:56

-How are you going to go about valuing that, Rupert?

-With a hope and a prayer.

0:28:560:29:00

-Maybe £20?

-They paid 35. I think it's too much.

-I agree.

-Yeah.

0:29:000:29:04

I think they're going to need their bonus buy.

0:29:040:29:07

Let's go and have a look at it.

0:29:070:29:09

-Now, Kelvin and Jean, you spent £160.

-Mm-hm.

0:29:090:29:13

£140 went to Philip Serrell. What did you spend it on, Phil?

0:29:130:29:17

-I didn't spend all of it.

-Didn't you?

0:29:170:29:19

It's small, whatever it is.

0:29:200:29:21

-I bought this, which is, I think, a rope gauge.

-Right.

0:29:210:29:26

I think this is probably 1920s, something like that.

0:29:260:29:29

It's boxwood and it's in brass.

0:29:290:29:32

How it works, I do not have the first idea.

0:29:320:29:34

-I've never seen one before.

-Right.

0:29:340:29:36

I would imagine that you put your piece of rope in there

0:29:360:29:39

and somewhere along these various scales,

0:29:390:29:41

depending upon whether it's wire, rope, hemp or whatever,

0:29:410:29:45

it will tell you the size of it.

0:29:450:29:47

I paid £20 for it.

0:29:470:29:49

I think, with the internet, it's the sort of thing that could make £30-£50.

0:29:490:29:54

-That's what I think.

-Right.

0:29:540:29:56

-Look at the look on your face!

-I'm gobsmacked.

0:29:560:29:59

-I don't know who would buy it.

-A scientific instrument collector.

0:29:590:30:03

-Really?

-Yeah. People who like rules, scales, instruments.

0:30:030:30:07

-They don't have to be great navigational tools that make thousands.

-OK.

0:30:070:30:12

You can buy beautifully made little objects like that

0:30:120:30:16

and make a most interesting collection.

0:30:160:30:18

I think at £20, it's an absolute snip.

0:30:180:30:20

It could make £40-£60. I mean, hold on, treasure that.

0:30:200:30:24

-Who'd have thought?

-We'll hang onto that.

0:30:240:30:26

Hello a fiver now, isn't it?

0:30:260:30:29

-It's all on the day, I suppose.

-Yeah.

-Absolutely right.

0:30:300:30:33

And the day is cometh.

0:30:330:30:35

But for the viewers at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks

0:30:350:30:39

about Phil's little scales.

0:30:390:30:41

-Well, look at that.

-Isn't that beautifully made?

0:30:420:30:45

I know. A bit of boxwood that's been inscribed with those lines

0:30:450:30:49

-and that thing slides up and down well, does it?

-Not bad.

0:30:490:30:52

-What a difficult thing to value.

-I don't know many rope measurers, do you?

0:30:520:30:57

No but it's the scientific instrument collector.

0:30:570:31:00

-It comes into broadly that category.

-Very much so.

0:31:000:31:03

I don't think they need to measure ropes. They like the beauty of the instrument.

0:31:030:31:07

-I think it is a boy's toy, really.

-Yeah.

0:31:070:31:09

-How much?

-£25-£35, Tim.

-£20 paid by that cunning monkey Philip Serrell,

0:31:090:31:15

-who does love these things.

-He's done well.

-I think he has.

0:31:150:31:18

That's it for the Reds, so now to the Blues, Chris and Ros.

0:31:180:31:23

First up, it's their Danish brooch.

0:31:230:31:26

-Well, it's a very striking design, isn't it?

-Certainly is.

0:31:260:31:29

-You want it to be by Jensen, though, don't you?

-You do, I'm afraid.

0:31:290:31:33

Then it's a couple of hundred pounds' worth.

0:31:330:31:35

What's it worth by this other punter,

0:31:350:31:37

Carl Ove Frydenberg?

0:31:370:31:39

-Beautifully said.

-Yes.

-I think it's £30-£40.

0:31:390:31:43

-£30-£40 for a Frydenberg?

-Yes.

-OK, they paid 40.

