Norfolk The Hairy Bikers' Food Tour of Britain


Norfolk

Si and Dave explore Norfolk where they cook a traditional county favourite in Diss. They fish for Cromer crabs and forage on the Norfolk marshes for samphire.


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Transcript


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We're the Hairy Bikers!

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We're on the road to find regional recipes to rip up your appetite.

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We're riding county to county to discover, cook and enjoy the best of British.

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-Come on!

-Wahey!

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Today, we're in search of the real tastes of Norfolk.

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-The Norfolk Broads!

-There's only one broad I want to see in Norfolk and that's Delia Smith.

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Look, she's not the only famous resident in Norfolk. Lord Nelson.

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-Lord Nelson! Delia Smith. Two eyes.

-The Queen at Sandringham.

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There's only one queen at Norfolk, that's Delia Smith.

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Delia was a revolutionary who brought good food to the masses.

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Who was it who taught the nation how to boil an egg? Delia Smith.

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Look, Norfolk is a water-based county.

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You've got the Broads and the bountiful coastline, which produces some of the finest seafood.

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We've got crabs, lobsters, cockles. You name it, it's there, dude.

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-The best in the country.

-So it's not going to be all turkey and mustard?

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No, it's not. Get on the bike.

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'On our quest to define the true flavours of Norfolk,

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'we live on the edge and cook a local recipe

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'that we would never dare try at home.'

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We learn why the locals think Cromer crabs are the best in the country.

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We meet an eggs-pert in his field!

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'And representing Norfolk in a cook-off later is Galton Blackiston.

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'Will we be able to beat him in a blind tasting judged by local diners?'

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'You can't come to the north Norfolk coast without visiting the local institution. Cookie's crab shop.

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'This place has been selling seafood for three generations.'

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Look at that Norfolk man, you've got to love it.

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-Let's nick a strawberry.

-You're caught on camera!

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-Hello there.

-Wow, look at this, all this smoked fish.

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In Norfolk, is there a tradition of smoking fish as well?

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-Most definitely, yes.

-What's a buckling?

-That's a herring too.

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-It's roasted and then smoked so you can eat it as it is.

-Look at that, that's perfection.

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-Great with the garlic, I'm surprised actually.

-Yes, wonderful, isn't it?

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It sounds daft to say, but what, to you, is Norfolk on a plate?

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-Crab. Samphire.

-Samphire?

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-Samphire goes with everything. It's God's salt.

-Is that you gathering the samphire?

-That's me.

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-Is that local to Norfolk then?

-Oh, yes, it's plentiful on the marshes. You have to know where to go, though.

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Could we have a quick look at where it might be grown on?

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I'll show you one place, but not the best place.

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'Samphire is a wild plant which grows in muddy marshland.'

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'It's got a unique salty taste that works brilliantly with seafood.'

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'Only real locals like Pete know the best spots to find it.'

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It's vast, isn't it? It's such a lovely area.

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It is vast. Pete said, "We're just going to go over there," and it kind of looked pretty close.

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20 minutes later, we arrive at the centre of samphire.

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Wow. It's like little cactuses.

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It's lovely, samphire, isn't it?

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-You can do a lot with it.

-You can.

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You can pickle it, blanche it, eat it raw in salad.

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People used to call it sea asparagus, didn't they?

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-That's right, yes.

-Is samphire seasonal, Pete?

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Yes, the middle of June to the middle of September.

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Says something about your coastline, because it only grows in good clean waters.

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It's great what you when you know what to pick.

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It's lovely. But it's a bit dangerous sometimes. You've got to study the tide a bit.

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Get in your dykes and out sometimes.

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You've got to study your tides and not eat toadstools and the like!

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Look at that, we've got crabs as well.

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We've got it all, dude.

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-It truly is a bounteous county.

-It is!

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Next up on our food tour of Norfolk is Wells-next-the-Sea.

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Right, let the searching commence.

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What to you is good traditional Norfolk fare?

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You can get some really nice local mackerel and sea bass.

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I'd say shellfish on the seafront is beautiful.

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-It comes straight off the boat.

-Have you any traditional recipes?

-Pick some samphire.

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What are you fishing for?

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-Crabs.

-If you don't mind me saying, I don't think there's much of a feed on that one!

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-A bit of Colman's mustard. That's pretty nice.

-Of course.

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What to you is good traditional Norfolk fare?

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Proper beef stew and dumplings.

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-Norfolk dumplings?

-Norfolk dumplings, definitely.

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What's in a Norfolk dumpling?

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If I told you that, everyone would know.

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If he won't tell us, we'll have to find someone who will.

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-I don't use suet.

-You don't?

-No, no.

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-I use flour and water.

-Right.

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Cook them for about 20 minutes

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until they blow up big.

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-Hello, how are you?

-I'm very good, hi.

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Hey, what a fabulous place.

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You've got lots of Norfolk things here.

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What to you is Norfolk on a plate?

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Today, I think it's Binham blue, which is a local blue cheese.

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This is made by Mrs Temple. She's a local farmer's-wife-cum-scientist and this is one of her first cheeses.

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It's won several awards. If you'd like to have a little taste.

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-That's nice, isn't it?

-That's a good cheese.

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It's not crumbly like a Stilton.

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-Mmm.

-Get the blue, get the cream.

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Have you got any other secrets?

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We've got some local sea lavender honey. He has all his hives

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out here on the marshes. They start here and go all the way to Blakeney.

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He just harvests all the hives there.

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It doesn't taste anything like lavender.

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You get that rich sea mineraliness in it.

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-You do, don't you?

-There's nothing light and floraly about that.

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There's a salt to it as well.

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-That's mad.

-It's got a savoury finish.

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-I've heard of salt marsh lamb, but never salt marsh honey.

-No!

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'There's certainly no shortage of great produce in Norfolk,

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'but we still need to nail a traditional county recipe.'

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-Hello.

-Hello, I'm Si. Nice to meet you, sir.

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-This looks great.

-Doesn't it?

-Arthur, are there any old traditional dishes?

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Norfolk dumplings, that would go with mince or something like that.

