Episode 18 Real Rescues


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Episode 18

Series following the work of the emergency services. A man's life hangs in the balance after a wasp sting, and the team introduce the dog who can sniff out the cause of fires.


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It takes three adrenaline shots to save Dale's life after a wasp sting.

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He had no idea he was allergic.

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Dale? Take a nice deep breath in for me.

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-And out. OK. Does your tongue feel a bit swollen, does it?

-Yeah.

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-Have you had this before?

-No.

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75 miles out in the North Sea, a Force 7 gale rips down the mast

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of a tiny Norwegian yacht. The crew are stranded,

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and to rescue them will take the Scottish coastguard more than 25 hours.

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Hello and welcome to Real Rescues. On average, 104,000 emergency calls

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-are made every single day in Britain.

-And picked up in places like this,

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South Central ambulance control.

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The duty control manager is busy at the moment,

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so we'll go and see one of regulars, Claire,

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and see if she can tell us what's happening today.

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-What's your most recent call?

-We had a call from a gentleman

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in office, from a railway station,

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telling me that a toddler had got their hand trapped

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-between two carriages, in the door.

-Oh, right.

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So we sent a rapid-response vehicle to them,

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and they were treated at scene, and then they... That was it, really.

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-They carried on their journey?

-Yeah.

-Not a serious injury?

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-No. Just minor injuries.

-OK. That's quite clever.

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They send someone to the station. They treat them, hop off, and on they go. Interesting, eh?

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We'll keep you up to date with what's going on today.

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Yes. Now a story with a sting in the tail.

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Did you know it's possible to develop an allergy to wasp stings

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after just one sting? You could even suddenly become allergic

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after being stung many times over a period of years.

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The reaction can be fatal. This is very rare,

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but not rare enough for Dale, who nearly lost his life after being stung.

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Pilot Chris Atchell and medics Kevin Hodgson and Gordon Ingram

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are racing to a man who's collapsed, seriously ill, whilst mountain-biking.

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Anaphylactic shock sends the body's immune system haywire.

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It can kill unless urgent treatment is given.

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Dalby Forest is a popular tourist spot,

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but it's remote and difficult to get people out of.

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The casualty is already being treated in an ambulance.

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To help the helicopter crew reach him quicker,

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they've parked at the side of a picnic clearing.

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Gordon has rushed inside to assess Dale's condition.

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Dale? Take a nice deep breath in for me.

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-And out. OK. Does your tongue feel a bit swollen, does it?

-Yeah.

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-Have you had this before?

-No.

-OK. Open your eyes for me.

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When we arrived on scene, Dale wasn't fully alert.

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Because he had gone through a severe anaphylaxis,

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he was still quite groggy, quite fatigued, quite tired.

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Dale was on a ground training exercise

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with fellow members of the RAF. On one of the woodland trails,

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he fell off his bike and landed on a wasp's nest.

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He received several stings, but didn't react immediately.

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Dale's throat closed up and his tongue ballooned in size,

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making it difficult for him to breathe.

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Dale? Just going to give you...

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-..another little injection, OK?

-OK.

-Good.

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It became apparent that Dale was in quite a bad way

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when they first arrived on scene. Severe anaphylaxis can be a killer.

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To save his life, Dale has already needed three shots of adrenaline.

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Tongue was slightly swollen, so the decision was made

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to give him some more adrenaline to calm that swelling down

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to fully open up the airways,

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and to make sure that he gets to hospital as safely and quickly as possible.

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Because Dale's reaction was so severe,

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they don't want to take any chances of it flaring up again.

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Hiya, Dale! Open your eyes for me again.

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Good man. Well done. I'm going to stick some monitoring onto you, OK?

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They want him to have a full check-over at the hospital,

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as there may be other hidden injuries caused by his fall.

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Right. I'm just going to pop a little needle in your arm here, OK?

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I'll let you know what's going on all the time.

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How you feeling now? You feeling a bit better?

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-HE MOANS

-A bit...

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A bit drained?

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Gordon keeps a constant eye on Dale's response levels

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in case he starts to drift away again.

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Your mate's just next to you, if you want to chat to him.

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-How's things, mate? You all right?

-What's your mate's name, Dale?

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-Bob.

-Is that right?

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There's also a possibility the allergic reaction may have had an effect on Dale's memory.

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I'll ring Chloe. Give her a dial. I'll give her a ring at work.

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-What's her extension number at work?

-Um...

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At her desk? Three something?

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Er...

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Don't worry if you don't know it. I'll let her know.

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Dale's RAF ground training has ended up with him being back in the air

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sooner than expected.

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The flight to Scarborough Hospital takes just six minutes.

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As chance would have it, having just brought in a patient themselves,

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the crew of the local coastguard search-and-rescue helicopter are on hand to help.

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-All right?

-Easy on the grass, lads.

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In the short time the air-ambulance crew have been with him,

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Dale's condition has shown signs of improvement.

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The team can now make themselves available for further emergencies.

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In the meantime, Dale will be kept under observation

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until he is hopefully back to his normal self.

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Well, Dale joins us now, along with Mark Ainsworth-Smith,

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a friend of the programme, to help explain what was going on there.

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We left you there saying you were showing signs of recovery,

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but in fact you took a downward plunge after that, didn't you?

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Yes, apparently I did.

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Went into a cardiac arrest and they had to resuscitate me.

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And quite an aggressive resuscitation, by all accounts,

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because you had a bust rib afterwards.

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Yeah. I woke up with a pain and broken rib,

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and they told me they had to resuscitate me, and that's why.

