Argyll and Bute The Hairy Bikers' Food Tour of Britain


Argyll and Bute

Si and Dave explore Argyll and Bute where they cook a county favourite in Tarbet. They go fishing for langoustines and sample a few wee drams of single malt whisky.


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Transcript


LineFromTo

We're on the road to find regional recipes to rev up your appetite.

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We're riding county to county to discover, cook and enjoy the best of British.

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-Come on!

-Wahey!

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We're here to define the true taste of Argyll and Bute.

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# Oh, I am come to the low Countrie

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# Ochon, Ochon, Ochrie

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# Without a penny in my purse

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# To buy a meal to me... #

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Phwoar, look, Kingy! The islands within the county of Argyll and Bute.

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You know, if the Cotswolds are the nation's chocolate box, this must be the big tin of Scottish shortbread.

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It's absolutely beautiful.

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You know, Dave, the coastline here, if you added it all up together, is longer than the coastline of France.

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-And it's bigger than Belgium.

-Most things are though.

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Oh, aye. But it's diverse as well.

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-You've got Loch Lomond.

-You've got Loch Fyne.

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You've got Gigha, there's Islay.

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And Bute and Mull.

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-You've got great grub.

-The beef's got to be wonderful.

-Every little corner of the county.

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It has the best whisky.

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-It's whisky galore.

-You're not wrong. Galore is the right word, mate.

-It is.

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Kingy, let's go on an island fling.

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Let's away, dude.

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On our quest to define the flavours of Argyll and Bute,

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we head to the fish market to resurrect a traditional way of serving local fish.

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We go in search of Scotland's most famous export, whisky, and try a few wee drams along the way.

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How many have we got to go?

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Big Hugh invites us to climb aboard to creel for the freshest shellfish possible.

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And representing Argyll and Bute in today's cook-off is Clare Johnson.

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Will we be able to beat her using the county's finest ingredients?

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Tarbert. It's a pretty spot.

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It's windswept and interesting.

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The wind comes in, you've got all the heat of the Gulf Stream - not.

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-Not!

-There's exotic shellfish, lobsters, seafood...

-Look at this.

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Pretty painted houses. We're here because Tarbert

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has the greatest concentration of award-winning restaurants per capita of any other place in Britain.

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So, we're on the hunt for Tarbert tucker.

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Bring it on!

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What's the best thing about the food?

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Prawns and the scallops, yeah.

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-Seafood.

-And the kippers.

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-Whisky.

-Whisky. There's a fella, now.

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What sort of recipes did your mam cook for you?

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-Fish cakes.

-Fish cakes?

-Fish cakes.

-Kippers.

-Scallops, prawns...

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White fish, haddock, whiting.

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-Do you ever get any herring these days?

-Very rare.

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Seafood is obviously the most important produce around here.

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I can't wait to get stuck in.

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-Fancy some fish and chips?

-Yeah, let's have a go, eh?

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This restaurant even has its own boat to catch the freshest local fish possible.

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Chef Pascal is originally from France but has run a bistro in Tarbert for many years.

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-Our seafood platter.

-This is everything from the local vicinity.

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-Yes.

-Erm... You know what? I'm going to have this lango here.

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Pascal, what brought you here?

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When I first came here, when I saw all the variety of fish and shellfish you can have daily.

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-I come from Brittany.

-You know your seafood.

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-Yes, I knew the stuff and I think it's better than Brittany, definitely.

-What do we have here?

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What you have is a langoustine, medium-size.

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That's a medium-size?

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-Hee, hee, hee.

-Whelks.

-I'm going to have one.

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-Winkles. Same taste.

-Sweeter, actually, a bit sweeter.

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Yes. Has to be cooked with plenty of pepper.

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-Oh, right.

-Yeah. Squat lobster.

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-Yes.

-Very sweet taste. I think much better than langoustine or prawn.

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Ideal to make a bisque.

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We can't get that on the east coast where my home port is in North Shields.

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Brown crab from Loch Fyne.

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Ah, yes.

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Now, there is a delicate way to eat this.

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However, this is my approach.

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That's something I've never eaten before.

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-That is sea urchin. The best way is to cut in half.

-And that's local as well, Pasqual?

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-Yes, it's local, yes.

-Right, my first sea urchin.

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-That's divine, isn't it?

-It is.

-It almost tastes like a soft fruit.

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Yes, the same texture as scrambled egg.

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It's just wonderful. Well, Pascal, can I say for both of us, thank you so much.

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-No problem at all.

-This is one of the best meals I've ever had.

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-Yeah, yeah. It's just brilliant.

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

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-And I've lost my urchin virginity.

-You have.

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'To keep the catch alive, shellfish are stored in oxygenated salt-water tanks, before heading off to market.

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'Neil Prentice is an expert on this seafood treasure.' Good grief!

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Those scallops are enormous.

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What makes the seafood so special here?

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The water is very, very clear.

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No pollution. So they grow that size.

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Cold-water seafood, we think, is the best in the world.

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Because it works that much harder for its keep.

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Yeah, that's true. The water is seven degrees here just now.

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-The water. And it only gets to maybe 14 in the summer.

-Right.

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Where does most of your produce go?

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-There's probably about 70% goes to Spain.

-What?

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Yeah, I'm afraid to say, that's the way it is.

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We don't eat enough shellfish or fish in Britain compared to Spain and these other countries.

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It's changed days. It used to be herring and it used to be haddock and cod.

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-Now it's mostly shellfish here.

-Aye.

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We've been exporting them to Spain for about 20 years now

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and Spanish trucks come into the village here every Sunday,

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load on a Monday and away to Spain 52 weeks of the year.

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We obviously can't ignore shellfish but what Argyll and Bute

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was traditionally known for was white fish and herring.

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-The old-fashioned way that a herring would be done in the oatmeal as opposed to frying it.

-Right.

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That was the traditional way.

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You still do that now, then, or no?

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-No, it's like most things regards to herring. A lot of it's in the past.

-That's a shame.

-Yeah.

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That's something we should revive.

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There's a fishmonger's just around the corner.

