Liverpool 19 Bargain Hunt


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS


Liverpool 19

The teams are under starter's orders in an antiques fair at Aintree Racecourse, where experts Jonathan Pratt and Henry Meadows help them find three profitable objects.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Liverpool 19. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

The Grand National, a race where anything can happen.

0:00:040:00:08

A bit like our show, really!

0:00:080:00:11

So let's go Bargain Hunting!

0:00:110:00:13

Dealers have replaced horses today here at Aintree,

0:00:390:00:43

which means that our teams are going to both have their trots and their wits about them

0:00:430:00:48

if they have any chance of cantering off to victory.

0:00:480:00:51

Coming up...

0:00:530:00:54

Danielle keeps her team on track.

0:00:540:00:57

-We need to walk faster.

-OK.

0:00:570:00:59

-Let's go.

-OK.

-This way.

-Did you hear her?

0:00:590:01:01

Start walking fast, Dorothy!

0:01:010:01:03

Wendy tries to derail hers.

0:01:030:01:05

£20. He's sticking his heels in.

0:01:050:01:09

22.50?

0:01:090:01:11

No, that's the wrong way, you daft...

0:01:110:01:13

And I travel into the heart of Liverpool

0:01:150:01:17

and discover an unexpected connection at the Walker Art Gallery.

0:01:170:01:21

Now, Danielle, you describe yourselves as a grandmother/ granddaughter combo,

0:01:270:01:33

but actually you're also the best of friends.

0:01:330:01:36

Absolutely. My gran is my best friend of all time.

0:01:360:01:38

We speak to each other on the phone all the time

0:01:380:01:41

but if we're not on the phone, Gran is texting me non-stop!

0:01:410:01:45

Hi-tech, eh, Gran?

0:01:450:01:47

Yes!

0:01:470:01:48

-Danielle, your passion is dance.

-Right.

-Tell us about that.

0:01:480:01:52

I started in the Form School of Dancing when I was younger.

0:01:520:01:55

-I've worked on two cruise liners as a singer/dancer.

-Did you?

0:01:550:01:59

Then I opened my own dancing school two years ago, the Skelmersdale School of Dance,

0:01:590:02:04

where I have over 40 children.

0:02:040:02:06

Are you going to teach us a few steps today?

0:02:060:02:08

Get your tap shoes on!

0:02:080:02:10

-Me tap dancing!

-Or your ballet tights!

-That I am looking forward to!

0:02:100:02:15

Very funny. Dot, what's your strategy today?

0:02:150:02:18

What is your plan to win loads of dough?

0:02:180:02:21

Hopefully just lift the ornament up and look on the bottoms!

0:02:210:02:28

What, see what the price is?

0:02:280:02:30

See what it's made of and everything.

0:02:300:02:33

Well, that's not a bad strategy, I have to say.

0:02:330:02:36

Very good luck to you two girls.

0:02:360:02:37

Now, Wendy and Duncan.

0:02:370:02:39

-How are you?

-Very well, thank you.

-Fine.

-Brilliant.

0:02:390:02:43

You shove off to France for extended periods, like five months a year.

0:02:430:02:47

-That sounds like fun.

-We hide in the hills in a region called Limousin.

0:02:470:02:53

For 30 years without a break we've gone there every year.

0:02:530:02:56

Now we've got a little cottage and our son's bought a wood just above it

0:02:560:03:01

and one of big projects is to make the wood accessible to local people.

0:03:010:03:06

That's very nice. Wendy, you're incredibly creative.

0:03:060:03:09

Your houses in France and England are full of artistic objects.

0:03:090:03:13

They are. A lot of them are mine.

0:03:130:03:15

When I do glass or do paintings, where do I put them? On a wall.

0:03:150:03:20

-Yes.

-I mean I sell the odd thing. They have little exhibitions so I sell the odd thing.

0:03:200:03:26

They're quite interested in glass because I have glass hanging from trees

0:03:260:03:30

-because I don't know where else to put it!

-You hang glass from trees?

-Yes.

0:03:300:03:35

We've got a lovely cherry tree in the garden and I hang various glass objects that I've made.

0:03:350:03:40

Does it not smash every time a gale goes through?

0:03:400:03:43

I have replacements!

0:03:430:03:45

-I make such a lot!

-You keep producing it.

0:03:470:03:50

When that's bust, it doesn't matter, I've got more!

0:03:500:03:53

That's rather a whizz, isn't it? Anyway,

0:03:530:03:57

this is the money moment.

0:03:570:03:59

£300 apiece. There's your £300.

0:03:590:04:01

You know the rules. Your experts await. Off you go!

0:04:010:04:05

And very, very good luck!

0:04:050:04:07

Smashing glass, eh?

0:04:070:04:09

Luckily, our teams will be in safe hands with today's experts.

0:04:090:04:13

The reds are led by Jonathan Pratt.

0:04:130:04:16

And the blues by Henry Meadows.

0:04:170:04:20

Right. We've got the teams, we've got the experts.

0:04:210:04:24

All we need now are some clear tactics.

0:04:240:04:27

-What are your tactics?

-Go straight up there.

-Then right.

0:04:290:04:32

OK. You lead the way, then.

0:04:320:04:35

Good. That's clear as mud!

0:04:350:04:38

-Focussed, too, red team?

-What are you looking for?

0:04:390:04:42

-It depends what's there, Jonathan.

-OK.

0:04:420:04:44

-Dancing figurines, jewellery.

-Whatever takes my eye.

0:04:440:04:48

Well, there's plenty to choose from, so let's fill our boots.

0:04:480:04:52

Fill our boots.

0:04:520:04:54

Let's head down this row, yeah?

0:04:540:04:56

The first quarter of an hour, don't worry. After that, worry.

0:05:020:05:07

We're interested in the pair of vases here.

0:05:070:05:10

What can you tell me about them?

0:05:100:05:12

-VENDOR:

-Those date back to the '60s.

-'60s, right.

0:05:120:05:15

Would you like to have a look?

0:05:150:05:17

-Have a look.

-I like the colours. And I like the...

0:05:170:05:21

-Have you seen the West German lava?

-No, I haven't, no.

0:05:210:05:26

It's very much in vogue at the moment. There's been books written about it.

0:05:260:05:31

I have to be honest, I'm not terribly familiar with Eric Leaper.

0:05:310:05:36

He's obviously influenced by that particular movement.

0:05:360:05:40

I like these two. What's your best price on the two?

0:05:400:05:44

I have 130 on them. I would do them for 95.

0:05:440:05:47

-For the two.

-80?

0:05:470:05:49

Now you're pushing it!