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-What is a Norfolk dumpling?

-Can I get you my father? He'd be the man to tell you.

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We're going through layers of generation to find out what the actual dumpling is.

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-It's like Lara Croft of the dumpling world.

-The dumpling-nator. Hello, sir.

-Nice to meet you.

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-Nice to meet you.

-Hello, I'm Dave.

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Sir, we need to know, what's a Norfolk dumpling?

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A Norfolk dumpling is just plain water and flour.

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-It's self-raising flour.

-Right.

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You had to eat them as soon as they came out because they went flat.

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-They used to put them on top of the potatoes.

-Right.

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I think this gentleman knows his dumplings.

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-I think he does. He is a Jedi of the dumpling world.

-Yes.

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'We won't forget about the fabulous Norfolk seafood when it comes to the cook-off,

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'but for a really authentic taste of the county, it just has to be Norfolk dumplings.'

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The locals insist we have got to make them without suet.

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We'll serve them in the traditional style with mince and potatoes.

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To get cooking, we are off to the market town of Diss.

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# Oh, Delia, you're breaking my heart

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# You're expanding my cooking confidence daily... #

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It's such a thrill to be in Diss.

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-We have scoured Norfolk.

-We have.

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And we have come up with what we reckon is a good traditional dish.

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And that's the Norfolk dumpling.

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Yes!

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For us, I think it's fair to say the jury is out.

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-Absolutely.

-We're northerners, we love big dumplings.

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But we love suet dumplings.

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Now, the Norfolk dumpling, it's just flour, water, salt and pepper.

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-It's wrong.

-But we are doing a favourite, I think, of everybody.

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It's mince. People love mince.

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-They do.

-It's brilliant. Anyway, we'd better try these dumplings.

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For the Norfolk dumpling, you add flour to a bowl.

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Add to that... salt.

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I think these dumplings have to be well-seasoned, or else it is going to be dough.

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I have put a lot of pepper in, because I think this is going to be nice if they are a bit savoury.

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It's odd without suet.

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I've got no fat to rub in.

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We put the water into the flour.

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The only thing is, it's self-raising flour, so I'm hoping that is what will give the dumplings a lift.

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These are going to be fantastic. There's loads of pepper in!

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-Dave.

-Yes?

-Are you going to chop your parsley now?

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Oh, Carruthers! I forgot.

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-I'll do that.

-Go on then.

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Now, a top tip when you're making Norfolk dumplings is put the parsley in

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with the flour first, before you start making the dough.

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I never was one for an easy life.

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I'm quietly confident, ladies and gentlemen.

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I'll go with a kind of golf ball sized dumplings,

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because I don't know how much they'll swell up in the pan.

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If I do these and they're all big, we all can't have some!

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CHEERING

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-Look at the size of those!

-Do you think they're too big?

-No, they're fine.

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-All right.

-I think me pan is too small, that's what I think!

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No, they'll be fine.

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What I've done is, I'm sauteing off these lovely onions in readiness for the mince.

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Now, look, I'm coming to a top tip.

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Look. Chop the organic beef stock cubes up, nice and fine and crumbly.

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Do about two and a half of those.

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Then put them in your pan like that. Sprinkle them.

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Then just cook them out a little bit. And it changes the flavour of that stock cube. It's really odd.

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-But it happens. It does work.

-Oh!

-Doesn't that smell lovely?

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And then, it gets all the onions coated in the stock cube, you see.

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So, all I'm going to do now is add the mince.

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You know it makes sense.

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You put your potatoes in a pan of boiling water without splashing the cameraman.

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-We just get those back to the boil.

-Now, what I'm going to add to this, is some Worcester sauce.

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I'm gonna put a few drops in. And then there's about a litre of water.

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This water will miraculously turn into gravy, you know!

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With the addition of the stuff that seasons and thickens, but we can't mention the name.

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Potatoes that are all in the boil. It's time for the Norfolk dumplings to take a bath.

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Just throw them into your potatoes and watch them bubble.

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They're nice when they're fluffy.

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Right.

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Now, simply simmer for 20 minutes, by which time, the potatoes will be done,

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and so will the dumplings and you'll have a hearty but simple supper.

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Now, back to the mince. You've got to simmer this

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for three hours, so these dumplings may be a bit previous.

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You don't really have to wait three hours, because here's the mince that we did earlier!

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You get lovely, thick gravy with the mince, that's what happens after three hours of cooking.

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What we do with this is, we've got our final garnishing flourish, some lovely baby carrots.

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They've just been washed. Just topping them, and we'll boil them.

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Hello. As the Town Mayor of Diss, I'd like to present you with a Diss apron.

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-Are you the the Mayor of Diss?

-I am.

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-Well, thank you very much. Thank you very much.

-You're welcome. You can put your nice apron on.

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Can we have a cheer for Diss? CHEERING

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Such a time to distract you. Have you seen the dumplings?

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-They're growing some, aren't they?

-Now that's what you call a rising dumpling.

-Put the carrots on.

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I've left the green tops on.

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Like they do in the posh restaurants.

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Let's have a look. Nice. Look. It's risen. It's bouncy.

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-Beautifully cooked. Ow!

-I'll drain the carrots.

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-A big knob of butter.

-Thanks very much.

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-Let's serve dinner.

-Dumplings.

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Now, mince. We want it with a glaze of gravy.

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See what I mean?

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The carrots.

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These are so good, I think I could eat three.

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Oh, look at that!

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Just on the potatoes for that country chic.

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Voila! The Norfolk dumpling!

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I never thought we'd see the day when we'd serve up dumplings without any suet.

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-How will it go down?

-Would you like to try a Norfolk dumpling and mince?

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-Very nice.

-They're delicious.

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They're different to ones with suet, aren't they?

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-And healthier without the suet.

-Absolutely.

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I put me fork in and couldn't get it out!

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-Your Worship?

-Interesting. Were they lighter when they first came out?

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-No.

-Really nice.

-Yeah?

-Yeah, I'd have them again.

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Thank you.

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Do that, look, you missed a bit, look at that!