0:31:430:31:47

So they're pretty well on the money. That's good.

0:31:470:31:50

Then we've gone with this absolutely ghastly vase,

0:31:500:31:53

a perfectly nice white pot that somebody chucked a pot of paint at.

0:31:530:31:57

Yes but it's a good form, isn't it,

0:31:570:31:59

and young people like that sort of thing, don't they?

0:31:590:32:02

I suppose they do

0:32:020:32:03

but why bother to send it all the way from Israel, I do not know.

0:32:030:32:07

-What's your estimate?

-£20-£30, Tim.

-Very sensible. £40 paid.

0:32:070:32:12

-Ah.

-Yes. I think you could be struggling with that.

0:32:120:32:15

Mark you, I could eat my words if I'm wrong.

0:32:150:32:18

Next up is the Zebedee lamp.

0:32:180:32:20

I can't imagine why it's called a Zebedee lamp.

0:32:200:32:23

-Very boingy, isn't it?

-Is it going to be buoyant, though, in the sale?

0:32:230:32:27

-Erm, probably not.

-Is it going to spring forward into a profit?

0:32:270:32:30

-Well, it might be. £40-£60.

-That's not too bad. £50 they paid.

0:32:300:32:35

They're in with a chance.

0:32:350:32:37

I think they're going to need they're bonus buy desperately,

0:32:370:32:40

so let's have a look at it.

0:32:400:32:42

-OK, kids, you spent a miserable £130...

-That's right.

0:32:420:32:46

..and you gave David £170. David, what did you spend it on?

0:32:460:32:50

Well, I didn't blow the whole lot, Tim. I bought something simple.

0:32:500:32:53

Bearing in mind you two like travelling to exotic climes,

0:32:530:32:56

I thought I had to buy something appropriate

0:32:560:32:59

-and of my taste, not necessarily yours.

-Oh!

0:32:590:33:01

So in this little box here, there is a thermometer.

0:33:010:33:07

So you would take this in your luggage

0:33:080:33:10

and then when you got to a particular hot climate,

0:33:100:33:13

you can register the temperature and watch the temperature rise.

0:33:130:33:17

And this is by Negretti and Zambra,

0:33:170:33:21

a very highly respected maker of scientific instruments.

0:33:210:33:26

-I paid £40 for it.

-Oh, right.

-That is all.

0:33:260:33:29

-You could have got one of your vases for that.

-Thank you!

0:33:290:33:32

-How old is that?

-Date wise, it's got to be round about the middle of the 19th century.

0:33:320:33:39

Well, I like it. I think it's a good buy.

0:33:390:33:42

Oh! Oh!

0:33:420:33:43

-£40 profit? Double the money?

-I don't think you'll double the money.

0:33:430:33:48

I think it might go for round about 60, one hopes.

0:33:480:33:51

-You watched those lips. You saw them move.

-We did. We heard that.

0:33:510:33:55

They said 60. Hold that thought.

0:33:550:33:58

For the viewers, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about David's thermometer.

0:33:580:34:02

-There we go, look.

-It's Negretti and Zambra.

0:34:030:34:06

-Yes, good makers.

-Yes, they really were.

0:34:060:34:09

Well, it's a proper, useful scientific instrument.

0:34:090:34:11

-Definitely not medical, though.

-Er, no.

-No.

-No.

0:34:110:34:15

-OK, then, how much?

-Well, I think it's £15-£25.

0:34:150:34:20

It's difficult to display and more difficult to use.

0:34:200:34:24

Well, it's Barby's bonus buy and he's spent £40 on it.

0:34:240:34:27

-Well...

-Has he gone bonkers?

0:34:270:34:28

-Sometimes he's lucky but I think he'll need his luck.

-Yes.

0:34:280:34:31

Well, we'll have to take the temperature up, won't we?

0:34:310:34:34

-We'll do what we can do.

-Thank you very much, Rupert.

0:34:340:34:38

..at £80...

0:34:390:34:41

-Jean and Kelvin, how are you feeling?

-OK.

0:34:450:34:49

OK.

