Lewes 7 Bargain Hunt


Lewes 7

Antiques show. Tim Wonnacott presents as a pair of policemen take on some glamorous grannies. The teams are expertly assisted by Catherine Southon and Thomas Plant.


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Transcript


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We're in the heart of East Sussex today in the picturesque

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town of Lewes, to be precise, which is steeped in history.

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The big question today is are our Bargain Hunters about

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to make their own little bit of history? Let's find out!

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Let's go bargain hunting, yeah!

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Now, there are four antique centres to choose from, three items

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to buy, two experts to help them, but only one Bargain Hunt.

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So, let's have a quick peek as to what's coming up.

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There's dissent in the ranks for the Reds...

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-Would you have that in your home?

-Yeah, I would. Yeah, yeah.

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I wouldn't.

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..and the Blues drive a very hard bargain.

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-You know, these people do have to eat.

-Yeah.

-Do they?

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When they go home at night and they have their baked beans on toast,

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if they're lucky, they might have an egg.

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But if we don't pay enough, they can't have an egg.

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They can't have an egg.

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So, it's a battle of the sexes on today's programme.

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For the Reds, we've got Kevin and Adam and for the Blues,

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we've got the double L's.

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We've got Leslie and Liz. Hello, everyone.

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ALL: Hello!

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Very nice to see you.

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So, you guys are in red today but you ought to be in blue

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-because you're both cops.

-Yes, that's right.

-That's right, yes.

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-And where are you based?

-We were based at Kingston.

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-That's where we met about 20 years ago.

-20 years ago, yeah.

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And then we met up quite a little time after that. Didn't we?

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Yeah, at Heathrow, which I now still work at.

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-This police job isn't the first job you've ever had, is it?

-It's not.

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I've done some weird and wonderful jobs in the past.

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-You've worked on a farm in Australia.

-Yes, I have, yeah.

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We were the first six-man team to pick pumpkins in Australia

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-and we picked 25 tonnes in one day.

-Get away!

-No, it's true.

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And you're keen on the old scuba?

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Yes, I'm a scuba diving instructor as well.

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-And when you're not working, what do you like to get up to?

-I like to play the ukulele.

-Never!

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That's what my wife says.

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And you've done a fair amount of travelling, have you, Adam?

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Uh, yeah, I have.

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When I was 33, I took a career break from the police

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and went travelling round the world.

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I went to...

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India, Hong Kong, Thailand, Cambodia...

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-Gosh.

-..Vietnam, Australia...

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You went round the world then, did you?

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Well, I was originally going to go for a year and a half

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but I ended up cutting it short. I only went for 80 days in the end.

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-I missed my wife who was my then girlfriend so I came home.

-Right.

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So, how do you think you'll get on today, boys?

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-Oh, we're going to win.

-Are you?

-Yeah.

-Well, there you go.

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You're two highly respected officers.

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I'm sure you'll be highly respected at the end of this performance too.

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Anyway, good luck with that.

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-Now, girls, are you quaking in your boots?

-Yes.

-I don't blame you.

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Now, Liz, it says here that you're mad keen on driving.

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Yes, that's very true.

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I have a coach licence,

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-and I passed my coach licence on Friday 13th of June '88.

-Ah.

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And then I worked for a company in Billingshurst for about

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-ten years and then I moved onto Cranleigh.

-Right.

-And I'm working for a company in Cranleigh now.

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And you're pretty fond of your motors too, aren't you?

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Oh, I love my motors. I have two little Morrises.

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I have Doris the Morris, who's a white convertible,

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-and Marigold, who's a green saloon.

-And what are they, Morris 1000s?

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-Morris 1000s, yeah.

-Ah, lovely, jolly good.

-They're proper cars.

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-What about the gee-gees?

-The gee-gees, yes.

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I did a lot of riding back in 1972

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with my lovely horse, Sam Weller.

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I rode at Windsor and we won the Hunter class and then we went

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through to the Supreme Championship and we won.

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I don't believe it! We have a supreme champion here!

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-And then we qualified for Wembley.

-Gosh.

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-So we went to Wembley and we were fourth.

-Well done! What a thrill!

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-So, very good.

-Yeah, well done.

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And now, Liz, you have a lifelong passion for art.

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I have, yes. It's part of my family.

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My grandfather was one of the earliest people to do lantern slides,

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or slides, as we now know them, and so I was brought up with looking at art,

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particularly photography so...

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You won a painting competition when you were a nippper.

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Yes, the Harrogate Festival Of Visual Arts

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-and LS Lowry presented me with my prize.

-Did he really?

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And I have his autograph.

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So, have you known each other for years, you two?

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Well, about eight years now we've known each other.

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Where did you meet?

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We met at a bridge club,

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very near me and we actually got talking,

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I suppose about four years ago or three years ago about antiques

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and things like that and then I said, "Liz, how about Bargain Hunt?"

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-And she said, "Yeah, let's have a go."

-And here you are today.

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-And here we are today.

-Yes.

-Lovely.

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Anyway, it's great to have you on the show. In fact,

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so great I'm going to give you £300. There you are. £300 apiece.

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You know the rules, your experts await and off you go!

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And very, very, very good luck.

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Let's meet the experts.

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Keeping the Red team in check, it's Catherine Southon.

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And sticking his oar in for the Blues, it's Thomas Plant.

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Adam, Kevin, £300 burning away in our pockets,

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what are we going to do with the money? Do we have a plan?

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-Oh, yeah, definitely.

-What are we going to be buying today?

-Um...

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Looking for something like pretty little furniture pieces.

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-Sort of silver.

-Silver.

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I think we're going on the charm offensive.

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-Oh!

-If that doesn't work, we're going to go good cop, bad cop.

-Yeah.

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If that doesn't work, we're just going to wing it.

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-Something to do with...

-Art Nouveau, really.

-Art Nouveau? Hmm.

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-Well, that's my favourite subject.

-Is it?

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-And the young style, just like you two. In we go.

-OK.

-Thank you.

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Watch out.

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# Whoop, whoop That's the sound of the police

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# Whoop, whoop That's the sound of the police... #

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Lots of goodies.

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# Girls just want to have fun... #

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I like little boxes. Anything that's small and box-like.

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-Kevin, look at this.

-What's that, Ad? What have you found?

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-It looks like a Hindu cow or something.

-Indian, it could be.

