Devon 26 Bargain Hunt


Devon 26

The antiques contest comes from Exeter, with experts Philip Serrell and Charles Hanson on hand to help the contestants find suitable treasures to sell at auction.


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Transcript


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Hello! Today we're in Devon, the last county in Britain where witches were put to death,

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but we're not here for casting spells or any of that business.

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No! Let's go bargain hunting!

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Our home today is the West Point Arena near Exeter.

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And having had a quick squint at our teams

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there's just the outside chance there could be some spooky business.

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Let's have a quick peek at what's coming up.

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Today it's all about opposites. The Reds prefer the logic of science.

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Logic has been employed...

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Whereas the Blues turn to witchcraft to summon up a profit.

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-We're going to use our vibes. OK, ready?

-OK.

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-Can you feel it?

-I can feel it! #

-Can I feel it?

-#

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Here's a quick reminder of the rules. Each team gets £300 and an hour to shop for three items

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which they sell later at auction. The team wins that makes the most profit or the least loss.

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So let's meet today's teams.

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On today's show we've got boys versus girls, best mates versus best mates.

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-For the Reds, we've got Lawrie and Paddy. And for the Blues, we've got Claire and Yola. Hi!

-Hello!

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-Lawrie, how did you and Pads meet?

-We were at University of Exeter.

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On the first day our eyes met across the room at the gym and the rest is history.

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-You thought, "He's muscular. I'll go for him"?

-We were both skinny.

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-What are you up to now?

-I'm studying a Master's in Economics at Oxford

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and Paddy's studying water environmental management at Bristol.

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-So you are perpetual students.

-We are.

-You got into the groove.

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-We don't want to get away.

-So is a doctorate coming your way? Prolong it another 4 or 5 years?

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-Potentially, yes. Paddy's doing a PhD.

-This is something else!

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Absolutely marvellous. What do you do in your spare time?

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I've been in a band for a while and we played some festivals and I enjoy sport as well.

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-What sort of sports?

-I rowed at Oxford for a while, but I'm giving that a miss now.

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Cycling will be the next one.

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-Paddy, you're interested in antiques?

-Well, yeah, my mother is an artist and a painter.

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My brother's a sculptor and stonemason, so I have an appreciation for art.

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Being scientists, we do like scientific instruments.

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Some sell for a big old price. So what are your tactics - spend it all, or nothing? What?

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We're going to go out pretty hard, pretty fast. Spend big. Go outrageous, I think.

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-Get some quirky items.

-Gosh! Stand by for this.

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If it goes with your pimped up hats, it should be quite a performance.

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Well done. Very nice to meet you. Girls, are you quaking?

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-No!

-You're not.

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-So how did you meet Yola?

-We met at college about...sixteen years ago.

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-Since then we've been best friends.

-And what do you do now, Claire?

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I support families with children in care. I supervise the contacts between children and parents.

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-Is this social services?

-It is.

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-Is that a fun job or...?

-It can be. It can be hard at times.

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You never know what you're going to get from day to day.

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-Quite stressful, I would think.

-It can be.

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-What line of work are you in, darling?

-I work with homeless people as a meaningful occupation worker.

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I organise activities and make sure people have proper life skills and we lobby government

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-for specific causes as well. It's a busy role.

-I bet it is.

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-What do you like to collect?

-I like things from the occult.

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I like things a little bit spooky and magical.

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Could you be sufficiently drawn to something that you could predict how much profit it would make?

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-Why bother going to the auction? Just get this kid...

-It'd be a boring programme!

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That's a brilliant concept. So what are your tactics? What'll you get up to?

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-We'll just wait for something to attract us...

-Jump out at you.

-And we'll chat to our expert.

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Very sensible. What fun. Here we go, then. £300 apiece.

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You know the rules. Your experts await. And off you go! Very, very, very good luck.

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Love the hairdo.

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Hoping to ride to victory for the Reds today is expert Philip Serrell.

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And brushing up on some magic for the Blues is antiques wizard Charles Hanson.

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We've got two young girls to take on. How will we apply ourselves to this?

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We'll exploit the powers of logic that we've built up in education.

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-Do you feel vibes?

-I do.

-Really?

-Really.

-What are they telling you?

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Well, you're just drawn to things. Like you're drawn to a partner that you fancy.

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I think the same thing with objects.

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We'll use mathematical reasoning. Buy low, sell high.

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Oh, Lord help us. Come on.

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-Can you feel the vibe now? Yola?

-Yes, I can feel the vibe.

-Look at those vases.

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-What are they saying to you?

-They're saying, "Look at my bottom!"

-Oh!

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Focus the mind.

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-Look at them.

-They're fun.

-Aren't they wonderful?

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-Oh, just look at those vases. They have a wonderful magic about them.

-Haven't they?

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-They are £1,800.

-I don't think the love we're expressing...

-The magic isn't working, is it?

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-Onwards!

-Onwards!

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Onwards and upwards, exactly.

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Hope you're still feeling the vibe, girls.

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So the search continues and no stone is left unturned in the quest for a bargain.

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Correct me if I'm wrong. These are a set of oars. They look too short to be out of an eight.

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Mm. We've had a closer look. This looks like the ceremonial blade

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given to the First Eight crew of Oriel College during summer racing.