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It's blowing a hoolie.

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We've got to cook for them.

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It's got to be fish, hasn't it?

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Look what I've found. What are they?

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They are called silver darlings. And that's the herring.

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Herring. Look at those. Aren't they beautiful?

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At one time, they say that the herrings were so thick in the sea, you could walk across it.

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We've got two, so we won't be treading...

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You know like the dead traditional way, to cook it in oatmeal? Let's do it with other fish.

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There's four hake.

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That's a proper west coast fish, a haddock.

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Bright eyes and gills. You know you can go out with her.

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-Gurnard?

-No, that's naturally smoked haddock.

-Aye.

-Look.

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-Salmon.

-Salmon there.

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-SCOTTISH ACCENT:

-You can take away my freedom but you're nae taking away me seafood

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cooked in oatmeal with a wee tasty tartare sauce.

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We're going to cook the locals their real traditional dish,

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fish in oatmeal, served with a creamy tartare sauce for dipping.

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-And because it's blowing a hoolie, we're taking cover in Tarbert's fish market.

-Yeah!

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It's pandemonium.

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But got to cook fish.

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-Fish!

-We got some filleted already.

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This is the place to be.

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We're going to fillet that.

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-Gurnard. Lovely thing.

-One of my favourites - nice fresh hake.

-Look at the chompers on that.

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Now, these may not look important but they were, because these were the herring.

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-Does anybody have any memories about herring?

-And the old fleets?

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-Yes, I do. I fished them.

-How did you cook your herring?

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Well, we boiled them a lot.

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-Boiled?

-Ah!

-In the salt water.

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-And that was your tea?

-Through the night.

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Did you ever have your herring in oatmeal?

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Well, sometimes. When you fried them in the house, you know.

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-We've got a lot of people to feed.

-I'll get goujon...

-I'll get filleting.

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The thing is just to let the knife do the work.

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-Fillet number one.

-Perfect.

-You work on the trawlers.

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-Aye.

-So, when you're at sea, do you eat fish on the trawlers or...

-Aye.

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Fish first thing in the morning.

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-Right.

-It gives you brain power.

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You know, when you get haddock fresh, it's good as a sea bass, isn't it?

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Look at that. Falling away now.

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See if I can get this herring skin off.

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Great, I've managed to take the skin out of that.

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-Lovely.

-Hake.

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Good lad! Give us that back. It's for the bisque.

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It's... Woo!

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-Angus, where are you, dude?

-It's Si and Dave's seafood creche.

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Hello, mate! You don't have much to do in the night time.

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There's loads of kids up here, isn't there?

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It's the long, dark nights.

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That's brilliant, isn't it? That's what you call a fish platter.

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Before we fry, shall we make some tartare sauce?

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-Why not?

-Take a big bowl of mayo, gherkins, or you can have the little cornichons, the little ones.

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And some capers. So I'll chop some of those and bung 'em in.

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And what I'm going to do is I'm going to chop some nice dill and some parsley, nice and fine.

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-Isn't it?

-Eurgh!

-Eurgh?

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What do you mean "eurgh"? Listen...

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-You're eating plants.

-Yeah, you're eating plants.

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-The chip was a plant once.

-Aye, yeah, it was.

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It was a potato. Yeah. See.

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The chopping of the gherkin.

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And if you go too far, you end up with little gherkin fingers.

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It's only a plant.

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It's not going to eat you. It's lovely.

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Isn't it? Smells a little aniseedy, doesn't it?

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-It smells of your feet.

-Me feet?

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What sort of children...

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Now, you can put as much gherkin as you like in your tartare sauce.

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Now we've got capers going in. Now, capers are a little bit like salty peas.

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The capers go into the mayonnaise with the gherkins.

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And then what you do, herb it up, about two tablespoons of parsley.

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-Nice.

-One tablespoon of dill.

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And then give it a mix, taste it and then if we fancy more dill, we can.

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Look at the colours.

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-We could do a bit of lemon juice.

-And a bit of Tabasco, just give it a bit of zip.

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That looks great, doesn't it?

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-Should one dip one's finger in said mayonnaise?

-No, use a spoon.

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-We're on the telly.

-Oh, aye.

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-Mmm. That tastes all right, that.

-Is that for breakfast?

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No, it's to dip your fish in.

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Do you like fish?

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-It's porridge.

-Porridge.

-Just try this on your fish. It's like posh salad cream.

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And that's how to make tartare sauce under duress.

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Right, what we're going to do now is, we've got all the fish prepped,

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we got the tartare sauce made, so we need to take each piece of fish,

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squirt of lemon, salt and pepper, coat with egg, press it into oatmeal and then fry it.

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Rinding, squirting and washing. Oatmealing and stacking.

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Pinhead oatmeal, which is what your porridge comes from.

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Eurgh!

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-What's wrong with porridge?

-Look, it's a national treasure, porridge.

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Oatmeal is in haggis and all manner of good things.

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So, you take a piece of fish, squirt of lemon, twist of pepper,

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pinch of salt, brush with egg

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and pass to the oats department.

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-Roll in oats.

-Do you want a job? Come on.

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I'll put you on lemon.

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Not too much.

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Now, if you just put lemon on all those pieces of fish and then we'll crack on.

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Right, thank you. Yeah, mate, coming in.

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-Look at these.

-Now, these are what you call fish fingers.

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Gareth, more lemon.

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-He's a class act, our Gareth, isn't he?

-Oh, look at that.

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I have this feeling I'm going to end up running a chip shop somewhere.

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-Probably in the west coast of Scotland.

-Well, it's good produce, isn't it?

-Yep.

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Oat and lemon is delicious.

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It's easy for you to say, isn't it?

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-Right, now I have to put the lemons on a jaunty fashion.

-Oh, boy.

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Always have odd numbers on your plate. It looks better.

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Shall we have little parsley sprinkles?

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-I have some dill here.

-Dill sprinkles.

-Set aside for this very occasion.

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You take a goujon...

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dip it into the tartare sauce.

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It doesn't get much better than that.

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Argyll and Bute on a plate, the wonderful surroundings of Tarbert.