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-Is it incredibly light?

-Yeah, very light.

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Yeah, I wouldn't say it's great, to be honest.

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Do you think there will be any people

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-that are interested in Indian bulls at the auction?

-Fair enough.

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-Yeah, there we are. J S&S - an Art Nouveau copper jug.

-Yeah.

-Price?

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-£28 it is.

-I quite like that.

-It is quite nice, actually.

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It is very nice.

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Well, you just don't see very much these days

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-and it has that nice sort of organic bit.

-It does.

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Quite a commercial piece.

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Arts and Crafts copper is being made quite commercial.

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-So that would be quite good to go for, that sort of thing?

-It would be.

-Oh.

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-Has that got silver on it?

-A hickory shafted cane.

-Right.

-Or holly.

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-Oh, it's holly?

-Could be.

-They use those for horses, the whip that's used for driving horses.

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Is there any label on it? What does the label say?

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-It just says stick and it says £23.

-Is it a woman's one?

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-No, it's a man's one.

-Is it?

-It's quite short then.

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-They were a bit smaller then, weren't they?

-Yeah.

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-I think that's rather fun.

-It is rather fun.

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Can you see if there's a mark on there?

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-It's quite badly worn, to be honest.

-Is it?

-It is, it looks very sort of squashed.

-Look, it's all sort of...

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-Oh, is it? Oh, right, OK.

-I think we ought to carry on.

-OK, carry on.

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I'll put that back very carefully.

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-No sticking around for the Blues then.

-Do you like the toys?

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Do they come in their original packaging?

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Is that what people are after these days?

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Yes, that is important, also being in mint condition.

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Sometimes when the boxes haven't even been opened.

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When you've got a stall like that where they sell these,

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they know the prices, they know what they're worth

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-and we're not going to beat this.

-Sure. Sure.

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-We've always got the cow as back up, haven't we? So...

-No, I've changed my mind about the cow.

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We've agreed to disagree on the cow.

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-Just looking at what that was.

-What what was?

-These, what are these?

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-That's a baby's rattle.

-Yeah.

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It's been thrown across the room a few times.

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-And in the red corner, a box.

-I like the boxes.

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Well, you have good taste. This is known as Tunbridge ware.

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You see all those little tiny mosaics of different coloured woods,

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so I think that's probably a Rosewood box.

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And they're all laid in sort of geometric shapes.

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The only thing I would say, sadly, is this is

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-not quite as collectable at the moment as it once was.

-OK.

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-BUT there's some very nice pieces there.

-Now, talking of boxes...

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I just like this little stamp box.

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You can use it so it's going to be left out

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-and people can admire the top.

-It's very pretty, the top, isn't it?

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-It's lovely.

-Shall we have a look at that?

-Are the Reds being box clever?

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-I love that little box there.

-Little money box. How much is on that?

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-Oh, £90.

-Oh, I thought it said £40.

-Oh, dear.

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Cor, boxes are popular today.

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-It's a very sweet stamp box, isn't it?

-Yeah, first class, second class.

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-First class, second class.

-It's got a sloping interior so you can get them out easily.

-Oh, really?

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-How clever!

-Not the oldest thing. It's only £23.

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-Wouldn't a philatelist quite like that?

-A phil...

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-That's a good name, isn't it?

-It's a good name.

-A good word, philatelist.

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-It's the battle of the boxes.

-£90 for something really quite simple.

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-Yeah.

-It is nice, there's no real damage there

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because these little pieces can come out quite easily.

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It is in nice condition.

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That's what I would say.

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I think we'd make more money with the Hindu cow.

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If we could get that a lot cheaper...

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-Do you want to ask what he can...

-£60? If he can do it for £60...

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While the Reds are trying to close a deal,

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Thomas is opening Pandora's box for the Blues.

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-OK, I'm going to be slightly controversial here.

-OK.

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-Slightly controversial.

-Mh-hm.

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I think it's a real cop-out buying something which is marked at £23.

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-In this cabinet here...

-Yes?

-..are a number of little boxes.

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-You've got enamel boxes, porcelain boxes, papier mache boxes.

-OK.

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I think if you want to play the game,

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and we want to win, I think we buy the lot.

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We buy all the boxes and it's one lot of boxes and it will appeal.

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-That's a brilliant idea!

-You like that idea?

-I do!

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-You could get a good discount by buying them all.

-Exactly.

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He's thinking outside the box there.

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-We're wondering what you could do for us with this.

-Let's have a look.

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Cos we really love it.

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-If you do love it then you won't mind paying 80 quid, will you?

-80?

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Could you do it a little bit less than that for us?

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I'll tell you, you can have it for 70 quid but that's it.

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-It's nice, but I don't love it.

-I'll hang on to it for you.

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-Yeah, put it to one side.

-So that box is shelved for the Reds.

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-Now, Thomas, we're counting on you.

-So, we've got one, two, three, four, five, six...

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-Seven with the stamp.

-OK.

-Shall we get them out?

-Yes.

-Get them all out.

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# Little boxes on the hillside

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# Little boxes made of ticky tacky

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# Little boxes, little boxes

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# Little boxes all the same

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# There's a green one and pink one

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# And a blue one and a yellow one

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# And they're all made out of ticky tacky

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# And they all look just the same... #

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-Well, with 10% off, that comes to £80.

-Yeah, and another 20...

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-And another 10, that would be...

-He's shaking his head slowly.

-70.

-70?

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-Yeah.

-So it's £10 a box?

-That was the most expensive one, wasn't it?

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What he's done is that was 23 and he's marked it down to 20,

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so he's already done us 10%...

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-Right, OK.

-..off already.

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You know, these people do have to eat.

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When they go home at night and they have their baked beans on toast,

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if they're lucky, they might have an egg.

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But if we don't pay enough, they can't have an egg.

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They can't have an egg. You see? It's very unfair.

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-I know, but we're out to do well.

-I know we're out to do well.

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We want to win! We want the gavel.

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-I know you want to win, you want the golden gavel.

-Yes.

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I understand, I do understand.

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Well, you know, forego an egg tonight and 65?

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-No, I have to stick to 70, I'm afraid.

-Right, OK. £70?

-Yes.

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-You're happy?

-I think you should buy them.

-Yeah.

-Let's go for it.

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-I mean, I like them.

-Oh! I'm exhausted.

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All this talk of eggs, eh? Thomas has had "en-oeuf" already.