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And you'd been stung previously in your lifetime?

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Yeah, several times as a kid,

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but obviously not while I was mountain-biking up a hill,

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so, er, never had a problem before.

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And yet all of a sudden, years on... Mind you, to be fair,

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you did go head-first into a wasp's nest.

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Yeah. I was travelling quite fast. I'd been cycling up a hill,

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got the adrenaline going and took a corner too fast.

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-Went over the handlebars.

-How many stings do you think you got?

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Probably five or more, but I can't be sure, to be honest.

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And you then cycled on up the hill and then collapsed.

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Yeah. I cycled about 500 yards, and there was a noise on the bike,

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so I stopped with another two colleagues,

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and just about to repair the bike, and that's all I remember.

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-Six weeks off work?

-Six weeks off work,

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but that was because I cracked my leg on the handlebars

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-and had a big haematoma.

-All right. Obviously a very violent reaction.

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At one stage he went into arrest.

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-And you have a scale, don't you?

-Yeah.

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-For... The coma scale?

-We do. We call it the Glasgow coma score.

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It's used to assess how alert Dale is.

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At the scene, it appears that he is conscious. He is alert,

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but he is confused. He's unable to give telephone numbers.

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So we would have scored him as 14 out of 15,

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-and you or I are 15 at the moment.

-But when he got in

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and went into attack, that's because...

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When he was in cardiac arrest, he would have had a GCS,

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a Glasgow coma score, of just three out of 15,

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which is basically the same as being dead.

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Really? That bad? He was that close? How often do you survive that?

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Obviously, anybody in cardiac arrest, it's a very poor prognosis.

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But he had expert help. He had exactly the right treatment,

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and with that he's made a full and complete survival.

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I don't understand why you can go your whole life being stung

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and have no reaction, and then suddenly have a massive reaction.

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-Does this happen a lot?

-It's very unusual.

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It is very common to be stung once and not have a reaction

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then have one the second time. It can only be related

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to a couple of things. I think one is, probably,

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the fact that he was exercising,

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and that can bring on allergic reactions.

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He was also producing lots of adrenaline because of the exercise,

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and that is one of the drugs we use when someone has an anaphylaxis,

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so I wonder if it's related to that.

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Presumably you now have to carry an EpiPen?

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Yeah. I've got two EpiPens with me at all times.

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Right. But does this mean if he gets stung by,

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say, for example, a horsefly, will there be a similar reaction?

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Not necessarily, but people who have allergies are very likely to react

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to other things, so he must be mindful of it.

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Certainly around wasps he's got to be incredibly careful.

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So there are all kinds of things that you can get anaphylaxia to.

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Watching that, you had an audience during the whole process there!

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Yeah, I did, but I don't remember anything at all.

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We're very pleased all those people were around to help you,

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because if they hadn't taken you by helicopter...

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I think it was just purely luck on the day.

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There was a first responder within a mile.

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My teammates what was there already was virtually trained in first aid.

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So without my teammates, the first responder,

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the ambulance and the air ambulance, I wouldn't be here today.

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Learn first aid! We have at various stages talked about first responders.

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If you want to learn how to become one, and save someone like that,

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then, contact your local ambulance- control room. All right? Louise.

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A Norwegian yacht, the Anga, has set sail from Scotland

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straight into a Force 7 gale, 70 miles out

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in the freezing North Sea, and the boat is in tatters.

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Its mast is ripped from the deck and its propeller is ruined.

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With no radio, it's up to the coastguard

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to find and rescue them.

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Late morning, and the volunteer crew of the Peterhead lifeboat

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are heading into the rough seas of the North Atlantic.

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Coxswain Andy Brown was at his day job

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when he was told a long trip was in store.

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'I got a phone call from the lifeboat operations manager.'

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He said, "You're going 17 miles offshore

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for a yacht that's been dismasted."

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"OK, that's fine. 17 miles, that's OK."

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"No, 70 miles," he said. I went, "Oh, my God. 70 miles!"

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I thought, "Right. I need to take my lunch,"

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because I knew it'd be a long shout.

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A brief Mayday call from a satellite phone

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has given them the yacht's last position,

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but they'll take three hours to get there.

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We had a rough idea where they were,

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and we just plotted that

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and used the tides to see where they would eventually be.

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At 1:00 PM, the Norwegian yacht Anga finally comes into view.

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The yacht's mast has fallen in rough seas,

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and the rigging has fouled the propeller.

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With the satellite phone of limited use,

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the couple on board have been rudderless, adrift

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and without radio communication.

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The aerial for their VHF radio is on top of the mast.

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Unfortunately that was probably at the bottom of the sea.

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Since the early hours, they've been thrown around

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at the mercy of the ocean.

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Lifeboat crewmember Peter Duncan knows it must have been an anxious wait.

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'The couple that was on the yacht was very relieved to see us.'

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Because their radio was out, there was no contact with the Anga

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until we actually arrived on scene,

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and I don't know if they knew we were coming

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until we popped up over the horizon

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and said, "Hello, we're here to help."

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It had been up to nine hours, I think, that they had been waiting,

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lying dead in the water, getting tossed about,

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and it's probably not very comfortable for them.

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But they'll have to wait a little longer.

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The lifeboat crew need to get a tow rope over to the yacht -

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not a straightforward task in these conditions.

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'It was quite windy. The sea was quite rough.'

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There was a lot of swell. The conditions were...not drastic,

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but a bit fresh, shall we say.