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We've done the fish justice, a bit traditional.

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-We've got some herring.

-Gurnard.

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-We've got hake.

-We've got plaice.

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It's kind of like a fritto misto a la Rob Roy.

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It's also like Gordon Brown after he's had a shower.

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Right.

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This is a fritto misto a bit like Gordon Brown after he's had a shower.

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And that's as it shall appear in the cook book.

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I don't think we've ever had a dish so local.

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Local people caught it, helped us cook it

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and now they're going to taste our oatmeal-fried fish and tartare sauce.

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-Ladies, it's your tea.

-Hooray.

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-What do we reckon?

-They go well together.

-Don't they?

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-Yeah.

-Do you remember, when you were younger, having oatmeal with fish?

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-Yes.

-I don't think we had it with anything other than herring.

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Yeah? Now, chef superstar.

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-What do you think, mate?

-It's quite delicious.

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It's a good idea to put the oatmeal. It's something I'll try.

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-It's like posh fish fingers.

-You're not wrong.

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-It's so easy to do.

-It's nice.

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-Can I get another bit?

-Yes.

-The oatmeal's really tasty, isn't it?

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You get this toasted flavour.

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Don't you think it's a shame, though, that so much of your wonderful fish goes abroad?

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-Why keep it all to yourself if it's that good, eh?

-You're not wrong. You're not wrong, missus.

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You're not wrong. Want more?

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-What do you reckon?

-It tastes like...

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-Hake, maybe?

-Yes. It is. That's right.

-Very nice, especially with your tartare sauce.

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It tastes like...

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-Hake. Is it hake?

-Yes.

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Very nice. Very nice.

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It tastes like...

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fish.

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-LAUGHTER

-Excellent!

-That's a good lad.

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He got there in the end.

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Our white fish in oatmeal went down a storm...in a storm,

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but now we're facing our biggest challenge of the trip.

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As always, we're taking on one of the county's top chefs in their restaurant,

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using local ingredients, to see who can best define the taste of the region.

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It will be up to local diners to decide whose dish

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best represents the true flavours of Argyll and Bute.

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Our opponent is Clare Johnson,

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head chef and owner of the Kilberry Inn.

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Clare is completely self-taught but her skills in the kitchen

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have helped Kilberry to become Scotland's Restaurant of the Year 2009.

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I cooked because we couldn't afford a chef

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and my cooking must have been awful when I started.

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I couldn't boil an egg. People seemed to keep coming back so I stuck at it.

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There isn't much to Kilberry. It's quite small, there's about a dozen houses.

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We're on a single-track road so it's a 40 mile round trip for a pint of milk

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but we've got some really great local suppliers -

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Jim who comes with mackerel, Hector who brings mullet and pigs from Archie as well.

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I think when people come to Kilberry,

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they are looking for really good locally-sourced things that are fresh and tasty and not...

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..nothing frozen or ready-made or bought from a cash and carry.

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We have a Bib Gourmand from the Michelin Guide

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which is pretty fantastic but this year we got nominated

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for the Scottish Restaurant Awards and not only did we win our little category, we won the whole thing.

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So now we're Scottish Restaurant of the Year.

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To take on the Bikers, my taste of Argyll and Bute

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is hand-dived king scallops, little pork sausage meatballs and lentils on the side with some salsa verde.

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Hello.

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Hello. Nice to see you.

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-Scotland's Restaurant of the Year! Have you got the kettle on?

-Come in.

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Good lass. I like her already, great!

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-Here we are and welcome to the Kilberry Inn.

-It's dead cosy and lovely.

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It's the type of place that you want to stay for 15 weeks.

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-It's great.

-What are you going to cook for us, Clare?

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-Scallops.

-Could you outline your dish?

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-What is it?

-It's local hand-dived king scallops

0:17:040:17:07

and I'm making little spicy sausage meatballs and lentils and a bit of salsa verde.

0:17:070:17:12

Lovely, so, crack on, Clare, crack on.

0:17:120:17:14

OK. Well, I've got my lentils going here...

0:17:140:17:17

-What have you got in your lentils?

-I've got some bay leaves and some thyme and some garlic

0:17:170:17:21

but I've got some vegetables chopped to...

0:17:210:17:24

-And are they the posh lentils, puy lentils?

-Puy lentils, yes.

0:17:240:17:27

-Look at those!

-Aren't they lovely?

0:17:270:17:30

So what do you do with these?

0:17:300:17:32

-You just get your knife in...

-You've got to watch your hands, haven't you?

-Yes.

0:17:340:17:37

And then you just have to separate the...

0:17:370:17:41

-Look at that.

-Clare, are you a coral on or a coral off?

0:17:420:17:46

We generally do them off. Not everybody likes them so...

0:17:460:17:50

Look at all the meat on that.

0:17:500:17:52

Look, I love this bit, fiddling with it.

0:17:520:17:56

-We'll take all that off like that.

-We're after that white nugget.

0:17:560:18:01

There's one with the coral off.

0:18:010:18:02

-I've got some vegetables chopped earlier.

-Would that be a mirepoix?

0:18:020:18:07

-He's off again!

-I've learned so much.

0:18:070:18:10

We've got the celery, onion and carrot finely diced.

0:18:100:18:15

We're going to make salsa verde.

0:18:150:18:17

We've just got some basil and some parsley.

0:18:170:18:20

It's not maybe an accurate salsa verde.

0:18:200:18:22

So I'm just going to put some olive oil in.

0:18:230:18:26

I'll give it a little...pulse.

0:18:270:18:31

I've got some mustard somewhere.

0:18:310:18:33

Dijon mustard. And some capers.

0:18:340:18:38

-They're dinky capers, aren't they?

-Dinky ones.

0:18:390:18:42

How much mustard are you putting in there?

0:18:420:18:45

Just a teaspoon.

0:18:450:18:47

So what brings you to this part of the world? You're not a Scot.

0:18:470:18:52

No, I came up for six months and I didn't go home.

0:18:520:18:56

That was about 12 years ago.