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-Deal.

-Thank you.

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you, thank you.

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Thank you very much. Thank you.

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That's cracking. One deal done, Blues.

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Now, what's Catherine taken a shine to?

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-I quite like that.

-Manly!

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-Wow, they're quite heavy.

-What is that?

-A ship's lantern.

-A ship's light?

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A ship's light.

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You get so many reproductions of these, so many.

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I think that's a definite possibility.

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Do you want to see how much...

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-Shall we all go?

-Yes.

-OK.

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-Strength in numbers.

-Strength in numbers. Steven.

-Yes?

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-We rather like these ship's lights.

-Strictly speaking, they should be 170 so...

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-150's about as much as...

-How about 130?

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I'm being cheeky but....

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No, it's going to be on my head if it is.

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I'll tell you what, we'll split the difference. 140.

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-I'll take that risk.

-I quite like that price.

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-I noticed a pen there that was interesting.

-That was lovely.

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-That was really nice.

-It was a similar price to this.

-Where in?

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-Back where Kev saw the little moneybox.

-Oh, the Tunbridge ware?

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-Yeah, there was a quill.

-Oh, OK, well do you want to...

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-That cabinet's still open, isn't it?

-I think so, yeah.

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Do you want to quickly go and grab that?

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-Is Adam steering the Reds off course?

-It was up here, I saw erm...

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-This pen here.

-I think that's really special, actually.

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-Look at the design on that.

-So, the boys are back at the Tunbridge ware.

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But what have the girls found?

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That was the other thing we were looking at.

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-Some of the old glasses, were they called something stem?

-Cotton twist.

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Cotton twist in there. What else is it called in Italian?

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-Oh, I don't know.

-A thousand canes. Millefiori.

-Oh.

-Oh, right!

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So those are canes. Millefiori canes. Cotton twist canes.

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-It's got...

-What's it called?

-Pontil.

-Pontil. You're quite right.

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You're quite right. Well done.

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-And the gold flecks inside there are aventurine inclusions.

-Right.

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-Oh, my goodness.

-Something's crystal clear.

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That TP sure knows his glass.

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What you need to do is angle it. This is the way.

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Angle it and look at the edge of the base, the rim,

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where it would have sat on a table and look at it with detail

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and you've got to see if you can see some tiny, tiny scratch marks on it.

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-A bit.

-A bit. You can see a bit, can you?

-Yes. Not much.

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-Does that mean it's old?

-Yes. You're looking for wear.

0:15:350:15:40

And that slight wear from moving, when your staff have been in.

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-You both have staff, don't you?

-No.

-No? What is this?

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When your staff are in cleaning the house, moving backwards

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and forwards, it gets wear on it.

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Rub your finger around the top rim.

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No broken bits.

0:15:580:16:01

Just make sure there are no chips, nibbles, bites, cracks.

0:16:010:16:05

And I'll do one final thing. OK.

0:16:050:16:08

GLASS PINGS

0:16:080:16:09

Yes. No cracks.

0:16:090:16:11

GLASS PINGS

0:16:110:16:13

I think it's going to be early 20th century,

0:16:130:16:15

especially with that wear around it. What do you think this could be?

0:16:150:16:19

-39.

-39. Normally that would be...we'd take 10% off.

0:16:210:16:26

Could we do 33?

0:16:280:16:31

-30.

-I'm a simple man. I've got two very intelligent females here

0:16:310:16:35

who can think more than I can think.

0:16:350:16:38

OK. I'm under pressure now. So, 30 then.

0:16:380:16:42

-Thank you.

-Thank you, ladies.

-Thank you very much.

0:16:420:16:45

That deal is ringing true for the Blues. That's their second buy.

0:16:450:16:49

This is late 19th century.

0:16:520:16:54

-Really lovely.

-I think this is the first item we've all agreed on.

0:16:540:16:58

-I do quite like that. It's quite quirky.

-I agree that it's lovely.

0:16:580:17:01

It's just the price, isn't it? Let's go see what he can say.

0:17:010:17:05

What can you do for us?

0:17:110:17:13

-145 should be.

-145.

-Should be.

0:17:130:17:17

-But might not be.

-135.

0:17:170:17:20

135, so it's a case of do we buy this or do we buy this?

0:17:200:17:24

I prefer the lanterns for the price. OK. Catherine.

0:17:240:17:29

-Can you do 135 on those?

-Go on, Steve.

-Go on, 135. Time's running on.

0:17:290:17:35

135. 135. Decisions.

0:17:350:17:38

-Let's do the lanterns.

-Manly lamps, 135.

-Let's do it.

0:17:380:17:42

What a manly pair. The boys have made their first deal.

0:17:420:17:45

-Happy?

-I am, yes.

0:17:450:17:47

I do quite like this shop. Can we look in this area here?

0:17:470:17:50

-We missed it.

-You don't want to go out?

-Just five minutes.

0:17:500:17:53

-I know we haven't got much time left.

-OK. Let's go and have a look.

0:17:530:17:57

I want to show you two things here.

0:17:570:17:59

-I love this.

-I hoped you were going to say that.

0:17:590:18:03

A lovely large Victorian pewter meat platter with the tree drainer.

0:18:030:18:09

You put your hot water in there. Fabulous bit of pewter.

0:18:090:18:13

Great bracket for it.

0:18:130:18:15

To top it off. I think, out of all of this,

0:18:150:18:18

if you're going to have this, you're going to want this with it as well.

0:18:180:18:22

1897. This is dated AA. So it's probably from a country house.

0:18:220:18:27

I was going to offer, out of these two,

0:18:270:18:30

£195, because we've got £200 left.

0:18:300:18:34

Gives me a fiver to spend.

0:18:340:18:36

Do you think that can be done?

0:18:360:18:39

-I'll have to phone them.

-That's 160. That's 105.

0:18:390:18:44

So I'm nearly there.

0:18:440:18:46

I'll ring.

0:18:480:18:49

195 leaves me a fiver.

0:18:500:18:52

Thomas is setting himself up for a challenge there.

0:18:520:18:55

I think the police have got a lead.

0:18:550:18:58

-Ello, ello, ello.

-Down there.

0:18:580:19:00

-Down there.

-What have we found?

-Let's have a look.

0:19:000:19:04

-Oh, truncheons.

-A truncheon. A police truncheon.

