Essex The Hairy Bikers' Food Tour of Britain


Essex

Si and Dave explore Essex where they cook a traditional county favourite in Southend-on-Sea. They harvest Colchester oysters and learn how to talk to turkeys.


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Transcript


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-We're the Hairy Bikers!

-On the road to find recipes to rev up your appetite.

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We're riding county to county to discover, cook and enjoy the best of British.

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Come on!

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Today we're in search of the real taste of Essex.

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Hey, hey!

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Glorious Essex! Do you know what?

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In some ways Essex is the cradle of humanity for England,

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as the oldest town in England is called Colchester which is in Essex.

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There's so much history here, you know?

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XR3Is, dude. Dagenham, Essex, Bob's your uncle.

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There also is ancient foods in Essex.

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They used to grow saffron in Essex. Saffron Walden, the clue's in the title.

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-Saffron.

-Look at those mudflats.

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Some of the finest seafood in the country comes from there, mate.

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You get oysters, lobster. You get cockles.

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Well, whatever's out there, we've got to get stuck in.

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On our quest to define the true flavours of Essex,

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we pull into Southend-on-Sea and give the locals a taste of their great seafood.

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We get a gobble on and meet some pedigree turkeys. They're not just for Christmas!

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Boys, who wants to volunteer?

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That's good!

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Kingy and I visit a traditional jam making factory

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where we sample some of the fruitiest preserves in the world.

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And representing the Essex in the cook-off later is Mark Baumann.

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Will we be able to beat him in a blind tasting chosen by local diners?

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Ah, my favourite, we're heading to the coast,

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and few British seaside resorts are quite as traditional as Leigh-on-Sea.

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We're on the hunt for the food that defines Essex,

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and I've got a hunch it's coming from the direction of the water.

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How much of this stuff here is local?

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Today it's all local except for the prawns.

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No! No, your squid can't be local!

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Yeah, squid's local. We work down the Thames, get the odd one.

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I don't think many people realise you're catching fresh squid in the Thames.

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You think of the Mediterranean.

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What to you is Essex on a plate?

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It's got a lot of shellfish, wet fish. You've got skate, cod, bass, mullet, dabs, flounders.

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Look at these clams!

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I know you have oysters.

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Clams they are, mate. They're all local.

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-The weight in these. They're absolutely full.

-Local, yeah. Yeah, farmed in Barling Creek.

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Could I have a pot of jellied eels?

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Oh, they're lovely. Cheers, Richard.

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-But what are the great traditional foods of Essex?

-Pie and mash.

-Pie and mash.

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I always want my little dish of prawns and sit on the front. In the sunshine, preferably!

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Is there anything else apart from seafood?

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Lovely local ice creams called Rossis.

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-Thanks a lot.

-I fancy an ice cream.

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-Aye, let's have an ice cream. Yeah, can we have two cornets, please?

-Oh! The ice cream's not bad, is it?

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It's amazing to walk along here and find it's all just the same as I remember as a kid, you know?

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-Right, brilliant.

-Is there a big culture of oysters here?

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Well, there seems to be now. I don't remember it then.

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-Well, I mean, the thing then was scampi was posh.

-Yeah.

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And cockles were the thing that you generally had.

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You can't go wrong with fish and chips.

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-I mean...

-Eels. Jellied eels.

-Yeah.

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-Eels. Jellied eels.

-Cockles.

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-Cockles? Seafood.

-Seafood, cockles.

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In extreme conditions I come down three times in a week.

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-For your cockles?

-Yes.

-You're an addict!

-Yes, I am definitely.

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-Oh, yes!

-This is my sort of thing, here.

-Yeah.

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Could I have some cockles, please?

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-Do you sell oysters here?

-Could I have half a dozen, please?

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And while I'm waiting can I have some shrimp?

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Cheers. Thanks, mate. You see, the tradition is salt, pepper and lots

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of vinegar for my monstrously sized bag of cockles.

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-This is heaven.

-It is heaven. Dave's got his cockles, I've got my oysters.

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I can't eat them because they make me poorly, but I can eat these. These are superb.

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These are spectacular. We've got to find out where these come from, man. Really, really good.

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Si, well, I'm happy enough. I've got my cockles!

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Now, we let you buy your cockles, it's about time I got my oysters, mate. Let's go off and have a look.

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So, Essex is seafood. Let's give the locals a taste of their cheapest cockles

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and their most expensive oysters.

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Colchester oysters are world famous.

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The water around Mercy Island helps give them their wonderful flavour.

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These shellfish delicacies have been officially farmed here since 1189.

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The Colchester oystermen have been working this stretch of the county for 40 years

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producing five tonnes every week,

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with a steady supply going to La Gavroche and The Fat Duck.

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Alex Grundy will be introducing us to these local specialities.

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What makes called Colchester oysters so good?

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Well, a large part of it is the position of the island.

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We're at the confluence of the River Blackwater and the River Colne, which are both very muddy rivers.

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They're full of plankton, minerals and nutrients.

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-A freshwater and seawater mix, isn't it?

-There is a mix.

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You've got the North Sea just round the coast, and you've got the fresh water from the Colne.

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I'll take you down on to the boat and we'll see if we can get some oysters.

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Excellent.

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The tide's come in now so we're going to start to dredge for some oysters.

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So, the dredge will basically go into the mud on the bottom

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and just hook in and scrape along and the oysters come in.

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Wow!

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OK, so we've got a lot of stone and shell, but you can see there's some

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nice oysters that have come out there, nice fluted, nice size.

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Knock all the shell of there and that one is ready to go.

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Dan, the guy, the skipper in the boat, he's fifth...

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-Fifth generation oysterman is it, Dan?

-Yeah, fifth.

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Fifth, yeah. So, what Dan doesn't know about oysters is not worth knowing, quite frankly.

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-It's like Bargain Hunt, isn't it?

-It is great, isn't it?

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First, this is where we purify the oysters.

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They go into these tanks here.

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The water, seawater, is passed through these UV lights here and that purifies the oysters.

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They have to be passed through there by law for 42 hours.

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It takes all the nasty bacteria out, makes sure they're good and ready to eat

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and they're not going to make you feel sick.

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-These are some needs native oysters. These are indigenous to the United Kingdom.

-Right.

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The finest ones have always grown along the South Suffolk, Kent, North Kent and Essex coastline.

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-These would take four to five years to grow.

-That's the Colchester oyster with the blue.

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Why don't we go outside and have a few?

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I know! I know it's the obvious choice, but I'm a big lad.

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-Go on.

-Come on, come on. Come to Daddy.

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Yes!

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-Good?

-Oh, my good gracious me!