0:05:490:05:50

80 and we'll shake your hand.

0:05:500:05:53

85.

0:05:530:05:54

82.50.

0:05:540:05:56

I like your style in haggling.

0:05:560:05:59

OK. 82.50.

0:06:010:06:03

-Wonderful.

-82.50.

-We've got a deal, then.

0:06:030:06:05

-Yep!

-Great.

-Thank you very much.

0:06:050:06:08

My word, blues! Those tactics are clearly working. Whatever they are!

0:06:080:06:12

-That was a quick deal. Well done.

-Sorry about that.

0:06:120:06:16

-Excellent.

-I like the colours.

0:06:160:06:18

-'70s.

-It gives us time now.

0:06:180:06:20

-We can coast.

-Go and have a cup of tea!

0:06:200:06:23

-Put your feet up.

-Absolutely.

0:06:230:06:25

Ten-minute nap and I'll be refreshed.

0:06:250:06:27

-Let's carry on.

-Don't get too cocky, Wendy and Duncan. You've still got to find two more items.

0:06:270:06:33

How are the red ladies getting on?

0:06:330:06:35

Are they egg cups?

0:06:350:06:38

-A couple of egg cups for the dressing table!

-Candlesticks!

-Oh, candles!

0:06:380:06:42

Candlestick holders.

0:06:420:06:45

Quail eggs for breakfast!

0:06:450:06:46

I like that.

0:06:460:06:48

That's something I'd do is my Gran's sort of style.

0:06:480:06:51

It's not my style. You're not happy, are you?

0:06:510:06:54

I'm not saying I'm not happy. My feelings are OK, £40 isn't a lot of money.

0:06:540:06:58

And it's kind of retro.

0:06:580:07:01

And it's pink, so it's, you know...

0:07:010:07:03

-We'll keep it in mind.

-It could be.

0:07:030:07:07

Jonathan, you don't sound convinced.

0:07:070:07:10

I fear you've got your work cut out today, old boy.

0:07:100:07:12

-We could nip outside.

-Steady!

0:07:120:07:14

OK.

0:07:150:07:16

-What do you think?

-Have we finished in here? We haven't been over there.

0:07:160:07:21

OK. Go that way. Go on.

0:07:210:07:23

A leisurely pace. Let's keep going.

0:07:230:07:26

-That's quite nice.

-Yes.

-It is nice, actually.

0:07:330:07:36

Let's have a look.

0:07:360:07:38

-It's got quite an Indian feel about it.

-I quite like that.

0:07:380:07:41

-This is what?

-I'd say it's probably been electro-plated.

0:07:410:07:45

You can see brass coming through.

0:07:450:07:47

It depends on how much it is, really.

0:07:470:07:50

-Do you like it?

-Yes, I do. We could ask and find out.

0:07:500:07:54

We don't have to get it immediately.

0:07:540:07:56

-Do you want to ask, Duncs?

-Can you tell me how much that is, please?

0:07:560:08:00

-30.

-30, right.

0:08:000:08:02

What do you think about 30?

0:08:020:08:03

-Leave it and come back?

-£30, it's food for thought, really.

0:08:030:08:07

Food for thought, indeed.

0:08:070:08:09

Now, Danielle, have you found something to tempt JP?

0:08:090:08:14

Jonathan?

0:08:140:08:16

Dancing figurines. What do you think?

0:08:160:08:19

Pennies or pounds?

0:08:190:08:21

We'll have to see what the stall-holder says.

0:08:210:08:25

Um...

0:08:250:08:26

What is it made of? I suppose it's moulded glass.

0:08:270:08:30

-Could do with a clean.

-It's not that old, I would have thought.

0:08:300:08:34

It depends what it's worth.

0:08:340:08:35

Danielle's a dancer. She saw the ballerina.

0:08:350:08:38

-Right.

-How much are you asking?

0:08:380:08:40

15.

0:08:400:08:42

What do you think?

0:08:420:08:44

Do you think it... What would you...

0:08:450:08:47

-What's it made of? I can't work it out.

-I don't know.

-It's not cold.

0:08:470:08:51

No, it isn't that cold.

0:08:510:08:53

But if 12 sounds more attractive, then you've twisted my arm.

0:08:530:08:57

I think that, for a decorative figure,

0:08:570:09:00

-you might make a fiver out of it, maybe more. I don't think there's money on it.

-OK.

0:09:000:09:05

It's not an antique. It's a collectable.

0:09:050:09:08

-What do you think?

-You like that, don't you?

-I like it because it represents what I do.

0:09:080:09:12

-But if you don't like it.

-I don't dislike it, at all.

0:09:120:09:15

I think it's good for the money as well. It'll make something.

0:09:150:09:19

-Even if it's a couple of pounds, it's better than nothing.

-It's a profit.

0:09:190:09:23

-A profit of two pounds!

-Then everybody's happy with it.

0:09:230:09:26

-You happy with it?

-I am. At that sort of money,

0:09:260:09:29

you could buy three objects at £12 and probably make a profit on all of them.

0:09:290:09:33

-Well, we'll have it, then.

-Yep, we'll have it.

-Right.

0:09:330:09:37

Here we go. Thank you.

0:09:370:09:38

-£12.

-Thanks very much. Thank you.

-Thank you.

0:09:380:09:41

And you can't take it home!

0:09:410:09:43

Well handled, Jonathan. And you're off the blocks.

0:09:430:09:47

-Do you like this snuff box, sir?

-Oh, yes, that's nice.

0:09:470:09:50

-It's pewter.

-Windsor Castle.

-It's not a lot of money.

0:09:500:09:54

Let's have a look.

0:09:540:09:56

-Perhaps you need an eye-glass!

-No, I've still got fresh eyes!

0:09:560:10:01

-JD. James Dixon and Sons of Sheffield.

-Yes.

0:10:010:10:05

What can I say? It's pewter.

0:10:050:10:08

Obviously during the days of snuff. I don't know where this is.

0:10:080:10:11

-Right.

-Your knowledge might be greater than...

0:10:110:10:15

Might be in Yorkshire or something. It's nice that.

0:10:150:10:18

-It's not a lot of money.

-No.

0:10:180:10:20

-Even less if we bargain.

-Yes, we'll bargain.

0:10:200:10:23

-Have a haggle. See what...

-What's your best price?

0:10:230:10:26

-What's on it?

-25.

-Well, for you, 50!

0:10:260:10:31

-Brilliant.

-50p?

-It should go down, not up!

0:10:320:10:35

Sorry, I couldn't remember how it went!

0:10:350:10:37

It was half of 25, wasn't it?