0:19:040:19:07

-Is it an old one?

-It looks old.

-They don't issue them any more.

0:19:070:19:11

It's certainly got quite a bit of age to it.

0:19:110:19:14

I love this leather strap. It's lovely, isn't it?

0:19:140:19:16

It's not Victorian but it's probably '20s, '30s.

0:19:160:19:20

There'll be a lot of retired police officers

0:19:200:19:22

that might like something like this.

0:19:220:19:25

You're narrowing your market, aren't you? What's the price on it?

0:19:250:19:28

-£35.

-We've got to get this.

-Have you?

-I think it's fate.

0:19:280:19:32

-Not for that price.

-I think we have to buy this.

-Yeah, go on.

0:19:320:19:36

-Ah. You're not Steve.

-Nothing gets past you, Adam.

-We really like this.

0:19:360:19:41

Could you do us a good deal on this?

0:19:410:19:43

-30?

-We were thinking a little bit lower than that.

0:19:430:19:47

-We've already bought an item from here.

-25 would probably be OK.

0:19:470:19:51

Even though we've already bought something from here before?

0:19:510:19:54

-Top marks for trying.

-She's tempted, she's tempted.

0:19:550:19:59

-I think we should go...

-22.

0:19:590:20:01

I think that's a nice price.

0:20:010:20:03

We'll do it.

0:20:030:20:04

-Shall we shake on that? Thank you.

-Nice one.

0:20:040:20:07

That's two down and one to go.

0:20:070:20:09

-What do you think they'll make on it?

-Kitchenalia is popular these days.

0:20:110:20:15

It really has a huge appeal.

0:20:150:20:17

Erm. We're spending a lot of money.

0:20:170:20:20

There could be a profit. Let's see.

0:20:200:20:22

-What's the story?

-195.

0:20:220:20:25

-Well done, that is fantastic.

-Happy?

0:20:250:20:28

-Very happy. Thank you very much.

-It's a bit bold and daring.

0:20:280:20:32

Of course. It leaves me a fiver, thanks.

0:20:320:20:34

So, the Blues have cracked it.

0:20:340:20:37

And the Reds are trying somewhere new.

0:20:380:20:41

-How does this feel?

-Erm.

0:20:410:20:45

-What are you going to find for £5?

-Don't worry.

0:20:450:20:47

Let me organise that. Let's go and have a cup of tea.

0:20:470:20:51

Whilst the Blues are off for a brew, the Reds are getting ahead.

0:20:510:20:55

So we've got a big old chunk of bronze here. It's been nicely cast.

0:20:550:21:01

It's really nicely modelled. We've got a side-on view there.

0:21:010:21:05

-Possibly of the young Augustus. Do you like it?

-I do.

-It's quite nice.

0:21:050:21:10

It's very heavy. I'm just worried it's a bit broken.

0:21:100:21:15

It's a bit damaged at the bottom, unfortunately.

0:21:150:21:18

Ideally, it would be nicely mounted on a new piece of marble.

0:21:180:21:23

-And then it's fine.

-It's really nicely...

0:21:230:21:25

-Could you do us a good price on that?

-Bearing in mind it's damaged.

0:21:250:21:29

-Bearing in mind we're in the last...

-We've got three minutes.

0:21:300:21:34

Well, 85.

0:21:340:21:36

Would you do 70?

0:21:360:21:38

-75.

-What do you reckon?

0:21:390:21:42

-Would you have that in your home?

-Yeah, I would, yeah.

0:21:420:21:45

I wouldn't. THEY LAUGH

0:21:460:21:48

-Doesn't seem to fit the profile for Kevin.

-One minute.

0:21:480:21:52

-Do it. Let's do it.

-60 seconds. Let go for it.

0:21:520:21:56

-OK. 75.

-Thank you.

-It's been a pleasure.

0:21:560:21:58

Well, they found their man. Just in the nick of time.

0:21:580:22:01

Tick-tock, time's up. Let's check out what the Red team bought.

0:22:010:22:05

The boys took a shine to the manly pair of lanterns, paying £135.

0:22:050:22:11

They didn't beat around the bush for their second buy.

0:22:120:22:14

They had to have the truncheon for £22. And it's a bust.

0:22:140:22:18

Well, a plaque of Emperor Augustus, actually.

0:22:180:22:21

The boys paid £75 for their third item.

0:22:210:22:24

-So, chaps, how are we?

-Very good.

0:22:250:22:28

How was your hour with Catherine Southon?

0:22:280:22:31

It was a lot of fun. It was a lot of fun.

0:22:310:22:34

Well, you're looking very well on this. You're both still smiling.

0:22:340:22:37

Excellent. Kevin, which is your favourite piece?

0:22:370:22:39

-The pair of lanterns.

-And do you agree with that?

0:22:390:22:41

I'd have to agree with Kev. I would go for the lanterns as well.

0:22:410:22:44

-Super. So you spent in total?

-232.

-May I have £68 of leftover lolly?

0:22:440:22:50

Thank you very much. That's it. So it goes straight across, look.

0:22:500:22:54

-Lovely. Wonderful.

-And your plan, Catherine?

0:22:540:22:58

My plan is I don't have one.

0:22:580:23:01

-Oh, good.

-But I'm not going to buy a cow.

-OK.

-Going to buy what?

-A cow.

0:23:010:23:07

-Don't ask.

-No. I would suggest not. Very expensive to keep cows.

0:23:070:23:12

Anyway, good luck.

0:23:120:23:13

Meanwhile, why don't we check out what the Blue team bought?

0:23:130:23:16

The Blue team bought a job-lot of boxes for their first purchase.

0:23:160:23:19

Seven for £70.

0:23:190:23:22

Their story took a twist

0:23:220:23:24

when they spent £30 on the Venetian glass bowl.

0:23:240:23:27

The girls went big with their last buy, £195 on the meat dish and pan.

0:23:270:23:33

OK, girls. What a thrill that was. Thomas Plant for a whole hour.

0:23:350:23:40

-I know.

-So, which is your favourite item?

-The Venetian glass.

0:23:400:23:44

-What about you, Liz?

-I think the Venetian glass.

0:23:440:23:47

-And is that going to bring the biggest profit?

-I think it will.

0:23:470:23:50

I'm not sure. I think it might be the last item which is two items,

0:23:500:23:54

which is the big carving plate. And with the saucepan, I think that

0:23:540:23:59

-might...

