Episode 14 Real Rescues


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Episode 14

Nick Knowles and Louise Minchin present dramatic events from the work of the emergency services. A four-year-old makes a 999 call to help her mum.


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Today on Real Rescues, stuck between a rock and a wet place,

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six friends stranded by the tide

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and looming dangerously above them, is a crumbling cliff face.

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And a little girl dials 999.

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It's a call that might just save her mum's life.

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-Hello.

-Welcome to Real Rescues.

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Busy times here at Hampshire's Police Control Room.

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An emergency call comes through every 20 seconds.

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At the moment they're dealing with about 60 ongoing incidents.

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We can speak to one of the supervisors, Mark.

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This is the second-in-command desk, isn't it?

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How busy is it at the moment?

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It's ticking over.

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About 60 incidents right now across Hampshire and the Isle of Wight.

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We've got more phone calls coming in.

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60 sounds like a lot to me, so how do you prioritise?

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Yeah, it's a bit tricky. We've only got so many officers,

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but we look at each individual job.

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If life is at risk or anything's happening there and then, that's our main priority.

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We need to get an officer out straight away.

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It's saying, "What's the most urgent?" and working our way down.

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When they're urgent, some need particular care, don't they?

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I've noticed you guys get up and walk over to where the calls come in. Why?

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We've got various control desks,

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so as soon as they highlight something as more urgent, they will call us as supervisors over,

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we'll go over to the desk, to provide further advice,

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and let the boss know, the Inspector, and make sure he's aware of it when need be.

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He's sitting behind you, so he can hear what's going on.

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-Yeah, he's right there.

-He's busy at the moment. More from you later. Thanks, Mark.

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Let's get started on our rescue stories from around the country.

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A normally picturesque road in the North Yorkshire Moors

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is transformed into a disaster zone.

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A motorbike has collided with a car, head-on.

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The Great North Air Ambulance crew

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have been sent to a report of a road accident.

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It's happened deep in the North Yorkshire Moors.

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Motorcycle accidents are a regular call-out for the Air Ambulance,

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and they're often the most badly injured.

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A paramedic in a rapid response vehicle

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has already reached the scene.

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There's been a head-on collision between a motorbike and a car.

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The damage shows exactly what happened.

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The bike has ploughed right into the car.

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The rider's come off and made a large dent at the top of the windscreen.

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The good news is that the 17-year-old motorcyclist, Brian,

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is conscious and breathing, but he's in a lot of pain...

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HE GROANS

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Hang on.

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..and has clearly broken bones in his left arm.

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OK, love? All right, sweetheart. Let's have a little look at that.

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I'm just going to cut your jacket.

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All right, love?

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Brian is Dutch and he's on holiday with his father, Joff,

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who's helping to translate.

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Yeah.

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How long have you been on holiday for?

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-Oh. That's not a good start.

-No.

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OK, love, we're just going to pop this collar round your neck. Have you got his head?

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Joff witnessed his son's accident.

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Brian was weaving across the road to take his bike to a parking space on the other side.

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He was going uphill when a car came over the brow.

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The car driver, Joe, looks shaken.

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Jane goes to check he's OK.

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You all right, love?

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Yeah, you feel all right.

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Do you want to go to hospital?

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Sure? Do you want to just have a sit on that edge for me, love?

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Physically, Joe seems OK.

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He was on his way to have his wedding suit fitted

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before his day took a shocking turn.

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Brian's left side from his shoulder to the wrist

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took the full force of the collision.

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Brian, we're going to pop a tiny needle into one of your veins

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for the pain you've got in that arm, OK, love?

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Little bit uncomfortable, just for a second, pet.

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Um, this is just some intravenous morphine

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that we make up,

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so we'll give Brian a bit now.

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He's a young, fit, healthy lad.

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So it should make his journey a little bit more comfortable.

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You'll feel a little bit light-headed, all right?

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Yeah?

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The soothing effect of the morphine

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means they can now properly examine him.

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Jane cuts away clothing so they can check all over with minimal movement.

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Let's have a look at your arm, see what's happening.

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Whereabouts was it painful, Brian?

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Anything there?

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No?

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Can you move those fingers, Brian?

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Can you move the fingers?

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He's got a good pulse there.

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Can you feel me touching there?

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You can? OK.

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And can you feel me touching there?

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-Excellent.

-OK?

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-HE GROANS

-All right, sweetheart, all right.

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We'll put that in a special splint to keep it nice and still, OK?

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They can't take Brian to hospital

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until they protect and stabilise the fractures in his arm.

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For the next few seconds, he'll need to be brave.

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We're going to put something around it, OK, to make it more comfortable.

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OK, mate?

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Just going to put your arm straight, Brian.

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Just... Brian...

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Relax it, OK? Make it soft.

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Just need you to lay it down by your side, chick.

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Well done, pet.

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I know it's painful, sweetheart.

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-HE GROANS

-Well done, Brian.

-OK, love.

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OK, sweetheart.

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OK, well done, Brian. How does that feel now, mate?

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Next, the team gently ease him onto a scoop stretcher.

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Pelvic injuries often result from these kind of accidents

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so they put straps around his hips to keep his pelvis still,

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in case there are any hidden breaks.

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OK? Ready?

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One, two, three.

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Joe, the car driver, can only watch on.

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It may not seem like it now, but Brian has actually been lucky.

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It was his shoulder that hit the windscreen.

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Had it been his head, things could have been far worse.

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OK, we're going to load feet first, everybody, all right?

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Keep it up as high as we can, that's lovely.

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-HE GROANS

-All right, sweetheart.