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So, I've got the native oyster, Si's got the rock oyster.

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What's the differences?

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This is much more of a delicacy.

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It's a more expensive oyster because it takes longer to grow, because it has a more unique flavour.

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The size of the muscle makes the Colchester oyster distinctive.

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It gives it that extra sweetness. The rock oyster you can take out of the water all year,

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but the native oyster you can only eat when there's an R in the month.

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-So they keep that tradition?

-They do, by law, to protect the species.

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Describe to us what they taste like.

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-That's the native.

-They are absolutely sublime.

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On your palette it's a far superior oyster, full stop.

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The rock oyster?

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Great oyster,

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but nowhere near the sophistication of flavour of the native.

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Oh, this is a side of Essex I didn't know existed.

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-Absolutely.

-You're welcome down any time. It's been really nice to have you down.

-Thank you.

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Way-hey!

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We've got the oysters, we've got the cockles, we've got a day at the seaside,

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we've got a party!

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And we've got a day out, dude, on the longest pier in Britain, Southend Pier.

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Fantastic!

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We're going to Southend-on-Sea to give the locals a perfect showcase for their cockles and oysters.

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A cockles chowder, oyster mornay and oysters au naturale. Oh, man, what a treat!

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-Southend, here we are.

-I'm allergic to oysters, as I've said before.

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-However, I'm not.

-We've been to Leigh-on-Sea and we got some of the best cockles

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we've ever had and I can't stop eating them. Cockles are traditional.

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Chowder is simply a soup that's been thickened with potatoes and cream.

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You start with bacon, onions, potatoes, parsley, thyme and it's cracking.

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But, first off we're doing dice, that's like chips but in cubes.

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We're just going to get the potatoes on and we just want to blanch them

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for about five minutes and there'll be plenty for everybody.

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We just brown bacon off. We've got a couple of onions diced up.

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Now, that's what you want, crunchy bacon bits! Put the onions into that bacon fat.

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A bit more oil. There wasn't as much fat as anticipated come out of that said stripes of pig.

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-Right, I'll drain these tatties off.

-You see, in here the onions are sweating and they've gone down.

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They clean the pan of all those bacon bits.

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On to that now we need to put about two thirds of a bottle of wine.

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We've got the best part of this bottle of fine sauvignon blanc.

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The alcohol's boiled off. We're ready to get on.

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It's quite a lot of potatoes, but it is a chowder.

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Stir the potatoes into the wine and the bacon and add a pint of milk.

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-Oh, look at that.

-It really is a good thick, curdled soup.

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What's happened is I've put the milk in to the wine and the sauce

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has kind of, what you'd say, split, which means it goes a bit funny.

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So, what you do is to put a spoonful of flour in,

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stir that in, and you'll find something miraculous happens.

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It was all curdled, it's gone back into one now.

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Bring that to the boil.

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That's looking good.

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This is an oyster knife, a handy implement when dealing with an oyster.

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See this little bit here,

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that's the hinge. You need to get that part of your oyster knife...

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..into it. Take a tea towel...

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Now, it's always best to do away from yourself so that you don't

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slip and stab yourself in the belly.

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Put the end of the oyster knife into the oyster

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and then that will lift the top off from the bowl of the oyster.

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There's a little muscle here and you just need to release that as you just turn them over like that.

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Oh, lovely!

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And chew it. Chew it, take the time to appreciate the flavour.

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Don't just swallow it. That's just bad.

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We're going to get on with this sauce.

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It's really, really simple. As fine as you can possibly get them,

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chop the shallots. Put them in a little bowl. Just cover in red wine vinegar.

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Now, it's best if you let it sit for a little while so all of that onion infuses the, umm...

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Infuses the vinegar. We'll do three little options,

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au naturale, then we'll join do some with shallots and red wine vinegar,

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one with Tabasco and a bit of Worcester sauce, why not?

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Time to put in the cockles.

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These are cockles as you would buy them and also the cooking liquor, that goes into the soup, as well.

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I'm just going to add some nice herbs, some parsley and some thyme.

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All I'm doing is I'm mashing down some of the potatoes, the chunks,

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cos that's what's going to make it a nice thick chowder.

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You need some seasoning. A good twist of pepper. Some salt.

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Now, I've got no seasoning in it until now, so give it a fair old amount.

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If it isn't good enough already, let's put half a jug of cream in.

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-You know it makes sense.

-Go on, son!

-So, that's done. What how are you doing, Si?

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I'm going to dress the oysters. Shallot and red wine vinegar. A little bit of Tabasco.

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Just a little bit of Worcester sauce.

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-OK, so they're ready, mate.

-Right, the chowder's ready.

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So, the last push is the oyster mornay.

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We start off with a big block of cheese.

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Right, first off, to make the cheese sauce I've melted some butter,

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I've got some cornflour and I'm just going to cook that for a few minutes for the flour to cook out.

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What I mean when we say cook out is so it doesn't have a floury taste in it. Add some milk and whisk it in.

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This will make a white sauce, which is otherwise known as a roux.

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If you start, as I do, get lumps in your sauce give it a bit of a whisk.

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Now, that's what you call a white sauce. Look at that.

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Not to lump near. So, while we're doing that is add a load of cheese.

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Sprinkle it in. Watch it go thick.

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-Oh, look at that.

-You could stick tiles on with that.

-You could.

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Pepper in there. A nice spoonful in each oyster.

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Look at that. Lovely.

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You know how you get cheesy chips?

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It's like cheesy oysters. A sprinkling of cheese.

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Now they need to be grilled. We just grill them till they go golden.

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Right, let's chuck them over there. These are just coloured nicely.

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The cheese has melted. Let's say the oysters will have a little bit of heat,

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-but we don't want to cook them till they're like rubber.

-No.

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-And that's it.

-Beautiful.

-That's wonderful cockle chowder.

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And we've got oysters au naturale.

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And oyster mornay, a classic.

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-There we go.

-Time to find out if our take on the seafood offerings

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of Essex have hit the spot with the people of Southend.

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-Have we done their produce pride?

-Now, sir.

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The oyster mornay.

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Thank you.

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Oh, aye, just dig in.

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I think the cheese gives it a little bit more... A different texture.

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-Yeah, it's nice.

-Yeah.

-Do you like it?

-Yeah, it's nice.

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-Not chewy.

-You can taste the sea in this, it's really nice.

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-Good.

-Absolutely beautiful.

-Absolutely, yeah.

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-I'm thinking about doing that at home.

-That's nice.

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-Really nice.

-That was absolutely delicious.

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-The big ones, the real ones.

-Can I try a little bit of lemon on it?