0:10:370:10:39

-17?

-20.

0:10:390:10:42

-20.

-Slightly less?

-No, 20 would be it.

0:10:420:10:45

- £20. - He's sticking his heels in!

0:10:450:10:48

22.50?

0:10:480:10:50

No, that's the wrong way, you daft...

0:10:500:10:53

The other way! No!

0:10:540:10:56

20.50.

0:10:560:10:57

-No, he said 20!

-Right.

-So it's less than 20 you're trying to do!

0:10:570:11:02

-19.50.

-I'm totally confused. I'm 20. 20 is it.

0:11:020:11:05

-It's a deal.

-Shake on it.

0:11:050:11:07

It's nice, that.

0:11:070:11:09

-This is crazy. It's only my wife!

-I'm no good at maths.

0:11:090:11:13

£20. "I'll give you 22 for it!"

0:11:130:11:15

-Marvellous!

-That was hard work!

0:11:150:11:17

Certainly was!

0:11:170:11:19

Sorry, Henry!

0:11:190:11:21

-It's all right.

-Two and two always make five or six with Wendy!

0:11:210:11:25

She was going to give away £2.50. Silly...

0:11:250:11:28

Steady on, Duncan. It all came good in the end!

0:11:290:11:32

Reds, at least you're seeing eye-to-eye.

0:11:320:11:35

-We walked all that way without looking at anything!

-I was looking!

0:11:350:11:39

-OK.

-You may have been asleep.

-No, I'm never asleep.

0:11:390:11:41

Oh, well, maybe not.

0:11:410:11:43

I need something that's going to make us some money.

0:11:430:11:46

We haven't got anything yet, have we?

0:11:460:11:50

-We've got one object and a profit out of it, I'm sure.

-You hope!

-Definitely.

0:11:500:11:54

We need to get something else.

0:11:540:11:56

Something a bit more expensive, I think.

0:11:560:11:59

It's just finding it.

0:11:590:12:01

You've hit the nail on the head, there, Dotty!

0:12:010:12:04

Luckily, I have found something. Come and have a look.

0:12:040:12:08

These are fun, aren't they?

0:12:080:12:11

Six bonnets.

0:12:110:12:12

Look at that. Made of solid silver.

0:12:120:12:15

Most importantly, cast silver.

0:12:150:12:18

Not cheaply embossed from behind,

0:12:180:12:21

but actually cast in a mould

0:12:210:12:23

which means there's more silver in them. On the back,

0:12:230:12:27

you've got this slightly snake-skin textured effect

0:12:270:12:33

where it's been removed from the mould.

0:12:330:12:36

Difficult to read the date on the hallmark, but they're not old.

0:12:360:12:39

I make the hallmark around the year 2000.

0:12:390:12:43

All very decorative and nice,

0:12:430:12:45

but what's their function and purpose?

0:12:450:12:47

These are name place holders.

0:12:470:12:51

You use little cards which you tuck just behind the bow here,

0:12:510:12:56

so that the card stays prettily on the table. Now,

0:12:560:13:01

if you don't have too many dinner parties that you need to use place card holders like this,

0:13:010:13:06

they do have another function. You can use them for holding photographs.

0:13:060:13:11

I just happen to have a photo of an incredibly good-looking fellow here.

0:13:110:13:17

Look how well it holds a snapshot.

0:13:170:13:20

So they have form and they have function.

0:13:200:13:23

And I think a certain amount of value as a collectable.

0:13:230:13:28

180 to £240 would be my estimate of value

0:13:280:13:34

for the six.

0:13:340:13:36

But what might you buy them for here today in the fair at Aintree?

0:13:360:13:40

They could be yours, the whole lot, for £80.

0:13:400:13:44

Now, there's a feather in your cap!

0:13:440:13:48

Let's go back up this way.

0:13:490:13:51

-We need to walk faster.

-OK.

-Let's go.

0:13:560:13:59

OK. Did you hear her? Start walking faster!

0:13:590:14:03

We have to get going.

0:14:040:14:06

OK.

0:14:060:14:07

Come on, Dorothy. Keep working at it!

0:14:070:14:09

Maybe about 1960, 1970, something like that.

0:14:190:14:23

This is a costume bracelet. It's silver. Silver and paste.

0:14:240:14:28

No, it's zircon and spinel.

0:14:280:14:31

You think this is zircon? It's so identifiable as a gemstone.

0:14:310:14:36

It splits light and so you see double images through the stone.

0:14:360:14:40

Very visibly.

0:14:400:14:42

-And is it?

-I don't think so.

0:14:420:14:44

That's how I bought it.

0:14:440:14:46

Yeah. '95. Quite modern.

0:14:460:14:49

It's an English hallmark, silver.

0:14:490:14:51

Oh, crikey! How much is it?

0:14:510:14:55

-65.

-£65.

0:14:550:14:58

-It's rather showy.

-I think it's very pretty.

0:15:000:15:04

-It would look pretty on the wrist.

-Dorothy?

0:15:040:15:06

It's quite pretty, yes. Honestly.

0:15:060:15:08

-What do you think, Jonathan?

-Would you wear it?

0:15:080:15:11

Have you got the matching earrings? I'd only wear it with earrings!

0:15:130:15:17

-It suits you, sir.

-Is that your best price?

-Green's my colour.

0:15:170:15:20

-65?

-50.

-50.

0:15:200:15:23

At £50 it stands a chance. It's a nice good-looking piece.

0:15:230:15:27

-OK.

-If you think about it. Around that sort of figure, maybe.

0:15:270:15:31

-Leave you with it.

-Thank you.

0:15:310:15:33

I'll look at a couple more stands and maybe you can do a deal.

0:15:330:15:36

OK. Thank you very much.

0:15:360:15:38

-What do you think?

-45?

0:15:380:15:40

-Yeah.

-Thank you very much indeed. Thank you.

0:15:400:15:43

Thank you.

0:15:430:15:44

Thank goodness for that deal done.

0:15:440:15:46

Hey, what have you got there?

0:15:500:15:52

Come on, show me.

0:15:520:15:54

I'll see if I can sell them to you.

0:15:540:15:56

Good.

0:15:560:15:57

Obviously, a cased set of, by the size of them, probably serving spoons.

0:15:570:16:02

Are they silver or are they electroplate?

0:16:040:16:08

Ah.

0:16:080:16:09

-They're electroplated.

-Right.

0:16:110:16:13

-Shucks.

-But they may well be in our price range.

-Yes.

0:16:130:16:17

Style-wise, it's very organic, the terminals.