0:18:560:18:58

-That's a long holiday.

-Obviously, like the local products

0:18:580:19:02

that you use, it is like a treasure trove of plenty, isn't it?

0:19:020:19:06

Yes. There's always something new

0:19:060:19:08

and every year, we've got the ladies that bring us rhubarb

0:19:080:19:11

and John brings us honey and all sorts of stuff.

0:19:110:19:14

So just to recap, the salsa verde - it's fine herbs, mustard,

0:19:140:19:20

olive oil, chopped onion, lemon juice and capers.

0:19:200:19:23

Yeah. Well, that's mine.

0:19:230:19:26

Look at the colour of that.

0:19:260:19:28

Beautiful, isn't it?

0:19:280:19:30

That's that.

0:19:300:19:32

-Can I put my my lentils back in there yet?

-Do what you like. Have a look and see what you think.

0:19:320:19:37

-I think that's great.

-It's nice, isn't it?

0:19:370:19:40

Then we need to make some little meatballs and cook those off.

0:19:420:19:45

Because pork and scallops and pork products, they go great together, don't they?

0:19:450:19:50

-Black pudding and scallops are fantastic.

-Bacon and scallops.

-Belly pork and scallops.

0:19:500:19:55

Oh yeah. So I've just got some ground up fennel seeds, a bit of cayenne and some of Archie's lovely...

0:19:550:20:00

Fennel's fantastic, isn't it?

0:20:000:20:02

-I love fennel seeds.

-I love fennel, too.

0:20:020:20:05

That is what I love about it.

0:20:050:20:07

It's not just a sausage or sausage meat. No, it's Archie's sausages.

0:20:070:20:11

I'll put those at the back. They will probably be quite happy.

0:20:120:20:16

It's getting very hot now so put a bit of seasoning on these.

0:20:180:20:21

So you season it?

0:20:210:20:23

-That's interesting.

-Is it? Why?

0:20:230:20:26

We would normally season them when they are in the pan.

0:20:260:20:28

They're good.

0:20:340:20:36

Where do you get your scallops from?

0:20:360:20:38

They're hand-dived locally.

0:20:380:20:40

We get them from a chap called Neil in Tarbert.

0:20:400:20:43

Do you find the hand-dived ones are less muddy than trawled ones?

0:20:430:20:46

Yes, and they're always whole, you don't get bits. That's the best thing.

0:20:460:20:53

You just cook them in olive oil with no butter.

0:20:530:20:56

I usually put butter in, but because I am anxious, I haven't.

0:20:590:21:02

Anxious?! It's only us!

0:21:020:21:04

Go on, put some butter in, man.

0:21:040:21:06

Oh, yes.

0:21:070:21:09

-The butter helps them go golden, doesn't it?

-It does.

0:21:090:21:13

Anyway, I'll take these out.

0:21:130:21:15

They must be done.

0:21:170:21:19

Look at them. Just the job.

0:21:220:21:24

OK, I'm just going to put some of these lentils in here and put a bit of dressing on them just to...

0:21:240:21:30

-A bit of ooomf!

-A bit of ooomf! And then I suppose we're kind of good to go.

0:21:300:21:36

So in there we've got the mirepoix, we've got the mixed vegetables,

0:21:360:21:40

some bay leafs, some thyme, some garlic and the puy lentils that have been cooked till they're tender.

0:21:400:21:45

-See, I was paying attention.

-I'm glad you were.

0:21:450:21:50

Some of the salsa verde.

0:21:500:21:52

I can see that now, that's going to go through.

0:21:520:21:54

It's like basting with emeralds.

0:21:560:21:58

-The scallops are massive, Clare.

-We have got a spare.

0:22:080:22:11

-Awww!

-Oh dear!

0:22:110:22:12

-I'm sad. Never mind.

-Do you want that big one?

0:22:120:22:15

-No. We couldn't possibly.

-You have that little one.

0:22:150:22:20

-Clare, they're perfect.

-Oh, man!

0:22:200:22:22

So, Clare, recap what your dish is for us.

0:22:280:22:31

Well, it's hand-dived king scallops with sausage meatballs

0:22:310:22:35

with a little bit of spice and some lentils and some salsa verde.

0:22:350:22:39

Fantastic.

0:22:390:22:41

It looks lovely, doesn't it?

0:22:430:22:44

All flavours I want to eat.

0:22:440:22:46

I like the spice, the fennel.

0:22:480:22:50

-That goes well with the scallops.

-Really good.

0:22:500:22:53

Lentils, I wasn't sure at first with them, I know they work with salmon.

0:22:530:22:58

-Works really well.

-The salsa verde makes it though.

0:22:580:23:00

-I think these sausage balls are brilliant.

-They are, aren't they?

0:23:000:23:04

It's interesting because Clare is not a classically-trained cook,

0:23:040:23:07

you have a go and it's what ends up on the plate tastes great.

0:23:070:23:11

It's intuitive.

0:23:110:23:13

We'd better roll our sleeves up and get stuck in. What are we going to do?

0:23:130:23:17

It's gotta be tasty.

0:23:170:23:19

-It's got to be representative.

-It's got to be good food.

0:23:190:23:22

Right. We'd better get cracking.

0:23:220:23:25

But it's the locals who will decide whose dish is best in a blind tasting coming up.

0:23:250:23:30

Clare's got scallops covered

0:23:370:23:39

so we're going for the other local shellfish speciality of Argyll and Bute - langoustines.

0:23:390:23:45

Big Hugh has offered to take us to sea to get some fresh catch.

0:23:450:23:48

You picked a lovely day for it.

0:23:480:23:51

That's Spud, a sea dog.

0:23:530:23:55

Come on, we'll get you out and doing something.

0:23:550:23:58

-Button you up a bit.

-I feel like a Fisherman's Friend.

0:23:590:24:05

Have you seen what we're going to go for?

0:24:050:24:07

Look at these.

0:24:070:24:09

Aren't they beautiful?

0:24:090:24:11

Langoustines. Aren't they canny?

0:24:110:24:15

Keep your nice biker jacket clean.

