Episode 16 Real Rescues


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Episode 16

Nick Knowles and Louise Minchin present dramatic events from the work of the emergency services. There is a 999 call from a family trapped upstairs by fire.


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Today on Real Rescues - a terrified family struggles to breathe as fire sweeps through their home.

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And what's that mewing under the decking?

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One little, tiny kitten.

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Oh, you nasty little thing. OK, you can bite. That's nice.

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We follow the rescue of two trapped kittens as their mum watches on helpless from the sidelines.

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Hello. This is Real Rescues. The team in this ambulance control room

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near Winchester work up to ten hour shifts and are rarely off the phone.

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That's right, each of the 999 call handlers average about 40 calls a shift.

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As you can hear, if you listen,

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very busy in here today. Let's see what sort of calls have been coming in, Shall we?

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Let's see if we can grab a word with Kelly who doesn't appear to be on the phone.

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-Anything interesting for us?

-Yes, we just had

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an electrocution come through and Julie will tell you all about it.

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Julie is over there.

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Hello. On the phone, not on the phone. Electrocution?

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That's right. We are attending a lady who has touched a bare wire

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which was exposed on a freezer in a local store

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-so we sent an RRV to sort her out at the moment.

-Any symptoms yet?

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Heart racing. She's complaining that her heart is racing.

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Is that standard reaction to an electric shock?

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Yes. That's why we've deployed a rapid response vehicle so hopefully they'll be with her really soon now.

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We'll try and keep you updated with that as we go on through the day.

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-Louise.

-Now just by looking at the wreckage of an accident skilled

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medics can work out how serious the injuries are likely to be.

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The way debris is scattered or the shape of dents in the

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vehicle can point to the internal injuries a victim may have suffered.

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In the rescue we are about to see a motorcyclist collided with a 4x4.

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The wreckage around the crash is an ominous sign.

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It's late afternoon and acting sergeant Tony Flatman

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has been called as back-up to a serious motorbike accident.

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We're going to a Land Rover versus motorcycle accident

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reported that the motorcyclist is unconscious with serious injuries.

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It's happened on a fast, country A-road outside a car breaker's yard,

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scattering debris all over the tarmac.

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Tony is brought up-to-date by PC Paul Barrett while critical

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care doctor, Deirdre Dunbar, starts examining the injured motorcyclist.

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Paramedics from the air and land ambulance are also on the scene.

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Got it? Steady, slide, perfect.

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I could see his motorbike on the ground, the extent of the damage

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to the Land Rover and I was really quite concerned that Andy had suffered some very serious injuries.

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I was particularly concerned about his head, having seen the state of his helmet.

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It was a call from staff of the garage that got them all here within minutes.

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I heard a big bang, looked around to see a motorbike up in the air.

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Came rushing out and the man lay on bonnet just groaning

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and then blood started coming out from his visor.

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Not nice.

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He looked in a terrible state so I went back and dialled 999

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and everything evolved from there.

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Amazingly the injured man, Andy, is conscious and able to talk to the emergency team.

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I was surprised to actually see that he was alert, he was conversing with the paramedics.

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So that was quite reassuring, but one can't be led into a false sense of

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security because sometimes these patients can go off very quickly.

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Paul keeps Tony informed.

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Andy's responses and level of consciousness give every indication that he will recover.

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Dr Dunbar and the ambulance teams cut away Andy's leathers in order to examine him more fully.

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There's quite a bit of bruising around the lower femur there.

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Stitch your cheek up

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and see you will be out by tea-time.

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Maybe not quite that quick!

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They strap him on to the board and he is ready to be taken to the Queen Alexander hospital in Portsmouth.

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The emergency team know just how serious this kind of impact can be for a motorcyclist.

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They're thankful that he was wearing the right gear.

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Whether he's actually rolled slightly on the bonnet...

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Rather than being flung straight on.

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That probably dissipated some of the energy.

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I'm flabbergasted the fact that he has escaped quite so lightly, but he was wearing

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very good protective equipment and I'm sure that played a very

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large part in actually minimising the extent of the injuries that happened.

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The driver of the Land Rover is in the police car where Paul has carried out an initial interview.

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He's very shaken up a the moment which is understandable

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seeing someone has gone through

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his windscreen, but it's a case of me now going away, speaking to

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witnesses and piecing all the pieces together and going from there to see where the investigation goes.

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With Andy safely on his way to hospital, the yard can take charge of the clear-up.

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They're used to recovering vehicles from road accidents, but not from one so close to home.

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Head injuries bleed a lot from the head and they always look a lot more severe than they are.

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It was a nasty cut.

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We thought he was a goner.

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Thank you very much for your help and your assistance.

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With the road now cleared, it can be fully reopened and the police officers can leave the scene.

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Tony will check on Andy's condition later in the day.