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Brian will be taken to the James Cook Hospital in Middlesbrough.

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Dad will catch up with him later.

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This is not the holiday they'd bargained for.

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OK?

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Dad, can I ask a couple of questions? Is he normally fit and well?

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-Yeah.

-No medications?

-No.

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All right, brilliant.

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A journey that would usually take 45 minutes on the moors' winding roads,

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takes just seven minutes by helicopter.

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Brian is still in a considerable amount of pain.

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One, two, three.

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His stay in the UK could be a prolonged one.

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It was a very bad accident.

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Brian broke his shoulder and wrist,

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and it's taken nearly two months to recover.

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But it hasn't put him off bikes.

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Brian's training to be a motorbike mechanic.

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We're going to chat to Susi Oliphant, one of the controllers here,

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to talk about a particularly unpleasant kind of criminal

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who takes advantage of elderly and infirm people,

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and they take advantage and grab money off them.

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We have an incident to talk about.

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People who take advantage of the elderly,

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you had a call regarding this recently, didn't you?

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Yeah, we had a phone call from Trading Standards,

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asking us to go and speak to an elderly gent in his nineties.

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He was falling victim of a mailing scam.

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He withdrew £100 out of his bank account

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and went to the Post Office

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to deposit it into an account for a John Smith,

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who was described as an Asian male.

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The Post Office got wind of it.

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They phoned Trading Standards, who phoned us and asked if we could go and speak to him.

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Obviously John Smith a made-up name, and doesn't fit with the description.

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Just out of interest, the police then went and had a chat with him.

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Very difficult. You can't say, "You can't put your money into this."

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-But there's some terrible scams.

-It's the second time he'd fallen victim of it.

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He'd done it before and withdrew £200 from his account,

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and the same kind of thing happened.

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So he was kind of aware,

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but I think they... they make it look pretty

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and say, "If you give us £100, we'll give you a holiday or so much money back,"

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and of course, people find it attractive and they do it.

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Yeah. I didn't know that the police will go round and have a chat.

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So if somebody you know is confused and getting caught up in these things,

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the police will come, if you have a chat with the local community police,

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and explain why it's not a good idea.

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-Susi, thanks.

-OK.

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Victoria must have been a very proud mum,

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not only when her daughter Olivia

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took her first steps or said her first words,

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but when she dialled 999 for the first time.

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It was a call that potentially saved Victoria's life

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and here is the actual recording.

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The "Ah, bless" came from Lyndsey who took the call.

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Olivia is here, who made the call, and her mum Victoria.

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Victoria, amazing that she managed to do that.

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-I'm so proud.

-Ahh.

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Tell us what was going on. You have epilepsy, don't you?

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I do, yeah, and I had tonsillitis,

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and my temperature was way up.

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So the seizure was a bit different than normal.

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And you told me earlier, you have fits every day, don't you?

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-Yeah.

-But this one was a bit different.

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How do you know about the three-minute rule?

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She was to call after three minutes, wasn't she?

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It's a general rule that if an epileptic has a fit for more than three minutes,

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somebody needs to look into emergency services.

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Olivia, you did brilliantly.

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How did you measure those three minutes?

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Um, well, I learned in reception

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and my mum tells me sometimes

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that when it's half of a minute,

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you need to wait until it gets to the 12, then you can count the minute.

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So you looked at the clock, didn't you?

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-You counted three and you knew that meant you needed to call the ambulance.

-Yeah.

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-You called somebody else first, didn't you?

-Yeah, my granddad.

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Cos I didn't know what the address was and everything.

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So I just called.

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Oh, you're so clever.

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And when granddad arrived, were you quite pleased? And the ambulance?

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-Brilliant. Lyndsey, this is the first time you've met her.

-Yes.

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It's been quite an emotional day today, and to listen to the call.

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Because she was only four, to be that clear and all the rest of it.

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-It's incredible, isn't it?

-She's just amazing.

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You've got a little girl, haven't you?

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I have. Hopefully she'll follow in Olivia's footsteps

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cos she's just an inspiration

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to everybody.

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Little star, aren't you?

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How do you talk specially to children?

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Do you have to change the language?

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We've got set protocols within working guidelines

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that we have to follow on emergency calls, obviously.

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But when the call came through, I could tell,

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the voice and everything, it was a little girl,

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so I just adapted the situation to make Olivia feel more comfortable.

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And Olivia, sometimes do you have to look at the clock again?

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Do you time when Mum's having her fits all the time?

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Well, she had one on the landing, like, last year.

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But there wasn't a clock, and it just... it was a short one,

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so I knew it was like, not going to end that long.

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It's an amazing responsibility she has, actually, isn't it?

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Yeah, and for me, it's like, I have to teach her these things.

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I don't want to put her in a position where it's life-threatening and she can't deal with it.

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But Lyndsey on the phone was brilliant.

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So actually, that call is a lifesaver for you.

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Yeah. I mean I don't think she would have given that much information

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if Lyndsey hadn't been adapting it to a child. That's really important.

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Brilliant. Olivia, thank you for coming to see us.

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Thank you all. Absolutely lovely to hear you and meet you.

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Ah, didn't she do well?

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The controllers here go through a long process of training

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to be able to handle the different types of calls.

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Moving on, then. Vera Lynn once sang,

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# There'll be bluebirds over

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# The white cliffs of Dover... #

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Notice none of them are joining in. Maybe it's not their kind of song.

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There weren't any bluebirds over the white cliffs of Dover for these six boys from Kent.