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-Yeah.

-Have a try.

-Squirt some of that on it.

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Oh, that is unbelievable. I can actually taste the sea.

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-The other one was nice, but that's was spot on.

-That's the purest way.

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Should have brought them first, we could have had two!

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Give it a squidge with your tongue on the way down.

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That's very nice.

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-It's the first time...

-The first time?

-I've tried a proper raw one, so...

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Go on, dude, go on.

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Mmm!

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Here you go, girls.

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Three, two, one.

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What do you reckon? You're not sure, are you?

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I haven't swallowed it yet.

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-That's really nice.

-Right.

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Right, then.

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-The cockle chowder.

-Great job.

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-I'd definitely make this.

-Well, it's all here on your doorstep.

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The north side of the Thames, mate. Wonderful food.

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Our seafood feast went down a storm with the people of Southend,

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and it was great to give some of the locals their first taste of Essex oysters,

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but next a bigger challenge is around the corner.

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As always, we're taking on one of the county's top chefs in their restaurant, using local ingredients

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to see who can best define the taste of the region.

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It will be up to local diners in a blind tasting

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to decide who's dish best represents the true flavours of Essex.

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Our opponent today is Mark Baumann,

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head chef and owner of Baumann's Brasserie in Coggeshall.

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Mark began his career in the Champagne region of France,

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then gained experience in various British Michelin starred kitchens,

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before Peter Langham gave him the opportunity to head up his own kitchen aged just 21.

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In 2003 he became a Master Chef Of Great Britain.

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Top quality produce is an absolute must and it is readily available here in Essex.

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My butcher operates a gate to the plate strategy.

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We see the animals bred and we see how they're produced and reared

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and then, ultimately, we see how they're dispatched.

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It is the coast that really is the highlight.

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The fishermen are going out on a daily basis

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and they come and deliver to us before it reaches London, so it's a whole lot fresher.

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I chair the panel of the Essex Chef Of The Year.

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We launched this last year to find the best chef in Essex, let's say the second best chef in Essex!

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So, there's an awful lot of talent out there. I'm just happy to keep banging the drum.

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To take on the Bikers today, my taste of Essex is boned Colchester lamb

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filled with lobster and basil mousse on a cheesy mashed potato.

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Come on, Bikers, bring it on!

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Hello there, guys.

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-Hello, Mark, how are you?

-Nice to meet you, Dave.

-Hello, mate, I'm Si.

-Hello, Si.

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-How are you? Nice to see you.

-Very well, thanks.

-Well, welcome to Essex.

-Thanks very much.

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So, Mark, headline your dish for us.

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Right, I'm doing a boned and rolled loin of called Colchester lamb,

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and that's going to have a lobster and basil mousse in it,

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and it's going to be served on a mashed potato with mustard ham.

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Everything that I'm doing today is entirely local to my area here in Essex.

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I'm going to make a mousse with the chicken, the salmon.

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I've just taken off the skin off the corn fed chicken breast. I've diced that up into small pieces.

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Now I've got this piece of salmon. I've just taken the skin off, cut it into smallish pieces, as well.

0:17:040:17:11

I love the way you've kept the fat so it's all juicy.

0:17:110:17:13

-Absolutely right. Could you put that into the Magimix over there?

-Yeah.

0:17:130:17:17

Can you give it a little bit of a whizz round?

0:17:170:17:19

Dave, while that's mixing, next door to that there's an egg. I want the egg white please, Dave.

0:17:190:17:24

-Yes.

-And then put a good pinch of salt into that, please.

0:17:240:17:27

Now, would you be kind enough to put this salmon in, please?

0:17:270:17:30

There you have it now. We'll leave that just for about 30 seconds.

0:17:300:17:34

Next to you again, Davey-boy, you'll see some double cream.

0:17:340:17:37

Drop it in. Keep going.

0:17:370:17:40

-That'll do us there. We'll leave it for another 30 seconds.

-I think we're there, now.

0:17:400:17:44

Turn it off, Dave. Turn it off, matey, please.

0:17:440:17:46

-Now, if you be kind enough to scrape that bowl out.

-Is that enough?

-That's perfect.

0:17:460:17:51

-Sling that over here with the double cream?

-You want to loosen it up a bit?

0:17:510:17:54

Yes, it is. It's going to be quite light and then after that it'll become fairly elastic.

0:17:540:17:59

So, we can see now that it's actually starting to get a little bit shiny.

0:17:590:18:03

-It is, isn't it?

-OK? And it's starting to hold itself together.

0:18:030:18:06

We want it to become quite tight and then we want to add a little bit more cream.

0:18:060:18:10

-Could you pass on the left hand herbs across, please?

-Have a smell of that.

0:18:100:18:14

Isn't that nice?

0:18:140:18:16

-Oh, that's fabulous.

-That's nice, isn't it? Oh, it's like a jar of pesto.

0:18:160:18:20

Dave, if you could pass me that stainless steel container, there?

0:18:200:18:23

I'm just going to rip the basil off here

0:18:230:18:25

and I'm going to rip the basil off here, like that. Can I've a good quantity of olive oil in there?

0:18:250:18:30

Over they're you're going to find a stick blender, OK?

0:18:300:18:33

While he's making a noise, from the fridge could I have the lobsters, please? OK. Two lobsters.

0:18:330:18:41

What I want to do is take the claws off and then we're going to just...

0:18:410:18:46

If you could just take that away from me and just stick that in the fridge, that would be great.

0:18:460:18:50

So, chaps, we're just going to pull those little claws apart like that,

0:18:500:18:55

and I'm sure you know that we're just going to crack the lobster

0:18:550:19:00

and just open it up to reveal that lovely... The meat inside there.

0:19:000:19:05

-And we'll do that with both...

-Ah, typical!

0:19:050:19:07

I've got a softie!

0:19:090:19:10

He makes it look really easy, you know.

0:19:100:19:13

Going to crush that lobster shell down and then...

0:19:130:19:16

-They're not bad lobsters, are they?

-Aren't they beautiful?

0:19:160:19:19

I've just cooked these purely in salted water so that we really get a taste of the sea.

0:19:190:19:24

If we just get rid of these, guys, and we'll start again.

0:19:240:19:27

What I need to do now is I need to bang this out and this can get a little bit messy.

0:19:270:19:31

And if you haven't got a hammer like this, you can use a rolling pin.

0:19:310:19:35

We've got baby spinach and I've taken out most of the stalks.

0:19:350:19:38

I've got some boiling water with some salt in it. We put the salt in it to keep the colour green.

0:19:380:19:43

-Yeah, so it's a blanch, ten seconds, no more?