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As you can see here, we have the four colleges of the Oriel team in 1949.

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And same here for the First Eight.

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The other thing is that they are very much a ceremonial thing.

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It's a sacred rite to have earned one. As we can see on the back,

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they would have been mounted on the wall of whoever won them in 1949.

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-You both like these, do you?

-Definitely.

-Well, let's not show too much enthusiasm here.

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Sir?

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What's the best you can do on the pair?

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-Very best.

-90.

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-£90 the pair?

-£90.

-What do you think, guys?

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-It's a good price.

-Is that the very best? There is no more?

-That's it. End of story.

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-Do you like them?

-I really like them.

-A lot of blood, sweat and tears have gone into these boys.

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-Get the money, girls. Pay the man.

-Thank you so much.

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Pulling away smartly from the starting line,

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the Reds take the lead, just 10 minutes into the shop.

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-So what's this, then?

-This is a fantastic cauldron.

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-Could you cast a spell on this? Could you actually cast a spell?

-I could.

-Really?

-Yes.

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-Yeah...

-So could you turn it into a frog or something?

-No!

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What you send out comes back to you. If I turned you into a frog,

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-what on earth would I become?!

-With those ears, perhaps a witch's cat.

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Miaow!

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-Selling to people at auction, they'll be used to the same things, but something different...

-OK.

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Well, let's go...let's go over here and see what we can find.

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Oh, Claire, look at this! This is pretty damn gorgeous.

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-Absolutely.

-Look at this.

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What I like is it's a soft wood. It's well carved. Late Victorian.

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-And the plate glass appears to be original.

-Yeah.

-Quite a stylish mirror, actually.

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Aha! Now this is interesting.

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Isn't it just some mathematician drawing...?

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No. I don't know what they mean because everyone has their own... They're like hieroglyphics almost.

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-They're a code for some sort of spell. A witch's scrying mirror.

-A witch's...?

-Scrying mirror.

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-So it would have... it would have belonged to a witch?

-Oh, yes, most definitely.

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-Or given to a witch, for sure.

-Well, I'm spellbound.

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-No, I am.

-Can we get it, then?

-How much is it?

-What does it say?

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-£48 it says.

-Ah...

-Shall we try and haggle?

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-Hello!

-Morning.

-Morning, sir. Good morning to you.

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We're admiring this mirror. Priced at £48. What's the best price?

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The very best I would normally do would be 35.

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-What about 30?

-I can't do that. Who's your opposition today?

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-Philip Serrell.

-Then I can find a little bit more.

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-Yay!

-I can do 33. It gives me a £3 profit.

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-I reckon that's good.

-I've never sold a witch's item, but this is a first.

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I think at £33 with a guide price hopefully between 30 and 40, it stands a good chance.

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I'd normally say that's the death, but I'll say it's the best I can do.

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-Good idea!

-Yeah. It's up to you.

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

-Yes, we'll take it, sir.

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So the bewitching Blues have now purchased their first item.

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Is Charles starting to fall under their spell?

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Let's have a look in here, my love.

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-Now you did want quirky.

-We did want quirky.

-Do you know what this is?

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-I have no idea.

-Shall I give you a clue?

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-What you always wanted!

-A moustache brush.

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We expect a bit more luxurious growth. Imagine the Edwardian gentleman brushing his moustache.

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-I've never seen one before.

-Nor are you likely to again!

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-Do you like it?

-It is the quirkiness we required.

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I think it's brilliant. Brushing your moustache is quite a funny image with that.

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What's the price on that? 38?

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-What's the best you could do on that one, love?

-Em, I'll do 30.

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-30.

-You see, I think that's going to make £20-£30 at auction,

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-which means we need to try to get it lower.

-Could you do 25?

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-It's up to you, my love.

-Yeah.

-So we'll have that?

-For 25.

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-Thank you very much.

-Thank you very much.

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Grooming themselves for calculated success, that's the second item for the Reds.

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-I think we're doing quite well.

-19 minutes on the clock, got two items, spent £115.

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Maximising efficiency. Logic was employed.

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They're doing really well. The danger is to relax

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and if we take our foot off the pedal it can all go horribly wrong.

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Now let's take a peek at what I've found over here.

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These places are marvellous, aren't they? Just look at this fellow.

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Doesn't look very special in this tatty and filthy frame,

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but if I turn it over and if we carefully remove the card back,

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and take the picture out,

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you can see that what we've got here is rather fun.

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We've got a bloke who's got a nose

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that is the colour of a pillar box that is positively throbbing.

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He has spent a lifetime pouring alcohol down his throat.

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He's riding his trusty mare which is about to refuse a fence.

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And as the horse has put the brakes on, so this drunken man

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is about to be projected over the top of the horse's head

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and land on the other side. Tee hee hee. There's an inscription.

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"Blow'd if I shan't be spilt and no mistake!"

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What he's saying is, "I'm blowed if I'm not about to fall off,"

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which he is. And it's likely to be the work of a man called John Leech.

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He became a famous illustrator for Punch magazine.

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But he was also known as a caricaturist and that's what this is.

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As a Leech caricature this thing is worth about £150-£250.

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What would it cost you here today in Exeter? In the tatty old frame it could be yours for 30.

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Back to the shopping. We're halfway through and it's time to talk team tactics.

