Episode 22 University Challenge


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Episode 22

University College London plays the University of Warwick for a place in the quarter-finals. Jeremy Paxman asks the questions.


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Asking the questions, Jeremy Paxman.

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Hello. As the second round continues, five places in the quarter-finals have been taken,

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three remain and one will go to whichever team wins tonight.

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University College London were matched at first by York in their first match,

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but they hit their stride with starters on Necker's Cube, Salvador Dali and binary numbers.

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They were 80 points ahead at the gong. Let's meet UCL again.

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I'm Hywel Carver from Devon, doing a PhD in simulating blood flow.

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-Hi, I'm Patrick Cook from Texas, reading History.

-Their captain...

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Hello. I'm Jamie Karran from London and I'm a medical student.

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Hi. I'm Tom Andrews from Somerset and I'm studying Genetics.

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APPLAUSE

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University of Warwick had to work hard to keep Edinburgh in check in the first half of their match,

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then their opponents fell asleep, giving them showing off time

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which they used to show knowledge of the Andes, geophysics, the letter O and diseases of the eye.

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Hi. I'm Martin Rixham from Sheffield and I study Mathematics.

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Hello. I'm Celia Nicholls from Canada, reading for a PhD in Film.

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-And their captain...

-Hi. I'm Thomas Hayes, from Shepperton, studying for a PhD in Physics.

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Hello. I'm Sumukh Kaul from Oxford, reading for a degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics.

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APPLAUSE

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OK, you all know the rules, so let's get on with it. Your first starter.

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A double bind, a cleft stick and a Morton's fork are among expressions cited as precursors

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of which phrase, now in common use, which originated as the title of a satirical novel...

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-Catch-22?

-That's right.

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Your bonuses are on an English poet, Warwick.

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According to an elegy of 1640 by Thomas Carey,

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who, "purged the Muse's garden of its pedantic weeds",

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threw away, "the lazy seeds of servile imitation and fresh invention planted"?

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-Any idea?

-Milton?

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-Milton?

-No, it was John Donne.

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"With Donne, whose Muse on dromedary trots, wreath iron pokers into true love-knots".

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Which of the Romantic poets wrote those words?

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-Come on.

-Byron.

-No, it's Coleridge. And, finally,

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"Dr Donne's verses are like the peace of God; they pass all understanding."

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To which monarch is that remark attributed?

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-Charles I?

-No, it was James I or VI. Ten points for this.

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Urging the Tory policy of peace with France, Dr John Arbuthnot's political satire of 1712

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featured characters such as Humphrey Hocus, Lewis Baboon and Nicholas Frog...

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-John Bull.

-John Bull is correct, yes.

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Your first bonuses are on religious agreements.

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What word is used in English Bibles for a contract with God,

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such as that made at Mount Sinai, when Israel agreed to obey God's laws after He freed them?

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-Covenant.

-In 1638, members of which Protestant Scottish church, named after their Council of Elders,

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signed a "National Covenant" to protect their form of worship?

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-Presbyterian.

-OK. Were these known as the Covenanters?

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-Presbyterian.

-Yes. What four-word name was given to the agreement between the English Parliament

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and the Scots in 1643 to strengthen their position against Charles I?

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-I forgot the question.

-A covenant of the English Parliament and Scots.

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1643, if that helps.

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-No.

-No.

-Pass.

-That's the Solemn League and Covenant.

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"I'm sure what Spielberg actually said was, 'Pete thinks that he is the best actor in the world.'"

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These words are attributed to which Warrington-born actor who died in 2011?

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-Pete Postlethwaite.

-Correct.

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Your bonuses are on a conjunction.

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"Anthologised to weariness," according to its author,

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which poem of 1910 describes triumph and disaster as "two imposters"

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and encourages the reader to treat them "just the same"?

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-If.

-Correct. The 1969 film If, depicting life in a British public school,

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and culminating in an armed insurrection, was directed by which film critic turned director?

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-Lindsay Anderson.

-In the context of the cardiac pacemaker current,

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what word is denoted by the letter F in the abbreviation upper-case I, lower-case subscript F?

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-Frequency.

-No, it's Funny. 10 points for this. Meanings of what word include:

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in chemistry, an acid or base related to its counterpart by loss or gain of a proton,

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in biology, to become temporarily...