0:16:170:16:22

That's the Art Nouveau movement.

0:16:220:16:25

It was at its height in the 1890s up to about 1910, that sort of period.

0:16:250:16:30

I mean, ooh...

0:16:300:16:32

Let's have a look.

0:16:320:16:34

-£95.

-So we can bring him down?

-We need to get him down a lot.

0:16:340:16:39

If we can get them for... 60 to 80 would be my guide at auction.

0:16:390:16:43

They do stand a chance of making more. It depends on the day, really.

0:16:430:16:48

-We keep saying that.

-We want a better price. We'll go for 70.

0:16:480:16:52

See what he says. There might be some flexibility in it.

0:16:520:16:55

What a difference a team makes, eh?

0:16:550:16:59

Blues cruising...

0:16:590:17:00

-I don't want to throw 100-odd pounds.

-It's about spending it wisely.

0:17:020:17:06

Listen, Jonathan, we buy things starting at 30.

0:17:060:17:09

Ooh, things are turning ugly. Must be a tiff!

0:17:090:17:12

-I was going to have a look at that candelabra.

-Don't mention things.

0:17:120:17:16

We're looking at this lovely pair of spoons. What's your best price?

0:17:200:17:24

-My best price would be...

-The ultimate.

0:17:240:17:28

..75.

0:17:280:17:29

- We were going... - That's the lowest I can do.

0:17:290:17:32

-That's fair enough. Very fair.

-OK.

0:17:320:17:37

-I think we'll go for that.

-Shall we go for it?

-Yes.

0:17:370:17:39

-That's the third item, then.

-Yes.

0:17:390:17:41

-Can I get to shake the hand?

-Yes, of course you can.

0:17:410:17:45

Can I shake your hand on that? It's very kind. Thank you very much.

0:17:460:17:50

-Very kind of you.

-Thank you.

0:17:500:17:51

-Lovely. Job done!

-Job done!

0:17:510:17:53

-Excellent.

-Really good.

-Thank you.

-Time for coffee!

0:17:530:17:57

Well done, blues. You've jumped the final hurdle.

0:17:570:17:59

Reds, are you in sight of the home straight yet?

0:18:010:18:03

Have a look at that.

0:18:030:18:05

Flick a few pages over on that.

0:18:050:18:08

It's covering when he was in France and Belgium during the First World War.

0:18:080:18:13

-How much is it?

-I've got 38.

0:18:130:18:16

OK. £38.

0:18:160:18:17

There's still profit. Every page has been filled in.

0:18:170:18:21

Absolutely. It's got a lot about it.

0:18:210:18:23

It's got the drawings which people may find interesting. Nostalgia.

0:18:230:18:28

History about the army. It's always at the right price, though.

0:18:280:18:32

30, you've got leeway.

0:18:320:18:35

With that, it's a one-off. Only one person would have owned it.

0:18:370:18:40

-It's not a mass-produced item.

-I like it.

0:18:400:18:43

-You're offering it for how much?

-30.

0:18:430:18:45

That's your best price?

0:18:450:18:48

Just a little bit?

0:18:480:18:50

Tell you what, 27 and you're robbing me.

0:18:500:18:53

Then we'll rob you!

0:18:530:18:55

You're more likely to get the police is all I'm saying!

0:18:550:18:58

-As long as Jonathan's happy. I'm happy. Yes?

-I'm happy, yes.

0:18:580:19:03

-Job's a good 'un.

-Job's a good 'un.

-Sold, sealed and delivered. In a bag.

0:19:030:19:08

-Let's see the cash and I'll just get a bag for it.

-Thank you.

0:19:080:19:13

And they've crossed the finishing line!

0:19:150:19:18

Will it be a photo finish? Will there be a steward's inquiry?

0:19:180:19:21

Let's remind ourselves what the red team bought. Neigh!

0:19:210:19:26

Dancer Danielle fell in love with a ballerina figurine.

0:19:260:19:30

It's not a quality object, but it's pretty.

0:19:300:19:34

Have you got matching earrings. I'll only wear it with earrings!

0:19:340:19:38

Dotty thought the bracelet a real gem.

0:19:380:19:41

And JP eventually made his mark with the autograph book.

0:19:410:19:45

It could make a few pounds profit. It may make a few pounds loss.

0:19:450:19:49

It's an interesting object.

0:19:490:19:50

-That was slick, wasn't it?

-Slick?!

-Talking of slick!

0:19:500:19:54

You're always teeing something up, aren't you, JP?

0:19:560:19:59

-Did you have a good shop?

-Brilliant.

-Thank you, very nice.

-He's a lovely man.

-He is.

0:19:590:20:04

-Gorgeous!

-A lot of people would pay money to have an hour with him!

0:20:040:20:08

-I bet they would!

-You've had it for free!

-He paid us!

0:20:080:20:11

-Did he?

-I'm going red, now.

-Enough of that.

0:20:110:20:14

-How much did you spend all round?

-80...

-£80-odd.

0:20:140:20:18

-How much all round?

-£84.

0:20:180:20:20

-You should know!

-£84?

0:20:200:20:22

-You bought three items for £84?

-Yeah!

0:20:220:20:25

-That's pathetic!

-No, it's good bargaining.

0:20:250:20:28

-There we go.

-It's good shopping.

0:20:280:20:31

£84. So I get £216 back, then.

0:20:310:20:35

-Who's got the £216?

-I've got 200.

-200.

0:20:350:20:38

-And I've got six.

-You've got the 210 in there, I hope.

0:20:380:20:44

There's the six. 216.

0:20:440:20:46

I'll tell you, dot 1 and carry the I.

0:20:460:20:49

Here we go.

0:20:490:20:50

-There you go. That's a wodge of money, that is.

-A wodge of money.

0:20:500:20:54

-What will you spend it on?

-Something that ties in with what we've been talking about.

0:20:540:20:58

-I have my mind.

-Anyway, that's enough of that.

0:20:580:21:02

Well done, girls. Well done, Jonathan. Good luck.

0:21:020:21:05

Now, why don't we check out how the blue team got on, eh?

0:21:050:21:09

Wendy and Duncan jumped straight in with a pair of Eric Leaper vases.

0:21:090:21:14

Slightly out of my control, the pair of vases, I felt.

0:21:140:21:18

But Wendy tried to pay more than was asked for the pewter snuff box!

0:21:180:21:22

-22.50.

-No, that's the wrong way, you daft...

0:21:220:21:25

And they finished in great time with a pair of Art Nouveau serving spoons.

0:21:270:21:32

Really unusual, nice condition. In their original case.

0:21:320:21:36

We'll have to wait and see.