-There you've it.

0:19:430:19:47

In boiling salted water, we put it into iced water.

0:19:470:19:49

I've just strained it a bit. I'm putting it onto this cloth to get a bit more of the moisture out.

0:19:490:19:54

-It's heaven, isn't it?

-Actually, it is.

0:19:540:19:56

And I'm just going to sort of almost paint the fat, if you like.

0:19:560:20:01

What we need to do now is just a couple of simple things.

0:20:010:20:03

This is baby vegetables.

0:20:030:20:05

We've got some baby turnips there and over here we've got some baby carrots

0:20:050:20:10

-and then over here have got some leaks.

-What's up, Doc?

-I've got some caster sugar there.

0:20:100:20:15

What we're going to do is cook it with the sugar, add some salt and pepper.

0:20:150:20:18

We've got some unsalted butter which has been cut into cubes

0:20:180:20:21

and we'll allow them just to cook now gradually.

0:20:210:20:24

-What's in that pan?

-I've just taken some potatoes,

0:20:240:20:27

chopped them up, so we're going to make a mashed potato.

0:20:270:20:30

Now I need to put the mousse in and then wrap it up.

0:20:300:20:33

Don't forget, we've got to put the lobster in there.

0:20:330:20:36

-Should I?

-Please do, sir. I'm now just incorporating the lobster into the mousse just like that.

0:20:360:20:42

-Add some chives. Can I have the peppermill, Davey-boy?

-Certainly.

0:20:420:20:45

I'm going to season up the meat. When you season things, do you know it's important to season from a height?

0:20:450:20:50

If you season too close you get big clumps.

0:20:500:20:52

So, when you see people seasoning like that, that's the reason.

0:20:520:20:56

I'm just going to spread this mousse.

0:20:560:20:59

I'm going to roll it over here like this, OK?

0:20:590:21:01

I'm going to roll it all the way around.

0:21:010:21:04

-Sheep clingfilm!

-It's stomach of either a cow or a sheep.

0:21:040:21:08

And then I'm wrapping it around like this, OK?

0:21:080:21:11

This should encourage the meat to stay nicely in the lamb.

0:21:110:21:15

-That's fabulous. That just it appears, doesn't it? I mean, it all just goes.

-It'll make it juicy.

0:21:150:21:21

Just to make sure that we're really extra safe and it doesn't all

0:21:210:21:25

fall apart, we've just got some boring old string.

0:21:250:21:29

-You go round twice.

-That's it.

0:21:290:21:32

And then you do this. And you want it reasonably tight.

0:21:320:21:35

Now, is there some butter left?

0:21:350:21:36

-Just a tadgel.

-And I want this pan to be nice and hot.

0:21:360:21:40

I'm just going to drop that into there. We want it

0:21:400:21:43

to be invisible by the time it's actually cooked.

0:21:430:21:46

You can see we're getting a little bit of flame going there.

0:21:460:21:50

We want to serve it nice and rare if possible. I suppose nine to 11 minutes.

0:21:500:21:54

I'm just going to bung that in the oven for...

0:21:540:21:57

-It's still alight.

-That's still alight?

0:21:570:21:59

-Yeah.

-I was just going to ask if I could have those asparagus.

0:21:590:22:03

I'm going to put it into the boiling salted water and we're going to leave it for about 30 seconds.

0:22:030:22:08

We wanted nice and al dente.

0:22:080:22:10

So, I've just got some grated cheddar and I'm putting that into the potato.

0:22:100:22:15

-That's never local!

-Chuck it...

0:22:150:22:17

Oh! You're right! We've got some grain mustard to go in that today.

0:22:170:22:21

-That's a lot of mustard!

-It's going to have some good bite. Stir the mustard into the potato.

0:22:210:22:26

You can see we're not going to have to do too much

0:22:260:22:29

mashing up here. We're getting some good colour.

0:22:290:22:32

I'm now going to put this rosemary in the bottom of the pan.

0:22:320:22:35

Oh, it's like a Tuscan bonfire!

0:22:350:22:38

Let me just have a few more herbs, please, chaps. We've got some flat leaf parsley.

0:22:380:22:42

-Some! It's a tree!

-Yeah.

0:22:420:22:44

If you ever think you've got enough, just double it.

0:22:440:22:47

-That's an Essex motto!

-Yeah.

-If you ever think you've got enough...

0:22:470:22:51

-Double it.

-Double it. Geezer!

-Come on, son!

0:22:510:22:53

Wow!

0:22:530:22:56

What we do to test it is we just put a little knife in,

0:22:560:22:59

not a lot of blood coming out of that. You put it onto the most sensitive part of your body,

0:22:590:23:04

the bottom of the lip, and if it's hot on the lip you know it's cooked, right?

0:23:040:23:08

-Chef, have you forgot to put the basil puree in?

-Argh!

-No, we didn't tell him.

0:23:080:23:15

Into my jus, into my demi-glace, put a load of butter into that

0:23:150:23:18

and I'm going to put some basil puree into the potatoes.

0:23:180:23:21

That should have gone into the lobster mousse.

0:23:210:23:24

-That's probably rested for about five, six, seven minutes?

-Yeah.

0:23:240:23:27

We'll put those over there. I'm just putting a bit of that in the middle of the plate.

0:23:270:23:32

-Now, the moment of truth.

-Oh, yes! Oh, yeah.

0:23:340:23:40

-Can you see the lobster in there?

-Yeah, yeah.

0:23:400:23:43

That's so nicely seasoned, as well.

0:23:440:23:48

Mark, can you give us the title of your dish?

0:23:500:23:53

Colchester loin of lamb with a lobster mousse on a basil and cheese mashed potato.

0:23:530:24:00

-That looks lovely, doesn't it?

-Yeah.

0:24:000:24:03

The potato is so bursting with flavour.

0:24:050:24:09

The lamb's cooked just perfectly.

0:24:090:24:11

All of those flavours just go together really well.

0:24:110:24:14

I have to say, I was kind of thinking, umm, seafood, lamb?

0:24:140:24:17

Oh, really, really good.

0:24:170:24:19

-The lobster's still there. It hasn't been destroyed.

-No, not at all.

-It adds to it.

0:24:190:24:23

But this mashed potato!

0:24:230:24:25

It's got so much going on, but it tastes fabulous.

0:24:250:24:28

Yeah. It absolutely compliments all of the flavours on the dish. It's really clever food, this.

0:24:280:24:33

There's nothing pretentious about it.

0:24:330:24:36

It's all very well what we think, but the real judges are the locals,

0:24:360:24:39

who will decide who's dish is best in a blind tasting coming up.