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Andy is here to talk us through it and I have to say you are sat looking perfectly normal for

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a man who has actually taken out the front of a Land Rover is incredible.

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Yeah. I didn't think so at the time.

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I know, because

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I've had bike accidents.

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The first thing, it's all a bit confusing. What did you first think?

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They said you were lying on the bonnet groaning.

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Well, I knew I was going to have the crash.

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There's that instant when you know.

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Obviously I was on the bonnet, there was blood pouring into my mouth.

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-I was spitting it out and initially I thought I was paralysed.

-Why?

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I didn't know where my arms were.

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I thought they were underneath me.

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Then because of the pain I realised I wasn't and I just wanted to get off and try and get comfortable, really.

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We heard about there was a lot of blood coming from the visor, you were wearing a full faced helmet.

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Is it the mark we can see over your cheek? Do you mind us having a look?

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-No.

-Come in closer, you can see the mark over your cheek so what did that, do you know?

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I have no idea what it was, if it was the windscreen or the visor, it was quite a messy cut.

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It was more like something smashed into it.

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We can bring up a couple of stills for you to look at.

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That's the front of the vehicle and you've taken the wing off that

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and these things are built to go through trees and things.

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It's extraordinary that you could have actually survived that.

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Actually seeing that, it's quite incredible, really.

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But a lot is down to what you were wearing,

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we always go on this programme about wearing the right kit.

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Don't go out without it, full leathers, full crash helmet and gloves, everything.

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Because the knee cuffs, the armour in your knees might have protected

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your knees and that?

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Yes, the fuel tank was totally caved in so that probably saved my knee.

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Presumably no more biking?

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-No, yeah, yeah. Back on the bike.

-Really?

-Yeah.

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-You've got a new bike already?

-Yeah, I got it

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-back in October.

-Unbelievable.

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-That's before you could ride it?

-No, the guy delivered it for me.

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That was very nice of him.

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-He brought it up.

-If you are a biker, you are a biker and there's no getting away from it.

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Thank you very much for coming in and talking to us today.

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Extraordinary accident.

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Now, later on, Deirdre Dunbar, the specialist emergency doctor who treated Andy that you saw in that

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film will be here to explain how important roadside treatment can be in the first hour after an accident.

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It's often called the golden hour.

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I want to talk to Matt here about a call that came in and actually show

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you some of the really interesting equipment.

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A commuter was seen falling off a wall. What happened to him?

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He was waiting for his morning train.

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He had fallen off a wall and started fitting.

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Straightaway we realised his breathing wasn't effective after he had stopped fitting.

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So you start up this piece of equipment here.

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We've got a tool here which shows us, we can determine if a patient is breathing.

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-I need you to tell me every time they take a breath and start from now.

-You already started it.

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We wait for the intervals and as soon as it starts going orange, that's a warning light for us.

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These could be the patient's last breaths.

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At the end, once we have evaluated the breathing, it will come up and

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let us know it's not effective and straight away we have to start CPR.

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This is a good way of you being able to measure while they are on the phone the gaps between the breathing.

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And when you say those could have been his last breaths, you see this come up amber or orange.

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Once it's orange that's a warning light for us so we know we have to do something to help the patient.

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-So in this situation we start doing CPR.

-Between you and the call.

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I give instructions for CPR over the phone. The caller

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managed to get him back. A good result and he started breathing again.

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Good work. Thank you.

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Now the smoke from fires causes more deaths than just flames.

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Just a few breaths of toxic fumes can kill.

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We're about to hear the recording of a 999 call where a family are woken by smoke pouring into their bedrooms.

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This is a harrowing call, but just so you know, everyone in this fire

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escaped unharmed, but you can clearly hear the effects of that smoke.

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Well, the terrified family wait for help to arrive in mum and dad's bedroom, but they can't

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escape from the smoke and remember, everyone did get out, but this is a tough call to listen to.

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Well, the family are now trapped.

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Even with the window open, the smoke is overwhelming.

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The fire is raging below them and time is running out.

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Well, goodness me, we have the people who were on that call - Brian,

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Dawn and Louise, who was taking the call as well.

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Brian, you were incredibly calm during all of that and what is it like watching it back?

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-Shocking.

-Is it? Why is that then?

-It brings back a lot of memories.

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I am sure it does. How bad did you think this was going to get? You were really scared, were you?

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I didn't think we were going to get out, especially when I had trouble getting

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the window open but don't ask me how it opened, but we managed to break the lock and get out.

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Dawn, you were finding it difficult to speak

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on the phone. Was that because you were scared or because you couldn't breathe because of the smoke?

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It was a bit of both, really. I was really scared for the children.

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Obviously they were all crying and upset and we just wanted to get that window open.

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-How had you woken up in the first place?

-I smelt smoke

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and I tried to rouse Dawn, but couldn't

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so I went to investigate and found the downstairs door was open

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and all the stairwell was full of smoke so my first reaction was get down there and shut the door.