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We've got £115. To spend £100 on something would be nice.

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-Well-calculated spending.

-No pressure on Phil here(!)

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-Claire, we have to get spooky. We need to use our vibes.

-Yes.

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-OK, ready?

-OK.

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-Can you feel it?

-I can feel it! #

-Can I feel it?

-#

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Hmm, very different plans. Logic versus the occult. That's a first for Bargain Hunt.

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-Isn't that a lovely chair?

-Yes.

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-And how much is that lovely chair, Charles?

-If you were a lady in the late 17th century,

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-this could have been in your hallway. Isn't it great?

-Yeah.

-1680. A chair.

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Who was King of England then? Charles II.

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-Ah!

-So it's his period. Just look at the quality.

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This arch cresting is typical of the 1680s, 1690s.

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This seat is new. Yeah, this is all new.

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I just think that's a nice chair.

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-Are we going to make money on this?

-What do you think?

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-If the price came down a little bit.

-Can't I put it up?

-No!

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-Go on, go on.

-Put it down even more.

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-That could be £90.

-OK.

-I like the chair, but I don't like the £90.

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Don't you? 85.

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-- 83. - 83?!

-Go on!

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- Oh, no. - £83.50!

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- Go on. - Where do you find these women?

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-Do you know, I don't know?!

-Please, please.

-All right, then.

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And that's the second purchase for the Blues. Well done, girls.

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You're certainly persuasive. What's this? Time for Shakespeare?

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Double double, toil and trouble?

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Fire burn and cauldron bubble!

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They're a handful, but I'm enjoying it. We came across that interesting mirror with that witch feel to it.

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But I took them back to the real history of that wonderful late-17th century chair.

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So far, so good. I think we've got an interesting last 15 minutes.

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Like a hell broth, boil and bubble!

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Hmm, we don't normally get quotes from Macbeth on this show.

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Meanwhile, the pressure is getting to our Reds who need a sit down.

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It's good for a rest, this one. Phil, what are you thinking?

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-Come rest with us.

-I quite like that.

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It's only when you stand here, underneath it's shaped, isn't it?

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Yep.

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I bought a pair of these in France for 100 euros, so how much is this?

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-£100.

-That's double up, isn't it?

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Why do you two like this?

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We've got lots of benches at home and I like how sturdy it is.

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-My brother's a carpenter so I like wooden things. It's quite well made. It's nice.

-Yeah.

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Let's have a look at it.

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I do like that. I don't know how accidental that is or not.

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-Mortise and tenon here, look.

-I like that.

-Let's get the man over.

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-See what he can do.

-Good sir...

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-Could you do £60?

-< 55.

-£55.

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-Done.

-I think we can do that.

-I think you got a good buy there.

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-He's been really good to you.

-Thank you very much. We have a deal.

-Thank you very much.

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-Are you two going to carry it?

-Oh, yeah.

-Follow me.

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Ready? Legs apart, lift together.

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Ready? Off we go.

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Frogmarched by Phil, the boys can bench press away

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knowing that all three items are well and truly in the bag.

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-It's all three pieces.

-Oh, wow!

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And it's French, apparently. It's Poseidon or Neptune.

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-OK.

-Yes.

-Claire, observations?

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-Em, it's...

-A garniture.

-It's a garniture.

-Which is...?

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-I don't know.

-What's a garniture?

-You tell us.

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Essentially, here's your centrepiece.

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Your very desirable pewter or bronze.

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So it's a bronze-coated clock, which is, of course, Neptune.

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And then, secondly, you've got your two little supports of your garniture.

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-Seamen.

-Here's a fisherman or seaman.

-They can be taken off.

-I quite like these, actually.

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They're a real statement piece.

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-And how much is it?

-I think 175.

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And I would say, Yola, if it came into auction its market value

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is probably between £100 and £200.

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And it's the sort of thing that a high decorator's market would be happy to buy.

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-There's one best price only.

-OK.

-£110.

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-I really like it, I have to say.

-And it did call us.

-Yeah.

-OK.

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-Yeah, are you sure? Do it!

-Happy! Sure! Do it! Sir, we'll take it. Thanks ever so much.

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Marvellous. The Blues now have all three items. Having worked a little magic on the shopping

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their ultimate test is now on Charles.

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-I know you're not really into my magic things.

-No, it unnerved me.

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-Don't. I'm nice, I'm nice, honestly.

-OK.

-But I want to prove to you that magic exists. Ready?

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ALL: One, two, three!

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Ribbit!

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That's it. Time's up. That's your lot. Let's check out what the Reds have got.

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An awesome pair of illuminated Oxford University blades rowed in at £90.

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They shaved £25 off their budget by investing in a silver moustache brush.

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And finally they paid £55 for an elm Arts and Crafts-style bench.

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That's the trouble with a chancey oar, isn't it?

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You can never rely on it being a cutting-edge blade.

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Now listen, chaps, which is your favourite piece, Pads?

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-I think the moustache comb.

-Is it?

-It's quirky, interesting, a bit out there.

-A bit on here.

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-I would emphatically agree.

-So the favourite is the moustache comb. What'll bring the biggest profit?

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-I think the bench.

-The bench?

-I thought the oars, but I think the bench now as well.

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Yes. It's special that bench.