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They're about to be surrounded by an RNLI lifeboat,

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Coastguard Rescue, and a Belgian Air Force helicopter.

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The Dover lifeboat is heading to the white cliffs,

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scrambled by the Coastguard.

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These pictures are being recorded by a camera

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fixed to the helmet of one of the lifeboat volunteers.

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I think they're under... on the grass,

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through that bit that's coming down, in the middle of the grass.

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I can see red there.

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The lifeboat crew can just about make out the six teenage boys.

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They're on a ledge.

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They climbed up 100 feet from the beach, but they can't get down.

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The tide has cut them off.

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-You might be able to shout up to them.

-Yeah.

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The ledge is wide and grassy,

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but there's no escape until the tide goes out in six hours.

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During that time, the boys are at risk from rock falls.

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Bit of swell there so be careful.

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As the lifeboat continues its approach,

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at the top of the cliff, the Coastguard Rescue volunteers

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are preparing to lower a man down by a pulley.

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It's a staggering drop,

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and the cliffs are some of the UK's steepest.

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The height I had to get down

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to get down to where they were

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was in the order of about 200 feet.

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And that is a sheer drop.

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The major concern for their safety was obviously the rock falls.

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People standing around looking over the edge.

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Someone may have actually fallen down to where they were,

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and become a casualty themself.

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Pieces of rock may have fallen.

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Typically you get several hundred tonnes falling at one point.

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Lifeboat rescuers are now on the small Y Boat.

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They're going to attempt to land on the rocky cliffs.

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Hello, can you hear me?

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SHOUTING

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How did you get up there?

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The boys managed to climb up to look for a cave,

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but getting them back down with the waves crashing around them, will be much tougher.

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Pictures from Steve's camera

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reveal just how difficult it is to climb over these rocks.

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It's very crumbly, very loose,

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and, er, dangerous.

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It became pretty clear that it was going to be pretty dicey.

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The white cliffs, once they get wet,

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they can be very, very slippery.

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It wouldn't have improved their situation

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to get them to clamber down,

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then clamber through rocks,

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through nasty sea conditions at the base of the cliffs

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with quite a lot of swell and breaking water.

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Ken has come to a similar conclusion

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after reaching the ledge from the top.

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And it was also deemed that it would have been a very long job

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to take them one at a time back up the cliff by cliff lines.

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Um, so we very quickly assessed the situation

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and decided the best way to get them back

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would be to scramble a helicopter.

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It's clear that the only way out

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is going to be by Sea Rescue helicopter.

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While they wait for the airlift,

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there's still a real risk from falling debris.

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Steve and his crew are doing everything to protect the boys.

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He's sent for hard helmets,

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but even getting them up the rocks is proving difficult.

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I'm no climber, so I was just looking around,

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trying to find the easiest route up for me.

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And wearing those dry suits,

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they're not the easiest things to walk about in,

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let alone clamber over rocks.

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Even once you've passed the wet bit,

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you're getting covered in chalk and dust and dirt from the cliff anyway.

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He's managed to get close enough to throw a rope up to the ledge.

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Ken hauls the helmets over the last stretch.

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They're one short, so Steve has given up his own helmet

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with the camera still attached.

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Ken makes sure they're fitted correctly.

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That's a headcam one for when they're coming in to assess a situation.

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They can relay it back to the boat.

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The boys are in good humour, relieved that help is at hand.

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'They were all having a bit of a laugh and a joke about it,

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'I think about the unfortunate incident they found themselves in.

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'You know, they've realised that

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'they've followed someone's directions up to this cave, and it's not there,

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'and they've realised that they've had their leg pulled.

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'They were in good spirits.

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'Um, you know, very good lads.'

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They were unfortunately in the wrong place at the wrong time,

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and they got caught out.

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A Sea King rescue helicopter from the Belgian Air Force is in the area.

0:20:110:20:16

The Coastguard has tasked it to head to the cliffs.

0:20:160:20:19

On the ledge, Ken prepares the teenagers for the lift.

0:20:190:20:22

As the helicopter arrives, the boys can't wait to get on board.

0:20:330:20:37

Helmets will protect them from any debris dislodged by the downdraught.

0:20:450:20:49

As the winch man comes down, Ken gets one of the boys ready.

0:20:500:20:54

The others look on as he makes the 200-foot journey to safety.

0:20:560:21:01

Each one takes his turn.

0:21:060:21:07

It's a moment they'll never forget.

0:21:090:21:11

All six are safe, but this whole episode could have ended so differently.

0:21:320:21:37

Ken has some words of advice.

0:21:370:21:39

If anybody wants to explore the white cliffs,

0:21:390:21:42

and want to get down on the beaches by the various paths there are,

0:21:420:21:46

some of them not very good,

0:21:460:21:47

please, please, please look at the tide tables,

0:21:470:21:51

look at the weather,

0:21:510:21:52

and if in doubt, give the local Coastguard a ring first

0:21:520:21:55

to get their advice and their information.

0:21:550:21:58

Still to come on Real Rescues, forensics are called to a high-speed crash on a roundabout.

0:22:000:22:05

While the passenger is cut from the wreckage,

0:22:050:22:08

crash scene investigators comb every inch for evidence.

0:22:080:22:11

And the volunteers we all rely on.

0:22:110:22:14

There's the radio DJ, the managing director,

0:22:140:22:18

the gardening enthusiast,

0:22:180:22:19

the chef, and the plumber,

0:22:190:22:22

all leading double lives as...

0:22:220:22:25

lifeboat man,

0:22:250:22:26

First Responder, Search and Rescue,

0:22:260:22:28

Street Pastor, and Fire Support Volunteer.