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Yeah. Yep, yep.

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-And that was it.

-You phoned 999 and you got Louise on the phone.

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You were very calm as well during this whole call.

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It's something you train for, but not what you expect, I guess?

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We do get really intense training, but it never prepares you

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for an actual person and each situation is going to be different, different circumstances,

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but Brian did everything I asked him to do.

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He was so calm, which makes my job a lot easier because he is rational,

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and we can pass the information on to the crews and they know exactly where they have to rescue them.

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At that stage you know there are four of them and they are all trapped in an upstairs bedroom.

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Did you really fear for their lives?

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Well, yeah, you get a rough idea listening to them coughing and

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the frustration because you can't do any more apart from give them

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the basic fire survival, how to keep the smoke out, what to expect when the crews get there that they could

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have been going out the window, you know, to prepare them for two little boys, that might be quite scary.

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Yes, absolutely. How were the boys when they went out?

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-Where they OK, Dawn?

-They were OK.

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They all had oxygen when we went to hospital, but they were fine.

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And just being in that room with a fire raging down below, Brian

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said he didn't think you were going to get out. Did you feel the same?

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I was just really scared, same as the boys were, but I had to try and be as calm as possible for them.

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Calm for them, yeah. Interestingly, Brian you had some fire training just beforehand?

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-About two weeks before.

-How did that help you in this situation?

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Absolutely fantastic, you just go on autopilot.

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What did you know to do then?

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They gave you step by step instructions.

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Shut all doors.

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-Yes.

-Block off any exit for smoke to come in under the doors, get

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everybody in one room and basically get as much ventilation as you can.

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Yes, and you were incredibly calm so maybe that helped you give that calmness.

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Well, I had a calm lady on the other end of the phone.

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You did. Fantastic.

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Working on Real Rescues and the firefighters always say to me that at home we should all play a game

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with our children whereby they try to get to their parents' room with their eyes closed which is really important

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because then they are aware where the phone is as well. Thank you, all.

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Still to come on Real Rescues: It's only a small cut, but the bleeding won't stop.

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He may not want to go, but this man needs hospital treatment.

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A workshop used to restore historic steam engines goes up in flames.

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Inside are gas canisters, an explosive nightmare for firefighters.

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And the heat, it will basically go off like a bomb.

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And people, you know, close to it will get killed, there is no doubt about it.

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Recently, animal rescue expert Anton Philips was called to a back garden.

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A pet dog alerted the owner that some stray kittens have taken up residence under the decking.

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Anton has got his work cut out.

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Anton is responding to a call from the RSPCA already at the address.

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They've asked him to arrive tooled up, a tricky job may be in store.

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I've been called to some kittens that have been born to a stray.

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The stray has crept in under these people's

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decking and had their kittens underneath so I have no idea how old they are.

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The RSPCA man thinks they are probably

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one to two weeks old. We could find that they've still got their eyes shut. We will see.

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The home-owner Paula has been unable to get to the kittens and there's been no sign of their mother.

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We can in actual fact see the track where she's been in and out a lot.

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What identified that the cats were under here? Did you hear them?

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-Or was it the dog?

-The dog.

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The dog was just barking and barking

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and that's when I came out, I just saw a paw come out from underneath the decking and swipe him.

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We've got builders working here at the moment and you can see the machines there swinging,

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that's probably what's spooked her to put these cats under here in the first place.

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Adam from the RSPCA has identified one that's over the far side, a black one, that's down through

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the slats and we've got a white one enclosed here so I'm going to

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literally take the end off and hopefully give them some space.

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They may come out on their own if they're

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old enough, but I suspect that they'll probably run out the back,

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get away and hide.

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-Anton's DIY skills will be tested.

-Lovely.

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All this for kittens, eh?

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Is it coming right off?

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Yep, good.

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Super. There we go.

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They've exposed the white kitten, it seems in no mood to run.

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If I scruff it and take it out,

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and then I shall give it to her adult. Here we go.

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It's a little tiddler, that's a tiny, tiny young cat.

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It's a bit mucky around the eyes, but I'm sure after a little clean-up

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down the Arc, it'll be absolutely fine. A nice

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little cat, actually.

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There we go. Let's pop it in there. There we go.

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But getting to the other kitten won't be so straightforward.

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This concrete...

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Yep, I've got it.

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Neighbour Sarah and her daughter have already taken to the white one, but both kittens are very young, cold and

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clearly frightened, and need to be taken to the animal rescue shelter.

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That's literally a week or two weeks, maybe two weeks.

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So he's been under there all that time.

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Well, obviously, mother is going in and out and feeding them somehow,

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but at the end of the day, they can't stay there.

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I got you. Nice and steady. Here we go.

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One little tiny kitten.

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Oh, you nasty little thing.

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All right. OK, you can bite. That's nice.

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You blooming thing.