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If you're putting a 40-ton lifeboat

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alongside a smaller yacht,

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you get damage to the yacht. You could possibly sink it.

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Um, so you just have to be careful.

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So the best plan, plan B, was to use the little dinghy.

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The team get the Anga's crew to drift out their small inflatable

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towards the lifeboat. Peter has volunteered

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to jump onto the Anga's tiny dinghy

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before getting reeled back to the floundering yacht.

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When you arrive on a scene in a case like that,

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we have no idea if the people on the yacht

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have any sailing experience, if they're injured, if they're capable.

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So we put someone on the yacht in that instance.

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In the wallowing seas, Peter manages to get into the dinghy,

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and is set adrift 70 miles out in the North Atlantic.

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He is slowly pulled towards the relative safety of the Anga,

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but the problems aren't over yet.

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'Yachts are not designed to be towed.

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'The fittings they have on them are very lightweight -

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'excellent for sailing, but not for being towed by a lifeboat.'

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So I got onto the yacht, established that the tow

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would be safe for the lifeboat and for the people on the yacht,

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and that it would be strong enough to withstand the weather conditions,

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and not break and kill someone.

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Peter crouches on the bow of the boat, ready to catch the tow rope.

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Skipper Andy expertly manoeuvres the lifeboat gently towards them,

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careful to avoid collision.

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The tow rope has been successfully attached,

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but for Peter and the rest of the crew,

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this rescue is far from over.

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Once you start to take the yacht into tow back to Peterhead,

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you can't travel at 20 knots. You have to pick a safe speed

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of around six, seven knots in order to come back into Peterhead

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without causing further damage to the yacht.

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-70 slow miles.

-HE CHUCKLES

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Running at quarter speed, the return journey will take at least ten hours.

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And to keep the precious tow rope intact in these rough seas,

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they'll need to concentrate the whole way home.

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But on board the Anga, Peter has plenty of time

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to get to know his new companions Ann and Eivind.

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Told us where they were going, how they were getting there,

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when they bought the yacht, what they did for jobs.

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It was just conversation. But it was...

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You could tell they were relieved that someone was there to assist them.

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Finally, at one in the morning,

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15 hours after they left,

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the Peterhead lighthouse appears on the horizon.

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'The lighthouse is like... that you're almost home.'

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You're within sight of land, and it's almost over.

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Get home, get a cup of tea, get to your bed... Brilliant.

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You're just glad that you've got home safely,

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you've got your casualty home safely.

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With the yacht secure in the harbour,

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the crew can leave for some well-earned rest.

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Ann and Eivind will have an unexpected stay in Scotland

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while they get their boat repaired, but for now they're back on dry land.

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Their ordeal is over.

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Gosh, they had a really lucky escape!

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Once Ann and Eivind had recovered from their ordeal,

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they wanted to meet up with their rescuers.

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After having to watch the back of the lifeboat for a good ten hours,

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the couple finally had the chance to get on board,

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when they were given a tour by crewmembers.

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Looking back, Ann and Eivind remember just how desperate

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the situation seemed when their mast broke

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in the early hours of the previous night.

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Eight hours it took, from the mast breaking

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till we could see the boat. For eight hours we were drifting

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in the North Sea, without really knowing...

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where we were going to end.

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We kind of started counting how much food we had,

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how many days we will be OK drifting.

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It is one thing to have enough food and water,

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but it's a very, very scary feeling

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to be out in the ocean. All you can see is water.

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So...when we can see the lifeboat on the horizon...

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-That was great.

-That was very good! We were so happy to see them.

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Isn't it strange? You talk about the most dangerous part of your life,

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and you're giggling. In memory it's, like...

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-HE LAUGHS

-"We had a terrible time!"

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But luckily they're safe and well now.

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Remember when you were a kid and thought you were a superhero?

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You could throw yourself off the bunk onto the floor, not a care of your own safety.

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Four-year-old Micah is an indestructible superhero

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in his vivid imagination. He's playing in his bedroom

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when the game comes to a painful end.

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Emergency-response medic Andy Rudge to the rescue.

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SIREN WAILS

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Emergency-care practitioner Andy Rudge

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is working in the rapid-response vehicle

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when he's called to a four-year-old boy

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with a suspected fractured arm.

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Broken bones in children can be quite difficult to spot.

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If you imagine, like, a fresh branch.

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You bend it, it doesn't snap directly in half.

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It will snap through the middle. Children's bones are like that

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because their bones are softer than ours.

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When Andy gets there, little Micah is in obvious distress.

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His dad heard a crash come from the bedroom.

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-MICAH WAILS

-Hello! You fell off your bunk bed?

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Yeah?

0:18:500:18:52

Micah, where does it hurt? Which hand? This one?

0:18:520:18:55

Yeah, that one!

0:18:550:18:57

I lifted his hand because I could see there was something wrong. There was a click.

0:18:570:19:01

He's got a little knob at the back, as well.

0:19:010:19:03

Andy needs to win Micah's trust in order to examine his arm.

0:19:030:19:08

Everything I do, I'm going to tell you.

0:19:080:19:11

You tell me if you don't like it. Can you feel that?

0:19:110:19:15

Can you wiggle your fingers?

0:19:150:19:18

-No.

-No. All right.

0:19:180:19:20

Does it hurt up here?

0:19:200:19:22

No, there.

0:19:220:19:24

Just down...

0:19:240:19:26

-Nothing up here?

-No.

0:19:260:19:28

OK. Good boy.