0:21:360:21:38

'Ello, 'ello, 'ello!

0:21:380:21:40

I suppose you're out here looking at the race course

0:21:400:21:43

relaxing because you stopped so quickly, right?

0:21:430:21:47

Absolutely. We did it in record time.

0:21:470:21:50

That's good. And what did you spend overall?

0:21:500:21:54

177.50.

0:21:540:21:55

-177.50.

-Yep.

0:21:550:21:58

-Does that give me 122.50?

-Correct.

-Yes.

0:21:580:22:03

£122.50.

0:22:030:22:06

Where's the 50p? There we go.

0:22:060:22:08

£122.50 goes to Henry. A small fortune, Henry.

0:22:080:22:13

-Any idea what you're going to spend it on?

-Hopefully something that may sail away.

0:22:130:22:17

-Ah.

-Nautical!

0:22:170:22:19

Bit of a hint there, anyway. Jolly good luck.

0:22:190:22:23

Meanwhile, we're heading a short distance that-away

0:22:230:22:26

into the middle of Liverpool to the Walker Art Gallery.

0:22:260:22:29

The Walker Art Gallery in Liverpool opened its doors to the public

0:22:320:22:36

in 1877.

0:22:360:22:37

It started off as an art gallery

0:22:370:22:41

but now is bursting at the seams with treasures of all shapes and sizes.

0:22:410:22:46

One of the things I like about museums

0:22:470:22:50

are the connections between seemingly unrelated objects.

0:22:500:22:54

Take this magnificent painting of Napoleon.

0:22:590:23:03

It was produced by the artist Paul Delaroche in 1850,

0:23:030:23:09

exactly 50 years after Napoleon

0:23:090:23:14

led a modest army through the St Bernard Pass into Italy

0:23:140:23:20

and smashed up the Austrians at the Battle of Marengo

0:23:200:23:25

which was a tremendous achievement.

0:23:250:23:28

But what's interesting about this picture

0:23:280:23:31

is that at the time, in 1801,

0:23:310:23:37

the French artist Davide produced another version

0:23:370:23:40

which showed Napoleon in the same spot

0:23:400:23:44

but astride a magnificent charger

0:23:440:23:47

looking brave and heroic.

0:23:470:23:50

50 years later, the taste in art had changed

0:23:500:23:54

more towards a sense of realism

0:23:540:23:57

and here he's on some knackered, broken-down old mule

0:23:570:24:03

being led by a Swiss peasant.

0:24:030:24:06

This, effectively, is the realistic approach

0:24:060:24:10

to that moment in history.

0:24:100:24:14

But what possible connection could this have

0:24:140:24:17

with some other objects here in the Walker Art Gallery?

0:24:170:24:21

Cor, these are flashy, aren't they?

0:24:290:24:33

Strictly speaking, a pair of torchieres.

0:24:330:24:37

They would have been designed to take some massive lighting implement on the top.

0:24:370:24:45

What's most interesting, though, is this elaborate decoration.

0:24:450:24:49

What we have here is a series of sheets of brass

0:24:490:24:53

which have been cut and then beautifully inset into the rosewood timber ground.

0:24:530:25:00

In short, they are the absolute top of the notch

0:25:000:25:05

when it comes to Regency furniture making.

0:25:050:25:09

Why are they here in Liverpool?

0:25:120:25:14

Well, surprise, surprise,

0:25:140:25:17

they are the production of Liverpool's most celebrated cabinet maker, George Bullock.

0:25:170:25:23

He was the person who was successful in getting the commission

0:25:230:25:28

for the furnishing of New Longwood House in St Helena.

0:25:280:25:32

And St Helena was the place

0:25:320:25:35

that Napoleon Bonaparte, the guy on the stairs,

0:25:350:25:40

here in Liverpool was, of course, sent to in 1815

0:25:400:25:44

after his defeat at Waterloo.

0:25:440:25:46

So, you see, there are connections between objects

0:25:460:25:50

that at first sight seem unconnected.

0:25:500:25:54

George Bullock not only provided the furniture for the new house

0:25:540:25:59

that Napoleon moved into on the island of St Helena,

0:25:590:26:03

but he also provided the furnishings.

0:26:030:26:06

Here in the Walker Art Gallery

0:26:070:26:09

are a selection of pieces of ceramics

0:26:090:26:12

that date back to the time of Bullock's commission.

0:26:120:26:16

The interesting thing is that this particular set

0:26:160:26:19

wasn't actually taken by the British government for Napoleon.

0:26:190:26:23

They felt that the design, with this stylised laurel leaf

0:26:230:26:30

would have been unkind because the laurel wreath, in a way,

0:26:300:26:35

might have reminded the exiled emperor

0:26:350:26:39

not of victory, but of defeat.

0:26:390:26:42

But I think it's marvellous that they finished up

0:26:420:26:45

back in Liverpool, Bullock's birthplace.

0:26:450:26:48

The big question today is, of course,

0:26:490:26:51

will our teams have been successful in uncovering similar treasures

0:26:510:26:56

during their shopping spree just up the road in Aintree?

0:26:560:27:01

Well, let's find out.

0:27:030:27:05

I'm over at Peter Wilson's in Nantwich

0:27:050:27:08

where auctioneer Robert Stones awaits us.

0:27:080:27:12

Gosh, isn't this exciting?

0:27:120:27:14

How are Danielle and Dotty going to get on today, do you suppose?

0:27:140:27:19

-We wish them luck.

-We certainly do.

0:27:190:27:21

They'll need it with the first item cos this plastic figure is an acquired taste!

0:27:210:27:26

I thought it was glass, actually, Tim, but when I picked it up,

0:27:260:27:30

-shock of shocks, it's acrylic, or plastic.

-Yeah.

0:27:300:27:34

And not that old, either. I don't know how we'll do with that, quite honestly.

0:27:340:27:39

-Do you put ten, £20 on it? See what happens?

-That's what we've done.

0:27:390:27:42

Lovely. £12 they paid.

0:27:420:27:45

-Yep.

-Next, Dotty went with the bling.

0:27:450:27:49

A good decorative thing. As you say, bling.

0:27:490:27:53

It's not particularly well made, but it looks good.

0:27:530:27:56

It's got that dressed jewellery part about it.

0:27:560:27:59

-Again, ten to 20.

-Is that all?

0:27:590:28:02

-Hmm.

-Dotty paid 45.

0:28:020:28:04

-Good grief!

-Is she dotty?

-I think she had a good go at that!

-Yeah.

0:28:040:28:09

A bit of alcoholic interest here from the World War One Americano soldier.