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-Have you had the Norfolk dumplings before?

-I haven't. No.

-You've lived in Norfolk all your life?

-Yes.

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What do you think?

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-Yes!

-Very nice, actually. I'd never had a Norfolk dumpling before.

-What's this?

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-That's a Norfolk dumpling.

-I know.

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It just looked a bit hard. Oh!

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Well, a mixed response there, but the kids certainly seemed to enjoy getting stuck into them.

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Next, an even bigger challenge is around the corner.

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'We're taking on one of the county's top chefs in their restaurant,

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'using local ingredients to see who can best define the taste of the region.'

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It will be up to local diners in a blind tasting to decide whose dish

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best represents the true flavours of Norfolk.

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Our opponent today is...

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Galton Blackiston, the chef and owner of Morston Hall

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on the north Norfolk coast.

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He was born and bred in Norfolk and has been named East Anglian Chef of the Year.

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He's had a Michelin Star for over 10 years.

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There's a saying, us Norfolk boys always come back to roost,

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so I'm back in the county where I belong.

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I'd say the geography of the county is massively important.

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We haven't got a motorway in Norfolk, so people have to find the produce.

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Obviously, we've got a vast expanse of coastline, so there's never a problem with fish.

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It's a massive farming community here.

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Since coming back to Norfolk, most of my mates are farmers.

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Everything that comes out of the kitchen is fantastically fresh, fantastically local and seasonal.

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I only use fish caught out of the North Sea, wherever possible.

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In the summer months, I've got sea trout, sea bass, crab, lobster, cockles, everything that I'd want.

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We get fantastic vegetables, fruit, best strawberries in the country, but I would say that!

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What I do is all about the ingredients. The cooking is the easy part.

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Years and years ago, maybe I would mess about a bit more, but now,

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if I've got fantastic main ingredients, it's going to be served very simply, but really well.

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To take on the bikers today, my taste of Norfolk

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is Morston pan-fried sea trout

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with Stiffkey cockles and our own locally grown vegetables.

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-HE RINGS THE DOORBELL

-Galton!

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-Gentlemen!

-Hello there.

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-Pleased to meet you.

-Lovely to see you. What a day!

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What we need is a nice cup of tea to cool us down.

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-My mother used to say that.

-Come into my office.

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Good man. We'll follow you.

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-Galton, could you headline your dish?

-Yeah.

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I'm going to do Morston sea trout, pan-fried, with Stiffkey cockles,

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some locally grown vegetables and just a simple butter sauce.

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-And that's going to be...

-Beautiful.

-All right.

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These are things that are very local, they're blue in colour, that's why they're called Stewkey Blues.

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I actually got these myself.

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-Did you?

-I love doing that. I love going cockling.

-They're big!

-They're decent sized ones.

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You've washed them through so they don't go green. What have you got in the water?

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I put a bit of flour into the water so it makes it spit out

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any muck and grit and stuff - well, that's the theory behind it.

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And then you leave them in there for almost overnight, next day, drain them.

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Now, this is the way I cook cockles.

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White wine. Into a hot pan. Immediately, throw in...

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-Your old cockle, innit!

-Your shallot and your garlic.

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Pop in... You don't need to put any more liquid in than that.

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And the lid on the top.

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The thing is, in the professional kitchen, none of the pans have lids.

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Or if you have a frying pan, you put a lid on, you just put another frying pan on the top.

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-I thought that was just Norfolk, but maybe it does go round.

-No, everywhere.

-That's beautiful.

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-That's what I want to show you gents.

-Oh, that's a star turn!

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That's a local sea trout. Only here for eight weeks.

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And then you don't use them any more.

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These don't take long either. They're already beginning to open.

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There's so much meat on that fish. Have you got your own fishing boat?

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I have a crab boat. There's nothing better to relax than just messing about on a boat.

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If you know what you're up to. And that's half the trouble with me. I get caught in the mud.

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Everybody knows, they say, here comes Galton, he's ploughing his way through.

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-Beautiful.

-Now, what we don't want to do is to nail these too much.

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They'd be a pan of squash balls.

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When they're cool enough to handle, just take as many as you can.

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-Pop them in a dish.

-Unbelievable.

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The sort of thing that I'd sit outside and just eat like that.

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-Absolutely.

-I'm going to skin this sea trout.

0:18:300:18:33

Very simple. Quite interesting to see, this fish was quite bruised,

0:18:330:18:37

but it doesn't matter, it won't alter the taste of the fish.

0:18:370:18:40

It's a wild fish. And it's been on an epic journey, that fish,

0:18:400:18:45

so it should be bruised, it's the signs of its life.

0:18:450:18:47

That sea trout is gonna take some beating.

0:18:470:18:50

It's going to be rolled up tightly, so it'll look very neat on the plate.

0:18:500:18:54

But I'm essentially serving it with seasonal vegetables and cockles.

0:18:540:18:58

Now, I'd sort of refrigerate that for a minimum of an hour, just so it firms up.

0:18:580:19:02

-Could you pop that in that fridge? It's a bit limp at the moment.

-It is a bit limp, isn't it?

0:19:020:19:07

I'm just going to wash my hands.

0:19:070:19:10

-Chef?

-Yes?

-Do you want the one that looks remarkably like the one I've just put in back out here again?

0:19:110:19:16

-Yes, please, sir.

-Thank you very much, chef.

-That will be the "here's one he's done earlier."

0:19:160:19:20

Now, it's just a matter of doing the vegetables.

0:19:200:19:23

In a frying pan, just a little knob of butter, perfect.

0:19:230:19:27

Straight away, we're going to saute off some new potatoes.

0:19:270:19:31

You don't mind it going like a bernoisette?

0:19:310:19:33

No, I don't mind that too much.

0:19:330:19:35

These are local new potatoes, and then, seasoning.

0:19:370:19:41

I season lightly, because I'm bearing in mind

0:19:410:19:43

that I've got the cockles and samphire is going with it as well.

0:19:430:19:47

You can always add more salt. But you can't take it out.

0:19:470:19:50

Exactly, that's what I tell them all the time.