0:24:390:24:42

Mark's dish was packed with local ingredients, so to beat him we need something really Essex.

0:24:420:24:47

Turkeys have been bred in the county for generations.

0:24:470:24:50

Hundreds of years ago they were reared here and then walked to London to be sold at market.

0:24:500:24:55

Paul Kelly has been breeding these birds since he was six years old and in 2007 was named

0:24:550:25:00

Turkeyman Of The Year. There's nothing he doesn't know about these birds.

0:25:000:25:04

Hello, all right? How are you?

0:25:040:25:06

-You look great.

-Hey, hey!

-Hey, hey, hey!

0:25:060:25:08

-Hey, Paul!

-How are you, Dave? Hello, Si.

-All right, Paul? How are you?

0:25:080:25:11

-Come and see the turkeys.

-Great.

0:25:110:25:13

You're gonna love them. These are the bronze turkey, the black feather type?

0:25:130:25:17

On the end of the feather there's a bronze sheen, that's why it's called the bronze turkey.

0:25:170:25:22

-Some of them have got blue heads.

-They're all males.

-Right.

0:25:220:25:25

They go purple if they want to show off,

0:25:250:25:27

and also if they want to lose heat they get all the blood to the head, because turkeys don't sweat.

0:25:270:25:32

No fowl sweats. He's a grown male now.

0:25:320:25:35

-He weighs about...

-Oh, man!

-Eight or nine kilos.

0:25:350:25:37

-He's beautiful.

-Aren't they?

0:25:370:25:39

Look at these little black feather stubs, that's the only reason the bronze turkey disappeared.

0:25:390:25:43

Back in the mid '50s, late '50s, the modern retailers wanted nice pearly white skin for the plastic bag

0:25:430:25:49

and they were seen to been unsightly in the skin, which of course they are.

0:25:490:25:53

So, in the space of four years the bronze turkey went out of fashion,

0:25:530:25:57

the white turkey came along and all the genetic work is being done on the white turkey now.

0:25:570:26:01

-Good grief.

-The crazy thing with this is the white turkey has got the same amount of feather stubs.

0:26:010:26:06

-Yes.

-But because it's a white pigment you don't see them.

0:26:060:26:09

Boys, who wants to volunteer?

0:26:090:26:12

That's good!

0:26:130:26:15

So, guys, what these are, these are what we called show plucked turkeys.

0:26:180:26:22

This is how turkeys used to be plucked and they'd go to the London markets

0:26:220:26:26

and if you can remember they'd actually hang them like this in butcher's shops.

0:26:260:26:30

We talked about black feather stubs. You can see them in the skin.

0:26:300:26:33

-That's the reason the bronze turkey disappeared. You can see the fat on there.

-Oh, look at that.

0:26:330:26:38

-Yes.

-If you get meat and it's got a good cover of fat on it,

0:26:380:26:41

that means it's mature and flavour comes with maturity.

0:26:410:26:43

With turkeys like yours that have been hung,

0:26:430:26:45

because of the fat content you don't have all that nonsense with streaky bacon and butter on there.

0:26:450:26:50

You just cook them and eat them.

0:26:500:26:52

We recommend cooking it breast down to begin with because all the fat deposits are in the back there,

0:26:520:26:58

and then just turn it over for the last hour of cooking to brown the breast.

0:26:580:27:01

Enough talk, it's time to get tasting these turkeys.

0:27:010:27:04

-What have we got, Paul?

-What we've got here, guys, is we've got turkey sausage.

0:27:040:27:08

-That's fabulous.

-That's really, really good.

-This is just turkey.

0:27:080:27:12

In France it's coq au vin, here we call it turkey and plonk.

0:27:120:27:16

-Turkey au plonk!

-Innit?

0:27:160:27:18

-These are turkey...turkey testicles in a sweet chilli sauce.

-He's only joking.

0:27:200:27:25

-They're not really.

-It's minced turkey with Thai flavours.

0:27:250:27:29

-I'm not!

-What?

-They honestly are turkey testicles.

0:27:290:27:32

All I can say, viewers, is turkey nuts rule.

0:27:320:27:36

Paul's shown us just how versatile turkey can be,

0:27:360:27:39

so we're going to do a ballantine of breast meat stuffed with veal and chicken livers

0:27:390:27:44

served on saffron mash.

0:27:440:27:45

But to complete this dish,

0:27:450:27:47

we should capitalise on Essex's strong fruit-growing heritage

0:27:470:27:51

and there's a place that makes brilliant use of it.

0:27:510:27:54

The Wilkin family have been growing and preserving fruit

0:27:540:27:57

on the 1,000 acre Tiptree Farm for almost 150 years.

0:27:570:28:01

They have over 100 different recipes for jams and jellies.

0:28:010:28:04

Surely this will be the place to find the final local flavour to give Mark a run for his money.

0:28:040:28:09

Mulberry bush, dude!

0:28:110:28:13

It's bad luck, you've got to go around it.

0:28:130:28:16

# Here we go round the mulberry bush

0:28:160:28:18

# Mulberry bush, mulberry bush

0:28:180:28:20

# Here we go round the mulberry bush on a cold and frosty morning!

0:28:200:28:24

# This is the way we wash our face, wash... #

0:28:240:28:26

Walter. Dave.

0:28:260:28:28

Hello, Dave. Welcome to Tiptree.

0:28:280:28:29

-That's Si. He's going round and round the mulberry bush.

-Oh, dear!

0:28:290:28:34

-Simon, come and meet Walter.

-Hello, Walter. Sorry about that.

0:28:340:28:37

-It's bad luck. See a mulberry bush, you've got to around it.

-It's good.

0:28:370:28:41

You have factory, fruit trees. There's not many food miles there!

0:28:410:28:44

-It's very close!

-Do you use those mulberries in your jam?

0:28:440:28:47

That's our sole supply of mulberry.

0:28:470:28:49

-Really?

-Yeah. Those trees have been there about 150 years.

0:28:490:28:53

-Cor, they've earned their keep!

-Yes, they don't owe us anything, no!

0:28:530:28:57

-Do you grow other fruits?

-All the fruits that grow well in Essex.

0:28:570:29:00

Strawberries, raspberries, loganberries.

0:29:000:29:02

We've got Victoria plums, damsons.

0:29:020:29:05

And then on top of that we've got the old English fruits that are quite rare nowadays, medlars,

0:29:050:29:11

quince and the mulberry behind us.

0:29:110:29:13

So, you've got very traditional fruits and orchards.

0:29:130:29:16

Is your jam and preserve making done in the traditional way?

0:29:160:29:20

It is. We're cooking in open pans, on copper.