0:22:280:22:32

They're busy here, lots of calls from the motorway.

0:22:350:22:37

If you look on the screen, you can see there's a build-up of traffic.

0:22:370:22:42

It's just frozen now,

0:22:420:22:43

but I think we can find out from Mark, what's that all about.

0:22:430:22:47

You've got a problem on the M27 this morning, haven't you?

0:22:470:22:50

We've just had a couple of 999 calls about a broken-down bus.

0:22:500:22:53

It's either broken down or got a flat tyre.

0:22:540:22:56

It's full of children, possibly special-needs children with their carers.

0:22:560:23:00

That's just come in now.

0:23:000:23:02

We've got it on camera, we're just deploying a unit.

0:23:020:23:05

You've contacted the families, so they know what's going on.

0:23:050:23:08

-It's important to sort it out, isn't it?

-Of course.

0:23:080:23:11

We're concerned about the children,

0:23:110:23:13

but also it's causing major tailbacks so we need to get it freed.

0:23:130:23:17

OK, thank you very much, Mark, we'll get more on that later.

0:23:170:23:21

Hayacinths, crocuses, pansies and primroses,

0:23:210:23:24

it's springtime at the Oaktree Garden Centre,

0:23:240:23:26

and the locals are coming to soak up the sights and smells,

0:23:260:23:29

all except Jenny, that is.

0:23:290:23:31

Her daughter has to dial 999 before they've even made it past the cafe.

0:23:310:23:35

Paramedic Debbie Morse is heading out in a fast response car

0:23:430:23:46

after an unusual emergency call has come in.

0:23:460:23:50

Er, we're going to a 72-year-old female,

0:23:500:23:52

it sounds like at a garden centre,

0:23:520:23:54

and we've been so far given that she has a history of heart trouble.

0:23:540:23:58

We'll just have to take a full set of observations

0:23:580:24:01

and find out for ourselves what's going on when we get there.

0:24:010:24:05

Debbie is met in the garden centre car park

0:24:050:24:08

by Catherine, the sick woman's daughter.

0:24:080:24:11

What's actually happened?

0:24:110:24:12

-She has fibrillation.

-Right, OK.

0:24:120:24:14

She had something to eat, a cup of tea and something to eat,

0:24:140:24:18

then she gets this thing that her eyes, she can't see.

0:24:180:24:21

Unfocused and feeling sick,

0:24:210:24:23

she has got a cold as well.

0:24:230:24:25

She leads Debbie to the cafe

0:24:250:24:26

where her mother Jenny is feeling very unwell.

0:24:260:24:29

OK, apart from the cold, how are you feeling the last couple of days?

0:24:290:24:33

-Rough.

-Rough. That's other than the cold?

0:24:330:24:37

I stayed at home yesterday.

0:24:370:24:39

My eyes started glazing over. I couldn't...

0:24:390:24:42

-There was a grey cloud in front of my eyes.

-OK.

0:24:420:24:44

-And you have that on a regular basis?

-No, not usually.

0:24:440:24:47

-The times she's had it, we've taken her to the hospital.

-Yeah.

0:24:470:24:51

Jenny thought a trip to the garden centre might perk her up,

0:24:510:24:54

but instead, her condition has worsened.

0:24:540:24:57

Despite her mum playing it down,

0:24:570:24:59

Catherine was concerned enough to call 999.

0:24:590:25:02

Have you had any pain in the last week, couple of days?

0:25:020:25:05

Not really.

0:25:050:25:07

She's been feeling lousy for the last few weeks.

0:25:070:25:10

Debbie attaches an electrocardiograph machine to Jenny

0:25:100:25:13

so that she can see what's going on with her heart.

0:25:130:25:16

Your daughter said you might be having a pacemaker?

0:25:160:25:19

Well, there was some suggestion at one time.

0:25:190:25:23

Jenny has been suffering from a recurring irregular heartbeat.

0:25:230:25:27

It reduces her blood pressure and can affect her vision.

0:25:270:25:30

A bit of oxygen. A small amount, but it will help.

0:25:300:25:33

She's had treatment to try and correct the problem, but it's refusing to go away.

0:25:330:25:37

What things is it showing?

0:25:370:25:39

Your ECG's just showing some elevations of certain areas,

0:25:390:25:42

which could be indicative of a heart attack,

0:25:420:25:45

but because you've got an ongoing history,

0:25:450:25:47

I'm not sure what's old and what's new, so I can't take a chance.

0:25:470:25:51

It's an anxious time for Jenny's two daughters, Catherine and Marianna.

0:25:510:25:55

They've been worried by their mother's health,

0:25:550:25:58

and visit her daily.

0:25:580:26:00

Pulse is 90 to 100.

0:26:000:26:02

So that's normal, it's not disastrous?

0:26:020:26:04

It's just a bit on the low side, that's all.

0:26:040:26:08

OK.

0:26:080:26:10

Debbie has called for an ambulance.

0:26:100:26:12

Its siren cuts across the tranquility of the garden centre.

0:26:120:26:15

This wasn't what Jenny had planned.

0:26:150:26:18

I don't believe this.

0:26:180:26:20

Go out for a nice, quiet morning coffee and...

0:26:210:26:24

Vicky and Andy will be taking Jenny to hospital.

0:26:260:26:29

Despite all the fuss, she's remained in good spirits.

0:26:290:26:33

My eyes went funny.

0:26:330:26:34

Apparently that's normal for her, for her eyes to go all funny.

0:26:340:26:38

When all this happens.

0:26:380:26:39

Sharp scratch.