0:34:490:34:51

Are you nervous about anything? Any particular item?

0:34:510:34:54

I think the guardsman's jacket was a bit of a no-no, really.

0:34:540:35:00

-Well, it's got terribly wet at some point, hasn't it?

-Yeah.

0:35:000:35:04

The staining has come through on the frogging on the sleeve.

0:35:040:35:08

First up is the galleried tray and the paint set. Here it comes.

0:35:080:35:11

422 is an Edwardian mahogany, shaped tea tray

0:35:110:35:14

and there's a charming artist's watercolour set.

0:35:140:35:17

You can paint as you take tea. There you are.

0:35:170:35:20

Opening with conflicting bids at £30.

0:35:200:35:22

Oh, go on, Toove. Go on.

0:35:220:35:24

£30 here. 32, can I see? 32, 34, 36.

0:35:240:35:27

-38 and 40.

-It's going up.

-40 with you, sir, thank you.

0:35:270:35:30

At £40. Can I see the 42? At £40. Is there any more?

0:35:300:35:34

A bit shabby this, isn't it?

0:35:340:35:36

Thank you. £40.

0:35:360:35:38

-£40. You're minus 40.

-Slashed that in half, then, really.

0:35:380:35:41

-Yeah, it's not so good.

-Makes the maths easy, though.

-It does.

0:35:410:35:44

-Now, watch out.

-..a compact cigarette case of rectangular form

0:35:440:35:49

and opening the bidding here at £35.

0:35:490:35:52

£35. Can I see 37?

0:35:520:35:53

£35 here, 37 can I see?

0:35:530:35:56

37, 40 and 2.

0:35:560:35:57

42 now I have in the room. And 45.

0:35:570:36:00

-48, 50.

-You're in profit.

-55.

0:36:000:36:03

60, five?

0:36:030:36:06

60 with you, sir, at £60, thank you.

0:36:060:36:08

At 65 now in a fresh place. 65 I have. 70, is there?

0:36:080:36:13

-70 I have. And five?

-We're doing well.

0:36:130:36:15

70 I have in the corner. Thank you, sir.

0:36:150:36:17

At £70. Is there any advance on 70? At £70. Selling then at 70...

0:36:170:36:22

£70.

0:36:220:36:23

-Yes!

-Very good.

-That's five short of 50, that's plus 25, all right?

0:36:230:36:28

You're only minus 15. You've just got to claw back £15

0:36:280:36:31

from this dress tunic.

0:36:310:36:33

That isn't going to happen.

0:36:330:36:35

Lot 224 is a mid-20th century Coldstream Guards tunic

0:36:350:36:40

by John Hammond and Co.

0:36:400:36:41

At £20, anywhere? What about ten, then, please?

0:36:410:36:45

Five?

0:36:450:36:46

Five I'm bid. And seven. Ten?

0:36:460:36:49

12. 14. 16. 18.

0:36:490:36:52

20 and two. 24?

0:36:520:36:55

26, 28?

0:36:560:36:57

30? And two. 34.

0:36:570:37:00

-36?

-Oh, my goodness.

0:37:000:37:02

36 will you bid?

0:37:020:37:05

-36 I'm bid.

-Go on. A little one.

-One more.

0:37:050:37:07

And 40? And two?

0:37:070:37:09

44?

0:37:090:37:10

-Well...

-It's 42 standing, thank you, sir.

0:37:100:37:14

At £42. Are you all done?

0:37:140:37:16

At £42. 42.

0:37:160:37:18

42 is plus seven, which means you are minus eight.

0:37:190:37:23

-Minus eight.

-It's a lot of hard work to lose eight quid, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:37:230:37:27

-I know. We've been all ways, haven't we?

-Yeah, I know.

0:37:270:37:30

-What are you going to do about this bonus buy?

-We'll go with it.

0:37:300:37:34

-You're going to go with it?

-Yeah, I like it.

0:37:340:37:36

-I can tell you that the auctioneer's estimate is £25-£35.

-Right.

0:37:360:37:39

-He's predicting, already, a profit on it.

