22/12/2012 Click


22/12/2012

From Swedish self-driving cars to internet in the Amazon rainforest, Click takes a look back at some of 2012's biggest tech stories.


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Transcript


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From Swedish self driving cars it has to be Click, which takes a look

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back at some of 2012's biggest tax stories.

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Hello? I am still in here. Welcome to the best of Click 2012.

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This is the BBC TV Centre in London, an icon of broadcasting for decades.

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Take a good look at the place. The time is coming to an end. We have

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moved out and the place is pretty much been shut down. As we wrap up

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be fitting to from the programme here last time.

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We will look back at some of the coolest mobile technology that we

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have picked up in the last year. We will revisit some of the places

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where technology is playing a life- saving role.

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The air is also a few glimpses of the future. And we have the best

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websites of the year. It is to be, to hold it and it has

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failed to keep up with the advances in technology. Not this place. We

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started the year by asking if another old favourite reached the

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end of the road. With smart phones and tablets

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finally had its day. Something ably demonstrated by this rather

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laboured metaphor. You were sure to you again anyway. -- we will show

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Gaming is now pretty big business. This is a prototype device called

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Project Fiona. At its heart is a processor that has two analogue

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control sticks that act as handles. It is a PC disguised as a tablet.

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Supercharged processes in tablets and smart phones is something of a

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theme. Improved processing power allows the machines to do more,

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faster. Tablets can be used as controllers for televisions and

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games. Gestures and movements control the action. Overlain

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graphics on to the real world, or augmented reality, appeared in

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several forms. This included games that bring toys to life. Or

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was also offers phones with more buttons and keys.

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All of this is made possible by the more powerful chips at the heart of

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the devices. The Science Museum is always

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looking to push the envelope when it comes to innovation. The latest

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move is to develop an Android and iPhone smartphone application that

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can enhance the visitor experience. It uses augmented reality, that

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overlays review of the world. In this case we have done it with a

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person. It looks very realistic. You take your phone and point it at

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a particular market. The mark true then brings up a mayor to rise to a

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version of James May. It is a truly revolutionary piece of machinery.

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Just launched, it is called James May signed stories.

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weird. It is really being photographed, but being

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photographed signed more painlessly many differ many differ

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amphitheatre of cameras. They capture various different

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expressions. Once they have taken that of the view, they have you. In

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the early days of photography, people used to think that the

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picture took your soul. It is a bit like that. They can do anything

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with you. The processing in the mobile devices is so powerful they

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are now actually capable of rendering three-dimensional

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graphics. It allows you to move in, out and shake it all about. I am

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being driven around the headquarters just outside of

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called LTE called LTE tting speeds of up to 1,000 megabits per

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second. This is only a trial. We will not see this for a couple of

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years. There are some base stations literally just right by the car.

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What they are doing is combining bent wits at different frequencies

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and putting back together unbelievable speeds. But it is not

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4G can reach. We're inside the Arctic Circle, visiting Europe's

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newest computer Mac town. -- computer Mac. It extends well

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just how far. A ride into the wide world and this would prove a point.

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Imagine streaming high-definition movies out here. In the middle of

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nowhere. Unfortunately, we had to. I have got so over not found. --

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server. It seems that no matter how fast you hot spots get, there will

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always be some very cold spots in between.

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Some of the Some of the occasionally icy mobile technology.

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Talking of cool, I have to say, this place even if it is a few

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years old and it is more than half empty, it still looks cool. This is

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the newsroom. This is where the information comes in. A large part

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of the world does not have access to the highest technology or the

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fastest devices. Of four people in the developing world, technology

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place a simpler, but often much more vital role.

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At centres like this, people all over India are registering for a

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biometric data that is captured and ended in the system. The process

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begins here. First a photograph is taken. Then fingerprints are

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scanned. This biometric data forms the basis of that idea. While the

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technology is simple and robust, there are still a lot of problems

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creating an accurate data base that accounts for a population as large

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as India's. A number of people in this country are agricultural

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labourers. They do not drive that many tractors. These people twirl

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in the fields. Many of them, their fingerprints are coming off.

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Most women from poorer areas where Mary lives never see a health

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professional during their pregnancy. The usually deliver at home. They

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often have no option to walk miles to the nearest clinic. Every year,

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over 6,000 women in women in to pregnancy related complications.

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Every few weeks for the past few months, these automated calls have

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track to health as her unborn baby develops. She is a woman taking

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part in a trial called baby monitor. It develops an accurate, automated

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screening system that can identify potential problems remotely.

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All of us are bargain hunters at heart. But is it worth buying

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something just because it is going cheap? Gadget hunters in Bangalore

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head to the national market. An oasis of unbranded electronics. On

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closer examination, there is a new Hunter in town. Cabs. Not just Top

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End, but bargain basement. Tablets are supposed to stand out from the

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crowd. To be successful in any market place, especially when the

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competition is stiff, you need to have more than the shop next door.

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There is a couple of ways of doing this. Like adding features. This is

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a Intel Studybook out next month end of the Indian market. There is

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a rubber band inside, protecting it from dusty conditions. It has got

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all of the features you would expect. But it is not cheap. It

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costs around the same as the desktop computer. The other way is

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to go for value for money. For half the price of the Intel Studybook,

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this comes in a box. The price is due to cutting back on those

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features. As well as a capacity of screen,

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this tablet should run three to four times faster than the first

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one. They will also make a commercial version. This programme

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is an example of the government's eagerness to prioritise education.

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But is it the best way to reach out to rural areas? This is one of the

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mos remote place as I have ever visited.

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If you look behind every there, you can see that the shore line is ten

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kilometres away. It is also it, just behind me. It is one of the

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largest obituaries to the Amazon river. Two masts have been put up.