0:26:390:26:41

Before they leave, Debbie wants to put an intravenous line into Jenny's arm,

0:26:410:26:45

just as a precaution, in case she needs emergency medication.

0:26:450:26:49

Did you get your plants you wanted?

0:26:490:26:52

No, I came to look for plants but I couldn't...

0:26:520:26:55

I haven't managed to.

0:26:550:26:56

Right, squeeze my hand. That's OK, no problem.

0:26:560:26:59

So it's not hurting.

0:26:590:27:01

At the moment.

0:27:010:27:02

It's done. That was very good, actually.

0:27:020:27:05

Jenny walked in, but she'll have to be wheeled out.

0:27:080:27:11

-How's that sound?

-All right.

0:27:120:27:15

-We're going to take you backwards, OK?

-Oh, here we go.

0:27:150:27:18

We'll get you down the steps. All right?

0:27:180:27:20

-On three, then. One, two, three.

-Whur!

0:27:200:27:22

Up you come. You're perfectly safe, OK? Don't worry.

0:27:220:27:25

The family's trip out may have been spoiled,

0:27:250:27:28

but at least the check-up in hospital will reassure Jenny's daughters

0:27:280:27:32

that she'll be in the best place to get further treatment for her heart problem.

0:27:320:27:37

-See you in a bit.

-See you in a minute.

0:27:370:27:39

-Thank you.

-See you.

0:27:390:27:41

Earlier we saw lifeboat volunteer Steve Ladner

0:27:420:27:45

scale the white cliffs of Dover

0:27:450:27:47

to rescue six lads from a crumbling cliff face.

0:27:470:27:50

Like thousands of others, Steve's a volunteer.

0:27:500:27:52

He dedicates his life to the emergency services

0:27:520:27:55

when he's not in his full-time job DJ-ing for BBC Radio Kent.

0:27:550:27:59

We have Steve here with us,

0:27:590:28:01

along with Tony, who's going to talk to us about Community Responders.

0:28:010:28:05

So, DJ first or lifeboat man first?

0:28:050:28:09

Well, a bit of both. Six of one, half a dozen of another.

0:28:090:28:12

-The family has always been lifeboat, hasn't it?

-It has.

0:28:120:28:16

I am the first radio presenter in the family,

0:28:160:28:18

but grandfather and father

0:28:180:28:20

both at the Penlee lifeboat in Cornwall, where I'm from.

0:28:200:28:23

-Very famous lifeboat.

-So it's in my blood.

0:28:230:28:26

And for a short while you moved away inland and became a firefighter.

0:28:260:28:30

Absolutely. I was a retained firefighter for ten years.

0:28:300:28:33

That was like a lifeboat substitute,

0:28:330:28:36

but the call of the sea and the coast was too much, and I went back.

0:28:360:28:39

What makes somebody who gets up in the early hours to do a radio show

0:28:390:28:44

then go home and decide,

0:28:440:28:45

"I haven't had enough for the day.

0:28:450:28:47

"I might go out in a force 11 gale and risk my life."?

0:28:470:28:50

Um, first and foremost, I suppose, it's to help people,

0:28:500:28:54

but also, there's a huge adrenalin buzz when you're out there on the water.

0:28:540:28:58

-So you would recommend volunteering?

-Best thing I've ever done.

0:28:580:29:02

-Really.

-Mm.

-Cos it is dangerous work.

0:29:020:29:04

Your line is particularly dangerous.

0:29:040:29:06

But you get full training. The RNLI is brilliant.

0:29:060:29:09

You've got the fantastic college at Poole where we get trained to the highest standards.

0:29:090:29:14

Any job, you know that you're capable of doing it.

0:29:140:29:17

Right, let's have a word with Tony.

0:29:170:29:19

-Slightly different. Still a volunteer.

-Yeah.

0:29:190:29:21

-Successful managing director of a firm.

-Yes.

0:29:210:29:24

Most people who run their own business know it's tough.

0:29:240:29:27

You're working ridiculously long hours,

0:29:270:29:29

-you get home from work and decide, "I'd like to do a bit more."

-Yes.

0:29:290:29:33

-Why?

-Well, I'm fortunate.

0:29:330:29:34

The decision about my business was a lifestyle decision.

0:29:340:29:38

So I can work from home quite often,

0:29:380:29:40

and then I book on to be a First Responder.

0:29:400:29:42

Tell us what that is. I only found out in the last series.

0:29:420:29:46

We're trained by the local Ambulance Service to attend 999 calls,

0:29:460:29:50

and because we're based in the community, we're on scene very quickly,

0:29:500:29:54

normally within one or two minutes of the call.

0:29:540:29:57

So we help in things like cardiac arrest, where time is of the essence,

0:29:570:30:00

to bring a better outcome for the patient.

0:30:000:30:03

I know that the Ambulance Service,

0:30:030:30:05

in fact, the Health Service in general,

0:30:050:30:08

would like to find more Community Responders.

0:30:080:30:10

So they can have one person in every community that is first to respond.

0:30:100:30:15

-Yes.

-How difficult is it to do it?

0:30:150:30:17

Er, it's very easy. Anyone can do it. The training is fantastic.

0:30:170:30:21

It gives you the confidence to do a good job for the patient on scene.

0:30:210:30:25

In my own area, in Binfield, I'm recruiting.

0:30:250:30:27

I need more people. We'd like to run the service 24/7,

0:30:270:30:31

but there aren't enough volunteers.

0:30:310:30:33

I know you've been involved with saving people's lives.

0:30:330:30:36

There was one, a student?