0:19:500:19:53

Whilst they're being sauted off, I'm going to bring a couple of pans of boiling water.

0:19:530:19:58

I have a local guy who grows carrots for me now.

0:19:580:20:01

These are local, English carrots.

0:20:010:20:04

They're of a decent size, but they aren't huge, and they taste of a carrot.

0:20:040:20:08

What I'd like in here, a bit of a butter sauce.

0:20:080:20:11

Cooking liquor from those cockles.

0:20:110:20:13

Where does the name Galton come from?

0:20:130:20:16

My ancestor was a guy called Sir Francis Galton, who found that everybody

0:20:160:20:21

had individual fingerprints, and so I get lumbered with the name Galton. It's been a disaster.

0:20:210:20:26

So, what do you have in here? What's in here?

0:20:260:20:30

We've some shallots, lemon juice, white wine vinegar and white wine, and then you whisk in butter.

0:20:300:20:36

-Is that a beurre blanc?

-A beurre blanc or a butter sauce. That's ready, so that can stay around.

0:20:360:20:42

-Now, we're almost ready to get our asparagus in.

-He's quick, isn't he?

0:20:420:20:45

-Isn't he?

-This is another jewel from our region.

0:20:450:20:49

-Norfolk asparagus is great.

-How long for the asparagus?

0:20:490:20:52

Five minutes. That's quite thick asparagus.

0:20:520:20:55

So, once you've had your sea trout and you've put it in the fridge,

0:20:550:20:59

you can still cut it in the clingfilm.

0:20:590:21:03

-It's going to look a little bit like a hockey puck.

-Oh, monsieur!

0:21:030:21:08

For me, probably the easiest way to cook it, because it's all a similar thickness.

0:21:080:21:12

And you also get quite a lot out of it.

0:21:120:21:15

I think these vegetables are nearly there.

0:21:150:21:18

That's what I mean by tasting when it's hot.

0:21:180:21:20

That's cooked.

0:21:210:21:23

-So, John?

-Yes.

0:21:230:21:26

-Just strain those, please.

-Thank you.

0:21:260:21:29

The last thing, to cook the sea trout.

0:21:290:21:31

Olive oil in first, and a little knob of butter.

0:21:310:21:33

I'll cook these with the clingfilm on.

0:21:330:21:35

The clingfilm doesn't actually melt into anything like that, so it's perfectly safe to cook with.

0:21:350:21:41

And it just helps keep that shape.

0:21:410:21:43

-Sea salt.

-Lovely, all perfectly the same size.

0:21:430:21:46

It appeals to you that, doesn't that?

0:21:460:21:48

It does. Yes, I like uniformity.

0:21:480:21:50

It's really clean.

0:21:500:21:52

Of course it is. It's lush.

0:21:520:21:54

Turn it over like so...

0:21:540:21:58

Then I'm going to turn the pan off, leave these to finish off cooking,

0:21:580:22:02

a little bit of butter goes in with the asparagus.

0:22:020:22:05

-Of course.

-Of course.

-Gives it a nice little sheen.

-Absolutely.

0:22:050:22:09

Same with the carrots. Not a lot.

0:22:090:22:11

A little bit of butter.

0:22:110:22:13

Strain my sauce.

0:22:130:22:15

That sauce has held really well.

0:22:150:22:17

-It does.

-It's been standing for a while.

-I shall just put that back on a gentle heat.

0:22:170:22:21

All my vegetables are nice and hot.

0:22:210:22:24

Add a few cockles...to the sauce.

0:22:240:22:27

What I'm gonna do with these potatoes is just have a little samphire.

0:22:270:22:31

In its raw state.

0:22:310:22:34

Toss it through. You'll get a bit of crunch in with that.

0:22:370:22:39

Good colour, isn't it? We're just about ready to serve.

0:22:390:22:42

All you do is take that off.

0:22:510:22:54

Leave it to sit.

0:22:540:22:57

-That looks exquisite.

-A few chives in there, that's optional.

0:22:570:23:01

Put on the sauce.

0:23:010:23:03

You've done that a few times, haven't you?

0:23:060:23:08

I'd normally do it 10 times quicker than this.

0:23:080:23:11

It does excite me. This is very simple, but it's good.

0:23:110:23:16

I'm happy to have that as a main course.

0:23:160:23:18

Or any course.

0:23:180:23:20

So there we've it.

0:23:200:23:21

Gentlemen, that's my pan-fried Morston sea trout

0:23:210:23:25

with Stiffkey cockles, seasonal local vegetables, butter sauce.

0:23:250:23:30

That's good food.

0:23:300:23:32

Could you not have just done egg and chips?

0:23:320:23:34

I'd love to have done egg and chips for you, guys.

0:23:340:23:37

Right. Taste that sea-trout.

0:23:400:23:42

Can't wait. It looks wonderful, doesn't it?

0:23:420:23:44

That fish couldn't be better.

0:23:440:23:47

The acidity of the buerre blanc is just superb.

0:23:470:23:50

The vegetables are cooked to perfection.

0:23:500:23:51

The cockles are like a seasoning for the sea-trout.

0:23:510:23:54

-It's just so fresh.

-Fresh, light.

0:23:540:23:59

Absolutely perfectly executed.

0:23:590:24:01

-We're off again, aren't we?

-Yeah.

0:24:010:24:03

-We've got another challenge on.

-We've got to find out what's out there.

0:24:030:24:06

It's all very well what we think, but the real judges are the locals

0:24:060:24:10

who will decide whose dish is best in a blind tasting coming up.

0:24:100:24:13

Galton is a real class act and his knowledge and use of local

0:24:150:24:18

produce is second to none, so we really need to uncover some gems if we're going to stand a chance.

0:24:180:24:24

Everyone around here raves about the quality of the Cromer crabs, so we've got to get our hands on some.

0:24:240:24:30

This is Cromer. It's got a pier.

0:24:300:24:33

It has. We need a man in a boat.

0:24:330:24:36

To the sea! Come on!

0:24:360:24:39

Wait for us! Sorry we're late.