0:24:150:24:17

Beautiful.

0:24:170:24:19

It's salt herring.

0:24:190:24:20

We put this in the creel and it's got to be cut into three.

0:24:200:24:23

I'll give you an empty bucket when that overflows.

0:24:230:24:26

-Right, will we go to sea?

-Yes, sir.

-Right. Let's go.

0:24:260:24:30

You don't get Rick Stein doing this, do you?

0:24:400:24:43

-I wouldn't swap it though.

-I wouldn't.

0:24:430:24:47

The smell of the herring is making me feel a bit queasy.

0:24:490:24:52

Rather than trawling, Hugh prefers to creel for langoustine.

0:24:540:24:58

Creeling uses small baskets baited with fish and set in a line on the seabed by ropes attached to buoys.

0:24:580:25:05

Look at this. Yes.

0:25:050:25:07

Langos. Treasure.

0:25:070:25:09

See that's too wee. We throw that away. That is next year's.

0:25:120:25:15

What are you doing? Calling bingo?

0:25:150:25:18

No, this is the method of keeping langoustines, or prawns as we call them, alive. This is the big ones.

0:25:180:25:23

That is number ones. Number twos. Number threes.

0:25:230:25:26

And the smallest - number four.

0:25:260:25:28

This method, you couldn't get better.

0:25:280:25:31

Anything we don't want gets returned to the sea right away.

0:25:310:25:34

Each prawn get his own individual segment to keep them live.

0:25:340:25:38

We've got to be careful. It's like orange gold.

0:25:380:25:40

At market, they've got to be alive.

0:25:400:25:42

-Look at that, that's a beauty. It's like a lobster.

-That's a good one.

0:25:420:25:46

That is one of the large ones.

0:25:460:25:47

Imagine two or three of them on a plate.

0:25:470:25:49

-Beautiful.

-Suck the claws as well.

0:25:490:25:51

-What is sad is all of these are going abroad.

-Aye, aye they are.

0:25:510:25:55

Why don't we eat them? It's magic.

0:25:550:25:58

-It's a mystery.

-How many fleets of creels do you have?

0:25:580:26:01

-We have nine fleets.

-What?!

0:26:010:26:03

-That's like 1,000 pots.

-Yes, aye.

0:26:030:26:05

Pots are usually raised every other day to allow the catch to be collected and fresh bait set.

0:26:070:26:12

What's so special about the west coast for langoustines?

0:26:120:26:16

Good fresh water. We've got the Gulf Stream coming down from Mull,

0:26:160:26:20

rugged shoreline, you just can't beat it.

0:26:200:26:23

Langos, Dave! Look at him. Beautiful.

0:26:230:26:26

But not everything that's caught goes to market.

0:26:280:26:31

This is what goes back - a breeding female.

0:26:310:26:33

That's all roe which is its eggs.

0:26:330:26:36

That goes back so it sustains the fishery.

0:26:360:26:38

-Correct.

-On you go, me darling.

0:26:380:26:42

Oh, what we're doing now, we're moving to a fresh bit of water.

0:26:440:26:49

All the creels are baited and we're going to shoot the drift of creels.

0:26:490:26:54

This is the dangerous bit, there's a chance you could go overboard.

0:26:540:26:58

Right, fire away.

0:26:580:27:00

Might give him a job.

0:27:000:27:03

I like this bit. Watching Dave work, it's good.

0:27:060:27:10

-They're not light, these, you know.

-Go on. Go on. Oh!

0:27:100:27:15

-Flick it.

-Oops, that'll be me then, sacked.

0:27:150:27:19

You've got to be careful the ropes don't catch around your feet, or else you go in with the pots.

0:27:190:27:24

Kingy, it's your turn.

0:27:260:27:28

Oh, hey, I'm exhausted!

0:27:310:27:34

He's only done 3. I did 77.

0:27:350:27:38

That's it, we've done a whole drift.

0:27:400:27:43

Baited, shot, dinner.

0:27:430:27:46

-She hasn't got a chance!

-Got to find something to cook with.

0:27:460:27:49

It's in the air, isn't it? Whisky.

0:27:490:27:51

-Yes.

-A langoustine with a wee dram.

0:27:510:27:55

I tell you what, I'm getting more than a wee dram at the minute.

0:27:550:27:58

Hugh's langoustines should give Clare's scallops a run for their money.

0:27:590:28:03

Let's grill some with garlic and flame the rest in a whisky sauce.

0:28:030:28:06

So if we're looking for whisky, we need to park the bikes and go on foot.

0:28:060:28:11

Right, what we're looking for, hold on, distillery, should be about...

0:28:110:28:17

Oh, haha, here!

0:28:170:28:19

Springbank Distillery has been on the same site in Campbeltown since 1828.

0:28:190:28:24

-We're being shown around by whisky veteran Frank McHardy.

-Welcome to Springbank.

0:28:240:28:29

We can't visit this part of the world without seeing a distillery and this is unique.

0:28:290:28:34

The only distillery in Scotland that does 100% of the whole process to turn barley into bottles of whisky.

0:28:340:28:41

-Hey!

-Whisky is made from malted barley, yeast and water.

0:28:410:28:45

Malted barley is ground into grist.

0:28:450:28:48

We extract all the sugars from it, then we ferment the liquid.

0:28:480:28:52

It's called wash, then we take our wash from there

0:28:520:28:55

into these magnificent stills you see behind us.

0:28:550:29:00

-Proper coppers, aren't they?

-This is where the distillation process takes place, to turn wash into spirit.

0:29:000:29:06

Spirit is then taken from this building,

0:29:060:29:08

filled in to cask, the casks are then put away in the warehouse.

0:29:080:29:12

Oh, this is fantastic, man.

0:29:170:29:19

This is the final part of the process before we actually go to the bottling.

0:29:190:29:23

You can't actually call the product whisky until it's spent at least three years

0:29:230:29:27

in one of these oak casks in a warehouse in Scotland.

0:29:270:29:30

This is where the maturing is taking place.

0:29:300:29:33

A single malt whisky in different distilleries, different parts of Scotland, all taste different.