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-Conjugate?

-Correct.

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Bonuses are on the vertebrate ear.

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In tetrapods, what canal connects the pharynx with the middle ear?

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It permits equalisation of pressure on either side of the tympanic membrane.

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-Auricular canal?

-No, it's the Eustachian tube.

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The vestibular and cochlear nerves are branches of the cranial nerve denoted by what number?

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-Five.

-No, it's eight. Which ossicle is attached to the tympanic membrane?

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-Stirrup?

-No, it's the malleus. We'll take a picture round now.

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For your picture starter, you'll see a photograph of a newspaper magnate. 10 points if you can name him.

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-Pulitzer?

-It is Joseph Pulitzer, yes.

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He gave his name to the Pulitzer Prizes. 2011 is the centenary of his death. You'll see three pictures

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of female Pulitzer winners. 5 points for each you can name.

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Firstly, this 1961 Fiction Prize winner.

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-Agatha Christie...?

-No, the Pulitzer is for American literature.

-Oh, OK.

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-I think we'll have an answer, please.

-No, we don't know.

-Perhaps we won't!

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It's Harper Lee, author of To Kill A Mockingbird. Secondly, this 1989 winner for Drama.

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Not a very flattering picture.

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-I'm afraid we don't know that one, either.

-Wendy Wasserstein. Finally, the winner in 1982 for Poetry,

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awarded posthumously.

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OK. "Caroline" Duffy?

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Posthumously?! She's hale and hearty! It's Sylvia Plath.

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10 points for this starter. In December 2010, scientific tests showed that a mummified head,

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discovered as part of a private collection, was that of which French monarch, noted for his part

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in ending the Wars of Religion?

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-Henri IV?

-Henri IV is right. Henry of Navarre.

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Your bonuses are on the novels of George Eliot.

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What was George Eliot's first full-length novel, published in 1859

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and based in part on a story told to her by her aunt of a child murder?

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-Adam Bede.

-Correct. Given the epithet The Radical, who is the title character of the novel of 1866

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set during the time of the Reform Act of 1832?

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-Tess of the d'Urbervilles?

-That's Hardy. Do not say that.

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OK, no. Nothing. Sorry.

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-No answer.

-Very good. Well, it's terrible. It was Felix Holt.

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Set in the years before the 1832 Reform Act, which novel features a brother and sister who grow up

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by a river near St Oggs?

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-The Mill On The Floss.

-Yes! Recent holders of which Cabinet office

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share surnames with a major Australian river, Queen Victoria's residence...

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-Chancellor of the Exchequer.

-Correct, yes.

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You're on level-pegging again. These bonuses are on mineralogy.

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What is the chemical name of the lead ore galena?

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-Lead oxide?

-No...

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-Lead oxide.

-No, it's lead sulphide. In the Goldschmidt classification of elements,

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what term is used of elements with an affinity for sulphur? Their ores are usually sulphides.

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-No idea.

-It's a chalcophile. Its name derived from the Greek word khalkos,

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chalcocite is a sulphide ore of which metal, an important resource since prehistoric times?

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-Copper.

-Correct. That gives you the lead. 10 points for this.

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The solo exhibition Polaroids in New York in 1973,

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a study of the bodybuilder Lisa Lyon in 1983 and the portrait for Patti Smith's album Horses in 1975

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are among the works of which US photographer, who died in 1989?

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-Man Ray?

-No. Warwick, one of you buzz.

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-Er, Karen Elton?

-No, it's Robert Mapplethorpe. 10 points for this.

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"To make a man or a boy covet a thing, it is only necessary to make it difficult to attain."

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Referring to the hero's method of delegating the task of painting...

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-Tom Sawyer?

-Tom Sawyer is right.

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Your bonuses this time are on words that can be made from the letters of the title Das Kapital.

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In each case, give the word from the description. The French word that begins the full name

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of the residence of the President of the French Republic.

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-Palais? P-A-L-A-I-S.

-Yes.

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-Palais?

-Correct. A Hindi word for the red spot on the forehead

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used to show sect affiliation or for adornment?

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-I thought that was bindi.

-That's not in Das Kapital.

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Let's be convinced by our wrongness. Is it a bindi?