0:30:360:30:38

Yes. I've been involved in a number of incidents

0:30:380:30:41

that have been life-changing for the patient,

0:30:410:30:43

and having a Community Responder there quickly had a positive impact on the outcome.

0:30:430:30:48

-Rewarding for you?

-More rewarding than anything else I've done.

0:30:480:30:52

You get much more back than you put in,

0:30:520:30:54

so I'd recommend it to absolutely anyone.

0:30:540:30:56

I think you'd agree, wouldn't you?

0:30:560:30:59

Absolutely, yeah. When you come back from a job

0:30:590:31:01

and you've been part of a team that's saved a life or saved a vessel,

0:31:010:31:06

there's no feeling like it.

0:31:060:31:07

There you go. And Louise is outside with somebody else who volunteers.

0:31:070:31:11

I want to tell you about a volunteer service I had no idea existed.

0:31:110:31:15

Look at this vehicle.

0:31:150:31:16

It looks like a normal fire and emergency service vehicle,

0:31:160:31:20

but not what you expect inside at all.

0:31:200:31:22

-Come inside. Here's Dave.

-Hello.

0:31:220:31:24

It looks like a regular motor home here.

0:31:240:31:26

So what happens? Somebody's house is damaged, and you turn up?

0:31:260:31:30

Yes, we're ordered to an incident

0:31:300:31:32

via Hampshire Fire and Rescue Service.

0:31:320:31:34

We are paged to incidents.

0:31:340:31:36

Yeah, so imagine somebody's house has burned down, you turn up,

0:31:360:31:39

and provide them with essential kit.

0:31:390:31:41

Yeah. Initially this is an adapted motor home,

0:31:410:31:44

and we can provide immediate shelter.

0:31:440:31:46

If their house is burned down to the ground

0:31:460:31:49

or is on fire still as we arrive,

0:31:490:31:52

they come here.

0:31:520:31:53

For starters they can sit down here, and you've got a shower.

0:31:530:31:57

We can make tea and coffee,

0:31:570:31:59

provide even hot food if we need to.

0:31:590:32:03

And if they run out with no clothes,...

0:32:030:32:05

Which you might do in the middle of the night.

0:32:050:32:08

Look, you've got things here.

0:32:080:32:10

All sorts of clothing, from toddlers up to adults.

0:32:100:32:13

Speaking of toddlers, look what you've got here.

0:32:130:32:15

-Books and toys.

-Books and toys,

0:32:150:32:17

we have a television and films to keep the kids amused,

0:32:170:32:21

while we sort mum and dad's house out, and their futures.

0:32:210:32:25

And you even look after animals as well.

0:32:250:32:27

We certainly do. We have food on board the vehicle for pets.

0:32:270:32:32

Cat, dog, even goldfish.

0:32:320:32:34

And if somebody's house burns down,

0:32:340:32:36

they literally may not have a toothbrush, but you have the answer.

0:32:360:32:40

Yeah, this is called a comfort pack,

0:32:400:32:42

and in a comfort pack, we have toothbrush, toothpaste,

0:32:420:32:46

toothbrush, and all the necessities of everyday living, really.

0:32:460:32:51

You've got your comb, soap, everything you might need.

0:32:510:32:55

Um, it's amazing service,

0:32:550:32:56

and people can spend the night if it's a real emergency, can they?

0:32:560:33:00

This vehicle's just for immediate shelter,

0:33:000:33:02

and if they need to go somewhere for the night,

0:33:020:33:05

we make sure, through their insurances, that they get a hotel, etc.

0:33:050:33:09

I like this. I've been in a camper van recently, this is much nicer.

0:33:090:33:13

-But I hope I never have to use it. Dave, thank you.

-Welcome.

0:33:130:33:16

It makes you wonder whether you ought to do more in the community.

0:33:160:33:20

We're meeting two more emergency volunteers later.

0:33:200:33:23

Now, cutting a crash victim out of a car is a delicate operation.

0:33:230:33:26

The person must be kept still in case of damage to their neck and spine.

0:33:260:33:30

But here, two cars have collided,

0:33:300:33:32

and one driver's daughter's been pushed right in.

0:33:320:33:35

Removing the patient now becomes even more complicated.

0:33:350:33:38

Traffic cop Derek Hand's been called

0:33:400:33:42

to a serious smash on a busy roundabout.

0:33:420:33:44

An 89-year-old woman is trapped inside her car,

0:33:450:33:49

and the firefighters have already started work cutting her out.

0:33:490:33:53

Her husband has already been freed

0:33:550:33:57

and is being treated in an ambulance.

0:33:570:34:00

Another car hit the driver's side of the vehicle at the roundabout.

0:34:020:34:06

According to the witnesses.

0:34:070:34:08

She's already been a long way out, apparently.

0:34:080:34:11

Clarice was driving and took the brunt of the impact.

0:34:110:34:16

Station Manager Paul Coates is in charge of getting her out of the car

0:34:180:34:22

as quickly and safely as possible.

0:34:220:34:25

The side of the car, the driver's side,

0:34:250:34:27

is impacted into her,

0:34:270:34:28

so we're taking the roof off at the moment.

0:34:280:34:31

Paramedic Marcus Lawrence has clambered inside the car

0:34:330:34:37

to assess Clarice's condition.

0:34:370:34:39

It's a noisy, frightening experience for her.

0:34:390:34:42

Elderly people can be more prone to brittle bones,

0:34:440:34:48

so fractures are more commonplace.

0:34:480:34:51

They can also be on lots of different medication,

0:34:510:34:54

and that medication can have an impact on internal injuries.