0:19:280:19:30

Although he's got pain down here, he's got quite a lump under here,

0:19:300:19:34

so...

0:19:340:19:36

Oh, yeah. I'm going to suspect a fracture till proven otherwise.

0:19:360:19:42

Micah fell five feet from the top bunk.

0:19:430:19:46

His arm has taken the brunt of it.

0:19:460:19:48

Thankfully his back seems to be OK.

0:19:490:19:53

So, what were you playing?

0:19:530:19:55

-Incredibles.

-The Incredibles?

0:19:550:19:58

Yeah?

0:19:580:19:59

Is that your favourite?

0:19:590:20:02

Yeah?

0:20:020:20:04

Micah's being very brave, but his arm is causing him a lot of pain.

0:20:040:20:08

Andy's got some pain relief for him to swallow,

0:20:080:20:11

but there's a problem.

0:20:110:20:13

I don't like it.

0:20:130:20:15

Don't you?

0:20:150:20:17

Yeah? You just try it first.

0:20:170:20:19

I'll bet you do.

0:20:190:20:21

There you go. Open your mouth, Micah. That's it.

0:20:230:20:26

Just give you that little bit first. You like that? Taste nice?

0:20:260:20:29

It's not horrible, is it?

0:20:290:20:32

Yeah? Right. Let's give you some more.

0:20:320:20:34

Good boy. Well done.

0:20:340:20:36

Brilliant.

0:20:360:20:38

The little lad will need to go to A&E for X-rays.

0:20:390:20:43

Can I have ambulance backup to convey into hospital, please?

0:20:430:20:47

I'll come with you, yeah? All right?

0:20:480:20:51

-So, who's this one?

-That's little Ruby.

0:20:510:20:53

Is this your sister? You can't see, but...

0:20:530:20:55

Despite the distractions, Micah's arm is still bothering him.

0:20:550:20:59

How old's your sister?

0:21:000:21:03

-It hurts!

-It hurts?

0:21:040:21:07

Gas and air will help, but Andy doesn't want to frighten him.

0:21:070:21:11

Micah, this arm - is it really, really painful?

0:21:110:21:14

Do you want to try some other medicine I've got?

0:21:140:21:16

OK.

0:21:160:21:18

Good boy. If you don't like it, you don't have to take it.

0:21:180:21:22

We'll stop, yeah? Yeah? Might make you feel just a bit...

0:21:220:21:25

You're doing brilliantly.

0:21:270:21:30

As well as relieving his pain, it's making him very sleepy.

0:21:300:21:33

The ambulance crew arrive. Andy hands over.

0:21:380:21:41

He's had ten of Calpol.

0:21:430:21:45

-He's great self-administering the Entonox.

-Right.

0:21:450:21:48

It's certainly doing the trick. He seems quite happy with it.

0:21:480:21:52

They need to support his arm in a sling before he's moved.

0:21:520:21:56

Can you sit yourself up? Yeah?

0:21:560:21:59

He's a good boy!

0:21:590:22:01

Right!

0:22:050:22:07

Good man!

0:22:070:22:09

Well done, mate. You are so brave!

0:22:090:22:12

We get Daddy to carry you to the ambulance?

0:22:120:22:15

Inside the ambulance, they check out Micah's heart rate and blood pressure.

0:22:170:22:22

And Dad is by his side all the way to hospital.

0:22:220:22:25

Make your muscles pop up.

0:22:270:22:29

Show the man your muscles.

0:22:290:22:32

Once in A&E, Micah's arm will be X-rayed

0:22:330:22:36

to find out the extent of the damage,

0:22:360:22:38

and he will be given a thorough check to make sure he has no more injuries.

0:22:380:22:43

See you later. Goodbye. All the best.

0:22:430:22:45

A nasty greenstick fracture there, but no lasting damage for little Micah.

0:22:490:22:53

Still to come on Real Rescues - it's a painful fall for painter Robert.

0:22:550:22:59

He's going to need a trip in the ambulance,

0:22:590:23:02

but his workmate Paul can't resist a quick ribbing.

0:23:020:23:05

THEY LAUGH

0:23:080:23:09

And we put to the test two furry friends of the emergency services -

0:23:090:23:13

Spanner, who hunts for hidden explosives,

0:23:130:23:15

and Freckle, the fire dog who even has his own boots.

0:23:150:23:20

He has those to protect his feet from pieces of glass

0:23:230:23:26

when he goes into buildings. I want to update you on something

0:23:260:23:29

-that's been going on this morning. Jack, are you on a call?

-No.

0:23:290:23:33

You had a call from somebody who thought they'd seen somebody

0:23:330:23:36

-who had a problem with electrocution.

-Yes. I took a call from a lady

0:23:360:23:41

who was with someone who'd just arrived at work,

0:23:410:23:45

and somehow received an electric shock.

0:23:450:23:48

There was people with him in the background,

0:23:480:23:51

and one of the routine questions I asked him was whether he had fallen from anything.

0:23:510:23:55

-What was his reply?

-They passed on the questions,

0:23:550:23:58

because they'd just arrived with him. He said he hadn't fallen,

0:23:580:24:02

but he felt like he'd been thrown a good ten, 15 foot away from where he was originally stood.

0:24:020:24:07

-Which is a long way.

-It was quite a shock he'd received.

0:24:070:24:10

-So somebody is on their way to help?

-Yes. We're sending someone

0:24:100:24:13

to check him out, see what we can do for him.

0:24:130:24:16

Hopefully we'll be able to update on that later. Thanks, Jack.