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Why do cats always want to bite me?

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With both kittens accounted for, Anton and Adam prepare to leave, but then the anxious mother turns up.

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This gives them a problem as ideally they don't want to break up the family.

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There's mother over on the top, look. She's just waiting.

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What do you think, Adam?

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I could have a go. Go into that if there's no-one in that other garden.

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If she's that stray and she's been out for a long time, she'll be pretty agile.

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This is going to be highly entertaining, but

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quite frankly I'm not expecting any success.

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The best thing for them at the moment is to get to a vet

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and of course, if the mother can go too, that would be even better.

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From previous experience, Anton knows trying to trap a feral cat will be an extremely difficult task.

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He and Adam will attempt a two-pronged attack.

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Well, the cat has decided to walk off into the back alley, which is exactly what I thought it might do.

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Adam is coming in from the other side. I don't anticipate we'll get anywhere near it, but...

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Are you there, mate?

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I'll go back through and see if we can get her from the other side.

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Unfortunately, there are plenty of places for a cat to hide.

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This cat has dropped into here. I think it's probably gone over the other side, but we'll have a look.

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These builders have got used to the cat watching them work.

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He normally sits on that roof.

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It wouldn't stay here with you guys.

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Then a sighting.

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She's sat in an alley just here just by that wendy house.

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She's just sat on the floor.

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A change of plan.

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What I'll do, I'll go back to the animal centre and get a cat trap and

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hopefully catch her that way, and hopefully we can reunite her with her kittens if the cat trap works.

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She's a pretty quick cat.

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Too quick for me with this net.

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She's not gone down there?

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She went that way. She jumped over the fence and legged it that way.

0:24:170:24:20

-You know, bung a cat trap with a bit of grub and...

-Fingers crossed, we'll catch her.

0:24:200:24:24

And you'll pick her up in 24 hours or less.

0:24:240:24:27

Good stuff.

0:24:270:24:28

Adam and Anton agree that for now the best thing to do is to get the kittens to the shelter right away.

0:24:300:24:37

-There you go.

-I've got your number.

0:24:370:24:39

I'll give a ring about the cat trap.

0:24:390:24:42

Brilliant.

0:24:420:24:43

And then just give us a ring when we catch it and we'll get them reunited. All right then?

0:24:430:24:49

-Hope they're OK.

-No worries.

0:24:490:24:51

Bye then.

0:24:510:24:54

Ah, the kittens were taken to the RSPCA hospital and reunited with their mother.

0:24:540:24:59

On Real Rescues we often see the work of the critical care Basics doctors, Basics is

0:25:020:25:07

a charity made up of volunteer doctors who can provide medicine, even surgery at the roadside.

0:25:070:25:14

The key period following a serious injury is called the golden hour

0:25:140:25:18

when high level medical treatment can save lives.

0:25:180:25:20

Phil Hyde and Deirdre Dunbar are here. Hi to you both.

0:25:200:25:24

Let's talk about that golden hour, it really can make the difference, can it, between life and death?

0:25:240:25:29

It can indeed. When you're dealing with patients who have had

0:25:290:25:32

significant trauma and they can be the sickest patients within the NHS.

0:25:320:25:37

Statistics tell us that actually it often takes an hour for those

0:25:370:25:40

patients to go from the scene of their injury to the hospital.

0:25:400:25:44

Now that hour is the critical time when we can prevent some of the secondary damage that can arise.

0:25:440:25:50

As you're aware, trauma is the leading cause of death in the under

0:25:500:25:54

40s so we're dealing with a young population and by far the major injury often is head injuries.

0:25:540:26:00

OK, and Phil, you've got a specific example where you've used equipment

0:26:000:26:03

like this, when a 14-year-old had a serious fall. What happened?

0:26:030:26:08

Yes, he was a young chap and tried

0:26:080:26:11

to jump between two houses, and fell a couple of storeys on to his face

0:26:110:26:15

and so then had a really nasty blow to his head, but also he fractured all the bones in his face.

0:26:150:26:23

There was lots of bleeding into his mouth.

0:26:230:26:25

So what were you able to do then?

0:26:250:26:27

And you've got the piece of equipment here, haven't you, that you use?

0:26:270:26:29

His immediate problem was that he was dying because there was too much

0:26:290:26:34

blood in his airway so he couldn't breathe so he

0:26:340:26:39

needed help to breathe, but he was still alive at that point.

0:26:390:26:44

So what I was able to do for him was give him a general anaesthetic and put a breathing tube into his

0:26:440:26:52

windpipe and put him on a breathing machine, which took away the problem with the blood in his airway.

0:26:520:26:58

And then to reduce the bleeding, we used this device

0:26:580:27:02

and so this is just a little balloon which goes into the nose and slides backwards, and then you blow it up.

0:27:020:27:10

By blowing it up, blowing a balloon up, it presses

0:27:100:27:13

inside where I can't press on the bleeding and stops the bleeding.