0:29:330:29:38

-How can that be?

-A lot of this is down to the actual region the distillery is based in.

0:29:380:29:43

Campbeltown, where we are just now, can produce quite a salty whisky.

0:29:430:29:47

It's more a maritime influence, you're beside the sea,

0:29:470:29:51

so it's bringing on some of the flavours you have in the atmosphere from the seaside.

0:29:510:29:55

Speyside is different.

0:29:550:29:57

It's inland, so you've got much more lighter, more fruitier whisky coming from there.

0:29:570:30:02

-It's almost like sourdough bread.

-It's just remarkable.

0:30:020:30:05

Picking up stuff in the air.

0:30:050:30:06

Depending on the wood of the barrels you get a different flavour, don't you?

0:30:060:30:10

Absolutely, 70% of the flavour in any whisky is going to come from the wood.

0:30:100:30:16

-You've done that before, haven't you?

-Yeah, well, quite a bit of practice over the years!

0:30:160:30:21

Then we have this thing here, which is more or less a large pipette.

0:30:210:30:25

Give the whisky a good stir up,

0:30:250:30:28

so we take a little bit of this in here and we empty this out again.

0:30:280:30:32

It's just to rinse the glass out, to clean the glass.

0:30:320:30:36

Now we fill the glass up.

0:30:360:30:38

-Here we are. Have you any ideas what the barrel may have contained before we filled it with spirit?

-Rum.

0:30:380:30:45

-You've been looking at my notes, haven't you?

-No, you can taste it.

0:30:450:30:49

-It really is spicy.

-It is.

0:30:490:30:50

-Give us a go.

-Don't fight over it! I've told you before, there's plenty to go round.

0:30:500:30:54

There's only one glass though.

0:30:540:30:57

-Next one.

-What's the best way to take your whisky - neat, with water, a bit of ice?

0:30:570:31:03

If you try and put ice in it, I'll put you out of the door! Don't drink ice with malt whisky.

0:31:030:31:06

It locks in the flavours. But a little water does help to release the flavouring oils which are in there.

0:31:060:31:13

-A lot lighter, this one.

-This is more a pale straw.

0:31:130:31:16

-It is.

-What sort of flavours are you getting?

0:31:160:31:18

-Grass, that's what I've smelt.

-Yeah.

0:31:180:31:20

There's a citrus hint to it.

0:31:200:31:23

Is it a sherry cask?

0:31:230:31:25

I'm not going to tell you. You're going to guess.

0:31:250:31:28

-Well, it's come from an island but it's not quite in Spain.

-Madeira.

0:31:280:31:32

-Madeira.

-Got it right again.

0:31:320:31:33

-That's 2-0 so far.

-I know.

0:31:330:31:35

This is a great game. How many have we got to go?

0:31:350:31:38

-Another two.

-Oh.

0:31:380:31:42

Have you any hints to what kind of cask this is?

0:31:420:31:45

-I've got it.

-I've got it, too.

0:31:450:31:48

-This is a sherry cask.

-One to you.

-This is my favourite one yet.

0:31:480:31:51

18 years in this cask.

0:31:510:31:54

Right.

0:31:540:31:55

Oh, now that colour's telling!

0:31:550:31:58

-It's peachy!

-Yeah. That's a wine cask.

0:31:580:32:00

-That is a wine cask.

-That's peaty.

0:32:000:32:03

That is peaty, very smoky as well.

0:32:030:32:04

Would this be a red wine cask?

0:32:040:32:06

This is cabernet cask, yes.

0:32:060:32:08

What makes some whisky peaty and others not peaty?

0:32:080:32:11

It depends on the kilning process, how much peat smoke you pass through the malted barley.

0:32:110:32:17

That would go nicely with langoustines.

0:32:170:32:19

Not that we'd dream of cooking with your whisky.

0:32:190:32:22

Absolutely not. Good grief!

0:32:220:32:23

Clare, we've scoured your manor. We've got the best!

0:32:260:32:29

Look at this. Langoustines, in a whisky sauce and some grilled langoustines with garlic butter.

0:32:290:32:34

A wonderful dill and citrus lemon potato cake.

0:32:340:32:37

Surmounted by a quails' egg tempura. Quail's Scottish, a bit of game

0:32:370:32:41

going in there, and a quenelle of spinach.

0:32:410:32:43

Just for a bit of colour and a bit of greenery.

0:32:430:32:46

It would be up to local diners to decide whose dish

0:32:460:32:49

best represents the true flavours of Argyll and Bute.

0:32:490:32:52

These have been blanched for one minute.

0:32:520:32:55

All that does is it firms up the meat so we can get it out.

0:32:550:32:58

I'm going to split them. Make the patient comfortable!

0:32:580:33:01

Just put the knife there.

0:33:010:33:04

Just split it down the centre.

0:33:040:33:06

And from this point on the langoustine is known as Arthur!

0:33:060:33:12

Now, this is how you peel a langoustine.

0:33:120:33:15

Look, we just take the tail away from the head, just pull it nice and gently. Now, get a hold of it.

0:33:150:33:21

-Oh!

-Sorry, madam.

0:33:210:33:23

Every time!

0:33:230:33:26

Now, you just snap, pull there, like that,

0:33:260:33:29

and then just pull that off like that and then you snap it again, like that.

0:33:290:33:35

You see? You just pull off,

0:33:350:33:38

pull out and one perfectly-formed nugget of genuine loveliness.

0:33:380:33:43

Look at those, Si. All I want to do now is make some garlic butter

0:33:430:33:47

and put a little nugget of garlic butter and parsley on each one.

0:33:470:33:50

Garlic butter - soften butter, crush some garlic in it, salt and pepper and chopped parsley.

0:33:500:33:55

-Over to you.

-Now potatoes, we've blanched these with their skins on for five minutes

0:33:550:34:00

and we're going to peel them and grate them.

0:34:000:34:03

A little knob of butter on each of the little langoustines.

0:34:070:34:10

-This is a quail's egg.

-No!

0:34:110:34:14

What we'll do is boil these, just so they're firm enough to peel, so they should be very liquid on the inside.