-That could do the biggest profit?

-I think it could do.

0:23:590:24:02

We've got a slightly mixed message there which is lovely,

0:24:020:24:05

but one thing's for certain. You spent a lot of money, didn't you?

0:24:050:24:08

-Yes.

-How much?

-£295.

-Very good. This is a challenge.

0:24:080:24:13

£5 of leftover lolly. Just the bare fiver goes to T Plant.

0:24:130:24:18

-Is this your favourite moment, Tom?

-I love having a fiver.

0:24:190:24:23

-It's a challenge.

-You don't get much for a fiver these days, do you?

0:24:230:24:26

Basically, you can't go wrong, Tom.

0:24:260:24:28

TOM LAUGHS

0:24:280:24:30

I mean, for an auctioneer, £5, £10.

0:24:300:24:32

-You've doubled your money before you can say Jack Sprout.

-Absolutely.

0:24:320:24:35

And while Thomas gets his nose to the grindstone for the girls,

0:24:350:24:38

I'm going to take you on a little trip.

0:24:380:24:41

I've brought you to Shalford Mill,

0:24:440:24:47

an 18th-century, pretty water mill on the

0:24:470:24:51

outskirts of the enchanting village of Shalford, just outside Guildford.

0:24:510:24:55

Let's have a look, shall we?

0:24:550:24:57

Flour milling has flourished here from the medieval to Victorian times.

0:24:590:25:03

The current mill still houses some 19th-century machinery,

0:25:030:25:07

gears and pulleys, sack hoists and a water wheel.

0:25:070:25:11

But it's not just the mill itself that attracts visitors to

0:25:130:25:16

this National Trust property.

0:25:160:25:19

I'm going to join Polly Bagnall who's going to tell us some more.

0:25:190:25:21

-Good morning, Polly.

-Good morning.

-How very nice to see you.

0:25:210:25:24

Now, I know the milling industry has had its ups and downs

0:25:240:25:28

but tell us about the history of this particular mill.

0:25:280:25:30

There was a mill on this site and there is one

0:25:300:25:33

recorded in the Doomsday Book, so since medieval times.

0:25:330:25:36

This actual mill was built in about 1739 by John Mildred from Guildford.

0:25:360:25:41

And it's quite unusual.

0:25:410:25:43

It's got beautiful, scalloped, clay tiles on the outside,

0:25:430:25:46

so it's quite a grand mill.

0:25:460:25:47

But it would've only been run by about two men.

0:25:470:25:50

The grinder and a boy.

0:25:500:25:52

It was very busy, all through the 1700s, 1800s,

0:25:520:25:56

but around the end of the 1800s,

0:25:560:25:59

there was no great demand for English wheat.

0:25:590:26:02

It was cheaper to import it from abroad.

0:26:020:26:05

So, by 1914 this mill was pretty much defunct.

0:26:050:26:10

It was old machinery and obsolete.

0:26:100:26:12

And how did this mill become National Trust property?

0:26:120:26:15

That's a very interesting story

0:26:150:26:16

because at that point there was an awful lot of road-building

0:26:160:26:20

and all from London down to here, there were houses going up.

0:26:200:26:25

Two women came down from London and they wanted to save a little

0:26:250:26:28

bit of rural England and so they took the mill.

0:26:280:26:31

But it was in a sorry state and they said, "Let's repair it,"

0:26:310:26:35

and they had to raise money. They weren't any ordinary women.

0:26:350:26:38

-They were Ferguson's Gang.

-Who were Ferguson's Gang?

0:26:380:26:42

Well, there were five women. They were quite well educated.

0:26:420:26:47

Some from very wealthy families,

0:26:470:26:48

some from less so and had to earn a living.

0:26:480:26:50

But they were bright and had a great sense of fun and were in their twenties.

0:26:500:26:55

And they decided to get together

0:26:550:26:57

and they had funny names, like Sister Agatha,

0:26:570:27:00

Red Biddy, Bludy Beershop and the main person was Bill Stickers.

0:27:000:27:04

Rather than just raising money in a normal way, they went round

0:27:040:27:08

with masks and capes and went round all their friends and relatives

0:27:080:27:11

getting Victorian coins until they'd amassed enough to repair the mill,

0:27:110:27:14

-a few hundred pounds.

-Bizarre.

-And employed an architect to do it.

0:27:140:27:19

They gave it to the National Trust and they actually donated

0:27:190:27:23

several properties around the south-east. An old priory,

0:27:230:27:27

a town hall on the Isle of Wight and large tracts of Cornish coastline.

0:27:270:27:31

Throughout the '30s and '40s, they were really active and every time

0:27:310:27:36

they got money, they donated it to the National Trust in funny ways.

0:27:360:27:40

They would maybe roll it up disguised as a cigar

0:27:400:27:43

or inside the body of a carcass of a goose.

0:27:430:27:47

And one-time they made an elaborate pineapple that they put

0:27:470:27:50

the money inside and took it to the National Trust AGM and presented it

0:27:500:27:54

and everyone thought it was a bomb and was really scared.

0:27:540:27:57

But it hit the papers.

0:27:570:27:59

All their activities got great publicity for the National Trust.

0:27:590:28:04

I think they boosted the numbers by about a third

0:28:040:28:07

and they raised £1,000, which at that point was a lot of money.

0:28:070:28:11

-Did the gang remain secretive?

-Oh, indeed.

0:28:110:28:13

They even had their own headquarters here at Shalford Mill.

0:28:130:28:17

-This is the HQ, is it?

-It is. It's where they used to sleep...

0:28:170:28:21

All five of them?

0:28:210:28:23

-..and cook and eat. All five of them.

-Must have been cosy.

-It was.

0:28:230:28:27

And what we have, which is great, is that they kept a minute book

0:28:270:28:32

and in here, all their exploits that featured in the newspapers

0:28:320:28:37

of the times. The Times, the Daily Mail.

0:28:370:28:40

They stuck in the cuttings and some of the buildings they restored.

0:28:400:28:44

And they've also recorded some of their activities that they did

0:28:440:28:49

which was just for their enjoyment

0:28:490:28:51

and they used to have a ritual haunting of the mill.

0:28:510:28:54

Usually around the summer solstice.

0:28:540:28:56

It would entail them making a feast in here and then going up to what

0:28:560:29:01

they called the Chamber of Horrors,

0:29:010:29:02

which was the top gallery of the mill.