0:29:200:29:23

You get a better jammy flavour when you cook on copper than on stainless steel.

0:29:230:29:28

-So, we've kept all the traditional methods.

-Can we have a look?

-Of course.

0:29:280:29:32

Tiptree Jam sell 25 million jars a year in over 60 countries

0:29:320:29:35

and bountiful Essex supplies them with almost all the fruit they need.

0:29:350:29:39

Cor, it's very Willy Wonka!

0:29:390:29:42

It is a bit. You can see the jars coming through here.

0:29:420:29:45

These strawberries were in the field yesterday.

0:29:470:29:50

And then they go through the washer on to the belt. We pick out anything that shouldn't be there.

0:29:500:29:55

Will that end up being strawberry jam?

0:29:550:29:58

It will, yes, by this afternoon.

0:29:580:30:00

They're dancing with happiness, these strawberries!

0:30:000:30:03

"Oh, I'm going to make a pot of jam!"

0:30:030:30:05

They smell really is quite spectacular. It's lovely.

0:30:060:30:09

-It smells wonderful.

-How long have you been working here?

0:30:090:30:13

39 years in November.

0:30:130:30:15

-Oh, about 16.

-16?

-Yeah.

0:30:150:30:18

-Linda, how long have you been?

-20 something...

0:30:180:30:22

-20 odd years.

-Yeah.

-Go on, Linda! Hey, that's great, isn't it?

0:30:220:30:25

-They're good employers then, obviously.

-Yeah!

0:30:250:30:28

I tell you what, after 50 years I bet you get a golden shred!

0:30:280:30:32

To us, it's critically important to start with fruit rather than a concentrate.

0:30:320:30:37

So many people now start with a concentrate and reconstitute it

0:30:370:30:41

in a factory to make the jelly down to marmalade and it tastes awful.

0:30:410:30:44

-Yes.

-It's like the difference between freshly squeezed orange and the concentrated orange.

0:30:440:30:49

Once this is cooked we take it to the press,

0:30:490:30:52

which is like a big sort of muslin bag. We squeeze it gently to get the juice.

0:30:520:30:56

You know, it's just like Granny's kitchen but on a bigger scale.

0:30:560:31:00

-It is.

-The fruit goes in, gets squeezed,

0:31:000:31:03

juice comes out, makes a jam.

0:31:030:31:05

Lush. It's that smell, as well. It's really comforting, isn't it?

0:31:050:31:09

It's real fruit, isn't it?

0:31:090:31:10

I think it's safe to say that Dave and I are desperate now for a taste of the final product.

0:31:100:31:15

We'll see if we can find some we made earlier.

0:31:150:31:18

Oh, good man, good man. I'll follow... We'll follow you.

0:31:180:31:21

-Right, this bit's compulsory.

-Yes!

-Great!

-Oh, right.

0:31:210:31:25

You've got some interesting things.

0:31:250:31:27

There's the medlars.

0:31:270:31:29

-Oh, yes.

-There's the mulberry.

0:31:290:31:33

Tell me what a medlar is.

0:31:330:31:34

It's related to the apple and we make a jelly out of it,

0:31:340:31:37

so we put it through press like you saw, squeeze the juice from it and make a jelly.

0:31:370:31:41

Not as sweet as say a cranberry or...

0:31:420:31:45

What do you have this with?

0:31:450:31:47

I have it with white meat, pork, chicken, turkey.

0:31:470:31:51

-Crab apple jelly. That's one of my favourites.

-Give me a taste.

0:31:510:31:54

You can tell it's great fruit because it leaves a perfume on the back of your mouth.

0:31:540:31:59

Oh, the crab apple, it starts off sweet

0:31:590:32:02

and it goes to quite a sophisticated kind of sourness to it. It's lovely.

0:32:020:32:08

-How about making a crab apple gravy?

-Yeah. Just whip it through.

0:32:080:32:11

Like you do with redcurrants with venison.

0:32:110:32:14

-Yeah.

-Crab apple jelly with a turkey.

0:32:140:32:16

It's the one for us.

0:32:160:32:17

Let's hope it gets you well on the way to winning.

0:32:170:32:20

You're going to love this. Let's headline the dish.

0:32:200:32:23

A ballantine of turkey stuffed with a veal and pistachio stuffing.

0:32:230:32:27

-Yes, with a saffron cream and garlic potatoes.

-Saffron cream?

0:32:270:32:31

And a crab apple jelly gravy.

0:32:310:32:33

And roasted fine green beans with thyme and rosemary.

0:32:330:32:39

But will the local diners think our dish is good enough to beat Mark's in the blind tasting?

0:32:390:32:43

First up, I'll put my spuds on.

0:32:430:32:45

Just potatoes, water, boil.

0:32:450:32:47

But ours are going to be saffron.

0:32:470:32:49

Essex, Saffron Walden. Saffron, you see?

0:32:490:32:52

We've just got the crown of the finest Essex turkey.

0:32:520:32:55

-Turkey isn't just for Christmas.

-No.

-This is a game bird.

0:32:550:32:58

The crown is the breasts that sit on top of the bird.

0:32:580:33:01

A ballantine, basically, is a stuffed piece of meat.

0:33:010:33:04

It can either be poached or it can be roasted.

0:33:040:33:07

Clingfilm. Could I borrow your meat hammer?

0:33:070:33:09

I'm going to make a blanket of Essex smoked bacon.

0:33:110:33:16

While Dave's lining this up, I'm going to make a white sauce.

0:33:160:33:19

-We've got unsalted butter...

-Unsalted butter.

0:33:190:33:21

-We've got some cornflour.

-Yeah.

0:33:210:33:23

We need a heaped teaspoon of that. We're just cooking the flour out a little bit.

0:33:230:33:27

Yes, I understand, yeah.

0:33:270:33:29

Now, this is about 150 mil of milk.

0:33:290:33:32

-Look at that.

-So, what we need to do now is make the veal and pistachio stuffing.

0:33:320:33:36

Could you process me some veal mince and some chicken livers?

0:33:360:33:40

Meanwhile, I shall chop up some sage leaves.

0:33:400:33:43

So, we're going to get a slightly sort of gamy taste into the veal,

0:33:430:33:47

-with the livers, is that the idea?

-Yeah.

0:33:470:33:50

Fabulous. So, to that we put three chopped up sage leaves.

0:33:530:33:57

One finely chopped green pepper.

0:33:570:34:00

-Two egg whites.

-Two egg whites.

0:34:000:34:03

So, what... You've got the egg whites...

0:34:030:34:05

Kingy's going to whip them to firm peaks.