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-There's no B in Das Kapital.

-Well...

-No, it's tilak.

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A Spanish word meaning cover or lid that has come to denote a variety of cuisine?

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It's like a type of curry.

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-Tajine?

-Come on.

-No, OK...

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-No, pass.

-Tapas. 10 points for this.

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"The attempt to make the chaotic diversity of our sense-experience

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"correspond to a logically uniform system of thought," was Einstein's definition of what general term?

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-Quantum physics?

-No. UCL?

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-Philosophy?

-No, it's science. What two-word Latin phrase is formed by concatenating the letters

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that indicate the web domains from Bolivia, Namibia, Finland and Germany, respectively?

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-Bona fide.

-Correct, yes.

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Your bonuses this time, UCL, are on languages. Thought to derive from a corruption of the word "business",

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-what term denotes a simplified language produced by contact between groups...

-Pidgin.

-Right.

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From the Latin for "bring into being", what term denotes a pidgin that becomes the mother tongue?

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Creole.

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-Creole?

-Yes. A creole reckoned to have more than one million speakers,

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-Tok Pisin is an official language of which...

-Papua New Guinea.

-Correct.

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Set on a small Italian island, the 1994 film Il Postino tells the story of a fictional postman

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who delivers fan mail to which exiled Chilean poet, diplomat...

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-Pablo Neruda.

-Correct. You get a set of bonuses on Astronomers Royal.

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Who was the first Astronomer Royal, appointed in 1676, the year the Royal Observatory was founded?

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-Halley.

-Edmond Halley?

-No, it was John Flamsteed.

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The Astronomer Royal from 1835, George Biddell Airy's use in 1851 of the transit circle telescope

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established which point of reference, later acknowledged internationally?

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-The Greenwich Meridian?

-Correct. Which Astronomer Royal in 1974

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won the first Nobel Prize in Physics to be awarded for astronomical research?

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WHISPERING

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Russell?

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-Russell?

-No, Sir Martin Ryle.

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We'll take a music round now. For your starter, you'll hear part of the theme music to a US TV series.

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Ten points if you can give me its full title.

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THEME MUSIC PLAYS

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-Star Trek: Deep Space Nine.

-Correct.

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APPLAUSE

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So your bonuses - three more themes from TV science-fiction series,

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all of which are still in orbit on various satellite channels. Firstly, for five points?

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THEME MUSIC PLAYS

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-Space: 1999.

-Is it?

-Yeah.

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-Space: 1999?

-Indeed. Secondly?

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THEME MUSIC PLAYS

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It isn't Stargate, is it?

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WHISPERING

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-Stargate?

-No, that's Farscape. And finally?

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THEME MUSIC PLAYS

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- Lost In Space. - Yeah.

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-Lost In Space?

-No, that's Blake's 7. Right, another starter question.

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What name is both a city on the River Don east of the Sea of Azov

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and in Tolstoy's War And Peace, the family name shared by Petya, Nikolai and Natasha?

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-Makarova?

-No.

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UCL, one of you like to buzz?

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-Setrov?

-No, it's Rostov. Another starter question.

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In Scandinavian mythology, what is the collective name of the Three Fates

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who sit at the foot of the great tree, Yggdrasil?

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-Is it the Norns?

-Yes, it is.

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Right, your bonuses this time are on marine invertebrates.

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What is the two-word common name of Holothuroidea,

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a class of echinoderms that are prized in South Asian cuisine

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and known in Indonesia as trepang?

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It's a two-word term.

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-Sea cucumbers.

-Indeed they are!

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What is the two-word common name of Pleurobrachia,

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a genus of oval-shaped comb jellies covered with rows of small cilia?

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WHISPERING

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Didn't he say it was a long thing?

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Say "sponges", something like that?

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-Sponges?

-No, sea gooseberries.

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Often brightly coloured with long tentacles, what is the common name of the order Actiniaria?

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-That's jellyfish.

-They're clear.

-What are those things in rockpools that have tentacles?

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-Barnacles?

-No, like...

-Anemones?

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-Anemones. Anemones?

-Yes, sea anemones is right.

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Right, ten points for this.

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Answer as soon as you buzz. The three highest capitals in the world are all in South America.