0:24:160:24:19

You wouldn't think, when vandals set fire to a bin outside a building,

0:24:200:24:24

that it would be particularly dangerous to deal with,

0:24:240:24:27

but in this case, a fire crew are faced with toxic smoke

0:24:270:24:30

and burning plastic that could eat through clothing and even skin.

0:24:300:24:34

The firefighters of Green Watch are on their way to a sports centre.

0:24:410:24:45

It's some wheelie bins apparently on fire.

0:24:450:24:47

Oh, yeah. I see it.

0:24:470:24:50

-Down there.

-Right side.

0:24:500:24:52

The bins are well alight when they arrive,

0:24:570:24:59

and they can't get the fire engine up close,

0:24:590:25:02

so crew manager Steve Evans gets out to do a recce.

0:25:020:25:05

Start getting the reels off. It'll be quicker in the long run

0:25:050:25:08

to take a reel across and extend it.

0:25:080:25:10

I mean, it come through as wheelie bins.

0:25:120:25:15

I don't think, perhaps, that is wheelie bins.

0:25:150:25:17

There's a distinct possibility this could be an abandoned vehicle

0:25:170:25:21

or something like that.

0:25:210:25:23

Until we get closer, it's difficult to tell.

0:25:230:25:26

But as they get closer...

0:25:260:25:29

No. It is a bin. Yeah. It was two wheelie bins,

0:25:290:25:33

that have since melted.

0:25:330:25:35

Obviously they've been having a little party or something.

0:25:350:25:38

It looks like the revellers have set fire to these bins

0:25:420:25:45

as part of the entertainment, but it's not just a bit of harmless fun.

0:25:450:25:49

Because of the plastic in the wheelie bin, you need a lot more water to put it out.

0:25:490:25:53

Er, if it was just the rubbish, we wouldn't need quite so much.

0:25:530:25:56

That's why we've got the hose reel coming.

0:25:560:25:58

But the fire's just out of reach of the regular-length hose reel.

0:25:580:26:02

Each hose reel's approximately 60 metres long,

0:26:020:26:05

and the distance from the fire appliance,

0:26:050:26:07

the nearest point we can get to, is more than that,

0:26:070:26:09

so we've had to extend one hose reel with another.

0:26:090:26:12

So we've got one line of 120 metres now,

0:26:120:26:16

so we've got more than enough to get the water to the fire.

0:26:160:26:19

Paul O'Donovan is wearing full protective gear,

0:26:210:26:24

but pools of molten plastic could react

0:26:240:26:27

when the water gets onto them. No-one knows what could have been thrown into the bins.

0:26:270:26:31

Thankfully no-one has been hurt tonight,

0:27:060:27:09

but all the time spent on this fire is keeping a fire engine and crew

0:27:090:27:12

tied up and unavailable for a real emergency.

0:27:120:27:15

Rather than just enjoying themselves and keeping themselves to themselves,

0:27:150:27:19

they decide it might be a really good idea to set light to some bins.

0:27:190:27:23

It's just mindless vandalism.

0:27:230:27:25

Now, the car's crashed, but there seems to be very little damage.

0:27:270:27:30

However, the driver knows something is wrong.

0:27:300:27:33

She dials 999 and keeps absolutely still,

0:27:330:27:35

and it was exactly the right thing to do.

0:27:350:27:38

Ambulance crew Dan Major and Julie White-French

0:27:430:27:46

are on an emergency call to a road accident.

0:27:460:27:49

A young woman is trapped in her car with suspected neck injuries.

0:27:490:27:53

Well, there seems to be one vehicle,

0:27:530:27:55

so we'll find out exactly what's happened.

0:27:550:27:58

A local traffic cop, PC Freeman, fills them in.

0:27:580:28:01

On approach to the junction, just waiting at the junction there,

0:28:010:28:05

the give-way signs, another vehicle, a Rover, has come up behind her

0:28:050:28:09

and not stopped. It's gone into the back of this Rover,

0:28:090:28:13

which has shunted her going forward.

0:28:130:28:16

After the other car went into the back of her,

0:28:160:28:18

24-year-old Gillian discovered she had neck pain.

0:28:180:28:21

A first-responder medic has already spoken to her.

0:28:210:28:24

About two years ago she had an operation on her right shoulder,

0:28:240:28:28

with a tendon in there, again from an accident.

0:28:280:28:32

All her obs are absolutely fine at the moment.

0:28:320:28:35

After her previous accident, Gillian's well aware

0:28:350:28:38

that she should keep her neck as still as possible.

0:28:380:28:41

-Hello.

-Hi, there.

0:28:410:28:43

So you weren't knocked out? You were stationary when it happened?

0:28:430:28:47

-Yeah, I was.

-And the other car was slowing...

0:28:470:28:50

For the junction, yeah.

0:28:500:28:52

There are no dents to the car, but Dan knows that low-impact collisions

0:28:520:28:56

can still be harmful, and Gillian's neck pain

0:28:560:28:59

is in a different place from her old injury.

0:28:590:29:02

-Could you ask if there's ECP available to do a C-spine?

-Yeah.

0:29:020:29:07

Dan is calling in a special type of paramedic,

0:29:070:29:10

an ECP or emergency-care practitioner,

0:29:100:29:13

who's qualified to check for spinal injuries at the roadside.

0:29:130:29:17

This has been a fairly slow-speed impact,

0:29:170:29:20

and they should hopefully be able to clear it here and then. We'll still take you in.