0:27:130:27:17

The problem with that is you imagine if the bones of the face are broken then they'll slip down

0:27:170:27:22

and so you actually have to put one of these in, which is a bite block to stop the bones pushing down.

0:27:220:27:28

You carry... All of you have that particular kit.

0:27:280:27:30

You have another piece of kit which is terrifying me, actually.

0:27:300:27:33

If you're afraid of needles, you may not want to look at this.

0:27:330:27:35

This is a device, if we've patients who have bled a lot and we're unable to put a cannula into the usual

0:27:350:27:42

areas, we can sometimes use this piece of kit that's supplied by the charity to our volunteer doctors.

0:27:420:27:49

-It's a bit like a...

-It's like a Black and Decker drill, essentially.

0:27:490:27:52

I was talking to Andy the motorcyclist, if he'd had...

0:27:520:27:54

You'd maybe use this on him if he'd had a very serious injury.

0:27:540:27:57

If I was worried that he'd a lot

0:27:570:27:59

of blood loss and that was compromising

0:27:590:28:03

perhaps a head injury then I could have used this device at the scene to improve his chances.

0:28:030:28:08

OK, so how do you use it then?

0:28:080:28:10

Without using it!

0:28:100:28:13

-You're not offering to...

-No, I'm not offering at all!

0:28:130:28:16

Look away if you don't like needles.

0:28:160:28:18

That bit's like a Black and Decker drill. That's attached.

0:28:180:28:21

That will go into your arm, and then we could administer some fluids

0:28:210:28:29

or some drugs through that access point and as I say, it's a standard

0:28:290:28:34

piece of equipment for our Basics doctors.

0:28:340:28:37

Thank you very much for coming to talk to us. I know you're busy

0:28:370:28:40

so I'll let you go and you can take that with you. Thank you.

0:28:400:28:42

A quick update on emergency earlier, the lady

0:28:420:28:46

who got electrocuted at the supermarket.

0:28:460:28:48

Fine, treated on scene, gone home.

0:28:480:28:50

However, we've had another quick one come in now which we can ask Julie about.

0:28:500:28:54

Right, the first details that came in was a caller said something bad has happened. They've been investigating.

0:28:540:29:01

It transpires that a 55-year-old male has fallen from some scaffolding.

0:29:010:29:04

There's a crew on scene with this patient and they have asked for the heli-med to attend.

0:29:040:29:09

We've deployed heli-med and that's as far as we've got at the moment.

0:29:090:29:13

We'll try and find out by the end of the programme whether the heli-med,

0:29:130:29:17

that's the helicopter, gets there and how it progresses from there.

0:29:170:29:20

When Ian Lamb cut his hand in the garden, it didn't look much.

0:29:200:29:24

He thought a plaster would do the trick, but even the smallest cut

0:29:240:29:27

can cause complications, especially when it won't stop bleeding.

0:29:270:29:31

Paramedic Ross Smith is heading out to a man who has injured himself doing a bit of DIY in the garden.

0:29:340:29:39

We're going to a gentleman in his 50s.

0:29:390:29:42

Apparently, he's injured his hand gardening.

0:29:430:29:46

It sounds like he's stabbed his hand with something.

0:29:460:29:49

Hand injuries are very serious because there are lots

0:29:490:29:52

of nerves, ligaments and tendons that run through your hands.

0:29:520:29:55

That forms, obviously, the movement.

0:29:550:29:58

When he gets there, he finds Ian in the bathroom.

0:29:580:30:01

-He's wrapped his hand in a towel after blood splurted out of the injury.

-What have you done then?

0:30:010:30:07

I was in the garden.

0:30:070:30:10

I had an accident with a knife, I was cutting some tape.

0:30:100:30:13

-Right.

-It's gone on top of me hand so I phoned my doctors hoping I could

0:30:130:30:17

go down there, but they said no, I'd have to phone you.

0:30:170:30:20

I didn't want a fuss.

0:30:200:30:21

That's OK. We'll have a look in a second. Did you go to the top of the hand or in this way?

0:30:210:30:25

Between the thumb and the finger.

0:30:250:30:27

Point on there. So between those two bits there. Was it a knife or something?

0:30:270:30:32

-Yes, a sharp knife.

-And the knife's not in there now, I take it?

-No, no.

0:30:320:30:35

Did you see any blood spurting?

0:30:350:30:37

-Yeah.

-I can see the blood on the floor.

0:30:370:30:39

Right, let me get a bandage ready first.

0:30:390:30:41

When I take it off, I want to get it straight on and we'll have a little look.

0:30:410:30:45

Ross can tell by the amount of blood in the bathroom that Ian

0:30:450:30:49

must have sustained a nasty cut, but even he's surprised by how much it's bleeding when he removes the towel.

0:30:490:30:55

Ready.