0:24:390:24:42

What time do you call this?

0:24:420:24:44

-It's crab time. Hello, Dave.

-How do you do, nice to meet you.

0:24:440:24:48

-Hello, I'm Si. How are you?

-How do you do, Si?

0:24:480:24:51

-I think he's done that before, don't you?

-Yes, Si.

0:24:560:24:59

Oh, our insatiable quest for the crab!

0:24:590:25:03

-What's that smell? Is that you?

-Oh!

0:25:030:25:06

-It's the bait!

-It's bait. Lovely.

0:25:060:25:09

'John Davies has been fishing these waters for over 30 years.'

0:25:110:25:16

-Lobsters.

-Yeah, several smaller ones again.

-Is this OK?

0:25:160:25:18

No, not legal size.

0:25:180:25:20

-Goes back in the ocean.

-Oh!

-That's what you came after.

0:25:200:25:24

A nice, female crab.

0:25:240:25:25

It's got to be 115 mm, and that clearly is.

0:25:250:25:29

It's a small crab, but for the size of the meat density, it's very, very high.

0:25:290:25:33

So, John, what's the flavour of the Cromer crab that no other crab has?

0:25:330:25:37

-It's famous for being a very, very sweet meat.

-Yes.

0:25:370:25:39

There's just something a little bit different about our crab.

0:25:390:25:42

I bet some of these crabs have been round a few times before.

0:25:420:25:46

They say, "oh, no, not again".

0:25:460:25:48

And it's, oh, yes.

0:25:480:25:49

What makes the marine environment here great for crabs?

0:25:490:25:53

I think the main thing is that it's a shallow, flint and chalky sea bed.

0:25:530:25:57

A bit like a chalk stream trout really.

0:25:570:26:00

-How long has your family been doing this, John?

-About eight generations.

0:26:000:26:03

Do you like crab or are you fed up with it to eat?

0:26:030:26:06

No, I like crab. My grandfather he'd eat crab nearly every day.

0:26:060:26:10

I have it maybe, once a week, once a fortnight, fresh bread and butter, salad, green mayonnaise, or whatever.

0:26:100:26:16

Keep it simple, basically. Yes.

0:26:160:26:17

When you've got a good product, why do you want to mess about with it?

0:26:170:26:21

Yes, exactly. How many crabs do you reckon we got out of those pots, about 20 pots?

0:26:210:26:26

20 pots, 80 to 90 crabs in there.

0:26:260:26:28

Look at the size of that one. That's got our name on it!

0:26:280:26:32

Look at him!

0:26:320:26:35

He's magnificent, isn't he?

0:26:350:26:36

Three big ugly brutes together.

0:26:360:26:38

Look at that. Just show us how to hold a crab properly.

0:26:380:26:41

A big crab-like this, not only would he bite you, he'll give you a nasty crush in there.

0:26:410:26:46

-Yes.

-If you've got him on his back, there's no way he's going to hurt you.

0:26:460:26:51

Yes, that's there. Lovely little female crab.

0:26:520:26:54

-That's what Cromer is famous for.

-Si, I reckon against Galton, we can't do better than this.

0:26:540:27:00

-No.

-Let's buy a dozen of those off you, John.

-By all means.

0:27:000:27:03

-So I reckon we take a dozen, six will do for the diners, that leaves six for us.

-Cheers.

0:27:030:27:09

We'll use our shellfish bounty to make warm potted crab, and delicious crab cakes,

0:27:130:27:18

served with some of that samphire we saw earlier.

0:27:180:27:20

And I tell you what would complete the dish, a poached egg and some mayonnaise.

0:27:200:27:24

Let's hunt for the best eggs in the county.

0:27:240:27:27

In Great Snoring, there's a family farm that has been producing free-range eggs from chickens,

0:27:270:27:33

ducks, quails and geese for 20 years.

0:27:330:27:37

Although his 30,000 birds produce eggs for supermarkets,

0:27:370:27:40

farmer, David Perrault, proves that you can work on a commercial scale without battery farming. Excuse me!

0:27:400:27:46

-Good morning. How can I help you?

-Have you got any eggs?!

0:27:460:27:49

-We've got one or two.

-Free-range eggs?

0:27:490:27:51

-All free-range.

-Look at them.

0:27:510:27:53

Straight out of the field.

0:27:530:27:55

They're still warm. What makes the goose eggs so special?

0:27:550:27:59

It's the white, which is different from a chicken white.

0:27:590:28:01

Also, they've more yolk, so they've more flavour than a chicken egg, in proportion.

0:28:010:28:05

So, goose eggs, good for cakes.

0:28:050:28:07

Not quite as good as a duck egg. They really make lovely batter.

0:28:070:28:10

What's the equivalent of chicken eggs to a goose egg?

0:28:100:28:13

I suppose, about three to four medium eggs.

0:28:130:28:16

So, good value for money.

0:28:160:28:18

I still think it's too big. Have you got anything smaller?

0:28:180:28:21

Quails, they're comical looking birds, aren't they?

0:28:230:28:26

That's what we'll use, quail's eggs, they're rich, they look great on the plate.

0:28:260:28:30

I agree, they're beautiful. I'm very partial. I've often sat down and had a 12 egg omelette with quail's eggs.

0:28:300:28:35

Again, it's like a goose egg, it's got more yolk than white.

0:28:350:28:37

The shells are intriguing. One lady thought I painted thousands of them every night.

0:28:370:28:41

This is all nature's work, not mine.

0:28:410:28:44

Everyone is individual to each individual animal.

0:28:440:28:46

They nest on the ground, so they need to camouflage the egg.

0:28:460:28:49

We could just use three. On a plate, it would look great.

0:28:490:28:53

Ever since you suggested eggs, I have this idea of dipping crab cakes and stuff in there,

0:28:530:28:58

and it's too small.

0:28:580:28:59

Oh, look, David, have you got anything in the middle for Mr Pedantic over there?

0:28:590:29:04

-Dave, dude, duck eggs!

-Yes, you're right!

0:29:090:29:13

There's nothing better than nicely poached duck egg.