0:34:050:34:07

You know you add your cheddar cheese?

0:34:070:34:09

-This is our cheddar cheese.

-It's not from Essex, it's pistachio nuts.

0:34:090:34:13

-Look at the colour.

-Soft peaks.

-Soft peaks.

0:34:130:34:17

-Half a teaspoon of nutmeg, ground nutmeg. Now, salt and pepper.

-Salt?

0:34:170:34:22

Holy moly! Hey, dude, I thought... Cut that out, will you?

0:34:240:34:28

-That's for the mash. You should always use white pepper with mash.

-Why?

0:34:280:34:32

It tastes better. Have you got the roux, Si?

0:34:320:34:34

Yes, it's there and all.

0:34:340:34:35

-So, we put the thick roux in there.

-One thick roux.

0:34:350:34:39

Now, what we need to do now is to fold the egg whites into there.

0:34:390:34:43

Now, Delia says when you are folding egg whites

0:34:430:34:45

always use a metal palette knife, then you get it folded and not mixed.

0:34:450:34:49

-Oh!

-What Delia says goes.

0:34:490:34:51

-You're absolutely right.

-Now we have to stuff the turkey.

0:34:510:34:56

-OK.

-So, we put that over there.

0:34:560:34:58

Good! Whoa!

0:34:580:35:00

This is good. This is nice.

0:35:000:35:03

This isn't cookery, this is a martial art.

0:35:030:35:05

-I tell you what.

-What, brother?

0:35:050:35:07

How many are we feeding?

0:35:070:35:09

Three. It's fine.

0:35:090:35:11

Have you noticed, sometimes it grows bigger than you think?

0:35:110:35:14

Right, now foil.

0:35:140:35:16

I know what you're thinking at home. How is he going to get that clingfilm off?

0:35:180:35:22

You know what I'm thinking? How am I going to get that clingfilm off?!

0:35:220:35:26

Peel that off there. That's doing nicely.

0:35:260:35:29

-It has grown!

-Hasn't it, dude?

0:35:290:35:31

I need two or three layers.

0:35:310:35:32

Let's go tight with this second layer, Dave.

0:35:320:35:35

I have to admit, I didn't think it would be that big.

0:35:350:35:38

Now, all we need to do is to put that into a medium oven at about 150 degree Centigrade...

0:35:380:35:44

-For six weeks.

-Yeah!

0:35:440:35:45

-No, for an hour and a half.

-OK.

0:35:450:35:47

Why have you wrapped it up three times?

0:35:470:35:49

We want it to cook in that shape, but the bacon is going to look a little bit tired.

0:35:490:35:53

-Right.

-When we unwrap it it'll be congealed.

0:35:530:35:56

Then we can blast it under the grill so it's golden. Oh, crikey!

0:35:560:36:00

-It's got some weight in that.

-I'm not surprised, dude!

0:36:000:36:03

All that remains is to make the trimmings.

0:36:060:36:08

I've got some cream in here, single cream.

0:36:080:36:11

Some butter. We're doing some garlic butter.

0:36:110:36:14

I'm just going to crush that just to release all of that lovely garlic flavour.

0:36:140:36:19

-And could you put that...

-Okey-cokey.

0:36:190:36:21

Now, what we want to do is take a pinch of saffron...

0:36:210:36:24

I'm going to bruise it just so it releases the flavour.

0:36:240:36:28

You can smell that!

0:36:280:36:29

We're just going to infuse this cream with the saffron.

0:36:290:36:33

-This is the most expensive ingredient in the world.

-Yeah.

-It's more expensive than gold.

0:36:330:36:38

-I'm just drying the potatoes out there.

-Yes.

-Drier potatoes means fluffier mash.

0:36:380:36:42

-You've very slowly melted the butter...

-Yes.

0:36:430:36:46

..with the garlic, so you're trying to infuse the garlic.

0:36:460:36:49

-Yeah, absolutely right.

-Now, we'll have another infusion with green beans.

0:36:490:36:53

-We're going to roast them in an infused lemon oil.

-Are you?

0:36:530:36:56

-Yeah. So, first off, lemon zest. Mr King, sir?

-Yes, mate?

0:36:560:37:00

Would you mind sizzling that zest with olive oil?

0:37:000:37:03

This is sounding quite nice now.

0:37:030:37:05

I'm worried about the presentation.

0:37:050:37:07

-There you are.

-I'll put some herbs. Let them sizzle.

0:37:090:37:12

That looks very good, chaps.

0:37:120:37:14

There's the beans. Have you got that oil?

0:37:140:37:16

Fire that onto the beans.

0:37:160:37:18

Nicely coloured with that wonderful fragrance.

0:37:180:37:21

Spread them out.

0:37:210:37:23

Now, they need some salt.

0:37:240:37:26

I've never seen a bean cooked like this. Seriously, I haven't.

0:37:260:37:30

-It's a beautiful idea.

-I got that idea out of a magazine.

0:37:300:37:33

It said once you do your beans like that, you never do them any other way.

0:37:330:37:37

-Right, we'll put them in the...

-Quite a hot oven.

-Yes.

0:37:370:37:40

About 180 for about 15. Oh, come on Kingy, bring out the beast!

0:37:400:37:44

-It hasn't shrunk!

-It's grown!

0:37:440:37:47

Dude, it's a zeppelin!

0:37:470:37:49

-How do you know it's cooked?

-We want 70 degrees in the middle,

0:37:490:37:52

and I think that will do us nice.

0:37:520:37:54

# The temperature's rising... #

0:37:540:37:56

I can feel it, dude, it's there.

0:37:560:37:58

# We're having a party! #

0:37:580:38:00

-Come on, up you go.

-65...

0:38:000:38:02

-Up you go.

-70. Stop!

-80.

0:38:020:38:04

It's going to be dry. Yeah.

0:38:040:38:07

Could you light the grill for us, Mark?

0:38:070:38:09

This may look a little bit anaemic.

0:38:090:38:10

Now, these juices, when mixed with the crab apple jelly,

0:38:100:38:14

are going to make a crab apple jelly gravy.

0:38:140:38:17

It smells delicious.

0:38:170:38:18

Look at that!

0:38:180:38:20

Clear gorgeous loveliness!

0:38:200:38:22

-Shall we just leave that to rest?

-That's exactly...

0:38:220:38:25

You do the gravy, I'll do the potatoes. Clear the decks.

0:38:250:38:28

Si, all I'm going to do is pass those potatoes through a ricer.

0:38:280:38:31

You see here? The saffron floats to the top,

0:38:310:38:33

so if you didn't want it in, you just skin the lot off.

0:38:330:38:37

-Then you've just got the cream.