0:30:550:30:57

Right, where are we? OK.

0:30:570:31:01

-A little spurt.

-Yeah, it was, yeah.

0:31:010:31:04

You've just hit a little...

0:31:040:31:06

-Vein?

-Artery.

0:31:060:31:09

Ross needs to heavily bandage the hand in a bid to stem the bleeding.

0:31:090:31:14

Right, keep your hand up. Up.

0:31:140:31:17

Ian has cut into an artery and the blood is soaking through

0:31:170:31:20

the bandages as quickly as Ross can wrap it.

0:31:200:31:22

-Answer it if you want.

-Hello?

0:31:220:31:25

Ian's wife is rushing home and has called through.

0:31:250:31:28

-Am I going to hospital?

-Yeah, you have to go, yeah.

0:31:290:31:32

-In the ambulance?

-No, if your wife can...

0:31:320:31:34

If you can take me, we can go to QA, Barbara, or whatever.

0:31:340:31:38

OK, then. Right, thanks.

0:31:380:31:41

-Bye, bye.

-How long is she going to be?

0:31:410:31:43

-A few minutes.

-Oh, cool. I'm going to put another bandage on.

0:31:430:31:46

Hold it up like that. Can you feel your thumb?

0:31:460:31:49

-Yeah, I'm fine, mate.

-Fingers?

-Yeah.

-OK.

0:31:490:31:52

The force of the blood is stopping it from clotting.

0:31:520:31:56

Veins generally ooze and it's darker blood and this is bright red blood and it's squirting.

0:31:560:32:01

He's got a small arterial bleed.

0:32:010:32:03

Some good pressure, it's still coming through the bandage.

0:32:030:32:05

I'll put another one on just to give some more pressure and his

0:32:050:32:08

wife is literally two minutes so it should be quicker going straight in the car up to the hospital.

0:32:080:32:12

A big boxing glove on here, Ian, sorry about that.

0:32:120:32:16

Right, so no delays, get in the car and go straight over to QA

0:32:160:32:20

-and go into the accident and emergency department.

-Yeah.

0:32:200:32:23

And they'll take it from there.

0:32:230:32:27

The higher Ian keeps his arm, the lower the pressure of the blood pumping to his hand.

0:32:270:32:31

Ross fits a sling to help him hold it up and reduce the bleeding.

0:32:310:32:36

Before they leave, Ross wants to have a look at the blade that caused all the trouble.

0:32:360:32:41

OK, so it's just a normal vegetable knife, wasn't it?

0:32:410:32:45

I was cutting the tape from there

0:32:450:32:48

to do a repair and as I did it, it came down awkwardly.

0:32:480:32:53

It looks dirty, so again you'd be surprised how infected wounds can get

0:32:530:33:00

from objects like that.

0:33:000:33:02

Ian's wife Barbara has arrived ready to act as his emergency taxi.

0:33:020:33:08

-Thanks for your help.

-You're welcome.

0:33:080:33:10

Take care next time, Ian. Wear gloves or something, you know?

0:33:100:33:13

Ian requires hospital treatment to clean his wound properly as there's always a risk of infection.

0:33:130:33:18

Luckily, he's right-hand dominant and that's his left-hand, and he's not

0:33:180:33:23

a watch maker, he's a lorry driver, he still needs his hands to work

0:33:230:33:27

but it's not on the palm of his hand so he can still technically operate

0:33:270:33:30

even if they put a few sutures on the back of his hand.

0:33:300:33:32

If they go straight to QA now, the local hospital, there's

0:33:320:33:36

no reason why that can't be sorted out in a few hours.

0:33:360:33:38

We thought as there was so much blood involved in that particular story that we'd talk about blood

0:33:420:33:48

and related issues so we've got Julian to talk to us here.

0:33:480:33:50

Three types of bleeding, apparently?

0:33:500:33:53

Yes, that's true. There's capillary bleeding which is abrasions

0:33:530:33:57

and things when you scuff your knee.

0:33:570:34:00

Venous bleeding from a vein, which often is dark in colour,

0:34:000:34:05

dark red blood which will pour out slowly

0:34:050:34:08

and then you've got arterial bleeding which is probably the one you see on all the movies where somebody

0:34:080:34:13

cuts themselves and the blood is squirting across the room, and that's where, with every heartbeat,

0:34:130:34:18

-it shoots out.

-How do you stop bleeding?

0:34:180:34:22

We saw they were having difficulty there. Is it just about pressure?

0:34:220:34:25

I think that's the thing. It doesn't matter what type of bleeding it is, the best way to stop

0:34:250:34:29

any sort of bleeding is to apply direct pressure to it.

0:34:290:34:32

So, for instance, if it's also something on a leg or an arm,

0:34:320:34:37

if you apply direct pressure and elevate the arm or the leg,

0:34:370:34:41

that will slow the bleeding down.