0:34:140:34:19

I'm going to plunge the cooked eggs immediately into the iced water to stop them cooking.

0:34:190:34:24

I've done great research on this and two minutes is what you need.

0:34:240:34:29

You're only boiling an egg! It's like launching the space shuttle, that!

0:34:290:34:32

Right, all I'm going to do is crack an egg in there like that.

0:34:320:34:36

You wait until you taste these.

0:34:360:34:38

I'm going to whisk it.

0:34:380:34:40

How long are you going to whisk it for(?)

0:34:400:34:42

-Until it's...

-Done.

-Now, what I'm going to do is grate some potato into there like that.

0:34:420:34:47

It's a bit like a cross between a latke or a rosti,

0:34:470:34:50

-isn't it, this.

-Yeah. It is.

0:34:500:34:52

This stops the cooking process.

0:34:520:34:54

-Instantly.

-Then I'm going to put half the zest of a lemon in there.

0:34:540:35:00

Maybe about a dessertspoon of dill.

0:35:000:35:02

-I love the smell of dill.

-You want about a teaspoon in there.

0:35:020:35:06

And then what we're going to do is put a little bit of olive oil in.

0:35:060:35:09

That smells lovely already.

0:35:090:35:11

It does, doesn't it, it's great. It's a lovely recipe.

0:35:110:35:14

The most important thing, a bit of salt, a bit of pepper, and we're ready to rock 'n' roll.

0:35:140:35:21

-Now the quails' eggs have to be peeled but they're very delicate.

-Do you want us all to help?

0:35:210:35:26

-See how soft that is.

-Oh, yeah.

0:35:260:35:28

You see, that's how it should be though.

0:35:280:35:31

Can you see how that is?

0:35:310:35:33

We're going to put four in here.

0:35:330:35:36

You don't want the oil too hot, because you want it to cook all the way through.

0:35:360:35:40

On to this side, some celery salt, lots of pepper.

0:35:400:35:44

You can't have egg without salt and pepper.

0:35:440:35:46

-No.

-That's the potato cake mix finished with.

0:35:460:35:49

Check them in five minutes and then we'll flip them over.

0:35:490:35:52

I'm just rolling the eggs in the black pepper and celery salt,

0:35:520:35:55

so they've got a crusty coating and the moisture...

0:35:550:35:58

-Makes it stick.

-Yeah. Don't want too much.

0:35:580:36:01

I'm going to check these potato cakes.

0:36:010:36:03

-Yeah.

-Let's see what they are.

0:36:030:36:04

-Oh, yes.

-I think the word divine comes to...

0:36:040:36:07

-Look at that.

-Clare, are you worried?

0:36:070:36:09

I'm more intrigued to try.

0:36:090:36:11

What we've got to do is make the tempura batter for the quails' eggs.

0:36:110:36:16

About 70 grams of plain flour, 60 grams of cornflour, one teaspoon of baking powder.

0:36:160:36:22

One teaspoon of bicarbonate of soda.

0:36:240:36:27

An egg,

0:36:270:36:29

gently beat the egg. Normally if I was making prawn tempura, I'd put some salt in that batter,

0:36:290:36:36

but remember I've got salt and pepper on the eggs, so I'm going canny.

0:36:360:36:39

To the egg, I'm adding 100mls of ice-cold sparkling mineral water,

0:36:390:36:45

Scottish sparkling mineral water.

0:36:450:36:47

Mix that to there.

0:36:470:36:49

One of the tricks of tempura is don't worry about it being lumpy.

0:36:490:36:53

The bits of flour explode and it's lovely.

0:36:530:36:56

Mix that into your dried goods.

0:36:560:36:59

Don't worry about the lumps.

0:36:590:37:01

-What you want to do is a thin coating, look at that.

-That's the one, dude.

0:37:010:37:06

We've got to get ready for the final finish, the flourish.

0:37:060:37:09

To do the spinach, a big knob of butter.

0:37:090:37:12

You see everything is going to come together very, very quickly.

0:37:120:37:15

-All at once.

-Potato cake is doing well, spinach is doing well.

-Yes.

0:37:150:37:19

Langoustines under the grill.

0:37:190:37:21

Aaaaaargh!

0:37:210:37:23

Oh! Grasshopper.

0:37:230:37:26

A big knob of butter, Kingy.

0:37:290:37:31

Yes, please. I'm just taking the spinach off.

0:37:310:37:35

It's not a beurre noisette, you know. If you choke... Let us get on.

0:37:350:37:39

-Now listen to this.

-SIZZLING

0:37:390:37:41

Oh, look! We don't want to overload the pan too much. What we do...

0:37:410:37:47

How about that? Lovely.

0:37:490:37:51

-He's dying to do the flambe.

-I cannot wait.

0:37:510:37:53

If there's a flambe, that's it.

0:37:530:37:55

If there's eggs to peel, no chance!

0:37:550:37:57

You want to put some pepper...

0:37:570:38:01

..two teaspoons of whisky.

0:38:020:38:05

One, two.

0:38:050:38:08

What we're going to do...

0:38:080:38:11

Whoa, tequila!

0:38:110:38:13

I've just got to burn that off, I'm going to stir through

0:38:130:38:17

two dessertspoons of creme fraiche.

0:38:170:38:20

It's good because you have the sweetness of the langoustines. It's sour.

0:38:200:38:24

That's going to form a wonderful whisky sauce.

0:38:240:38:27

I've watched the salt because I tasted one. Honest.

0:38:270:38:32

We're just going to push through a load of freshly chopped parsley and then that's us. Brill.

0:38:320:38:39

-Can we have a...

-The tempura eggs, your hands are the best for this.

0:38:390:38:43

-Roll it in there like that.

-Just look at these potatoes.

0:38:430:38:47

In there like that.

0:38:470:38:48

They really don't take long.

0:38:480:38:52

You mustn't have them done too much.

0:38:520:38:55

There's the tempura quail's egg. Spinach off, eh, mate?

0:38:550:38:58

Yeah. Spinach is off and ready.