0:29:130:29:15

I hope this is what you want. Something in between?

0:29:150:29:18

We've got it, dude.

0:29:180:29:20

They are magnificent, David.

0:29:200:29:22

Every animal is what it eats.

0:29:220:29:24

Although, some of our diet is, in pellets and everything else,

0:29:240:29:26

an important bit of their diet is grass, it's the same with geese.

0:29:260:29:30

The goodness comes out in the egg. You see it in the colour of the yolk and everything else.

0:29:300:29:32

-Eggs need be eaten fresh.

-It depends on what you want to do with the egg.

0:29:320:29:37

If you want to poach them, fry them, a lovely fresh egg,

0:29:370:29:40

if you want a hardboiled one, it wants to sit in the fridge for a fortnight so you can peel it easily.

0:29:400:29:43

-That's a top tip.

-It is.

0:29:430:29:45

I think we need to visit your shop.

0:29:450:29:47

How many are you after?

0:29:470:29:49

-A dozen.

-A dozen.

0:29:490:29:51

There you go, nice and white.

0:29:510:29:53

-That's beautiful.

-It's people like you that are farming commercially

0:29:530:29:57

but responsibly, and that means we can have the quantity of good food at a reasonable price.

0:29:570:30:02

-Being commercial doesn't mean you don't care about what you do.

-Absolutely.

0:30:020:30:05

-Well, this is a perfect 'eggxit'.

-Certainly is!

0:30:060:30:09

You put them in your panniers.

0:30:090:30:11

-Thanks very much, David.

-See you, have a nice day.

-Thanks!

0:30:110:30:15

We can honestly say, we've gathered our own ingredients.

0:30:170:30:20

-We gathered the samphire out of a muddy gully. These were laid this morning.

-Right.

0:30:200:30:24

-And the crabs, we did go out on a crab boat and got 'em.

-Fantastic.

0:30:240:30:28

Our dish tonight is...

0:30:280:30:29

-A warm, potted Cromer crab.

-With a caper and samphire sauce.

0:30:290:30:35

With a softly poached duck egg on toast.

0:30:350:30:37

And Cromer crab cakes and lemon mayonnaise.

0:30:370:30:41

Oh, gentleman, that sounds absolutely brilliant.

0:30:410:30:44

Well, I hope so.

0:30:440:30:46

-We have a lot to do.

-You've got a lot to do.

0:30:460:30:48

But, will the local diners think our dishes good enough to beat Galton in the blind tasting?

0:30:480:30:54

These are the classic Cromers. These have been cooked for about 20 minutes.

0:30:540:30:58

-First of, for the potted crab, we'll serve it warm and we'll do a spiced butter.

-Right.

0:30:580:31:03

So, I'm going to heat this up until it goes frothy and strain it off.

0:31:030:31:07

See this little gap here, you just put your thumb in there,

0:31:070:31:10

and you just pull the crab out.

0:31:100:31:13

OK? Then, this little bit,

0:31:130:31:15

which is where its mouth is in effect, you push it like that...

0:31:150:31:21

then what should come out is that.

0:31:210:31:24

That, you can strip the meat of it but

0:31:240:31:26

this comes off.

0:31:260:31:28

What you do, so you can get at the meat, is you just crack it

0:31:280:31:33

and that will just crack of there like that.

0:31:330:31:35

All of this meat is good meat.

0:31:350:31:38

So put a little spoon in there and you can just bring all of that meat.

0:31:380:31:41

Don't forget, the dark meat comes from the inside of the shell,

0:31:410:31:44

the white meat comes from the legs and all of that. That's it, literally.

0:31:440:31:49

We'll move on to the claws.

0:31:490:31:51

Just pull them off, dead easy, get a hold of the claw,

0:31:510:31:56

hold the top part of the leg,

0:31:560:31:58

and crack.

0:31:580:31:59

If you got a big spoon use a big spoon, we've got a trusty old axe.

0:31:590:32:04

I feel at home with an axe.

0:32:040:32:05

All you do, nice and gentle...

0:32:050:32:08

Now once it cracks, you should get it out in a oner.

0:32:080:32:12

Look at that. Lovely.

0:32:120:32:14

There is a tough cartilage that you just need to pull the meat away from because you don't want that.

0:32:140:32:20

I've brought the butter to a sizzle,

0:32:200:32:22

we want the spices in here, I've got some shallots,

0:32:220:32:26

the zest of half a lemon,

0:32:260:32:29

and some mace. Mace is like the outside of nutmeg.

0:32:290:32:33

It's quite traditional with potted shrimps, isn't it? It's lush.

0:32:330:32:36

A pinch of cayenne pepper

0:32:360:32:39

and some nutmeg. A good pinch.

0:32:390:32:41

I want to leave this to infuse on a very gentle heat for about 10 minutes.

0:32:410:32:47

All I'm doing here is just making sure that this is absolutely smooth

0:32:470:32:51

because people pay quite a lot of money to come and dine here.

0:32:510:32:54

LAUGHTER

0:32:540:32:56

I'll pass that through, the smell is just absolutely wonderful.

0:32:560:33:02

-Brown crabmeat.

-This is starting to worry me now.

-Look at that.

0:33:020:33:05

-That's beautiful, isn't it?

-That is very good.

0:33:050:33:08

We've got these little moulds for potting. Line them with Clingfilm.

0:33:080:33:12

We'll just strain that off.

0:33:120:33:14

We don't want lumpy bits.

0:33:140:33:16

All we do is pour that spiced butter on to the crab.

0:33:160:33:19

We taste it, make sure it's OK.

0:33:240:33:26

A bit of salt?

0:33:300:33:32

You two keep tasting, let me try some. Please, sir.

0:33:320:33:36

Thank you.

0:33:360:33:38

Lovely.

0:33:400:33:42

Now we start packing the pots.

0:33:420:33:44

Two spoonfuls in each.

0:33:460:33:48

Right, so onto this, we are going to strata the brown meat.

0:33:500:33:56

So you haven't added anything at all to the brown meat?