0:34:410:34:43

If you can get it above the heart, the heart is having to pump uphill so you will lose...

0:34:430:34:47

-Exactly right, yep.

-Interesting as well, because a little bit of blood can look like a lot, can't it?

0:34:470:34:52

It can and different parts of the body bleed more as well.

0:34:520:34:55

The head is vascular, so if you get a small cut on the head,

0:34:550:34:58

it'll always look quite bad, but it may not necessarily be that way.

0:34:580:35:01

Well, oddly enough Louise carried out a demonstration of this just recently. Take a look at this.

0:35:010:35:05

What I've got here is a coffee cup with ink on it and I'm going to spill

0:35:050:35:09

it on the floor so we can get an idea of what it might look like.

0:35:090:35:12

Oh, my goodness, so that's a very small amount and I'd be extremely worried if I saw that.

0:35:130:35:19

That's about 50 mls and for an adult that's not a problem for us to lose.

0:35:190:35:23

There you go. A little bit of blood can go a long way, but that was obviously ink.

0:35:230:35:28

The last thing is, if you get a really heavy bleed,

0:35:280:35:30

we've seen in the programme, people starting to use tourniquets at home.

0:35:300:35:33

It's not something you should use at home, is it?

0:35:330:35:35

It's not something we'd recommend to anyone to do.

0:35:350:35:38

If you put a tourniquet on a leg or an arm, you can create other problems in addition.

0:35:380:35:43

-We'd just say to anybody...

-Pressure, elevation.

0:35:430:35:47

And if it's a serious bleed, 999 and call us and we'll come and deal.

0:35:470:35:51

Lovely. Talking of serious bleeds,

0:35:510:35:53

-Louise has got a little story connected.

-I have indeed.

0:35:530:35:57

Holly here, who's a call taker, you cut your own artery, didn't you?

0:35:570:36:01

What happened? You were cleaning your caravan?

0:36:010:36:04

I was spring cleaning my caravan

0:36:040:36:06

and I put my arm through the glass window trying to open it to let some

0:36:060:36:10

air in and just a little bit of glass sort of nipped the artery and it went into my skin.

0:36:100:36:17

How did you know it was an arterial bleed?

0:36:170:36:19

I could tell by the way it was bleeding, squirting out across the room.

0:36:190:36:24

Gosh, your mum was luckily there, wasn't she?

0:36:240:36:26

Yes, my mum was there and my friend was there and I just put a lot of

0:36:260:36:29

pressure on it, and my mum rushed me to hospital.

0:36:290:36:31

You say it was a tiny cut, we can just see the scar.

0:36:310:36:35

It's tiny, a designer cut, but it caused a lot of damage, didn't it?

0:36:350:36:39

Yes, I had to have a blood transfusion and I was put on drips as well.

0:36:390:36:44

And how are you with glass?

0:36:440:36:46

I can't stand breaking glass.

0:36:460:36:49

It freaks me out a little bit.

0:36:490:36:51

I'm not surprised. It's extraordinary that.

0:36:510:36:53

-A tiny little cut but it could be that frightening.

-Yeah, exactly.

0:36:530:36:57

Excellent. One of the first things firefighters need to know about a burning building is what's inside.

0:36:570:37:02

Apart from gas bottles, paint tins and the like, even innocent sounding substances like saw dust,

0:37:020:37:07

flour and sugar can explode when they're on fire.

0:37:070:37:11

When a workshop where they restore old steam engines went up in flames,

0:37:110:37:14

firefighters knew they had their work cut out.

0:37:140:37:18

Hampshire firefighters have been called to reports of smoke and flames coming from a railway station.

0:37:200:37:25

It's on the Watercress Line, a major tourist attraction that runs steam trains in Hampshire.

0:37:250:37:32

Retained fireman Peter Roach was on duty that evening.

0:37:340:37:37

I could see smoke coming up from the station, which we were probably half a mile away at that time.

0:37:370:37:44

As they arrive they find the workshop behind the station on fire.

0:37:440:37:48

It's where the train carriages are stored and it's used for welding so there are cylinders inside.

0:37:480:37:54

This creates a huge risk of explosion.

0:37:540:37:57

The heat, it'll go off, basically,

0:37:570:38:00

like a bomb and people, you know, close to it will get killed.

0:38:000:38:04

There's no doubt about it.

0:38:040:38:06

So it's a big danger to us.

0:38:060:38:08

We could see smoke coming out of the doors at the front, which were roller shuttered doors,

0:38:080:38:14

and smoke coming out of the roof.

0:38:140:38:17

The metal shutters are securely locked and there's no way of getting

0:38:200:38:23

into the workshop through the smaller side doors.

0:38:230:38:28

Group manager, Dave Loch, immediately sets up a 200 metre exclusion zone.