0:38:580:39:01

When they're done, this is it. Look at that.

0:39:010:39:03

Still soft in the middle, you've got the tempura batter, the egg white.

0:39:030:39:07

Have a taste of that, Clare.

0:39:070:39:09

You want that to burst on to the dill potato cake.

0:39:110:39:15

God, you can smell them from here.

0:39:150:39:17

That's a very beautifully-formed quenelle, Mr King.

0:39:170:39:20

You're on fire today, bud.

0:39:200:39:22

-Could I just pinch a little bit of chervil?

-It's Greek basil.

0:39:220:39:26

Could I pinch a bit of your Greek basil?

0:39:260:39:28

-Yes.

-I think two either side because then the taster is going to get one each, you know what I mean?

0:39:280:39:34

Now just some drizzlings of the whisky sauce. Wonderful, peaty...

0:39:340:39:39

-Do you think that's enough?

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

0:39:410:39:44

So there we have it, Argyll and Bute...

0:39:440:39:46

-On a plate.

-On a plate.

0:39:460:39:48

Langoustines in a whisky sauce and some grilled langoustines

0:39:480:39:51

with garlic butter, a quenelle of fresh spinach,

0:39:510:39:54

a dill and citrus lemon potato cake with the most fantastically-delicate tempura-battered quails' eggs.

0:39:540:40:00

Lovely.

0:40:000:40:01

Come on then, Clare, dive in, let us know what you think.

0:40:020:40:05

-Are the tempura eggs still runny?

-Yeah.

0:40:050:40:08

Yes. Brilliant.

0:40:080:40:10

-Yeah?

-Mm. It's yummy.

0:40:120:40:15

I like the lemony-dillyness.

0:40:150:40:18

You're the only woman that cuts a langoustine.

0:40:180:40:21

-I'm trying to be dainty!

-Look, like that.

0:40:210:40:24

Mm, mm.

0:40:240:40:27

-They're lovely, aren't they?

-Mm-hm.

0:40:270:40:29

I don't like whisky but that's gorgeous because there's that little smoky thing happening.

0:40:290:40:34

I think I'd rather have the potato cake with the eggs separately

0:40:340:40:38

and the prawns as two dishes rather than all together.

0:40:380:40:42

-It's really nice.

-That one's going off.

-I'm going to have that.

0:40:420:40:46

It's the moment of truth - the diners will taste both dishes

0:40:480:40:52

but without any idea of who cooked which.

0:40:520:40:54

First up are Clare's scallops and meatballs with puy lentils and salsa verde.

0:40:540:41:00

It was lovely, beautifully presented.

0:41:000:41:02

The pork was delicious. It had terrifically-strong flavours.

0:41:020:41:05

I wouldn't have thought of putting pork and scallops together

0:41:050:41:09

but it looked very good and tasted very good.

0:41:090:41:11

The scallops were perfectly cooked. There was a nice lemony zing.

0:41:110:41:15

Seared on the outside, still moist in the middle.

0:41:150:41:17

I can't cook my scallops as well!

0:41:170:41:20

I wasn't sure if I'd like the lentils, but I was very surprised how good they were.

0:41:200:41:24

It was better than good. It was excellent

0:41:240:41:27

The aniseed flavour that came through,

0:41:270:41:29

the pork meatballs really balanced the whole dish together with the pesto.

0:41:290:41:33

They liked that as much as we did.

0:41:330:41:35

Now it's our turn.

0:41:350:41:37

Let's hope our whisky flamed langoustine with potato rosti and tempura quails' eggs are as popular.

0:41:370:41:43

It's all the things I like. There's nothing I don't think is great.

0:41:430:41:46

The quail's egg was that well-cooked, I went through the tempura batter,

0:41:460:41:50

it just exploded and it really was tasty.

0:41:500:41:54

I thought there was too much garlic on the langoustines.

0:41:540:41:57

I like garlic a lot but drowned it a little bit.

0:41:570:41:59

The spinach I thought was cooked to perfection. I love spinach and that was perfect.

0:41:590:42:03

For me it was a little bit too much on one plate together. There was too many flavours.

0:42:030:42:08

The langoustines were delicious. I don't eat them very often

0:42:080:42:11

but I'd have to say that they're some of the best I've had.

0:42:110:42:14

I struggled to taste the whisky at first but in actual fact,

0:42:140:42:17

when you stop to analyse the tastes in your mouth afterwards, then you got the whisky bite.

0:42:170:42:22

Hello, how are you?

0:42:220:42:24

We've had a ball today.

0:42:280:42:30

Firstly can I thank everybody in this county for their hospitality

0:42:300:42:34

because we've had a really, really good time.

0:42:340:42:37

We've been drunk! That's what we've been, it's been great!

0:42:370:42:41

We'll be back soon.

0:42:410:42:43

Now this is the horrible bit.

0:42:430:42:46

So, a very clear show of hands please for the scallop dish.

0:42:460:42:50

One, two, three, four, five, six. And a show of hands for the langoustines.

0:42:530:42:57

So that's six to three.

0:42:570:42:59

-The scallop dish was our Clare's.

-It was Clare's.

0:42:590:43:03

-Deserved.

-Well done.

-It was fabulous. A great restaurant, a great kitchen, a very talented lady.

0:43:080:43:13

All that remains is for us to go and have a drink in the kitchen

0:43:130:43:16

and probably we'll have to do the washing up!

0:43:160:43:20

-Thanks very much.

-Thank you very much.

0:43:200:43:23

Clare's local scallops proved too good to beat.

0:43:230:43:26

Argyll and Bute has so much rich produce to offer,

0:43:260:43:29

our panniers are laden with the best of their fine seafood and whisky for us to enjoy at home.

0:43:290:43:35

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:500:43:53

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:530:43:57

Si and Dave explore Argyll and Bute where they cook a traditional county favourite in Tarbet. They go fishing for langoustines and sample a few wee drams of single malt whisky. Finally, they face the challenge of a cook-off against top chef Clare Johnson. Restaurant diners decide who has created the best taste of Argyll and Bute.


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