0:28:090:28:14

On the whiskey.

0:28:140:28:16

Very fashionable, these autograph books.

0:28:160:28:18

We handle quite a lot of them and some are extremely interesting.

0:28:180:28:22

Often they are a little snapshot of someone's life or period in time

0:28:220:28:26

-and some nice inscriptions, as you might expect.

-Yeah.

0:28:260:28:30

-How do you rate this one?

-We put 30 to 50 on it.

-£27 paid.

0:28:300:28:35

Fab. All being well, they won't need the bonus buy but let's look at it anyway.

0:28:350:28:41

Well, girls. £84, top end.

0:28:420:28:45

-It's not so much that, Dotty, is it?

-No, not very much at all!

0:28:450:28:50

No. £216 went to the boy. What did he spend it on?

0:28:500:28:54

Jonathan?

0:28:540:28:55

Some of these things are a bit difficult to cover up!

0:29:010:29:05

The subterfuge. JP, tell us about it.

0:29:060:29:09

OK, it's a bentwood rocking chair in the manner of Thonet

0:29:090:29:13

who was the man who invented

0:29:130:29:16

the cafe-type bentwood chair of the late French 19th century.

0:29:160:29:22

This isn't of that period, I should say.

0:29:220:29:24

It's a reproduction of that. But the cane is in nice order,

0:29:240:29:28

-and it's got style about it.

-So?

0:29:280:29:30

-Going straight for the jugular here!

-Yes!

0:29:300:29:34

Danielle doesn't hang around!

0:29:340:29:36

It cost me £40.

0:29:360:29:37

£40. Is that enough to send you off your rocker?

0:29:370:29:41

-Yeah, just a bit.

-It'll be nice for me, Granny, won't it?

0:29:410:29:44

-Have a go! Sit in it!

-Come on, Dotty, have a go, love.

0:29:460:29:51

-Nice for Granny, innit?

-This is when it snaps!

0:29:510:29:53

-Is it comfortable?

-Oh, it's lovely... Ooh!

0:29:530:29:56

-Come on!

-Oh, it's you!

0:29:590:30:01

-It's lovely.

-Is it?

0:30:010:30:04

So think about it, Dotty. £40. Would you buy that for £40?

0:30:040:30:09

-Would you buy it?

-Yeah!

-Would you?!

0:30:090:30:13

-Yeah.

-I'm not overly keen.

0:30:130:30:16

But you never know.

0:30:160:30:18

Think about it, girls. For you at home, let's see what the auctioneer thinks about the bentwood rocker.

0:30:180:30:25

There you go, Robert. Nice thing for you to nod off in!

0:30:260:30:31

Absolutely. I wish I had time to nod off in a chair like that in an auction room!

0:30:310:30:37

It never happens!

0:30:370:30:38

In the manner of Thonet. 1871 was when they finished production.

0:30:380:30:42

-But I don't think it's that old.

-No.

0:30:420:30:45

I agree. I think '60s or '70s. Anyway,

0:30:450:30:47

an old genuine Thonet one would be worth several hundred pounds.

0:30:470:30:52

-What's this copy worth?

-A disastrous ten to 20.

0:30:520:30:56

-Jonathan paid 40.

-Did he?

-He rates it as a bonus buy.

0:30:560:30:59

-Somebody will pop up.

-We'll look for them!

-And your persuasive tongue, too!

0:30:590:31:03

-Thank you!

-Anyway. That's it for the reds.

0:31:030:31:07

Now for the blues. The pair of vases.

0:31:070:31:10

Dribbly ones!

0:31:100:31:12

Yeah. Leaper. He was a potter. He persevered all his life

0:31:120:31:17

to make pots.

0:31:170:31:18

And he was somebody that seemed to be struggling as a potter.

0:31:180:31:22

But he actually produced some fantastic glazes.

0:31:220:31:25

In a strange sort of way, I think I quite like them.

0:31:250:31:29

-I'm not surprised.

-Cos he's got that dribble and the orange and brown.

0:31:290:31:33

-Mm.

-Good colours.

0:31:330:31:36

What do you think they're worth, these Leaper pots?

0:31:360:31:39

-30 to 50.

-Not leaping around too much, then, are they?

0:31:390:31:43

-Is that all?

-Yeah.

-30 to 50?

-Yeah.

0:31:430:31:46

-What did they pay for them?

-£82.50.

-Did they?

-Yeah.

0:31:460:31:50

Which is £41.25 per leap!

0:31:500:31:53

No, seriously,

0:31:530:31:56

onto a traditional antique. The pewter little snuff box

0:31:560:32:00

that looks just like silver. Isn't that amazing?

0:32:000:32:03

It is pewter. I was a bit disappointed, really.

0:32:030:32:06

When I first saw the top of that, I thought, "This has got to be Cambridge.

0:32:060:32:11

"One of the universities there."

0:32:110:32:13

But it isn't. When I had a look at some photographs, it just isn't the right place.

0:32:130:32:18

I wish we could identify it. It would make such a difference if we knew where it was.

0:32:180:32:22

-How much do you think, then?

-10 to 20 on that.

0:32:220:32:25

-They only paid £20. Duncan liked it.

-Did they?

-Yeah.

-That's all right.

0:32:250:32:29

Wendy went with the Art Nouveau serving spoons, nicely presented in their case.

0:32:290:32:35

Do you rate those?

0:32:350:32:37

I'd like them a lot more if they were silver.

0:32:370:32:39

But EPNS, they are. They're very well presented.

0:32:390:32:42

very stylish, it has to be said.

0:32:420:32:44

This typical sort of whiplash effect for the piercing on the top.

0:32:440:32:49

They're very stylish.

0:32:490:32:51

-Having said all that, how much?

-20 to 40.

0:32:510:32:54

-Oh, Lordy. £75.

-75?! Gosh! That's a good price.

0:32:540:32:59

-That's taken the wind out of your sails.

-It has.

0:32:590:33:02

£75 is a tad too much.

0:33:020:33:05

-If anything drags this team down, it'll be those.

-Yeah.

0:33:050:33:09

-They'll need their bonus buy.

-Definitely.

-Let's have a look at it.

0:33:090:33:13

Now, you happy punters. £122.50 was given to Henry

0:33:140:33:20

to go and find you your bonus buy. What did you find?

0:33:200:33:24

Well, I bought something - I know Duncan and Wendy weren't keen on spending lots of money.

0:33:240:33:30

So I hope you like this.

0:33:300:33:32

-Ooh, yes!

-Yes, nautical!

-What do you think to that?

-Excellent!

-Yes.