0:29:020:29:05

They would do chanting and I think we've got something in here.

0:29:050:29:09

"On the stroke of midnight, the Right Bludy,

0:29:090:29:12

"the Lord Beershop, Bill Stickers and Sister Agatha assembled with their

0:29:120:29:16

"weapons in the Chamber of Horrors.

0:29:160:29:18

"Solemnly swore the following oath,

0:29:180:29:20

"'I swear that at whatever cost, I for one will uphold Ferguson's Gang,'"

0:29:200:29:25

and they wrote it in this mockney. It's a bit like modern text speak.

0:29:250:29:29

-Polly, your interest in this is not entirely coincidental?

-Not at all.

0:29:290:29:33

I grew up here and my grandfather was The Artichoke, who was an architect.

0:29:330:29:39

He was a conservation architect.

0:29:390:29:41

The gang used him to restore and conserve all their buildings.

0:29:410:29:46

It is fascinating, that whole era of the 1930s,

0:29:460:29:49

'40s and what was happening in rural England.

0:29:490:29:53

-These women were quite important.

-Exactly.

0:29:530:29:55

-Doing their mysterious good deeds.

-Indeed.

0:29:550:29:58

The big question today is, of course, what good deeds are about to be done

0:29:580:30:02

by our teams over at the auction.

0:30:020:30:04

Well, what a treat. We're in Wisborough Green,

0:30:150:30:17

at Bellmans' saleroom, with Jonathan Pratt. JP,

0:30:170:30:20

-good to see you.

-And you, Tim.

-Let's see what the Reds have got.

0:30:200:30:22

-A couple of steaming lanterns.

-They're called Round Reds.

0:30:220:30:27

I looked and looked and couldn't find a similar example to them.

0:30:270:30:31

That will only, I suppose, help.

0:30:310:30:32

Yeah, probably. You get the port and starboard ones. The red and green.

0:30:320:30:35

The all-round job would be for a special function like your

0:30:350:30:39

-being towed at night.

-The quality of them is very good.

-Exactly.

0:30:390:30:43

So how much would the best price be?

0:30:430:30:45

£80-120 is my estimate.

0:30:450:30:48

Thank you. Catherine found them. She loves all this marine stuff.

0:30:480:30:51

She paid £135, which may just be a bit over the top. But not to worry.

0:30:510:30:55

We can soon knock them out with the truncheon.

0:30:550:30:58

JONATHAN LAUGHS

0:30:580:30:59

As truncheons go, this is quite a modern one.

0:30:590:31:02

This is like a 20th-century bobby.

0:31:020:31:04

And the collectors will be more after 19th-century or earlier.

0:31:040:31:09

-Yeah. Early Peelers.

-Exactly.

0:31:090:31:11

Which are painted and gilt and with a VR monograph instead of a GR.

0:31:110:31:16

-This is George V.

-How much?

0:31:160:31:19

-20 to 40.

-OK, £22 paid.

0:31:190:31:22

And lastly, we've got what looks like a death mask. But a Roman mask.

0:31:220:31:27

-Augustus. How do you rate him?

-Nice and decorative.

0:31:270:31:32

Nice quality. Not really much more to say about it than that.

0:31:320:31:36

It goes into most homes as well. The classical collector, the Victorian

0:31:360:31:40

type of house or someone who's interested in modern art.

0:31:400:31:43

You could still sit it in the same place.

0:31:430:31:44

Just needs a bit of tidying up, chips and marks.

0:31:440:31:47

The base isn't terribly good, to be honest, but that can be sorted out.

0:31:470:31:50

-Exactly. How much?

-60 to 80.

-£75. It's a classic, isn't it?

0:31:500:31:54

That's it. It's all pretty well on the button.

0:31:540:31:57

They may not need their bonus buy, but let's have a look at it anyway.

0:31:570:32:01

You gave Catherine £68. Catherine, what did you spend it on?

0:32:010:32:04

Well, here we are, chaps.

0:32:040:32:07

-A box.

-Wow.

-Look.

0:32:070:32:10

Open it up. Look at that. An artist box.

0:32:110:32:15

This is what you would take on your Sunday afternoon

0:32:150:32:18

and you'd go out and you'd start painting. Wouldn't you?

0:32:180:32:22

-Would I?

-You would.

0:32:220:32:24

You'd have one of those little stools, the collapsible stools.

0:32:240:32:26

You'd open it out and sit down and look at the countryside

0:32:260:32:29

-and you'd paint.

-How much did you pay for it?

-I paid £45.

0:32:290:32:32

I quite like it, actually. I think that's really nice.

0:32:320:32:34

What do you think we'll get for this?

0:32:340:32:36

-I think you should make £30 profit on it. 40.

-Do you think?

-30, 40.

0:32:360:32:40

-OK.

-OK, chaps. If you need it, you can pick it,

0:32:400:32:44

but only after the sale of your first three items, because right now

0:32:440:32:47

let's find out from the auctioneer what he thinks

0:32:470:32:49

about Catherine's little colour box.

0:32:490:32:52

-OK. I know you're very artistic. Good, isn't it?

-Windsor and Newton.

0:32:530:32:59

I mean, good name for just quality painting products.

0:32:590:33:02

It's a mahogany case.

0:33:020:33:03

It's got a bit of age and vintage look about it.

0:33:030:33:05

It's packed full of paint. You could buy this and go and paint tomorrow.

0:33:050:33:09

-How much?

-I quite like it.

0:33:090:33:12

As a practical object, it's good value for money. Decorative too.

0:33:120:33:16

How much money?

0:33:160:33:18

-£60-80.

-£45 paid by Catherine Southon.

0:33:180:33:20

-So I think she's done well.

-I think she has too.

0:33:200:33:22

That's it for the Reds. Now for the Blues,

0:33:220:33:24

who have got that group of pillboxes.

0:33:240:33:27

-Modern ones, aren't they?

-They're all modern ones.

0:33:270:33:29

I have been kind of trying to be generous here.

0:33:290:33:32

-£40-60.

-Gosh.

-This one here is white metal, possibly silver and enamel,

0:33:320:33:38

but not terribly nice quality.

0:33:380:33:39

And then you've got a few porcelain ones there.

0:33:390:33:42

Quite honestly, if I got to 40, I'd be really pleased.