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Name two of them.

0:17:050:17:07

Lima and Sucre?

0:17:090:17:11

No. Warwick, one of you buzz?

0:17:110:17:13

La Paz and Mexico City?

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La Paz is one. Quito and Bogota are the other ones. Another starter.

0:17:150:17:20

Which British city links the songs Back Buchanan Street

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and My Old Man's A Fireman On The Elder-Dempster Line

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with the traditional songs Johnny Todd and Maggie May?

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-Liverpool.

-Correct.

0:17:300:17:33

Your bonuses are on things "rare", Warwick. "Rare earths" is a term applied to the series of elements

0:17:350:17:41

in the Periodic Table known by what name, derived from the element with atomic number 57?

0:17:410:17:47

-Lanthanides.

-Correct. "Rare bird", a phrase denoting something exceptional

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or extraordinary, derives from the phrase "rara avis" in the satires of which Roman author?

0:17:520:17:58

-Nominate Kaul.

-Juvenal?

-Correct.

0:18:020:18:05

"Rare Ben", in this case meaning "remarkable", is part of the inscription on the tomb

0:18:050:18:11

in Westminster Abbey of which dramatist who died in 1637?

0:18:110:18:15

-Ben Jonson.

-Correct. Level-pegging again. Ten points for this. Answer as soon as you buzz.

0:18:150:18:20

What word of four letters can precede the words "brake", "harrow", "drive" and "jockey"

0:18:200:18:26

to form compound nouns?

0:18:260:18:28

-Disc.

-Disc is correct, yes.

0:18:280:18:30

Your bonuses are on shipping firsts, UCL.

0:18:300:18:33

Launched in 1859, the French ship La Gloire was the first of what type of ocean-going warship?

0:18:330:18:40

It was followed by the British HMS Warrior a year later.

0:18:400:18:43

A destroyer or dreadnought?

0:18:430:18:46

- Aircraft carrier? - How about a cruiser maybe?

0:18:460:18:49

-Cruiser?

-No, they were ironclads.

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The Soviet naval ice-breaker Lenin, launched in 1957,

0:18:520:18:56

was the first surface ship to be powered by what means?

0:18:560:19:00

-Nuclear power.

-Correct. In the early 1900s, Enrico Forlanini built the first of what type of vessel

0:19:000:19:07

which is lifted out of the water by a flat or curved, fin-like device, attached by struts to the hull?

0:19:070:19:14

-Hydrofoil.

-Indeed it is. We'll take our second picture round now.

0:19:140:19:18

For your starter, you will see a painting. Ten points if you can give me the name of the artist.

0:19:180:19:24

-Turner.

-It is Turner, yes.

0:19:240:19:27

His Stormy Sea Breaking On A Shore. Three more paintings for your bonuses, depicting seascapes.

0:19:280:19:35

Again I want the name of the artist. Firstly?

0:19:350:19:38

That's Hokusai.

0:19:390:19:41

-Hokusai.

-Hokusai is right. Secondly?

0:19:410:19:45

I do not know.

0:19:460:19:48

WHISPERING

0:19:490:19:51

-Caravaggio?

-I don't think it's Caravaggio.

0:19:520:19:56

-Caravaggio.

-No, that's... Caravaggio?!

0:19:560:19:59

It's Courbet, The Stormy Sea or The Wave. And finally?

0:19:590:20:03

Oh, no!

0:20:060:20:08

WHISPERING

0:20:090:20:11

If you don't say something, he'll say Caravaggio again!

0:20:110:20:15

Come on, let's have an answer, please!

0:20:150:20:18

-Pass.

-That's by Renoir.

0:20:180:20:20

Right, ten points for this. In pharmacology, a sialagogue is a drug

0:20:200:20:26

that promotes or induces the secretion of what?

0:20:260:20:29

-Saliva.

-Correct.

0:20:310:20:33

You get a set of bonuses this time, Warwick, on Queen Victoria.

0:20:330:20:37

"Such a cold, odd man." Of which Prime Minister did Queen Victoria say those words,

0:20:370:20:42

though she is said to have mourned him "as a father" when he died in 1852?

0:20:420:20:47

CONFERRING

0:20:470:20:50

I think we'd better have an answer, please.

