13/07/2013 Click


13/07/2013

Guide to the latest technology news. Click looks at online safety as seen through the eyes of kids, to find out just how aware children are of the dangers of the web.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 13/07/2013. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

in Pakistani. -- Pakistan. It is not from Click.

:00:08.:00:15.

Gambling, gaming and grooming. Isn't it about time that you ask your

:00:15.:00:25.
:00:25.:00:35.

children about the dangers of the Too much, too young and too worried

:00:35.:00:39.

about what their parents will say when they tell them about it. This

:00:39.:00:43.

week, Click takes a look at what bothers children online.

:00:43.:00:47.

London gets its chance to join the maker movement as we explore what

:00:47.:00:49.

geeks can do with a bit of time on their hands.

:00:49.:00:54.

And we will meet the man who believes his video games are worth

:00:54.:00:59.

every penny. How many pennies is after you. -- is up to you. Also,

:00:59.:01:07.

the most memorable day of your life from every conceivable angle.

:01:07.:01:17.

Welcome to click . Ask any parent and they will be fixated on

:01:17.:01:22.

shielding their children from the Congress of the Internet. Just as

:01:22.:01:28.

much as children are focused on immersing themselves online. We

:01:28.:01:31.

assume that children do not have the first clue on what is safe online.

:01:32.:01:36.

But do they? We have been looking at some groundbreaking research that is

:01:36.:01:46.

asking the kids would bothers them online.

:01:46.:01:49.

If the Internet were a babysitter, you would not let it anywhere near

:01:49.:01:53.

your house, let alone your kids. And yet we parked our children online

:01:53.:02:02.

where they can end up enduring pop up pornography and violence.

:02:02.:02:09.

Recently, headlines have been dominated by the availability of

:02:09.:02:14.

images of child abuse. Feeding the fantasies of those who have gone on

:02:14.:02:19.

to commit acts of abuse. We have got to get the volume of the images

:02:19.:02:22.

down. We have got to get the number of people accessing them down. We

:02:22.:02:27.

will never do it through conventional police methods. We need

:02:27.:02:34.

better measures. Project on by the government, British Internet service

:02:34.:02:39.

providers plan to block images of abuse. Some cite Google are donating

:02:39.:02:48.

cash to organisations and developers tackling illegal content. These are

:02:48.:02:51.

real, concrete measures. The emphasis on images of child abuse,

:02:51.:02:58.

stranger danger, is obscuring other child online safety issues.

:02:58.:03:03.

Researchers at the London School of Economics hit on the idea of asking

:03:03.:03:09.

kids themselves what bothered them online. The survey 9-16 -year-olds

:03:09.:03:15.

across 25 European countries. the things we asked was to tell us

:03:15.:03:18.

in their own words what upset report that about what they saw the

:03:18.:03:23.

Internet. Pornography was absolutely the number one concern. Quite

:03:23.:03:33.
:03:33.:03:34.

closely followed by violent content. The research does make difficult

:03:34.:03:38.

reading. Children's innocent playtime intruded by very adult

:03:38.:03:48.
:03:48.:03:49.

content. But the news is not all bad. Childnet, which gives training

:03:49.:03:54.

in online safety, sent me off to Willingdon Boys School. I sat in on

:03:54.:04:03.

an IT course. The kids here have had a lot of help in how to negotiate

:04:03.:04:06.

difficulties on the net. They know what they like and what to do when

:04:06.:04:15.

they find something they do not. There are teacher is careful to

:04:15.:04:19.

point out that they are never far away from something that they

:04:19.:04:27.

perhaps do not want to see. They understand that terminology of just

:04:27.:04:31.

two clicks away from seeing something unsuitable. That could be

:04:31.:04:37.

anything. It could be nudity, a website that is to alter them. There

:04:37.:04:40.

is gambling, dating websites. There should not be exposed to them.

:04:40.:04:49.

are some technical fixes. In the end, however, it is really hard to

:04:49.:04:59.
:04:59.:05:01.

rein in a curious mind. Sometimes they are looking for something a bit

:05:01.:05:06.

edgy, a bit experimental. And they find more than they bargained for.

:05:06.:05:10.

Even if teenagers are looking for something, it does not mean they are

:05:10.:05:20.
:05:20.:05:21.

ready for what they find. To who should kids turn? Parents, friends?

:05:21.:05:27.