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-It's nice.

-OK, fine. So you spent how much in total?

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-170?

-£170.

-£130 of leftover lolly, please.

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-He's the accountant.

-There you go.

-130. That goes straight over to the Serrell.

-Yeah.

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-Who I hope will blow the lot.

-What I really want is a hat so I'll try to find one.

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-It's the way forward.

-It'll cost you a good deal less than £130. Good luck!

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Meanwhile, check out what the Blue team bought.

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Our spellbound Blues bought a carved witch's mirror for £33.

0:20:580:21:03

They spent £83.50 on a late-17th-century walnut and elm chair.

0:21:030:21:09

And ooh-la-la! Finally, they spent £110 on a spelter French clock garniture.

0:21:090:21:16

Cor, that was a shop, girls! Was that not a shop?

0:21:180:21:22

-Have you been frightening the natives?

-I frightened Charles.

0:21:220:21:27

-Aww. He's not so easily scared, Charles.

-Oh, you'd be surprised!

0:21:270:21:33

-Listen, which is your favourite piece?

-The chair.

-That's your favourite?

-It's very nice.

0:21:350:21:40

-Do you go along with that?

-No, witch's mirror for me.

0:21:400:21:43

-Is that going to bring the biggest profit?

-I think it is, yeah.

0:21:430:21:48

-Possibly.

-Best not to go against her, I'd say.

0:21:480:21:51

OK, fine. And you spent how much in total?

0:21:510:21:55

226.50.

0:21:550:21:58

So do I get £73.50?

0:21:580:22:00

-Correct.

-£73.50.

-There you go.

-And that is a cussed amount of money...

-Absolutely.

0:22:000:22:06

-..to count up.

-And some change as well.

-Make sure you spend the 50.

-I will indeed.

0:22:060:22:11

-Have you got any idea what you're going to buy?

-Something mystical, magical.

0:22:110:22:15

I'm feeling spellbound by this lady here, so something to really conjure up something quite exciting.

0:22:150:22:22

You've dreamt up all the words. You got the whole lot out, mate. Well done.

0:22:220:22:28

Anyway, very good luck. Have a nice cup of tea.

0:22:280:22:30

Meanwhile, we're heading off somewhere absolutely gorgeous.

0:22:300:22:34

Welcome to Antony in Cornwall,

0:22:420:22:46

named Antony after the parish in which it resides.

0:22:460:22:50

This has been home to the Carew family for hundreds of years.

0:22:500:22:55

The Carews are an ancient family, deriving their name from Carew Castle in Pembrokeshire.

0:22:570:23:03

They first settled here in Cornwall in the early 15th century.

0:23:030:23:07

Over the next 500 years,

0:23:100:23:13

the family have accumulated a considerable collection of antiques and works of art,

0:23:130:23:19

for example, set off by this original, grey and white marble fire surround,

0:23:190:23:24

fitted when the house was built in the 1720s.

0:23:240:23:28

But some of the furniture in the place truly is spectacular.

0:23:290:23:34

And on this side of the room, the most eye-catching piece is this side table.

0:23:340:23:40

Just look at the detail in this.

0:23:400:23:42

This is a table made around 1715 to 1725.

0:23:420:23:48

The masks themselves are very unusual.

0:23:480:23:51

He's got short, little horns and a very jovial face

0:23:510:23:56

because he's connected with Bacchus, God of drink and all that jollity,

0:23:560:24:02

and this table probably originally stood in a dining room,

0:24:020:24:07

covered in bottles and accoutrements connected with drink.

0:24:070:24:12

The really unusual feature, though, is the foot on each of the four supports.

0:24:120:24:18

That has been carved in the round naturalistically with a horse's hoof.

0:24:180:24:23

Very, very strange and rare.

0:24:230:24:26

If you look at the house brochure, there's a suggestion

0:24:260:24:31

that this table is the work of the famous Exeter cabinet-maker, John Channon.

0:24:310:24:37

As John Channon was born in 1711,

0:24:370:24:39

it's unlikely that he was capable of making a table quite as good as this

0:24:390:24:45

when he was only nine or ten years of age,

0:24:450:24:48

so he's not the cabinet-maker.

0:24:480:24:51

But it is possible that another piece of furniture in this room,

0:24:510:24:55

which has got a German root to it,

0:24:550:24:58

might be connected with John Channon.

0:24:580:25:00

That's because this piece on the other side of the room is German.

0:25:020:25:06

This was made at the beginning of the Rococo period.

0:25:060:25:11

And what we've got is an elaborate arrangement of drawers and surfaces,

0:25:110:25:16

applied with gilt metal mounts.

0:25:160:25:19

Open it up and a very handsome writing surface is revealed.

0:25:210:25:26

And because this thing is German, it's properly engineered

0:25:260:25:30

with these structural struts that support this,

0:25:300:25:33

so that a man could write quite meaty papers on this leather surface

0:25:330:25:38

with all the accoutrements and bits and pieces that he might use in the fitted back.

0:25:380:25:45

If I shut it up, we can have a demonstration of just how practical this piece is

0:25:450:25:52

because around the knee hole here, we've got some useful drawers.

0:25:520:25:56

A standard drawer there like that, look, with oak linings.