0:33:560:34:00

-Nothing at all because the crab speaks for itself.

-Yeah.

0:34:000:34:03

Cover those with Clingfilm so the steam doesn't get in there.

0:34:070:34:10

We'll put that aside for a moment.

0:34:100:34:13

We'll start building the crab cakes.

0:34:130:34:16

For this we're going to mix the white and the brown meat.

0:34:160:34:19

Chopped parsley.

0:34:190:34:20

Splash of Worcester sauce. I think that's enough, do you?

0:34:220:34:25

Can you do us a duck's egg yolk in there, Kingy?

0:34:250:34:27

No worries, dude.

0:34:270:34:29

About a tablespoon of creme fraiche, some salt and pepper.

0:34:290:34:34

These are fantastic.

0:34:370:34:38

Some lemon zest, a squeeze of lemon juice.

0:34:400:34:43

Mix that together - and see how sloppy or how thick it is.

0:34:430:34:47

Then we thicken it up with breadcrumbs.

0:34:470:34:50

While Dave's doing that, I am going to get on with the lemon mayonnaise.

0:34:500:34:54

Three duck eggs... We only want the duck egg yolks you see.

0:34:540:34:57

-I'll get those going.

-Now this is for the assembly for the crab cakes.

0:35:030:35:08

I've got one tray with a beaten egg, one tray with breadcrumbs and one tray with flour.

0:35:080:35:14

What I'm going to add is a little touch of Norfolk's finest mustard.

0:35:140:35:18

Just whisk that in, great product.

0:35:180:35:21

-Shall I put some in the fish cakes as well.

-Yeah yeah, why not?

0:35:210:35:23

Not much.

0:35:230:35:25

-Mustard and crab are great.

-Absolutely.

0:35:250:35:29

Add some lemon juice to that.

0:35:290:35:30

These have to be quite small, we're not back in the chip shop doing fishcakes, am I now? no.

0:35:320:35:38

Into the flour,

0:35:380:35:41

into the egg,

0:35:410:35:43

into the breadcrumbs.

0:35:430:35:44

Look at that little beauty.

0:35:490:35:51

Marvellous.

0:35:510:35:53

I'm going to pop those in the fridge now for about 20 minutes to firm up.

0:35:530:35:57

Thanks, Galton.

0:35:570:35:59

-That's bobber, innit?

-Job's a good 'un.

0:35:590:36:03

Heavenly. Thanks, Chef.

0:36:040:36:07

Put them in there.

0:36:070:36:08

Now we put those into a low, medium oven, 150 degrees centigrade,

0:36:080:36:14

-for about 15 minutes.

-Yes.

0:36:140:36:16

Water, bring to the boil with a splash of white wine vinegar, that is all you'll need.

0:36:160:36:21

Have you heard this one about putting the egg in the water to heat it up.

0:36:210:36:25

I heard about this a few weeks ago and I can see how it can make sense.

0:36:250:36:28

-Have you done it before like this?

-No.

-Brilliant!

0:36:280:36:31

What I could do while I'm waiting for the water to boil is go through this samphire.

0:36:310:36:38

All this you can eat.

0:36:380:36:39

The bottom bit there, it's just a tiny bit woody...

0:36:390:36:42

We went out with Cookie from his crab shop.

0:36:420:36:45

..and you just pick it like that.

0:36:450:36:47

-It's all lovely and fresh.

-Did you put the egg in?

0:36:470:36:49

20 seconds. Yes. I'll count. Ready?

0:36:490:36:52

Go.

0:36:520:36:54

Right, they've had 20 seconds in the water.

0:36:570:36:59

Now, you break the egg first into a bowl.

0:36:590:37:03

-That is slightly jelly.

-It has.

-It's jelly.

0:37:030:37:06

Just float the egg in there...look at that.

0:37:060:37:11

-You've gone and pulled that off.

-It's done it, hasn't it?

0:37:110:37:14

And...repeat.

0:37:140:37:16

-Do you think we'll get away with more than one in the pan?

-No.

0:37:160:37:18

-Yeah.

-He's trying to nobble them.

-No I'm not.

0:37:180:37:20

I'm full of admiration for you two so I wouldn't try and nobble you.

0:37:200:37:24

Fresh eggs make good poachers.

0:37:240:37:26

-Right, dude.

-It's coming out.

0:37:260:37:29

Right, to stop it cooking further, just plunge it into ice-cold water.

0:37:290:37:35

Perfect eggs - set aside. The final push.

0:37:350:37:37

The final push, dude.

0:37:370:37:38

-I'll get the potted crab out.

-I'll get the sauce on.

0:37:380:37:41

Just leave those to cool now.

0:37:410:37:42

I'll put my toast on now. I want this toast precisely one centimetre thick.

0:37:420:37:47

-Dave, I'm just going to chop down some of these capers cos they are a bit big.

-Yeah.

0:37:470:37:53

I need about 60mls of white wine into this pan.

0:37:530:37:57

We need to turn that up because I need to reduce it.

0:37:570:37:59

I'm going to put this samphire in.

0:37:590:38:01

Just need to blanch it for three minutes and then we'll drain it.

0:38:010:38:04

Look at those babies.

0:38:040:38:06

Where's Myers gone? Get him out of the... Myers!

0:38:060:38:10

Kingy, you should see the inside of this man's fridge.

0:38:100:38:13

You could live for a month.

0:38:130:38:15

No but you've got to whistle every time...

0:38:150:38:17

Get him to whistle or he'll eat stuff.

0:38:170:38:19

Fabulous. The crab cakes have firmed up a treat.

0:38:190:38:22

I've just reduced that 60 ml of white wine and I'm just going to put the butter into it now.

0:38:220:38:28

And just give it a good whisk. I'm just going too whisk this in...

0:38:280:38:33

They'll be all right.

0:38:330:38:36

Now these must seal on the bottom.

0:38:360:38:40

If we try and turn them before they're done they'll fall to bits.

0:38:400:38:44

Now, to this I'm going to add some parsley, some capers.

0:38:440:38:48

Another whisk just to infuse...