0:33:320:33:37

It's a Prattware jug. Obviously it's got Captain Hardy here and Admiral Nelson.

0:33:370:33:44

I think it's a commemorative piece made in 1905 for the centenary.

0:33:440:33:49

Unfortunately, it is damaged, but you can't have it all.

0:33:490:33:53

People are going to recognise it as a good item.

0:33:530:33:57

How much did you pay for it?

0:33:570:33:59

-I paid the princely sum of £40.

-That's all right!

-It'll make at least 100, easily!

0:33:590:34:06

That's OK. That's the damage, is it?

0:34:060:34:08

You can't have it all, as I say.

0:34:080:34:10

-I really like that.

-Hopefully, it'll sail away!

0:34:100:34:13

-Super. Really nice.

-Super.

0:34:130:34:15

Hold that thought that it might make £100.

0:34:150:34:18

For viewers at home, let's see what the auctioneer thinks about Henry's jug.

0:34:180:34:23

-There you go, Robert.

-Thank you very much.

0:34:240:34:27

A Prattware pot for you.

0:34:270:34:29

Battle of Trafalgar, 1805. Here we've got Nelson on one side, Hardy on the other.

0:34:290:34:36

-Kiss me.

-Kiss me, exactly.

0:34:360:34:39

-No, thanks!

-Not today!

-Not this week!

0:34:390:34:42

And we've got a jug. We think it was probably made to commemorate 100 years

0:34:420:34:47

-since the Battle of Trafalgar and the impact it had.

-A great victory.

-Yes.

0:34:470:34:52

-What's it worth?

-The estimate we're saying 20 to 30.

0:34:520:34:55

-£40 paid.

-Did they?

-By Henry.

-OK.

-It's fair enough.

-It might do it.

0:34:550:34:59

Somebody will be sufficiently intrigued. That's marvellous.

0:34:590:35:03

-Thank you, Robert.

-Thank you.

-Looking forward to the outcome with interest!

0:35:030:35:08

-Now, you both went with the Leaper pots.

-Yes.

-You liked them, didn't you?

0:35:130:35:18

-The colour.

-You paid £82.50. He's estimated 30 to £50.

0:35:180:35:23

-Wonderful.

-Marvellous.

-It's not so wonderful!

-Each?

-No, for the two!

0:35:230:35:27

-Let's hope it was a leap of faith!

-It didn't exactly ignite his enthusiasm.

0:35:270:35:33

He likes them, but not to take to anything like a leveller.

0:35:330:35:38

Anyway, first is the Leaper vases. Here they come.

0:35:380:35:41

Lot 155, ladies and gentlemen,

0:35:410:35:44

the Eric Leaper vases.

0:35:440:35:46

Several commissions left on this. So it's to save time, £40 bid.

0:35:460:35:51

45 I have. 50 is there now?

0:35:510:35:53

At £45 I'm bid. 50, anywhere? 50 I'm bid. Your bid at 50.

0:35:530:35:59

Five anywhere now? 55 on the internet. 60 I'm bid.

0:35:590:36:02

65 on the internet. At 65.

0:36:020:36:04

It's your bid at 65. 70 now? At 65.

0:36:040:36:07

On the internet at £65. Will be sold.

0:36:070:36:10

At 65 and going.

0:36:100:36:12

£65. Bad luck.

0:36:120:36:14

Five off 70. That means you're minus £17.50.

0:36:140:36:20

Here comes the snuff box.

0:36:200:36:21

James Dixon pewter snuff. Lovely thing.

0:36:210:36:26

£10 to start it off. Great value for money at ten. Ten I'm bid. 15. 20.

0:36:260:36:30

20 bid? Yes.

0:36:300:36:32

25. 30, now.

0:36:320:36:33

25 it's there. 25. 30? 30.

0:36:330:36:36

-35.

-Look at that. Well done, Duncan.

0:36:360:36:39

45 anywhere else? At £40. Going to be sold at 40.

0:36:390:36:42

Bid's there at £40. All quiet at 40.

0:36:420:36:44

Plus £20.

0:36:440:36:46

It's plus £20 which means you are £2.50 up.

0:36:460:36:52

Here we go.

0:36:520:36:54

-The spoons.

-I really like these.

0:36:540:36:56

Art Nouveau design.

0:36:560:36:58

£20 I'm bid straightaway. Great value. At £20 I'm bid. 25 there.

0:36:580:37:02

25. 30 is it now? 25 your bid.

0:37:020:37:05

At 25. 25. Look what I'm doing. 30. Well done.

0:37:050:37:07

35. 40 now?

0:37:070:37:09

£40. £40. 45.

0:37:090:37:11

45. Keep going. 45. At 45.

0:37:110:37:13

50 now. Fill it up. At 45, the bid's in.

0:37:130:37:16

45 there. 50 fresh bidder. 55?

0:37:160:37:18

50, fresh bidder coming in for the kill at £50.

0:37:180:37:22

Only at 50. I'm going to sell at £50 only.

0:37:220:37:24

That's not that bad, £50.

0:37:240:37:28

That's minus 25. So overall

0:37:280:37:30

you are minus £22.50.

0:37:300:37:32

-That's fine.

-It could have been a lot worse!

0:37:320:37:35

What are you going to do about the Staffordshire jug?

0:37:370:37:40

We have every faith in our expert.

0:37:400:37:42

-Henry's going to lead us to success.

-Pressure's on.

-The bonus buy. Here it comes.

0:37:420:37:47

161 is the Staffordshire jug.

0:37:470:37:50

Admiral Nelson. There we are. I've got £30 bid for it straightaway.

0:37:500:37:55

-Good start.

-35 there.

0:37:550:37:57

35. 40, is it now? 35 bid there. Bid's there at 35. Looking for 40.

0:37:570:38:01

-At 35. Bid's there at 35.

-Very close, isn't it?

0:38:010:38:04

40 anywhere? 40. Well done. 45. 50 now?

0:38:040:38:07

50, yes? At 45 the bid's there. At 45. Bid's there.

0:38:070:38:10

£45 and will be sold. At £45 last chance. £45.

0:38:100:38:13

-£45. Well done, Henry.

-It's a profit, anyway!

0:38:130:38:17

Well done, Henry. Five pounds.

0:38:170:38:19

-Overall, that is minus £17.50.

-Fantastic.

0:38:190:38:22

-It's OK, isn't it?

-It could be a winning score. Don't tell the reds.

0:38:220:38:26

Well done, Henry, making that profit.

0:38:260:38:29

-OK, girls. Excited?

-Yes.

-It is exciting, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:38:330:38:37

-Here on the edge of the auction. Look how busy it is.