0:25:560:26:00

And if we take the key, try down below, this is a cupboard door

0:26:000:26:05

and it opens to reveal another drawer.

0:26:050:26:08

It's got a double lock to that which with a bit of effort and heave-ho...

0:26:090:26:13

Whoopsy! With a hinged flap like that,

0:26:130:26:17

it reveals an oak strong box

0:26:170:26:20

because this is where the master of the house would have stuffed all those wads of cash.

0:26:200:26:25

Wads and wads of £300!

0:26:250:26:29

Just like the wads of £300 that we gave our teams to spend,

0:26:290:26:33

the fruits of which we're about to see over at the auction.

0:26:330:26:38

Today, we've come east to Bearnes Hampton & Littlewood's Saleroom in Honiton

0:26:470:26:54

-to be with Brian Goodison-Blanks. Brian, good morning.

-Good morning.

-Lovely to be here.

0:26:540:27:00

Gosh, we've got a selection of objects today!

0:27:000:27:03

First of all, these two oars.

0:27:030:27:05

They're quite interesting. They're nicely illuminated.

0:27:050:27:09

This is the Oxford University Boat Club for the coxswainless fours.

0:27:090:27:13

One of them has suffered a bit with the varnish over the years and has deteriorated.

0:27:130:27:18

-And they've been chopped down.

-And remounted on these poles. They should make £60 to £80.

0:27:180:27:24

-£90 paid by our...

-Right.

-..coxless two.

0:27:240:27:28

Anyway, there we go. Next is the so-called moustache brush.

0:27:280:27:33

That's rather interesting. Not a moustache, but more of a muff brush in the small leather purse like that.

0:27:330:27:40

This is for a lady and not many ladies that I know have moustaches.

0:27:400:27:46

It's not unknown, but generally, they wouldn't go around with a brush to brush their moustache,

0:27:460:27:51

so something else about their person is the answer, isn't it?

0:27:510:27:55

-You're quite right.

-It's a muff brush. They have it on a chain.

0:27:550:27:59

This is just to keep the stole or the fur in nice condition.

0:27:590:28:03

-It's quite a rare thing, actually.

-It is quite unusual.

0:28:030:28:07

And it may make £10 to £15.

0:28:070:28:09

-£10 to £15?

-Yes, it could do a bit more.

-£25 they paid.

-Right.

0:28:090:28:13

And last but not least is the lovely bench

0:28:130:28:17

which is a nice colour and a bench is a very practical thing in a kitchen or a hallway.

0:28:170:28:22

It's a good thing. With larger pieces of furniture, modern houses are a little bit small,

0:28:220:28:28

-but it's a well-made, hand-crafted thing.

-What's your estimate?

0:28:280:28:32

-About £50 to £60.

-That's great. They paid £55. That's bang in the middle.

0:28:320:28:36

Super-duper. They'll do all right.

0:28:360:28:38

They'll not need their bonus buy, but let's have a look at it anyway.

0:28:380:28:42

OK, Lawrie, Paddy, this is exciting.

0:28:420:28:45

You spent £170. You gave P Serrell 130 to spend.

0:28:450:28:49

-We'll take the rag off and that's what he bought.

-Oh, wow!

0:28:490:28:54

-Is that a good "wow" or a bad "wow"?

-It's lovely.

0:28:540:28:57

-It's a chest?

-Yeah.

-Come on, let's pick it up.

0:28:570:29:00

I said I'd get something sort of Bargain Hunt related and I think that's a Bargain Hunt bargain.

0:29:000:29:07

It cost me 40 quid and it's a coaching trunk, I would think, hide...leather covered.

0:29:070:29:13

It would date somewhere, I would think, between...

0:29:130:29:16

If you were lucky, it's 1780 and if you weren't so lucky, it would be about 1820, 1830.

0:29:160:29:22

And I paid 40 quid for it which I think is nothing.

0:29:220:29:25

-What might this sell for?

-I think it would at least... I hope double its money.

0:29:250:29:30

If we're really lucky, it might make three figures. It's an old-fashioned lot and I think it'll do all right.

0:29:300:29:35

Add it to the rest of the profits that we make today.

0:29:350:29:39

-I love the optimism.

-The innocence of youth!

0:29:390:29:43

On that lovely note, why don't we find out what the auctioneer thinks about Phil's chest?

0:29:430:29:49

Right, Brian, a little something for the weekend.

0:29:500:29:53

Yes, something you can pack to go away for the weekend. It's a nice period piece, 18th century.

0:29:530:29:59

It's had a hard life over the years, but it has the initials of the owner on the top, the E and the A.

0:29:590:30:05

It's very well worn around the edges, but it has its original iron handles.

0:30:050:30:09

This would have been perhaps a Louis Vuitton of its period.

0:30:090:30:13

-Nice one. What do you think it's worth?

-Probably £80 to £100.

0:30:150:30:19

That's brilliant. Serrell only paid 40, if the team go with it, which, of course, they may not do.

0:30:190:30:25

OK, that's it for the Reds, now for the Blues...

0:30:250:30:28

We've got this mirror frame, oak, beautifully carved.

0:30:280:30:33

It is. It's nicely marked at the bottom there.

0:30:330:30:36

I think it was bought as... It says it's a witch's mirror.

0:30:360:30:39

Witch's mirrors or scrying mirrors, as they're known, are usually circular.