0:38:480:38:51

David, will I turn over your...

0:38:540:38:56

-Yes, please.

-They've gone quick, haven't they?

0:38:560:38:58

There perfect, aren't they?

0:38:580:39:00

It's been blessed by the hand of the master. Right, dude.

0:39:000:39:03

That's the sauce.

0:39:030:39:05

Toast on, mate.

0:39:050:39:07

That needs to go in your bag.

0:39:070:39:09

-All right, chief.

-That's that sauce ready.

0:39:090:39:12

-Toast's good.

-Perfect.

0:39:120:39:16

What's those crab cakes like?

0:39:160:39:19

HE CHEERS

0:39:190:39:20

I'm so happy with that. Come on, son.

0:39:200:39:22

-Look at that.

-Great.

0:39:220:39:25

I'm going to refresh the poached eggs. How many?

0:39:250:39:28

Three each.

0:39:280:39:29

That's it.

0:39:370:39:38

Too much...so the window box has collapsed.

0:39:420:39:45

-Sea salt flakes on the egg?

-Yes.

-Lemon wedge?

0:39:450:39:48

-No!

-All right. Just a thought...

0:39:480:39:50

I like it, it's very good, guys.

0:39:520:39:54

There you have it, our tribute to Norfolk.

0:39:540:39:56

Hewn from the beaches and the oceans and the land -

0:39:560:39:59

it's a hot potted Cromer crab.

0:39:590:40:02

Served with a samphire and caper butter sauce.

0:40:020:40:05

And a perfectly poached poached egg on toast.

0:40:050:40:08

Cromer crab cakes served with a lemon mayonnaise.

0:40:080:40:11

Absolutely. Well done.

0:40:110:40:13

Go on, Galton, get your laughing gear round that.

0:40:130:40:16

I'm actually really looking forward to this because I think you have done a brilliant job.

0:40:160:40:20

That's delicious. The big test is this crab cake.

0:40:220:40:26

Really lovely. And your poached eggs are good as well.

0:40:290:40:33

Dear, oh dear, this is a disaster actually. I was expecting you

0:40:330:40:36

to make at least one, two, three, four mistakes - you haven't.

0:40:360:40:39

It's right up my street.

0:40:390:40:41

If it was me,

0:40:410:40:43

I would tart up the presentation a little bit more, but that's me.

0:40:430:40:47

-That's not our strength.

-No.

0:40:470:40:48

-It's honest.

-It's lovely.

0:40:480:40:50

It's lovely. Everything works well together, really well.

0:40:500:40:54

Thanks, Galton.

0:40:540:40:56

It's crunch time. The diners here will taste both dishes but without any idea who cooked which.

0:40:560:41:01

First up its Galton's sea trout and cockles with seasonal vegetables and butter sauce.

0:41:010:41:07

That was a fine selection of the local produce.

0:41:070:41:11

Stewkey blues, samphire and asparagus, one of Norfolk's specialities.

0:41:110:41:14

The sea trout was delicious. It was buttery, it melted in the mouth and it tasted as good as it looked.

0:41:140:41:20

The cockles and the sea trout played very nicely together because they've got the seafood flavour.

0:41:200:41:26

It's a really good representation of the county, definitely.

0:41:260:41:29

In Norfolk, from the sea, from the land, couldn't be better.

0:41:290:41:33

Well, they were rightly impressed by that. What will they think of our dish? Fingers crossed.

0:41:330:41:36

When it came to the table it had that real kind of wow factor.

0:41:360:41:41

I didn't think I liked crab but it was subtle and tasty.

0:41:410:41:44

The samphire was zingy, it had a lemony tinge to it and was quite nice and crunchy as well.

0:41:440:41:49

The cakes were delightfully spiced with a crispy texture.

0:41:490:41:54

I particularly liked the samphire with the caper butter.

0:41:540:41:57

It looked more like a dish of separate items rather a completely melded together meal.

0:41:570:42:02

There were a lot of flavours there, I enjoyed all of them and I could eat it all over again.

0:42:020:42:06

APPLAUSE

0:42:060:42:09

Hello!

0:42:090:42:11

Thank you so much for coming this afternoon.

0:42:120:42:14

We've had a belting time in Norfolk, the weather has been kind to us for a change.

0:42:140:42:18

The coast here is stunning. I just want to come back now.

0:42:180:42:22

I can only reiterate what Dave has said and thank Galton for his kind hospitality. It's been fantastic.

0:42:220:42:28

Now we have to get down to the nitty gritty of it.

0:42:280:42:31

For the sea trout can I have a clear show of hands?

0:42:310:42:37

One, two, three, four, five, six, seven. Thank you.

0:42:370:42:42

For the Cromer crab?

0:42:420:42:45

1, 2.

0:42:450:42:47

Thank you very much indeed.

0:42:470:42:50

Well, the sea trout...

0:42:500:42:53

-was Galton's.

-Congratulations.

0:42:530:42:56

Thanks.

0:42:560:42:59

Thank goodness for that!

0:42:590:43:01

And ours was the crab, funnily enough!

0:43:010:43:03

LAUGHTER AND APPLAUSE

0:43:030:43:06

We're very proud and privileged to have gone round some of the best kitchens in the UK.

0:43:060:43:12

-And yours is up there - without a doubt.

-Absolutely.

0:43:120:43:16

All that remains for us to do is to thank Galton so much for having us in his kitchen.

0:43:160:43:20

-Thank you, guys.

-Thanks very much.

-Thank you, my man.

0:43:200:43:23

'Well done, Galton. We were beaten by a truly great chef.'

0:43:230:43:27

Ee, we've had a great time in Norfolk,

0:43:270:43:30

a 'bootiful' county with a real sense of pride in its food.

0:43:300:43:34

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:470:43:49

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:490:43:53

Si and Dave explore Norfolk where they cook a traditional county favourite in Diss. They fish for Cromer crabs and forage on the Norfolk marshes for samphire. Finally, they face the challenge of a cook-off against Michelin-starred chef Galton Blackiston. Restaurant diners decide who has created the best taste of Norfolk.


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