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They're covering about 45-50 kilometres length of the river. And

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the communities that live each side. They are carrying both voice and

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data. The villagers have something to celebrate. It is not just our

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connected to the internet through a wi-fi rata, which connects to the

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new mobile network. It of us several computers to access basic

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information for study and for a play. They are running an operating

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system that runs applications on service for running the entire

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system over the data network means that the set-up needs to be

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reliable. The masts are suited with solar annals. Each of the

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communities covered by the signal will use it in a different way.

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This man walks the -- is woman circus. TRANSLATION: We can now

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take pictures and vi circus and show others what we do.

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We will be able to ask people what we need. More resources to expand.

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There are still challenges here. Wages are low and if this project

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is to expand, it will need affordable data.

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Here on the 4th for is our old home. This is Click's old edit suite. To

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give you one example of how technology marches on, we used to

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need all of this equipment appear. As well as saying how technology

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can change lives in the developing world, we are lucky enough to see

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some of the most advanced research on the planet. Some of the stuff

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still years away from being ready. Even smartphone Scandi Kunduz and

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if you want to do anything that requires more than one hand. --

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cash left over can wear goggles fitted with the GPS sensors to show

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speed, and position. Innovega is an wearable

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wearable displays. They have developed a contact lens, you can

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focus on two things at once. Light from the surrounding environment

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goes through the outer portion of the pupil. They Redknapp receives

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each image in focus at the same time. -- the retina. The only real

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thing about this are my eyes. In the future the cameras will combine

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the thing into one photographic moving image of my face. It will be

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more flattering. The very height of ocular fashion. This is another

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device that relies on your eyes. You are holding on with one hand,

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trying to use your tablet with the other. This is a device controlled

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by simply looking at it. At the bottom of the Tatler there are two

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sensors monitoring by movement. -- tablet. The pointer follows my eye

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movements. The browser opens. We have got arrows on the screen. I

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can scroll up and scroll down. Left and right just by looking at it.

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Each of these things sheets contains 500,000 transistors

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printed onto every day plastic. They are combined with a layer of

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e-ink, becoming a flexible display. This will be production ready at

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from black-and-white to colour displays, the electronic Kinglake

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is one way to take advantage of flexible electronics. -- e-ink. It

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is sending images to Aith free- standing display. Tiny text becomes

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more readable on a larger screen. In the future we may not have to

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backs to charge them. Some of the biggest car manufacturers are

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for third-party GPS systems. It is outside the car where Wi-Fi

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charging could prove the real game changer. This electric car is

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its charger. That would be embedded in the garage or parking space.

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This system by CoreCom means you do not have to be that precise. What

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is unique about this system is its tolerance to dodgy parking. You can

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stick the wheels on the white lines and fees two pads will still

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transfer energy. That freedom to no longer have to be directly over the

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charging point opens up other possibilities as well. This is just

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a dream at the moment. CoreCom says there is no reason why hundreds of

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charging points could not be embedded in roads, each one sending

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without without eve without eveg. This is a

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running for the last three years. A convoy that allows the driver to

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take their fate of the pedals and their hands of the wheel. It is

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cruise control. Cars travel six metres apart and in perfect

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synchronisation. It is as though the truck throws out a --

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breadcrumbs. How does it feel to go hand free at 60kph? Is it OK to

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take my hands off? I do not want to. There we go. I have got to say,

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this is a really odd experience. Just turning around to told EU

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feels unfamiliar. A part of me is going, keep your eye on the road. -

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- to talk to you. Can you please pass me my laptop? Thank you. You

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could do anything. LJ Rich performing the world's first 60mph

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panpipe solo. Faces Gene Hunt's of Audi Quattro. It has electric

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Windows. Every week Kate Russell treats us to a small selection of

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enrich enrich all of our lives. These are

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Kate Russell's favourite websites of the year: With buttons to push

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and levers to pull, the Science Museum is one of the most

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Thank you to Chrome web lab, you do not need also fitting -- your sofa

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to enjoy it. You will have to wait for your turn in the queue to

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interact live. Now that I have told everyone about it, that weight will

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take a bit longer. Luckily, there are virtual options for all of the

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your turn. My favourite is the Sketchbot, you will need a web

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camera to take a photo. The app does not lecture upload a picture

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from your hard drive. If you are strapped for cash but need the help

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of a professional Getlunched is an lets you invite people to make up

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for a coffee or a bite to eat in return for advice. Using location

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data it will scour your lens and contacts and their own registered

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users looking for a suitable expo. If you see someone useful, say for

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example an account -- accountant, you can offer to take them to lunch.

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You can split it 50-50, you can also suggest they pay, but that

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could be a little cheeky if the one verifies. It is a... -- if you want

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their advice. How many times have you clicked I agree button without

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reading the terms and conditions? It is called the biggest lie on the

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internet. TOS aims to put a stop to this cavalier attitude to out

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receive. It highlights the good, bad and the downright cheeky. It

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applies a rating so you can see in an instant if you should be blindly

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clicking agree. If you had to choose one song that reflects your

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life right now, what would it be? That is the idea behind this is my

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chance. It delivers a different take on the modern player list. --

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This Is My Jam. The website will also recommend people to follow who

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have liked similar tracks to you. There are popular jams to choose

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from. This creates a wonderfully eclectic playlist accessed through

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the home screen. Science experiments always have the power

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to amaze, mainly because this is than being an illusion designed to

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trick our eyes. This YouTube channel shows what is in front of

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your nose. The addition of a compilation showing highlights is a

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great idea. It is worth watching the longer version to see exactly

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how science has created the illusion. Kate Russell's favourite

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website of the past 12 months. That's it for the best of Click

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2012, Part 1. If it has tended you to watch any of our features again

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in full, there are links at our website: Next week, more of our

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