0:30:390:30:44

It's got some writing on the back which I don't think quite relates to the mirror.

0:30:440:30:49

-There's nothing witchy about it.

-It's going to make about £30 to £40.

0:30:490:30:53

£33 paid, so they're in the frame for that.

0:30:530:30:56

Next is the walnut and... I don't know what it is. Ash? Something or other, that high-backed chair.

0:30:560:31:03

I don't really like it. It's in a terrible state.

0:31:030:31:06

It is, unfortunately. Bits of the period are still on there, but not quite enough.

0:31:060:31:11

It's got a new seat and new stretchers to the back and it still retains a crack to the back panel.

0:31:110:31:17

Useless as a chair, a bit of decoration.

0:31:170:31:20

A bit of decoration and I think it will probably make about £60 to £80.

0:31:200:31:25

£83.50 they paid, which is a pretty precise amount.

0:31:250:31:28

Lastly is the spelter garniture.

0:31:280:31:30

This is a weird collection of characters, isn't it?

0:31:300:31:33

It is, isn't it? It's a bit in your face, really, isn't it?

0:31:330:31:37

But somebody, particularly where we are in the south-west here, there's a lot of fishing and naval history,

0:31:370:31:43

so we have clients for these things.

0:31:430:31:46

-I think we'll probably be looking at 150 to 200.

-Really? They'll be delighted. They only paid £110.

0:31:460:31:52

If you get £200 for that, they'll be jumping up and down

0:31:520:31:55

and they won't need their bonus buy, but let's go and have a look at it.

0:31:550:32:00

-Claire, Yola, are you excited about this?

-We are.

0:32:000:32:03

-You really want to know what's under Charles's wrap?

-We do. It looks a little small.

0:32:030:32:08

-I beg your pardon?

-It looks a little bit small.

0:32:080:32:11

-I don't know about that. It might be just scrunched up.

-Exactly.

0:32:110:32:16

-Carlos...

-It might be cold.

-Thank you very much.

-You had £73.50.

0:32:160:32:21

-What did you get the girls?

-I got very nervous. I had to really go out and impress. Are you ready?

0:32:210:32:26

-Look at that!

-Oh!

0:32:260:32:29

-They say small is beautiful.

-It is beautiful.

-Yeah.

-Have a handle.

0:32:290:32:33

-What is it?

-What does it say?

-Ashtray?

-Yes. But importantly, it's got that name "Moorcroft".

0:32:330:32:39

It's in this pomegranate 1930s form,

0:32:390:32:43

beautifully mounted in this plated mount.

0:32:430:32:46

-It's in good condition. I quite like it.

-How much did you pay for it?

0:32:460:32:50

It's a designer object, I think. It's a bargain at £40.

0:32:500:32:54

Oh! Are we going to make money on this?

0:32:540:32:57

-I think it ought to happily make...

-£100.

0:32:570:33:00

I think so, Tim. Between £50 and £70 is a fair guide price,

0:33:000:33:04

so 40 is a rock, rock bottom price to pay, I hope.

0:33:040:33:08

-Excellent. Well done, you.

-Girls, you may not need to go with it if you've made so much profit so far.

0:33:080:33:14

-You might not risk another £40.

-We'll be retiring!

0:33:140:33:17

It's the thrill of the chase.

0:33:170:33:19

Anyway, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Charles's little ashtray.

0:33:190:33:24

There we go. Meat and drink for the saleroom, Mr Moorcroft.

0:33:240:33:28

It's a lovely piece of Moorcroft with the pomegranate pattern there.

0:33:280:33:33

It's a bit of a shame that it has this ashtray mount on it

0:33:330:33:36

because it detracts from the quality of the Moorcroft.

0:33:360:33:40

You have a period where smoking was very popular and it's obviously declined,

0:33:400:33:45

but still, it's a nice little piece,

0:33:450:33:47

probably about £40 to £60.

0:33:470:33:49

Brilliant. £40 paid by Charles Hanson. Could even make a bit more.

0:33:490:33:53

It could do because there are collectors after this pattern.

0:33:530:33:57

-Good luck.

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

0:33:570:34:00

18. 20. 22...

0:34:010:34:03

At 80...

0:34:050:34:07

-Are you feeling nervous at all?

-No, we're ready.

-You're ready for this?

-We were born ready.

0:34:080:34:14

First up is your old oars, yes?

0:34:140:34:16

Lot 90, the pair of illuminated Oxford University oars, dated 1949,

0:34:160:34:22

with the crew members all listed on the paddles there.

0:34:220:34:25

What can I say here? Bid me £60? 60 I have straight away.

0:34:250:34:29

-Straight in.

-60. And 5? At the opening bid here at 60.

0:34:290:34:32

-At £60. And 5 do I see?

-Come on.

-At £60.

-Come on.

0:34:320:34:36

Any advance then, at 60...?

0:34:360:34:39

60. Do you hear that? 60, just like that. That's terrible.

0:34:390:34:43

-£60 - minus 30...

-If you made a bit of money, you'd come again.

0:34:430:34:47

Interesting, this one. It's a 19th century, hallmarked silver...

0:34:470:34:51

We've catalogued it as a moustache brush, but it's a ladies' muff brush,

0:34:510:34:55

with the case there. So Lot 91 then.