0:29:200:29:25

If the ECP can give Gillian the all-clear,

0:29:250:29:28

she'll be saved an uncomfortable move out of the car on a spinal board.

0:29:280:29:33

Probably pop a collar on you to start with,

0:29:330:29:36

just so it keeps you in the same place,

0:29:360:29:38

then we'll wait and see what they come back with.

0:29:380:29:42

We'll slide this round there.

0:29:420:29:43

Gillian is worried about the fuss she's causing.

0:29:430:29:46

I felt really guilty calling you, but you don't...

0:29:460:29:51

With something like that, you can't...leave it, can you?

0:29:510:29:55

You shouldn't feel guilty about calling us at all.

0:29:550:29:58

It's just embarrassing, cos the car's a tip.

0:29:580:30:01

We'll not take any notice of that at the moment.

0:30:010:30:05

Within minutes, Di Humphreys, emergency-care practitioner, arrives.

0:30:050:30:09

With the same technique that doctors use in hospital,

0:30:090:30:12

she's going to examine Gillian's neck for injuries.

0:30:120:30:15

I'm just going to feel down your neck. Don't move.

0:30:150:30:18

-Just tell me if it hurts, will you?

-Yes.

0:30:180:30:21

Well, it's tender.

0:30:210:30:23

If I touch you here and here, does it feel the same both sides?

0:30:230:30:26

-No.

-No?

0:30:260:30:28

If I say the right side feels normal, and the left side...

0:30:310:30:35

-This side?

-Yeah.

-Feels different?

0:30:350:30:37

There's a very real possibility that Gillian has suffered a spinal injury.

0:30:370:30:42

This means the team will have to take great care,

0:30:420:30:44

and get her out of the car the hard way after all.

0:30:440:30:48

Dan prepares the KED, or Kendrick extrication device,

0:30:480:30:52

which will keep her head, neck and back in a straight line

0:30:520:30:55

ready for the move.

0:30:550:30:58

What we're doing now is, we're going to slowly spin you round.

0:30:590:31:03

Keep yourself as square as you can.

0:31:040:31:06

There you go. What we're going to do,

0:31:090:31:11

we're going to bring this board in underneath your legs and slowly slide you out.

0:31:110:31:16

-I'm so glad I've got trousers on!

-Aren't you ever!

0:31:160:31:19

Inch by inch, Gillian is lifted out as gently as possible.

0:31:210:31:24

-All right. Got your head.

-One, two, three.

0:31:240:31:27

-Where's it hurting now?

-Just all the same places.

0:31:290:31:32

When you're in a situation where you get strapped in,

0:31:320:31:35

all the muscles that were hurting slightly tense up a bit, as well.

0:31:350:31:40

They waste no time getting underway.

0:31:470:31:50

Steady. Roll.

0:31:540:31:56

At the emergency department, Dan hands over to Dr Ryan Thomas.

0:31:560:32:00

-Is it more painful...

-Yeah.

0:32:000:32:02

Well, when you were higher up on the neck, it was tender,

0:32:020:32:07

I suppose, but...

0:32:070:32:10

-Yeah, there.

-There. OK.

0:32:100:32:12

Dr Ryan can't rule out the possibility of a spinal injury,

0:32:140:32:17

so Gillian will need to have X-rays

0:32:170:32:19

to see exactly what's happened to her neck.

0:32:190:32:22

By taking all the right precautions, Dan and the team

0:32:220:32:25

have minimised the risk of further injury,

0:32:250:32:28

giving the grateful Gillian the best chance of a full recovery.

0:32:280:32:31

-I'll finish my paperwork and give you to these chaps.

-Thank you!

0:32:310:32:35

-I didn't catch your name.

-Dan.

-Thank you, Dan!

0:32:350:32:38

That's all right.

0:32:380:32:40

Further investigation showed that Gilliam only had whiplash

0:32:400:32:44

and severe bruising, but it is worth making the point again

0:32:440:32:47

that you can restrict the damage that happens to you

0:32:470:32:50

even in a low-speed accident if you have your head restraint up

0:32:500:32:54

in the right place in your car. Worth looking at next time you get in.

0:32:540:32:58

Now we're going to pop outside, where Louise has something special for us.

0:32:580:33:02

Yes, I do. Man's best friend can play a vital role

0:33:020:33:05

in emergency services. Dogs' incredible sense of smell

0:33:050:33:08

is used to find hidden explosives, and even detect whether fire has been started by arsonists.

0:33:080:33:13

I don't know if you spotted this guest, Nick - Freckle.

0:33:130:33:16

Lovely Freckle! And Dave as well. Hello, Dave.

0:33:160:33:19

You've worked with Freckle for two years. What is he trained to do?

0:33:190:33:22

To identify ignitable liquids at a fire scene,

0:33:220:33:25

so once the fire's been put out and the crews have damped it down,

0:33:250:33:28

his job is to identify how that fire was started.

0:33:280:33:31

So he can find if there's petrol, and it's actually been started by arson.

0:33:310:33:36

Yes. If we can find petrol at the scene when it started,

0:33:360:33:40

then we've got evidence of a deliberate ignition.

0:33:400:33:43

We've set up an experiment to see if he can work this out.

0:33:430:33:46

A bit earlier, you burned these five pieces of carpet.

0:33:460:33:49

We used a blowtorch to burn them, and we've contaminated one of them

0:33:490:33:53

with a tiny drop of petrol.

0:33:530:33:55

-So his job is to find which one it is?

-Hopefully, yes.

0:33:550:33:58

I like the way you say "hopefully"! Shall we let him do it?