0:38:280:38:34

It's extremely dangerous because

0:38:340:38:36

you don't know how long it's been involved in fire, and you don't know

0:38:360:38:41

when it's going to explode at all, so from that point of view, we take extreme safety measures.

0:38:410:38:47

By now, information is coming in that the workshop is divided by a wall into two separate sections.

0:38:470:38:54

So far, the fire is contained in the front half.

0:38:540:38:57

The acetylene cylinders are kept in the rear half so they won't have heated up to dangerous levels.

0:38:570:39:02

They must stop the fire spreading to the back of the building.

0:39:020:39:05

Dave issues instructions to the firefighters at the bridge end.

0:39:050:39:10

Their role was to make an entry into the fireside.

0:39:100:39:12

Once they'd made an entry into the fireside they reported back to inform us that the fire hadn't

0:39:120:39:19

spread to that end and they could actually see the acetylene cylinder that was in there.

0:39:190:39:26

I had a hazardous material officer attend

0:39:260:39:30

and he went and checked the cylinder and confirmed that the cylinder hadn't been involved in fire.

0:39:300:39:35

The danger of explosion has gone, but they still have to stop

0:39:370:39:40

the fire from spreading to the rest of the building.

0:39:400:39:43

First, they have to cut their way through all the metal doors

0:39:440:39:48

so that, as well as fighting the fire from outside, they can get to the point where it started.

0:39:480:39:54

The visibility in there was extremely poor so you couldn't see very much at all.

0:39:540:39:59

We'd been informed there was a carriage on the left-hand side, that was the main area of fire,

0:39:590:40:05

that smoke was virtually down to the ground.

0:40:050:40:07

Getting enough water has been difficult.

0:40:090:40:10

There isn't a supply down by the station.

0:40:100:40:14

Now they've set up an inflatable dam.

0:40:140:40:18

The water carrier arrived and dumped its 11,000 litres of water in the dam.

0:40:180:40:23

The water appliance then pumped out of the dam and put its water on to the fire.

0:40:230:40:29

While the water carrier then can go off and refill from that fuel station.

0:40:290:40:33

But the fire has now been going for nearly two hours.

0:40:330:40:37

There's no chance of saving the front half of the building, but the

0:40:370:40:39

other side where the acetylene cylinder was has escaped the flames and the aim is now to keep it safe.

0:40:390:40:45

Throughout the evening, over 50 men continue to pour water on to this building.

0:40:450:40:52

And some remain throughout the night just to make sure nothing flares up again.

0:40:520:40:55

After 14 hours, the last firefighter can finally leave.

0:40:550:41:00

They've managed to contain the blaze to the front half of the building.

0:41:000:41:03

The roof had collapsed, the wall panels had gone.

0:41:030:41:06

When you think, within that area, was totally destroyed.

0:41:060:41:09

However, the other end was fairly well intact.

0:41:090:41:13

Astonishingly, the next morning the trains are up and running on the Watercress Line.

0:41:130:41:20

Passengers can see the utter devastation to the building.

0:41:200:41:25

But, at the far side, there's little damage to see

0:41:250:41:28

and the fire was prevented from destroying the line or the station.

0:41:280:41:33

We've just got an update on

0:41:330:41:37

the heli-med, which is the helicopter with a medical team

0:41:370:41:40

on board who go to the emergencies and are on site now with the builder who fell off the scaffold.

0:41:400:41:45

I always feel terribly sorry when I hear of those, obviously being involved with builders a lot.

0:41:450:41:49

One of my builders fell off a scaffold this year and was out for six months with related injuries.

0:41:490:41:53

-It's very dangerous, building and scaffold in particular.

-Better?

-Yes, better now.

0:41:530:41:57

I was talking to Louise, the call taker from that fire, she was telling me about what we should practise at

0:41:570:42:03

home, because we have fire drills at work and at school, but we never think about doing it at home.

0:42:030:42:07

She says your children, if they're little, need to know how to get

0:42:070:42:10

to the parents' bedroom in the dark so you should practise it as a game.

0:42:100:42:14

And on your hands and knees, apparently, because smoke always goes up to the ceiling,

0:42:140:42:18

and if you make it a game and make them crawl on their hands and knees, they'll keep out of the smoke.

0:42:180:42:23

You should think about where you'll escape to as well, and where the phone is.

0:42:230:42:27

So there are three key things to think about.

0:42:270:42:28

Also check your fire alarms and make sure they're working.

0:42:280:42:32

Batteries, check them regularly.

0:42:320:42:34

We'll have more Real Rescues for you very, very soon.

0:42:340:42:36

Yes, we'll see you then. Goodbye.

0:42:360:42:38

Subtitles by RED BEE MEDIA LTD

0:43:140:43:17

Nick Knowles and Louise Minchin present dramatic events from the day-to-day work of the emergency services, going behind the scenes at one of Britain's biggest police control centres.

There is a dramatic 999 call from a family trapped upstairs by fire.