-Sure.

0:38:370:38:39

Look at this baby! Crab apple jelly.

0:38:390:38:42

I'm just adding the jelly a little at a time

0:38:420:38:45

because once it's in, you can't take it out, can you?

0:38:450:38:48

For the mash I'm just putting in a monstrously large knob of butter.

0:38:480:38:51

I'm adding the saffron cream.

0:38:510:38:54

Garlic butter, I don't want the big lumps of garlic in there.

0:38:540:38:57

Then just the seasoning. That's the mash.

0:38:570:39:00

Warm it through in a pan. Look at the colour. White pepper,

0:39:000:39:03

-which we always use with mash. Look at that!

-That looks good.

0:39:030:39:07

I'm disappointed.

0:39:110:39:12

Yeah, I wasn't expecting it to be as nice as that! That's very good.

0:39:120:39:16

Look at the beans, Mark.

0:39:160:39:18

Oh, thanks for that. All we need to do now is to crisp up the turkey,

0:39:180:39:22

and load the piping bag up with potatoes. Let that settle.

0:39:220:39:28

That's it, ready for carving.

0:39:280:39:30

That was delicate.

0:39:310:39:33

-That's a good...

-Oh, yes.

0:39:330:39:37

Yeah. Like that.

0:39:390:39:42

I think a bit of chervil.

0:39:420:39:44

That'll do it.

0:39:450:39:46

That's it.

0:39:460:39:48

-And there we have it.

-Well done, guys.

0:39:480:39:50

Essex on a plate.

0:39:500:39:52

We've got a ballantine of turkey, stuffed with veal and pistachio.

0:39:520:39:55

Served on a cream of saffron mash with garlic butter.

0:39:550:39:59

And we've got the crab apple jelly gravy.

0:39:590:40:02

Yes. With some roasted fine beans with lemon and thyme oil. Wonderful.

0:40:020:40:06

And plenty for sandwiches for everybody.

0:40:060:40:09

Well, yes. Half of Essex, actually.

0:40:090:40:11

Let's start with the saffron mash because...

0:40:120:40:14

You don't think it perhaps looks a bit vivid?

0:40:140:40:17

The saffron mash is absolutely perfect. It really is.

0:40:170:40:20

Now, the beans, I thought this was a nice idea. Equally, I love the sauce.

0:40:200:40:24

The three flavours are fantastic.

0:40:240:40:26

I was a little bit concerned about the turkey.

0:40:260:40:29

Not as concerned as we were!

0:40:290:40:30

Because it was a big piece of meat.

0:40:300:40:32

We've never cooked a torpedo before.

0:40:320:40:34

The combination is fantastic.

0:40:340:40:36

I love the bacon going round the outside. That has kept the turkey succulent and juicy.

0:40:360:40:40

I would be prepared to give you eight out of ten for that.

0:40:400:40:43

It's crunch time. The diners here will taste both dishes,

0:40:430:40:46

but without any idea of who cooked which.

0:40:460:40:49

First up is Mark's lamb stuffed with the lobster mousse,

0:40:490:40:52

served with the cheese, mustard and basil mash.

0:40:520:40:55

-Shall I cut them all?

-It looked professional.

0:40:550:40:58

I'm not too sure about the mousse that went with it.

0:40:580:41:01

The lamb spoke for itself, and I thought that was great.

0:41:010:41:04

I've not tried to seafood and lamb together before, but I'm a convert.

0:41:040:41:09

I thought it had a very, very delicate flavour,

0:41:090:41:11

but I'm not certain whether or not it was an ideal combination.

0:41:110:41:15

The mousse, I felt the flavours got a bit lost in.

0:41:150:41:18

There was a lot of things in there and I don't think, for me,

0:41:180:41:22

all the flavours came out.

0:41:220:41:24

The mash, a very interesting combination of herbs and mustard

0:41:240:41:28

and I'm certainly going to try one... Pinch that one and try it at home.

0:41:280:41:32

It's an excellent representation of the county.

0:41:320:41:35

Traditionally reared meat, we've got the best of seafood,

0:41:350:41:38

we've got the best of locally grown seasonal vegetables.

0:41:380:41:42

To me, that is Essex on a plate.

0:41:420:41:44

This lot seem to really know their food. How will our dish go down?

0:41:440:41:48

Time to find out.

0:41:480:41:50

I thought the turkey was really bland.

0:41:500:41:53

And I think it was made to feel a bit more bland

0:41:530:41:57

because the bacon was quite strong.

0:41:570:41:59

I think the presentation was rather slapdash

0:41:590:42:02

and amateur and almost childish.

0:42:020:42:04

The crab apple in the jus was nice.

0:42:040:42:10

I liked the beans, the way they had been roasted with the garlic and herbs.

0:42:100:42:14

That came across very well.

0:42:140:42:15

The saffron and the lemon worked really well together.

0:42:150:42:18

Unfortunately, they overpowered almost everything else.

0:42:180:42:22

The mash reminded me of a few Ford Escorts I've seen

0:42:220:42:25

driving around Basildon before now, so that reminded me of Essex!

0:42:250:42:29

APPLAUSE

0:42:290:42:31

Well, thank you very much for having us in Essex. We've had a blast.

0:42:350:42:39

-I've dressed up!

-Yes, it's the first time he's put the tie on for many a year!

0:42:390:42:43

-We've had the right good craic.

-Yeah, especially with this man.

-Yes.

0:42:430:42:47

Now, down to the nitty gritty of it, really.

0:42:470:42:50

Could I have a show of hands please for the lamb dish?

0:42:500:42:56

That's one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine.

0:42:560:43:01

OK, good. Well, that's nine for the lamb dish.

0:43:010:43:04

And a show of hands for the turkey dish?

0:43:040:43:07

Great, smashing. That's grand.

0:43:070:43:09

I can announce that the lamb dish was Mark's.

0:43:090:43:13

It's been a pleasure to have you guys here. The Hairy Bikers!

0:43:160:43:19

Well, that was a bit of a landslide,

0:43:200:43:23

but you can't really argue with a result like that.

0:43:230:43:26

Mark's a brilliant chef.

0:43:260:43:28

Despite our thrashing, it's been a great trip round Essex

0:43:280:43:31

-and we've enjoyed the food, especially the cockles.

-And the oysters!

0:43:310:43:35

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:460:43:48

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:480:43:49

Si and Dave explore Essex where they cook a traditional county favourite in Southend-on-Sea. They harvest Colchester oysters and learn how to talk to turkeys. Finally, they face a cook-off against top chef Mark Baumann. Restaurant diners decide who has created the best taste of Essex.


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