0:33:580:34:01

At home... Don't give him a secret sign!

0:34:010:34:05

It's the one in the middle, OK? Let's see if he can find it.

0:34:050:34:08

Ready, steady...

0:34:080:34:11

Ready, steady.

0:34:110:34:12

Go find Mum.

0:34:120:34:14

-So that's him indicating now.

-And almost immediately,

0:34:180:34:21

-he stopped. He's looking at you.

-He's telling me now

0:34:210:34:25

that that square of carpet is where the accelerant is.

0:34:250:34:28

That is the seat of the fire, and the petrol you put on is there.

0:34:280:34:31

-Yeah.

-And he could do this in a house? How many days later?

0:34:310:34:35

The best result we've ever had is four and a half weeks post-fire.

0:34:350:34:39

So he has an incredible sense of smell,

0:34:390:34:41

-and you couldn't have done that otherwise.

-No.

0:34:410:34:44

-What do we need to do now?

-I'll clip him back on the lead

0:34:440:34:47

and give him his reward, this tennis ball.

0:34:470:34:50

I thought he'd get a biscuit or something!

0:34:500:34:53

No, no. Freckle! Good boy!

0:34:530:34:55

And he's been really successful this year. Tell me what he's done.

0:34:550:35:00

So far this year we have had about 130 years of convictions

0:35:000:35:05

-and sentences based on -

-The work that he's done.

0:35:050:35:08

So he found it there, and then you would take him

0:35:080:35:11

to a suspected arsonist's house, and he would look for the petrol

0:35:110:35:15

-or whatever it was.

-Yeah. This is only half the job now.

0:35:150:35:18

We've identified accelerant. We now need a suspect.

0:35:180:35:21

If the police can identify a suspect, what we can do

0:35:210:35:25

-is search the suspect's clothing -

-Or their house.

0:35:250:35:28

-Or their house, or their car.

-So, we've got a line-up

0:35:280:35:32

that I prepared earlier, everybody from the office.

0:35:320:35:35

A line-up of suspects, and you've put a tiny piece of petrol

0:35:350:35:38

on one of your shoes, haven't you? Thanks, everybody!

0:35:380:35:42

-Tell me what you've done.

-Just to give you an idea,

0:35:420:35:44

this is a one-millimetre pipette,

0:35:440:35:46

so we've taken a little drop of the petrol

0:35:460:35:49

-and put a little trace on.

-That's all it is?

0:35:490:35:53

It's not even the contents of the pipette, just the trace evidence.

0:35:530:35:56

Come on, let's do it. And, at home, it's Kit. He's the one in the red!

0:35:560:36:01

-OK? Don't listen, Freckle.

-Ready, steady.

0:36:010:36:04

Freckie! Freckie! Go find Mum.

0:36:040:36:07

Come here!

0:36:080:36:10

So again now he's gone passive. He's gone still.

0:36:100:36:13

He's identifying accelerant actually on the shoe,

0:36:130:36:16

-and he's waiting for his reward.

-Brilliant work!

0:36:160:36:19

Thank you very much for that. Thank you, Freckle, and... Ooh!

0:36:190:36:22

Are you going to let him go and have a run around?

0:36:220:36:25

Well done, Freckle. Thank you very much.

0:36:250:36:27

Brilliant work!

0:36:270:36:30

Isn't that lovely? Isn't that brilliant, as well?

0:36:300:36:33

I love the way she whispers when she was telling you,

0:36:330:36:35

in case the dog heard which one. Right! A real DIY SOS now.

0:36:350:36:40

Robert's helping his mate Paul out with some painting and decorating

0:36:400:36:43

when he trips and crashes down the stairs.

0:36:430:36:45

Right now, laughter might not be the best medicine.

0:36:450:36:48

Mind you, it doesn't stop his mate from cracking a few jokes.

0:36:480:36:51

SIREN WAILS

0:36:550:36:57

Ambulance crew Ian Moss-Bowpitt and Dan Major

0:36:590:37:02

are heading to a house where a man is in pain after a fall.

0:37:020:37:05

We're going to a 44-year-old male who's fallen downstairs

0:37:050:37:10

and twisted his ankle. Basically we're going to assess the injury,

0:37:100:37:14

bearing in mind the distance he may have fallen down the stairs.

0:37:140:37:18

When they arrive, the injured man's friend Paul is waiting for them.

0:37:220:37:26

He's slumped on the stairs right by the front door.

0:37:260:37:29

Paul tells Ian exactly what happened.

0:37:290:37:32

-He's come off the step there...

-Yeah.

-As he's come off the step,

0:37:320:37:36

his full weight on there, he's twisted his ankle...

0:37:360:37:39

-OK.

-..and gone down.

-Right. What's your name?

0:37:390:37:41

-Robert.

-Robert, I'm Ian. My colleague's Dan.

0:37:410:37:45

Robert's ankle is already starting to swell rapidly,

0:37:450:37:48

and it's hurting.

0:37:480:37:50

-What's the pain like?

-Pretty bad, is it?

0:37:500:37:53

Can we have some Entonox, please, Dan?

0:37:530:37:55

Before Ian dares to ease off the shoe,

0:37:550:37:58

Robert needs to get dosed up with the analgesic gas.

0:37:580:38:01

-Have you had gas and air before?

-Yeah.

-OK. We'll try that,

0:38:010:38:05

then put a splint on you and get you down the hospital.

0:38:050:38:08

Robert's looking very fed up.

0:38:080:38:10

Paul's doing his best to take his mind off the pain.