0:33:420:33:45

We need to get to 70 and that ain't going to happen.

0:33:450:33:47

If we transport ourselves to Italy, we might go to Venice

0:33:470:33:51

-and we might pick up a glass bowl like that?

-Yeah.

0:33:510:33:54

I like this sort of stuff.

0:33:540:33:56

I like the quality that goes into making these things.

0:33:560:33:58

-You think of those Georgian ale twist glasses.

-Yeah.

0:33:580:34:02

It's the same thing.

0:34:020:34:03

It's lots and lots of canes made smaller and smaller

0:34:030:34:05

-and smaller. It's very typically Venetian glass.

-But does it sell?

0:34:050:34:10

There are collectors of this sort of thing.

0:34:100:34:12

-£40-60, I think, is realistic.

-That's good. £30 only paid.

-OK.

0:34:120:34:18

Lastly, and not least, comes the meat platter and the copper pan.

0:34:180:34:24

I prefer the pan to the meat platter.

0:34:240:34:26

People aren't using sideboards any more. So where would you put this?

0:34:260:34:29

You buy it and put it straight back into a cupboard.

0:34:290:34:31

This is a nice quality Victorian pan. It's much of a muchness really.

0:34:310:34:36

I rate the meat platter at maybe £40, £50,

0:34:360:34:39

and then the saucepan, another £20 or something.

0:34:390:34:41

-So to me, it's sort of £60, £80.

-OK, fine.

0:34:410:34:44

-Well, they paid £195...

-HE GROANS

0:34:440:34:46

..which is a lot of turkey, isn't it?

0:34:460:34:48

We just have to hold fast and reckon they will need the bonus buy,

0:34:480:34:52

so let's go have a look at it.

0:34:520:34:55

-OK, girls. This is fun, isn't it?

-It's great fun.

0:34:550:34:57

Have you any idea how difficult it is to spend £5

0:34:570:35:01

on an object that's likely to make a profit?

0:35:010:35:03

I think we can imagine it.

0:35:030:35:05

I tell you, Tom's been through there and back, haven't you?

0:35:050:35:09

The thing is, you can buy any old bit of tat,

0:35:090:35:13

-but I bought...

-BOTH:

-Oh!

0:35:130:35:14

..a moulded plate, moulded glass, so not the greatest

0:35:140:35:18

quality but it's an exhibition piece from 1938 for Glasgow.

0:35:180:35:23

-I think that's very clever.

-So do I.

-I think you've done brilliantly.

0:35:230:35:27

Did you pay your whole £5?

0:35:270:35:29

That was it. This was marked up at a huge amount more.

0:35:290:35:32

-He took pity on me.

-And how much do you think it will make?

0:35:320:35:36

You've got to double your money. You've got to double your money.

0:35:360:35:38

-OK, brilliant. Are you happy with that, girls?

-Fantastic.

0:35:380:35:41

I think that's a great thing to find for £5, so well done, Tom.

0:35:410:35:44

Let's find out from the auctioneer what he thinks about Tom's plate.

0:35:440:35:48

JP, you know how difficult it is to find something

0:35:490:35:52

for a five pound note in the leftover lolly department.

0:35:520:35:54

I think, to be honest, Tom's done rather well. Glasgow 1938.

0:35:540:35:58

Impressed with thistles. A little bit of wear to it

0:35:580:36:01

but what can you buy for a fiver?

0:36:010:36:02

Exactly. So what's your estimate on that?

0:36:020:36:05

-10 to 20.

-OK, £5 paid. So Thomas Plant has done a blinder,

0:36:050:36:08

if the team decide to go with it and that is their next big decision.

0:36:080:36:13

There's loads of people here.

0:36:210:36:23

They're all buzzing and gagging to get hold of your lots.

0:36:230:36:26

What is going to happen, chaps?

0:36:260:36:28

We're excited as excited can be to be here with you,

0:36:280:36:32

and the first item up are the copper lanterns and here we go.

0:36:320:36:36

-I have a bid of £40 commission.

-Oh!

-At £40 commission.

-That's a bit low.

0:36:360:36:40

There's 45. And the commission's now gone. 50.

0:36:400:36:43

-£50. On the right now, at £50.

-It's very low, isn't it?

0:36:430:36:48

-55. 60.

-Come on. Up.

-65.

0:36:480:36:52

Has it now standing at the very back at £65.

0:36:520:36:55

Come on. I thought the internet would bid for these.

0:36:550:36:58

£65. Any more at £65? I'll give you one more chance. No.

0:36:580:37:02

£65 still there. Back of the room at 65.

0:37:020:37:06

-THEY GROAN

-£65.

0:37:060:37:08

-That's miserable.

-That is minus £70. Lord.

0:37:080:37:14

-Here comes the truncheon.

-£20 to start me.

0:37:140:37:17

Good truncheon here for £20. Lots of 20s. 20 in front.

0:37:170:37:22

25 in the yellow. 30. 35. 40. 45.

0:37:220:37:25

50. 50 down here. At 50.

0:37:250:37:28

Where's the other hand that went up? Are you coming back in?

0:37:280:37:30

-50 down front. OK. He says no. 50 down here.

-Come on!

0:37:300:37:34

Your bid at £50. All done at £50. Last chance.

0:37:340:37:37

-50.

-£50. Eight short of 30.

0:37:370:37:40

That is plus 28. 28, which means...

0:37:400:37:44

-..you're minus 42.

-Here we go. Here is the bronze.

0:37:450:37:48

£60 to start me for this. £60.

0:37:480:37:52

40, then. There's 40 now. Front here at £40.

0:37:520:37:55

Surely worth more. It's £40 down the front. Where's the five?

0:37:550:37:58

-Where's the five?

-Are we all done at £40?

0:37:580:37:59

No other interest in the room at £40? I'll sell then to you, sir,

0:37:590:38:03

down on the right at £40.

0:38:030:38:05

That's minus 77.

0:38:050:38:07

We should have bought three truncheons.

0:38:070:38:09

-What are we going to do about the paintbox?

-We've got to go for it.

0:38:090:38:12

-We've definitely got to go for it.

-You're going with it?

-Yeah.

0:38:120:38:15

-We've got nothing to lose.

-Nothing to lose at all.

-Go for it.

0:38:150:38:19

Bids with me at 55. 65. £75. Straight in at £75.

0:38:190:38:23

-Oh, 75 straight in.