-Right.

0:37:390:37:42

If he's right, you could wipe out your £8 losses. How exciting.

0:37:420:37:46

-It's all to play for.

-It is all to play for.

0:37:460:37:49

We're going with the bonus buy.

0:37:490:37:51

What shall we say for this lot, please? £30?

0:37:510:37:54

Shall we say 20, then, please?

0:37:540:37:55

And 20 it is. At £20, now. 22 can I see?

0:37:550:37:58

At £20, now. 22 can I see?

0:37:580:38:00

At £20 and two can I see? At £20. Is there any advance?

0:38:000:38:04

-Lovely instrument, that.

-Oh!

-Are you all done?

0:38:040:38:06

-I don't believe this.

-A maiden bid, then, £20.

0:38:060:38:10

-Oh!

-No.

-We didn't lose on it.

-You didn't lose on it.

0:38:100:38:13

-It wiped its faced.

-It's a shame, though.

0:38:130:38:16

-It just should've been worth a bit more.

-Well, it was nice.

0:38:160:38:19

Bad luck. Minus £8 could easily be a winning score.

0:38:190:38:23

-Easily.

-Easily be a winning score.

0:38:230:38:25

I mean, so easily you wouldn't believe it.

0:38:250:38:28

So don't tell the Blues a thing, all right?

0:38:280:38:30

-Do you know how the Reds are doing?

-No idea at all, no.

0:38:350:38:37

-They were very good at...

-Coy.

-..not showing any facial expressions.

0:38:370:38:41

Yes, well, that's excellent, that's excellent.

0:38:410:38:44

Your brooch by Carl Ove Frydenberg,

0:38:440:38:48

-I think it's a bit of a number, that brooch. It's a nice thing.

-It is.

0:38:480:38:52

I mean, I don't know who Frydenberg is from Adam

0:38:520:38:54

but it's got the Jensen look and I think that's all that matters.

0:38:540:38:58

437 is a mid to late 20th century Danish sterling silver brooch

0:38:580:39:03

of abstract form.

0:39:030:39:04

Charming thing, that. What shall we say? £30?

0:39:040:39:07

Shall we say 20, then, please?

0:39:070:39:09

20 I'm bid. At £20, now. 22 can I see?

0:39:090:39:12

At £20, now. 22 can I see?

0:39:120:39:13

£20 for this charming brooch. At £20.

0:39:130:39:16

Maiden bid with you at £20, thank you. £20.

0:39:160:39:20

£20 is a gift. That's minus £20.

0:39:210:39:23

Now, here comes the Lapid Pottery vase.

0:39:230:39:26

Abstract running black glaze and a very good line to that vase.

0:39:260:39:31

What shall we say? £20?

0:39:310:39:33

10?

0:39:340:39:36

10, I'm bid, at £10. 12? 10 I have from the lady there.

0:39:360:39:39

At £10 now. 12 can I see? At £10 now. 12 can I see?

0:39:390:39:43

At £10. Is there any advance on £10?

0:39:430:39:46

Fair warning, madam. £10.

0:39:460:39:49

-I wouldn't go with that again.

-You loved it.

0:39:490:39:51

-I wouldn't go with that again, Chris.

-Worth every penny.

-Don't wrap it into your pension fund. Minus 30.

0:39:510:39:58

Now, Zebedee.

0:39:580:39:59

Late 20th century table lamp,

0:39:590:40:01

formed from a chromium plated coiled spring

0:40:010:40:04

supporting a globular opaline glass shade.

0:40:040:40:07

Marvellous. 40? 20?

0:40:080:40:12

-10?

-Oh, come on.

-Here we go.

0:40:130:40:15

10 I'm bid. Well called, thank you.

0:40:150:40:18

At £10 now I have. £10, now. 12 can I see?

0:40:180:40:20

-Paid 5o.

-Come on.

-12 can I see?

0:40:200:40:22

At £10. Is there any advance on £10?

0:40:220:40:25

It's the maiden bid at 10 and £10 it is. £10.

0:40:250:40:28

-£40 on that.