0:20:500:20:53

-Melbourne.

-No, he died in 1848, I think. It was Peel.

0:20:530:20:57

Prime Minister for almost ten years, to whom did Victoria and Albert give the disparaging name of Pilgerstein?

0:20:570:21:04

WHISPERING

0:21:050:21:07

-Gladstone.

-It was Palmerston. Finally, "the Queen bowed down with this misfortune".

0:21:090:21:14

These words describe Queen Victoria's reaction to the death of which former Prime Minister in 1881?

0:21:140:21:20

-Disraeli.

-Disraeli is correct. Six minutes to go. Ten points for this.

0:21:210:21:26

In geology, gibbsite is the mineral of the hydroxide of which metal?

0:21:260:21:31

-Calcium.

-Warwick?

0:21:330:21:35

-Sodium?

-No, aluminium. Ten points for this. Answer as soon as you buzz.

0:21:360:21:41

South Carolina is one of only two US states whose name contains six vowels. What's the other?

0:21:410:21:47

-Louisiana.

-Yes.

0:21:470:21:49

Your bonuses are on astronomy this time, UCL.

0:21:500:21:54

The irregularly shaped Amalthea is a moon of which planet?

0:21:540:21:59

WHISPERING

0:21:590:22:01

Saturn?

0:22:040:22:06

-OK. Saturn.

-No, it's Jupiter.

0:22:060:22:08

Neptune's largest satellite is Triton. Name either its second or third largest.

0:22:080:22:13

CONFERRING

0:22:140:22:17

Let's have an answer, please.

0:22:180:22:21

-Calypso.

-Calypso? No, it's Proteus or Nereid.

0:22:210:22:24

Which satellite is Saturn's largest and the second largest in the solar system...

0:22:240:22:29

-Titan.

-Correct. Ten points for this. Which composer gives his name to a pistachio-flavoured nougat

0:22:290:22:35

and chocolate sweet, said to be a 19th century invention of Paul Furst...

0:22:350:22:40

-Mozart.

-Mozart is right. Your bonuses this time are on a river, UCL.

0:22:400:22:45

Rising in Burundi, the Kagera and Luvironza rivers are the most remote headstreams of which major river?

0:22:450:22:52

-The Congo.

-The Nile. What is the English name of the upper reach of the Nile

0:22:530:22:57

which rises in Ethiopia and merges to become the Nile proper at Khartoum?

0:22:570:23:03

-There's a Red Nile as well.

-The Blue Nile.

-The Blue Nile.

-Correct.

-Yeah!

0:23:030:23:07

The Nile enters which lake in Egypt, created by the Aswan High Dam, named after a former President of Egypt?

0:23:070:23:13

-Lake Nasser?

-Lake Nasser is right. Ten points for this.

0:23:130:23:17

"Forsaken hatreds" is an anagram of the title of which short novel of 1902, set largely in Central...

0:23:170:23:24

-Heart Of Darkness.

-Correct. Here are your bonuses. They're on ancient monuments and archaeological sites.

0:23:240:23:30

Give the present-day country in which the following are located.

0:23:300:23:34

Firstly for five, the Roman settlement of Conimbriga and the Temple of Diana at Evora?

0:23:340:23:40

CONFERRING

0:23:410:23:43

Come on, let's have it, please!

0:23:460:23:48

-Turkey.

-Portugal. The ruined cities of Leptis Magna and Cyrene?

0:23:480:23:52

-They're in Libya.

-Libya.

-Correct.

0:23:520:23:54

The Porta Nigra, the largest Roman city gate north of the Alps, and the Rhaetian Limes or Frontier?

0:23:540:24:01

- Germany? - Possibly the Czech Republic?

0:24:030:24:06

-His guesses are good.

-OK.

-Germany.

-Correct.

0:24:060:24:09

Ten points for this. The Bank of England was established to support the public debt

0:24:090:24:14

in the wars of which monarch?

0:24:140:24:16

-William III.

-Correct.

0:24:160:24:19

Your bonuses are on female Nobel Laureates since 2000.

0:24:190:24:23

Give me the nationality of the recipient and the prize they won.

0:24:230:24:27

First for five points, Shirin Ebadi?

0:24:270:24:31

-Iran and Peace?