0:34:540:34:59

With the roof off, they now have much better access to her.

0:35:020:35:06

Marcus needs to treat a cut on her head.

0:35:060:35:08

All the time, another member of the emergency crew holds her still.

0:35:080:35:12

Eight firefighters are ready to lift Clarice clear of the wreckage.

0:35:140:35:19

We're going to put a long board in,

0:35:190:35:21

using two casualty shields,

0:35:210:35:23

support the lady's body.

0:35:230:35:25

We'll lower the seat out the way, take her out the back of the car.

0:35:250:35:28

Once she's level, we'll get her onto the paramedic's ambulance

0:35:280:35:32

and put the casualty bed blocks on.

0:35:320:35:35

Finally, she's out of her car.

0:35:410:35:43

It's been a success story for the emergency teams.

0:35:430:35:47

Because this is a T-bone incident, and the door is into the casualty,

0:35:470:35:52

we can't do our normal door-open procedure

0:35:520:35:55

where we put the tips of the spreaders into the door and spread the door out.

0:35:550:35:59

On this door, the door would go further into the casualty.

0:35:590:36:03

So we've left the door in situ.

0:36:030:36:05

Concern is now growing for her 83-year-old husband.

0:36:050:36:09

Otto has a history of heart disease, and he's complaining of chest pain.

0:36:090:36:13

A second ambulance has been called for him.

0:36:130:36:16

The injuries here are potentially worrying

0:36:160:36:18

because of the age of the couple.

0:36:180:36:20

Derek Hearn's well aware it might result in a prosecution.

0:36:200:36:25

Very serious injuries.

0:36:250:36:26

The two elderly occupants of the black car

0:36:260:36:29

have got some nasty cuts,

0:36:290:36:31

and until they get to hospital,

0:36:310:36:33

we can't tell exactly

0:36:330:36:35

how serious those injuries are.

0:36:350:36:37

We've stopped the traffic, to protect ourselves firstly,

0:36:370:36:40

to make a safe working environment,

0:36:400:36:42

and to protect any evidence at the scene.

0:36:420:36:44

We've got some skid marks which may determine speeds of vehicles,

0:36:440:36:48

and the exact collision point,

0:36:480:36:50

and how far they've travelled after the impact.

0:36:500:36:53

The marks on the road, and witness statements

0:36:530:36:56

will help Derek and his colleagues

0:36:560:36:58

determine how this accident happened.

0:36:580:37:00

Both drivers have given different accounts.

0:37:000:37:03

In the ambulance, it's Otto's chest pain that's the biggest worry.

0:37:030:37:08

In the meantime, the forensic collision investigators have arrived.

0:37:090:37:12

They're plotting the scene

0:37:120:37:14

to try and help us identify what speed the vehicles were doing,

0:37:140:37:18

and their exact position on impact.

0:37:180:37:21

The photographs taken by the forensic teams

0:37:210:37:24

could be used as evidence in court.

0:37:240:37:27

Slightly distracted there, I was, as I was watching on the screens.

0:37:280:37:32

We can give you a close-up of this,

0:37:320:37:34

which is, over on the left, a minibus is now safely on the hard shoulder

0:37:340:37:38

having been... The picture's just frozen.

0:37:380:37:41

The minibus has been taken to the hard shoulder.

0:37:410:37:43

The police went across the middle lane, slowed everything down,

0:37:430:37:47

sat in behind the minibus and guided it to the left side.

0:37:470:37:50

Families of those in the minibus have been identified and told.

0:37:500:37:54

You don't need to worry that your kids are out there in a minibus.

0:37:540:37:58

It's all been looked after.

0:37:580:37:59

They're safe and sound being looked after by the police.

0:37:590:38:02

Interesting to watch that develop live,

0:38:020:38:05

how they protect that minibus and move it out the way.

0:38:050:38:08

OK, getting back to the programme,

0:38:080:38:10

we saw the forensic crash investigators in that last story

0:38:100:38:13

before I started going on about the traffic.

0:38:130:38:16

Other forensic work comes through this dedicated forensic desk,

0:38:160:38:19

which is very busy this morning,

0:38:190:38:21

-so I'm hoping to have a chat, is that right?

-That's fine.

0:38:210:38:25

We're all right. OK. Let me grab a chair then.

0:38:250:38:27

There's a couple of ones I want to take you through.

0:38:270:38:30

-You had a burglary.

-Yes.

0:38:300:38:32

Interesting how they left a clue, but tell us that first.

0:38:320:38:36

Yep, we've had an incident overnight

0:38:360:38:38

where a female has woken up to find a strange man in her room.

0:38:380:38:42

She's screamed, and this man has then run out.

0:38:420:38:45

The point of entry is possibly through the kitchen door,

0:38:450:38:49

so a few things we can look at,

0:38:490:38:50

perhaps fingerprinting the door if they've pushed it.

0:38:510:38:54

They've walked through the kitchen to get to the bedroom on lino flooring

0:38:540:38:58

so we can look for footprints.

0:38:580:39:00

Interesting how footprints can be almost as good as fingerprints

0:39:000:39:04

-in identifying people.

-Absolutely.

0:39:040:39:05

And the other one was an attempted arson possibly?

0:39:050:39:08

We believe so. It's still ongoing.

0:39:080:39:11

Fire were called overnight to a fire

0:39:110:39:13

that happened in the understairs cupboard of a house.

0:39:130:39:16

It's believed that the offenders have come in through a window,

0:39:160:39:20

so it's believed to be deliberate,

0:39:200:39:22

and the cupboard isn't electrical

0:39:220:39:24

so there's no cause for the fire.