0:38:100:38:13

He certainly owes him! Paul had popped round to Robert's before work

0:38:210:38:24

to help him out with some decorating when he took a tumble.

0:38:240:38:28

See if it works. You need to pull on that with your breathing.

0:38:280:38:32

It takes about three minutes or so to actually work.

0:38:360:38:40

When you stop using it, the pain-killing effect will actually disappear.

0:38:400:38:45

Most people think it's better than beer.

0:38:450:38:48

It turns out that this was not the first injury of the day.

0:38:550:38:59

Ten minutes ago I hit my shin with a hammer,

0:38:590:39:01

and the bruise is just starting to come out now!

0:39:010:39:04

He was laughing at that!

0:39:040:39:06

Very carefully, Ian removes Rob's trainer.

0:39:060:39:10

-You're going to lose your laces.

-Don't mind about that.

0:39:160:39:20

The combination of the gas and Paul's quips

0:39:250:39:28

is certainly putting a smile back on Rob's face.

0:39:280:39:30

OK, let's get this shoe off.

0:39:300:39:34

Ian carefully feels Robert's foot

0:39:340:39:36

to check if the circulation is still working OK.

0:39:360:39:39

So you can feel everything in your foot, can you?

0:39:390:39:42

-I can feel it, but it seems like pins and needles.

-OK.

0:39:420:39:47

-How's that? Is that all right?

-Yeah.

-That's good.

0:39:470:39:50

Although it's going to be painful, they need to get a splint

0:39:500:39:53

around Robert's ankle to keep it immobile for the journey to hospital.

0:39:530:39:57

It looks like a fracture, so we're going to the minor-injuries unit, which can deal with this.

0:39:570:40:03

It's just a few short hops to the stretcher.

0:40:030:40:05

Don't put that down.

0:40:090:40:11

HE CHUCKLES

0:40:310:40:33

At last Rob seems more comfortable.

0:40:330:40:35

His mate Paul can't resist a few more jokes.

0:40:350:40:39

I know how many brushes I've got, an' all.

0:40:410:40:44

And I know how much I've got in my car, so leave it alone.

0:40:440:40:47

Cheers for that, Paul.

0:40:490:40:51

I will reply later!

0:40:530:40:55

Judging by the amount of painkiller Rob is using,

0:40:550:40:58

he's not going to be much help with decorating for a while.

0:40:580:41:01

This is good stuff. I might get some of this for at home.

0:41:030:41:06

Rob did suffer a nasty break and was off work for several weeks.

0:41:070:41:11

Louise has got some more for us outside.

0:41:110:41:13

Yes. I've got another friend. He may look like Freckle,

0:41:130:41:16

but he's Spanner, and he's got a different job, hasn't he?

0:41:160:41:19

He's an explosive-detection dog.

0:41:190:41:21

We've got some pictures of him working. What does he do,

0:41:210:41:24

-and where was he searching?

-He's trained to search

0:41:240:41:28

to find military / commercial home-made type explosives,

0:41:280:41:31

and the venue we went to recently was the Royal Marines Museum

0:41:310:41:34

in Portsmouth. The Royal Marine band did a concert for the public.

0:41:340:41:38

We attended prior to their arrival to make sure the venue was safe

0:41:380:41:41

-to carry out this concert.

-OK. We've hidden something here.

0:41:410:41:45

-That's correct.

-Tell us what we've hidden.

0:41:450:41:48

-You've hidden it.

-We train regularly with the real stuff,

0:41:480:41:52

but obviously we can't carry explosives with us

0:41:520:41:55

when we go to do a live search.

0:41:550:41:58

I've got a wrapper from a Semtex block.

0:41:580:42:01

It's four years old and used as a training aid.

0:42:010:42:04

It's over there, by that water butt. Shall we see if he can find it?

0:42:040:42:08

You take him into an area, let him off

0:42:080:42:10

-and give him an area to search.

-That's right.

-Let him go.

0:42:100:42:13

-What's he found?

-Good dog!

0:42:130:42:15

He's straight over there, because you told him to go in that general direction.

0:42:170:42:22

Just working round. He'll work off his own head

0:42:220:42:25

and do what he's got to do, and if I've got to,

0:42:250:42:27

I'll guide him in a bit. There we go.

0:42:270:42:30

He's stopped and he's looking back at you, telling you where it is.

0:42:300:42:33

He's saying, "Dad, that's where the device has been hidden."

0:42:330:42:37

That's where it is. Brilliant work. Thank you.

0:42:370:42:40

It's fantastic watching them work. He gets his reward, doesn't he?

0:42:400:42:43

If you look over here, they get the same reward. It's a tennis ball,

0:42:430:42:47

and Freckle has got tennis-ball envy!

0:42:470:42:49

Ahh! Thank you very much.

0:42:490:42:52

Fantastic stuff. Just to let you know

0:42:520:42:55

that the chap who had the electric shock is fine.

0:42:550:42:58

Now we've finished the programme, I'm off to get my tennis ball.

0:42:580:43:02

Louise and I, or, as we're now known by the crew,

0:43:020:43:04

Freckle and Spanner, will bring you more Real Rescues very soon.

0:43:040:43:08

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:100:43:14

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:140:43:18

.

0:43:180:43:18

Nick Knowles and Louise Minchin present dramatic events from the day-to-day work of the emergency services, going behind the scenes at one of Britain's biggest police control centres.

A man's life hangs in the balance after a wasp sting, and the team introduce a dog who can sniff out the cause of fires.