-Yeah.

-Iran and Peace.

0:24:310:24:34

Correct. Secondly, Elfriede Jelinek?

0:24:340:24:37

Literature and she's German, I think.

0:24:380:24:42

-Literature and Germany?

-Literature and Austria. Bad luck.

0:24:420:24:45

Finally, Ada Yonath?

0:24:450:24:47

Israeli and, er...

0:24:490:24:51

Come on!

0:24:520:24:54

-Literature?

-Israeli, Literature?

-No, it's Israeli and Chemistry.

0:24:540:24:58

Ten points for this. In physiology, which chemical element is present in the amino acid methionine,

0:24:580:25:04

but not in threonine?

0:25:040:25:06

-Sulphur?

-Sulphur is right.

0:25:060:25:09

Your bonuses are on measuring instruments, UCL.

0:25:090:25:12

From the Greek for "drink measure", name the instrument which measures the water uptake of a leafy shoot.

0:25:120:25:18

-A leaky shoot?

-Leafy.

-Oh.

0:25:180:25:21

-Hydrometer?

-Yeah?

0:25:210:25:23

-Hydrometer?

-No, it's a potometer.

0:25:230:25:27

A hydrometer measures relative density of a liquid. What does a hygrometer with a G measure?

0:25:270:25:34

-Humidity or something?

-Something that's hygroscopic absorbs water, right?

-Yeah.

0:25:340:25:39

Come on, let's have an answer, please!

0:25:390:25:43

-How well something absorbs water.

-No, humidity.

0:25:430:25:46

From the Greek for "path", what mechanical or electrical instrument measures distance travelled?

0:25:460:25:51

-Pedometer.

-What?

-Pedometer.

-As in P-E-D?

-Yeah.

0:25:510:25:55

-Pedometer.

-No, it's an odometer. Ten points for this. Hagfish and lampreys are members of Agnatha,

0:25:550:26:02

a class whose name suggests that they lack what physical feature?

0:26:020:26:06

-Jaws.

-Correct. Your set of bonuses this time, UCL, are on Middle Eastern cities.

0:26:060:26:11

Esfahan and Tabriz are major cities in which Middle Eastern country?

0:26:110:26:16

Iran or something?

0:26:160:26:18

WHISPERING

0:26:180:26:21

-Syria?

-No, it's Iran.

0:26:210:26:23

Which historic city in Eastern Kerman Province was devastated by an earthquake in December 2003?

0:26:230:26:29

-Syria?

-No, it's Bam.

0:26:340:26:37

Situated close to the borders of Afghanistan and Turkmenistan, what is Iran's second largest city?

0:26:370:26:43

-After Tehran?

-Shiraz?

0:26:440:26:47

-Is it still called Shiraz?

-OK, nominate Cook.

0:26:470:26:50

-Shiraz?

-No, it's Mashhad. Ten points for this.

0:26:500:26:53

What was the nationality of Knut Hamsun and Sigrid Undset,

0:26:530:26:57

winners of the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1920 and '28 respectively?

0:26:570:27:02

-Norwegian.

-Correct.

0:27:020:27:04

You get a set of bonuses on chemical elements. I will give a definition of a two-letter word.

0:27:040:27:09

You must answer with a chemical element that has those two letters as its symbol.

0:27:090:27:14

First, a denial, refusal or negative vote?

0:27:140:27:18

-No...

-Come on.

0:27:180:27:21

-GONG

-And at the gong, Warwick University have 150, UCL have 220.

0:27:210:27:27

You were on level-pegging for much of the contest, the first half anyway,

0:27:340:27:39

but you just seemed to fade towards the end, so we have to say goodbye to you, Warwick.

0:27:390:27:44

UCL, you're a very entertaining team, despite the vast number of passes you managed to utter.

0:27:440:27:50

We look forward to seeing you in the quarter-finals.

0:27:500:27:53

-Join us next time for another of these matches, but until then, it's goodbye from Warwick.

-Goodbye.

0:27:530:28:00

-It's goodbye from UCL.

-Goodbye.

-And it's goodbye from me.

0:28:000:28:04

Subtitles by Subtext for Red Bee Media Ltd 2011

0:28:240:28:28

Email [email protected]

0:28:280:28:31