0:34:550:34:58

What can I say for that? £15?

0:34:580:35:00

£10 then?

0:35:000:35:02

£5? 5, thank you, madam.

0:35:020:35:05

At £5. And 8 now?

0:35:050:35:07

At £5 only. Any advance on... 8. 10.

0:35:070:35:11

-12. 15.

-That's good.

0:35:110:35:14

Are you sure, madam? At £12 here. In the room seated at 12 then.

0:35:140:35:18

It's a fine moustache you have, sir. At £12 then...

0:35:180:35:22

-Did he say £12?

-He did indeed.

-That is terrible. Minus 13 on that.

0:35:230:35:27

Now here comes the bench. This is going to claw it all back.

0:35:270:35:31

It's the 19th century bench. I'm sure you've seen it.

0:35:310:35:34

And interest here with me at £30. 35.

0:35:340:35:38

40. 45. 45 I have. At £45.

0:35:380:35:42

Commission bid here. 50 do I see?

0:35:420:35:45

At £45. 50. 5. 60, sir?

0:35:450:35:47

£60. I'm out then. The bid is in the room at £60. Standing at 60. 5 now?

0:35:470:35:52

-At £60 in the room. 5, internet?

-No.

-No.

0:35:520:35:56

At £60 in the room...

0:35:560:35:58

OK, lads, that is your first profit - plus £5.

0:35:580:36:01

You're minus 43...

0:36:010:36:02

You're actually minus 38 at the end of this.

0:36:020:36:06

Minus 38. So, minus 38.

0:36:060:36:08

Are we going with the trunk?

0:36:080:36:10

-Yeah, we'll go with it.

-Do you want to park it?

-Yeah.

0:36:100:36:14

-Are you going to park it and not go with it or go with the bonus buy?

-Go with the bonus buy.

-Risk it?

0:36:140:36:20

-You are so high-octane, you two. Aren't they high-octane?

-Strap yourself in.

-Strap yourself in.

0:36:200:36:26

Lot 95 is the 18th century, leather-coated coaching trunk.

0:36:260:36:31

A little bit worn, but aren't we all?

0:36:310:36:34

Commission is with me, in fact, at £40.

0:36:340:36:36

And 5 now I'm looking for. At 40 with me.

0:36:360:36:40

5 do I see? Quite sure then? £40 for the... 45.

0:36:400:36:43

50. 5. 60. 5?

0:36:430:36:46

Can't see you, sir. 65. 70. 5?

0:36:460:36:49

£70, the commission bid is with me, at £70.

0:36:490:36:53

The hammer falls at 70...

0:36:530:36:55

Bad luck, chaps. £70, Philip, that's a lovely £30 profit, old fruit,

0:36:550:36:59

which means, overall, you are minus £8.

0:36:590:37:02

How ridiculous is that?

0:37:020:37:04

-All this effort...

-We had a go, didn't we?

-We did.

0:37:040:37:08

And that is so easily a winning score. You could be the champions of the day.

0:37:080:37:12

Just don't say a word to the Blues. Walk tall.

0:37:120:37:16

-Do you know how the Reds got on?

-No.

-We don't want you to, those naughty boys.

0:37:200:37:24

-Your mirror is coming up...now!

-Yes.

-Good luck.

0:37:240:37:28

Lot 110 is the carved, enchained witch's mirror, dated 1889.

0:37:280:37:34

The witch's mirror there, so you can predict the future.

0:37:340:37:38

£30...? 20?

0:37:380:37:41

-10?

-I don't believe it.

0:37:410:37:43

10 here. 15, madam.

0:37:430:37:46

20, sir? Are you sure?

0:37:460:37:49

15 to the lady. 18, anybody else then? I've got £20 online now.

0:37:490:37:52

25, madam...? £20 on the internet.

0:37:520:37:56

20 on the internet. 2, anybody else?

0:37:560:37:58

Predict the Lottery numbers!

0:37:580:38:00

At £20 then. For the mirror then at 20...

0:38:000:38:04

-That's harsh.

-It is. It's gone to some old witch on the internet.

0:38:050:38:09

Minus £13. She's going, "Hubble, bubble..."

0:38:090:38:13

Anyway, here comes the hall chair.

0:38:130:38:15

This is the late 17th century, walnut and elm hall chair, 1680.

0:38:150:38:21

The hall chair there and what can I say for that? £60?

0:38:210:38:24

-£40 do I see?

-It's crazy.

0:38:260:38:28

40 I have, thank you. At £40 for the chair. 5 now? 2 if you like?

0:38:280:38:33

At £40 then... 42. 45.

0:38:330:38:36

48. 50.

0:38:360:38:38

5. 60. 5.

0:38:380:38:41

70. 5. 80?

0:38:410:38:44

75 standing in the doorway then. At 75. At 80 now?

0:38:440:38:47

At 75, all done. The internet's not in. At 75 in the room...

0:38:470:38:52

Uh-oh, £75. It did better than I thought, I have to say.

0:38:520:38:56

-That's minus £8.50, girls.

-It's tough, isn't it?

0:38:560:38:59

But the clock's coming up.

0:38:590:39:02

Lot 112 is the French, bronze, spelter clock garniture.