-Packed.

0:38:370:38:40

-They're all here to buy your items, Danielle!

-Good thing. Hopefully.

0:38:400:38:45

With any luck.

0:38:450:38:46

-Danielle, you went with the ballerina.

-I did!

0:38:460:38:49

The plastic ballerina. You paid £12 for it.

0:38:490:38:52

Here it comes.

0:38:520:38:54

The figure of a ballerina. Lovely thing. Ten to start it. £10 only.

0:38:540:38:59

Ten. Ten do I hear? Who'd like this for £10 only.

0:38:590:39:01

This is no money at all.

0:39:010:39:03

At £10. Ten. Five.

0:39:030:39:05

There. £5. Six.

0:39:050:39:07

-Six. Seven. Eight.

-It's clawing its way now!

-Nine.

0:39:070:39:11

Ten. 11.

0:39:110:39:13

12.

0:39:140:39:16

13? The bid's there at 12.

0:39:160:39:18

It's going to be sold. At £12, then.

0:39:180:39:20

You wiped your face, darling. That's lovely.

0:39:200:39:22

-Break even.

-Yes. So...

0:39:220:39:25

Here comes Dotty's bracelet.

0:39:250:39:27

Bracelet. Lovely bracelet.

0:39:270:39:29

Several commissions here. £20 bid.

0:39:290:39:31

20 bid. 25. 30. 35. 40.

0:39:310:39:34

-45? At 40 the bid's here.

-Not bad, Dot.

-45 anywhere else?

0:39:340:39:37

At 40 I'm bid. With me at £40. 45 on the internet. 52 here.

0:39:370:39:41

55? 55 on the internet. At 55. 60? At 55 the bid's there.

0:39:410:39:47

At £55 and will be sold at 55 on the internet.

0:39:470:39:51

-That's OK.

-£55. Well done, Dorothy.

0:39:510:39:53

That is a good number. Plus ten. Thank you. I'm liking it.

0:39:530:39:57

Lot 136 is the autograph book. We always like these.

0:39:570:40:01

£30 I'm bid. 35 I've got. 40 anywhere? At 35.

0:40:010:40:05

At 35. 40 now, do I hear?

0:40:050:40:07

-At £35 only. 35.

-Fantastic.

-40 anywhere? At 35 only.

0:40:070:40:11

It will be sold at £35 only. All quiet. At 35 being sold.

0:40:110:40:15

-£35.

-Sold the scrapbook for £35. You are plus eight pounds.

0:40:150:40:19

So overall, you're plus 18.

0:40:190:40:22

Now, are you going to ringfence this or are you going with the bonus buy?

0:40:220:40:26

-It's a bit of a decision.

-It is.

0:40:260:40:29

What do you think, Dorothy? Stick?

0:40:290:40:31

-Stick?

-Yeah, we won't go with it.

0:40:310:40:33

-Not going to twist?

-No.

-Sure?

-Yes.

-We're not going with the bonus buy.

0:40:330:40:38

We're going to sell it anyway. Here it comes.

0:40:380:40:41

Lot number 140 is the bentwood rocking chair.

0:40:410:40:44

Super thing. What may we say?

0:40:440:40:46

£20 to start it off. At £20. £20.

0:40:460:40:49

This could be in your home tonight at £20.

0:40:490:40:52

£20 now do I hear?

0:40:520:40:53

20's there. Are you making that 25? Yes?

0:40:530:40:56

25. 30. Yes. £30.

0:40:560:40:59

35. At 30 the bid's there at £30.

0:40:590:41:01

35 anywhere else?

0:41:010:41:03

The bid's at 30 and will be sold. At £30 only. 35 anywhere now?

0:41:030:41:08

At 30 only, then. All finished at 30?

0:41:080:41:10

-£30.

-That was the bargain of the day.

0:41:100:41:13

That's your decision, isn't it?

0:41:130:41:15

That was the decision. Minus £10.

0:41:150:41:18

Overall, you're preserved your £18.

0:41:180:41:21

-Good.

-Don't say a word to the blues.

-Won't. Zip.

0:41:210:41:24

Very good. Nice little profit.

0:41:240:41:26

Well, teams, this is fun, isn't it? Been chatting?

0:41:310:41:35

-No.

-No.

0:41:350:41:36

I can reveal that you have near identical scores!

0:41:360:41:40

Oooh!

0:41:400:41:41

Nail-biting!

0:41:410:41:42

Except that one team has the nearly identical number but in the minus score.

0:41:420:41:48

That team today is, I'm afraid, the blues.

0:41:490:41:53

-Oh.

-What a shame!

-It's really crucifying, isn't it?

-It is.

0:41:530:41:58

Minus £17.50. That's what you got.

0:41:580:42:02

-Bad luck, isn't it?

-Yes.

-Typical.

-Awful.

0:42:020:42:05

-So close, yet so far.

-You've been a great team.

0:42:050:42:08

But the victors today are going to walk away with the near identical score of £18 but in real money!

0:42:080:42:14

-Yay!

-Yay!

-They made a profit.

0:42:140:42:16

£18. Here we go, darling.

0:42:160:42:19

-Look at that.

-Thank you.

-That twitchy finger is gathering it up.

0:42:190:42:24

-Here's your three pounds.

-Thank you very much.

0:42:240:42:27

£18. Congratulations. Because you got effectively free profit,

0:42:270:42:31

we're going to treat this as a golden gavel situation

0:42:310:42:34

-and out of my pocket come the modern equivalents of golden gavels!

-Ooh!

0:42:340:42:40

Bargain Hunt pins, which I will present now.

0:42:400:42:44

You put it on - I don't want to puncture anything!

0:42:440:42:47

-Here you go, Dotty!

-Thank you.

0:42:470:42:50

There's your golden gavel pin. There you go, Jonathan.

0:42:500:42:54

-Have you had any before?

-No, this is my first.

-Your first.

0:42:540:42:58

-Well, you can wear this pin with pride I tell you.

-Thank you.

0:42:580:43:03

We've lobbed out very, very few of them over the years!

0:43:030:43:07

You cracked it. Congratulations.

0:43:070:43:09

Join us soon for some more Bargain Hunting, yes?

0:43:090:43:12

Yes!

0:43:120:43:13

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:310:43:35

The teams are under starter's orders in an antiques fair at Aintree Racecourse, where experts Jonathan Pratt and Henry Meadows help them find three profitable objects. Before the auction gets going, presenter Tim Wonnacott heads to the Walker Art Gallery in Liverpool to discover how three seemingly unrelated objects are connected.