-Oh, my God.

0:38:230:38:25

£75. Where's 80? Do I see £80.

0:38:250:38:28

-I told you it was a good one.

-Yeah.

0:38:280:38:31

Any more in the room? There's someone twitching out there on the internet.

0:38:310:38:34

-If you're going to bid again, bid now.

-Go on, twitch.

-Come on.

0:38:340:38:38

-85 anywhere else?

-Come on.

-Selling at £80.

0:38:380:38:43

Still twitching there. £80.

0:38:430:38:46

-Well, £80 is plus £35.

-It's something.

0:38:460:38:50

That is minus £42. That, chaps, could be a winning score.

0:38:500:38:55

-OK, girls. Do you know how the boys got on?

-No.

-Fine.

0:39:000:39:03

Anyway, you've got your little collection of pill and stamp boxes.

0:39:030:39:06

You paid £70. The auctioneer's been a bit sniffy about them.

0:39:060:39:10

£40-60 is his estimate.

0:39:100:39:12

-That is a bit cruel.

-We'll see how you go and here they come.

0:39:120:39:15

And with bids on the book, I'm starting at 60. With me at £60.

0:39:150:39:20

-Look at that! That's remarkable!

-£60. Looking for five now.

0:39:200:39:24

-Surely worth five. It's £60 with me.

-More, more.

0:39:240:39:28

65 and 70. 75 and 80.

0:39:280:39:31

Look at that!

0:39:310:39:32

We'll eat our words, won't we, JP?

0:39:340:39:36

Are we all done at £80? I shall sell at £80.

0:39:360:39:40

-That is remarkable.

-Well done. Well done.

0:39:410:39:44

A Venetian glass hexagonal bowl.

0:39:440:39:46

Bids on this to start me. 25. £35.

0:39:460:39:51

-We're in profit before we start.

-40. 45. You sure?

0:39:510:39:55

-One more might do it, sir. £45. 50 in the room now.

-50.

-55?

0:39:550:40:00

You both want it now at 50. 50 dead set.

0:40:000:40:03

-This is good.

-This is good.

0:40:030:40:05

Come on now.

0:40:070:40:08

£50 in the centre. I'll sell it at 50. It's yours, sir. £50.

0:40:080:40:11

50. Sold it for £50, which is plus £20. Very good.

0:40:110:40:15

You're plus 30. Now, stand by.

0:40:150:40:19

Someone start me 60 for this. £60.

0:40:190:40:21

£60 for the lot.

0:40:210:40:23

-Bid.

-Oh, no. No.

0:40:230:40:27

£20. Stop me at 20. There's 20 there.

0:40:270:40:30

25 anywhere else? £20 I have at the front.

0:40:300:40:33

-It's a long climb.

-A very long climb.

0:40:330:40:36

30. 35.

0:40:360:40:38

35, now with you, sir. £35.

0:40:380:40:40

Oh, no!

0:40:400:40:42

£35. Are you all done? It's £35 and selling.

0:40:420:40:46

You've lost your way with that one, Tom-Tom.

0:40:460:40:48

That is minus 160, which doesn't sound too bad if you say it quickly.

0:40:480:40:53

Look, gilt plate. You going to go with that? Bonus buy. Why not?

0:40:530:40:57

-Why not?

-It's a no-brainer.

-Nothing to lose.

-We're unified in that.

0:40:570:41:00

The moulded glass and gilt plate,

0:41:000:41:01

commemorating the Tower Of Empire Exhibition in Glasgow in 1938.

0:41:010:41:05

Someone start me at £10. There's 10 in the yellow. Thank you at 10.

0:41:050:41:08

-Oh, good.

-£10 is bid. Looking for 12 now. Dead ahead at 10.

0:41:080:41:12

Got to be worth 12. Do you want to come in at 12? No.

0:41:120:41:15

10 at the back of the room. Anyone else at £12? Come on.

0:41:150:41:17

-Let's go for 12. It's only £2 more.

-Come on!

0:41:170:41:21

10 it is then. At £10.

0:41:210:41:24

Selling for 10.

0:41:240:41:25

Which is plus £5, which means overall you're minus 125.

0:41:250:41:29

If you say that very quietly.

0:41:290:41:31

Today's programme hinges on the extent of losses.

0:41:360:41:40

The team that has managed to clock up substantially more losses

0:41:400:41:44

than the other is, of course, the Blues.

0:41:440:41:47

-Oh!

-Minus £125 is quite a score.

0:41:470:41:50

-Yeah.

-Really, a position you could not recover from.

0:41:500:41:55

Minus £160 on the pewter meat plate. That was a death blow.

0:41:550:42:00

Otherwise, you got a profit on every lot.

0:42:000:42:03

You got a profit on the bonus buy. You got a profit on the other two

0:42:030:42:06

-but that meat plate. You were sunk.

-Absolutely.

-Disaster.

0:42:060:42:10

-But you've been incredibly sporting about this.

-They were very nice.

0:42:100:42:14

-They were just the wrong buyers.

-Exactly. You have got it so right.

0:42:140:42:18

But you and your mate, Liz, are lovely when it comes to

0:42:180:42:22

sportsmanship because you haven't let this get you down, have you?

0:42:220:42:25

-No, course not.

-Hope you've enjoyed the experience.

-It's been terrific.

0:42:250:42:28

Bad luck about that plate. Otherwise you'd have been swimming.

0:42:280:42:31

Anyway, good fun. But the victors today who've managed to win by only

0:42:310:42:34

losing £42 are our boys in blue. I mean red.

0:42:340:42:38

You were £77 down the proverbial until Catherine came to the fore

0:42:380:42:42

with her lovely paintbox.

0:42:420:42:44

-That paintbox made £35, so well done, Catherine.

-Thank you.

0:42:440:42:47

You are minus £42, but the victors today, and I congratulate you.

0:42:470:42:51

-Thank you.

-Good fun.

0:42:510:42:52

It's been so much fun, you should join us soon for some more

0:42:520:42:55

-bargain-hunting. Yes?!

-ALL:

-Yes!

0:42:550:42:57

A pair of policemen take on some self-named glamorous grannies. The teams are expertly assisted by Catherine Southon and Thomas Plant as they hunt for bargains in the antiques centres of Lewes.

Presenter Tim Wonnacott visits an 18-century watermill with an intriguing history.


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