0:39:020:39:06

Neptune and the horsemen. £100 do I see?

0:39:060:39:09

£100 for the clock? Nothing fishy going on, honestly. £50 then?

0:39:090:39:14

50 I have here. At £50, maiden bid. At 5 now elsewhere? At £50.

0:39:140:39:19

55, internet. 60, sir. 65.

0:39:190:39:21

70, internet? 65. 70, internet. 75.

0:39:210:39:24

-80, internet?

-Keep going.

0:39:240:39:26

80. 85, sir? 85. 90, internet? 85...

0:39:260:39:30

-90. 95. 100, internet?

-Come on.

0:39:300:39:33

100. 110, sir? 110. 120?

0:39:330:39:37

-Wait a minute.

-120.

0:39:370:39:39

130? 120, the bid is online. £120.

0:39:390:39:42

At £120 online...

0:39:420:39:44

-That's so good!

-You made a profit of £10 on that. Wonderful, girls.

0:39:460:39:50

Plus £10. However, it's not enough.

0:39:500:39:53

-No.

-Is it not enough?

-You were £21.50 down.

0:39:530:39:57

You just made a profit of £10 on the clock garniture,

0:39:570:40:00

which means you are minus £11.50.

0:40:000:40:04

-Good.

-I think we should go with Charles's ashtray.

0:40:040:40:07

-Minus £11.50.

-That's not bad.

-Are you going to go with the bonus buy?

0:40:070:40:11

-Yes.

-You're going with the Moorcroft ashtray.

-Good decision.

-Here we go.

0:40:110:40:15

Lot 115 is the Moorcroft mounted ashtray, circa 1930,

0:40:150:40:19

pomegranate pattern. I'm sure you're all familiar with this one.

0:40:190:40:23

£40? Do I see £40?

0:40:230:40:26

Do I see 30? 30, thank you, madam. At 30. 32. 35. 38.

0:40:260:40:31

40. 42.

0:40:310:40:33

45.

0:40:330:40:35

48? Are you sure, sir? At £45.

0:40:350:40:38

48, fresh place. 50, madam? 50.

0:40:380:40:41

55, sir? 55. 60? Are you sure?

0:40:410:40:44

-At £55. 60, fresh place.

-You're in profit.

0:40:440:40:47

At £60. Away in the doorway then at 60. And 5, anybody else at all?

0:40:470:40:52

-At 60 then and done... And 5.

-Yes!

-70. 5?

0:40:520:40:57

At £70 now in the doorway. It's yours, sir, at 70...

0:40:570:41:02

-Yes!

-Yes!

0:41:020:41:04

-We've done it.

-That is marvellous.

0:41:080:41:10

-The sheer joy.

-Excellent, yeah.

-That is so cool, isn't it?

0:41:110:41:15

Anyway, listen, ssh, ssh. Plus £30, yes? You were £11.50 off,

0:41:150:41:20

which means you're £8.50... I think you've made £18.50.

0:41:200:41:25

You are plus £18.50.

0:41:280:41:30

-Now, the big thing is, is that a winning score or not?

-We hope so.

0:41:300:41:34

-Just don't say anything to those naughty boys.

-No.

-No.

0:41:340:41:38

-Well, well, well, we've reached the final moment and nobody has been chatting about scores, yes?

-No.

-No.

0:41:420:41:48

Very good. So you have no idea where you are in the pecking order.

0:41:480:41:52

Actually, I can tell you there is hardly anything between you,

0:41:520:41:56

but there is something between you and sadly, today, the Reds are the runners-up.

0:41:560:42:01

-Yes!

-Yes! LAUGHTER

0:42:010:42:03

The pure joy is...is wonderful.

0:42:050:42:09

You didn't do so badly, did you? You made a profit on the bench, which was lovely.

0:42:090:42:14

And you nearly clawed it all back, Philip Serrell, with your £30 profit on the old trunk.

0:42:140:42:20

-Not quite good enough because, overall, minus 8 was your number.

-Not bad.

-I quite agree.

0:42:200:42:26

Normally, that would be a winning score, but today, we hadn't reckoned with the fantastic Blues

0:42:260:42:32

who are going to go home with £18.50 of profit.

0:42:320:42:36

-That's real money, yes?

-Real money!

0:42:360:42:38

Plus all this change. Have a look at that.

0:42:380:42:41

-Lovely.

-You're a good man.

0:42:410:42:43

-It's exactly all for you.

-Oh!

-A £10 profit on that rather queer garniture.

0:42:430:42:49

But the big number came from Hanson with his ashtray - £30 profit.

0:42:490:42:53

-Yes.

-Thank goodness for Moorcroft, eh, Carlos?

-Exactly, Tim. Wonderful.

0:42:530:42:57

-Did you have a good time?

-Wonderful.

-We loved it.

-It is a bit of a gas.

0:42:570:43:01

Thank you very much, girls, for making our day today.

0:43:010:43:04

-In fact, join us soon for some more bargain hunting, yes?

-Yes!

0:43:040:43:09

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:270:43:32

Bargain Hunt heads to Exeter as Tim Wonnacott presides over two teams of contestants, battling it out to find suitable treasures to sell at auction. Expertise is provided by Philip Serrell and Charles Hanson, and Tim takes a trip to Antony House in Cornwall.


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