-I've never been so embarrassed.

0:40:290:40:31

You started off minus 20, then minus 30 and now minus 40.

0:40:310:40:34

This is what you call a projection.

0:40:340:40:36

-It doesn't say much for the thermometer.

-Minus 90.

0:40:360:40:40

-Are you going to go with this thermometer?

-Definitely.

0:40:400:40:43

-We need some money.

-I feel the temperature's going down.

-Gosh.

0:40:430:40:47

-Anyway, you're going with the thermometer?

-Definitely.

0:40:470:40:50

-OK, fine.

-We're relying on David.

-No, don't.

0:40:500:40:54

442 is a mid-Victorian travelling thermometer

0:40:540:40:58

by Negretti and Zambra of London.

0:40:580:41:00

-We're opening this lot with conflicting bids at £30.

-Ooh!

0:41:000:41:03

At £30. Can I see 32? At £30 now. 32 can I see?

0:41:030:41:06

At £30, now. 32?

0:41:060:41:08

35. 38? 35 here with the book.

0:41:080:41:11

At £35. Are you all done at 35?

0:41:110:41:13

At £35. Fair warning.

0:41:130:41:15

£35. And 38 in a fresh place.

0:41:150:41:18

At £38, now. Can I see the 40?

0:41:180:41:20

£38, now. 40, can I see?

0:41:200:41:22

At £38, all done? With you, sir. 38. 38.

0:41:220:41:26

-Oh!

-Minus £2.

-Better than us, David.

-That's bad luck.

-Thank you very much.

0:41:270:41:31

That is bad luck. Overall you are minus £92.

0:41:310:41:35

-Now, that could be a winning score, so don't talk to the Reds.

-No.

0:41:350:41:39

-Well, what excitement. Have we had fun?

-Yes.

-Yes.

0:41:450:41:48

I mean, it's been seriously good fun, hasn't it?

0:41:480:41:50

-Been chatting?

-No, no, no.

-No chatting.

0:41:500:41:53

Well, I'm afraid it has been the most disastrous day for the Blues.

0:41:530:41:58

Minus £92.

0:41:580:42:00

HE GASPS

0:42:000:42:02

I mean, they only spent 130. No, no, £130 plus the £40 bonus buy,

0:42:020:42:08

so you spent £170, of which you lost 92.

0:42:080:42:11

-This is not good news, is it?

-No.

0:42:110:42:12

That Israeli pot didn't do you much good, did it?

0:42:120:42:15

And Zebedee, the lamp... Oh, dear, oh, dear.

0:42:150:42:20

Anyway, I don't think we ought to dwell on this, do you?

0:42:200:42:22

-I think we should dwell on the high point, the taking part.

-Absolutely.

0:42:220:42:26

-Was that good?

-Very good.

-It was lovely.

-We've loved having you.

0:42:260:42:30

Thank you, David, for everything, but the victors today

0:42:300:42:33

won by only losing £8.

0:42:330:42:34

So it just goes to show it's perfectly possible.

0:42:360:42:39

And you had all those pluses. £25 on the cigarette case cum powder compact

0:42:390:42:45

-and that Coldstreamers jacket...

-I know!

0:42:450:42:48

..making £7 was extraordinary.

0:42:480:42:50

And a wiped face on the rope measure. That was bad luck, too.

0:42:500:42:53

Anyway, overall, I feel you should be taking money home.

0:42:530:42:56

Morally, you're taking money home but you've won by only losing £8,

0:42:560:43:00

-so congratulations.

-Thank you.

-We had a great day.

0:43:000:43:03

In fact, join us soon for some more Bargain Hunting, yes?

0:43:030:43:06

Yes!

0:43:060:43:08

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:260:43:27

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:270:43:30

An Israeli vase and a Coldstream Guards tunic are among the items chosen by the bargain hunters - but will they make a profit when they are sold at auction? Antiques experts David Barby and Phillip Serrell are on hand to offer advice. Presenter Tim Wonnacott visits Dyrham Park near Bath where he discovers that a reproduction can be just as beautiful as the original.