0:39:240:39:26

So forensics, presumably, will be looking for the inflammables used.

0:39:260:39:30

See if there's any accelerants. Could have been very dangerous.

0:39:300:39:33

Very dangerous. A fire under the stairs, obviously a grudge there.

0:39:330:39:37

Lovely, Caz, thank you very much. Louise.

0:39:370:39:39

We've been talking to volunteers with the emergency services.

0:39:390:39:43

I'm going to speak to Liz now who's a nurse, also a Street Pastor.

0:39:430:39:46

You go out on a Friday night?

0:39:460:39:48

-Friday and Saturday nights, ten o'clock till four.

-Doing what?

0:39:480:39:52

We go out to people in the community,

0:39:520:39:54

demonstrating God's love for all people...

0:39:540:39:57

Trying to calm everybody down.

0:39:570:39:58

You've got an essential kitbag here, which I'm fascinated by.

0:39:580:40:02

What have you got there?

0:40:020:40:04

We've got flip-flops for girls who've drunk too much and can't walk in their heels.

0:40:040:40:09

Very good idea. I'll have those, I think.

0:40:090:40:11

Dustpan and brush, we sweep up broken glass

0:40:110:40:14

and pick up bottles so they can't be used as weapons.

0:40:140:40:17

That's a really good idea.

0:40:170:40:18

And I know that your secret weapon are these.

0:40:180:40:21

Yes, Fruit Pastilles are very useful to help diffuse arguments.

0:40:210:40:25

We had one instance where there was a man

0:40:250:40:27

with his fist raised to hit his colleague,

0:40:270:40:30

and we said, "Hi chaps, are you all right?"

0:40:300:40:33

We offered them a Fruit Pastille,

0:40:330:40:35

and he said, "If you've got a black one, I'll talk to you."

0:40:350:40:38

-No way.

-It stopped the argument, and they went off happily talking.

0:40:380:40:43

And you routinely do that, do you?

0:40:430:40:45

-We talk to people on the streets.

-No, but you offer them sweets?

0:40:450:40:49

How did you ever come up with that?

0:40:490:40:51

And people sleeping on the streets, we give them chocolate bars,

0:40:510:40:54

and we carry first-aid kits

0:40:540:40:56

and space blankets for people who are hypothermic.

0:40:560:40:59

I'm also fascinated

0:40:590:41:01

because I wouldn't choose to go out in a city centre the hours you do,

0:41:010:41:05

and talk to people who've had a bit more than they might need to drink.

0:41:050:41:09

How do you cope with the verbal abuse and all the rest of it?

0:41:090:41:13

You just accept it.

0:41:130:41:15

We're not there to discriminate with people.

0:41:150:41:17

We're there just to be a helping and listening ear.

0:41:170:41:20

And being a nurse really helps

0:41:200:41:22

-when you've got injured people or people who are ill.

-That's right.

0:41:220:41:26

We do have back-up from ambulance and police if we need it.

0:41:260:41:29

I know you're out tonight so good luck. I'll leave you those.

0:41:290:41:33

Let's talk about Search and Rescue.

0:41:330:41:35

Tony, you're busy putting in that generator.

0:41:350:41:38

This vehicle is the heart of Search and Rescue, isn't it?

0:41:380:41:41

Yes, it's our control room.

0:41:410:41:43

We do all our mapping for searches

0:41:430:41:45

so they know where they're going,

0:41:450:41:47

and obviously we keep a record

0:41:470:41:48

of everything that's done

0:41:480:41:50

so we can say to the police after the search is over,

0:41:500:41:53

exactly what's covered.

0:41:530:41:54

I'm fascinated by your story because you followed your son into this.

0:41:540:41:58

Yes, my son was a member and said, "Come along to a call out,"

0:41:580:42:02

which I did, thinking I was going to make the tea,

0:42:020:42:05

and then got hooked.

0:42:050:42:06

I've been in it for four years now

0:42:060:42:08

and enjoy every minute of it when we get called out.

0:42:080:42:11

Tell me about that moment when you've got everyone out on a search,

0:42:110:42:15

that moment when the call comes in, you've found who you needed to find.

0:42:150:42:20

Oh, when you get the call that they've been found,

0:42:200:42:23

that's actually a real, real buzz

0:42:230:42:25

cos that makes everything worthwhile.

0:42:250:42:27

And take us through the van. Essential kit here.

0:42:270:42:29

Mostly cups of tea for everybody.

0:42:290:42:31

Tea for the searchers when they come back, water, whatever they require,

0:42:310:42:36

stretchers, everything we need on a search is in there.

0:42:360:42:39

Great work. Thank you.

0:42:390:42:41

So just to update you, as you can see in the motorways,

0:42:410:42:44

the M27 that was blocked at that stage is now running freely,

0:42:440:42:48

despite the fact that there was a minibus stuck there.

0:42:480:42:51

Everybody is perfectly safe and has been taken off to the side of the motorway. That's good.

0:42:510:42:56

It's been very busy here this morning

0:42:560:42:58

and we haven't been able to speak to Bob the Inspector

0:42:580:43:01

because he's been so busy with a subject he can't talk about.

0:43:010:43:05

Time for us to say goodbye. See you again on Real Rescues.

0:43:050:43:08

Louise is still outside with those volunteers.

0:43:080:43:11

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:340:43:36

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:360:43:37

Nick Knowles and Louise Minchin present dramatic events from the day-to-day work of the emergency services, going behind the scenes at one of Britain's biggest police control centres.

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