I just close the window and tell my parents. If it is something like a

:05:27.:05:34.

rude message that comes up to me in my e-mail, I just talk to them.

:05:34.:05:40.

does not really affect me mentally. We just ignore it and do not think

:05:40.:05:46.

about it. My mum and dad are getting stricter and stricter. Sometimes

:05:46.:05:53.

when I want to go on Facebook, it says that the pages blocked. I tend

:05:53.:06:01.

to just ignore it. We teach them to tell a trusted adult. That could be

:06:01.:06:04.

myself as a teacher, it could be another teacher. It could be a

:06:04.:06:13.

parent or a friend. Whoever their trust. Some people do not want to

:06:13.:06:15.

speak to their mother or father about it, because it is

:06:15.:06:22.

embarrassing. They want to speak to someone who will understand and not

:06:22.:06:28.

whether top instantly. If they feel that the parent is going to

:06:28.:06:34.

overreact, they will protect their privacy. They want to protect their

:06:34.:06:40.

communication space. But they want somebody. Most say they would like

:06:40.:06:48.

to be a parent or sibling. Anything that parents can do to make it a

:06:49.:06:55.

non- judgemental conversation is going to be a benefit. Challenging

:06:55.:07:00.

content bothers younger children, inappropriate contact upsets older

:07:00.:07:09.

kids. But the value in the research is that underlining parents will be

:07:09.:07:17.

hard to ban things online, but people can talk about it.

:07:17.:07:21.

Now it is over to you. We would like to hear from parents and children

:07:21.:07:28.

alike. What concerns you more? Content or contact? You can e-mail

:07:28.:07:37.

us. Next up, this week's tech news. Yuan has launched its own national

:07:38.:07:42.

e-mail service. Requiring each adult citizen with a postcode to sign up.

:07:42.:07:44.

Many users are worried that the service will give the government

:07:45.:07:51.

easy access to the data and increase its stranglehold on the Internet. In

:07:51.:07:53.

won has attempted to block international e-mail providers and

:07:53.:07:58.

other digital services in the past. It imposes one of the world 's most

:07:58.:08:05.

strict international filters. The co-founder of Pirate Bay is planning

:08:05.:08:09.

a totally secure a rival to a message. Hemlis, which means a

:08:09.:08:18.

secret in Swedish, will use encrypted messaging. He says he is

:08:18.:08:22.

making it in response to the government spying on user data.

:08:22.:08:29.

However, Apple and WhatsApp say that users are already fully encrypted.

:08:29.:08:34.

The investment target has been met through crowd funding in just two

:08:34.:08:44.
:08:44.:08:46.

days. An application has been provided that can alert patients to

:08:46.:08:51.

infection before it becomes a problem. The nappies change colour

:08:51.:08:56.

when they become soiled. Once scanned, they can provide data that

:08:56.:08:59.

can whatever you're an infection is looming. The couple behind the

:08:59.:09:09.
:09:09.:09:13.

invention are attempting to raise $20-$50000.

:09:13.:09:20.

The Duke of York is the first member of the Royal family to have a

:09:20.:09:25.

Twitter account. It has been verified. A long-time embrace of

:09:25.:09:29.

technology, according to a spokesperson, the prince hopes it

:09:29.:09:34.

will let people know what he is doing.

:09:34.:09:40.

A lot has been made recently of the new videogame consoles. And the big

:09:40.:09:46.

budget titles that are set to push the graphics to the limit. These

:09:46.:09:50.

games could cost upwards of �20 million to develop. It is no

:09:51.:09:55.

surprise the players are sometimes charged �40 for a copy. But not all

:09:55.:10:01.

games need to cost a fortune to make. Small, independent stooges can

:10:01.:10:05.

sometimes come up with innovative new games at a fraction of the cost.

:10:05.:10:10.

The question is, how much would you pay?

:10:10.:10:13.

Flashback ten years and you could be forgiven for thinking that

:10:13.:10:19.

Blockbuster gaming was the future. But with the rise of the smartphone,

:10:19.:10:26.

everyone has now got an indie games console in their pocket. As a

:10:26.:10:30.

result, the indie games market has exploded. It's like Minecraft are

:10:30.:10:35.

challenging the big boys. Maybe there could be something to this

:10:35.:10:39.

business after all. One company that is flying the flag in the games

:10:39.:10:47.

developers everywhere is Humble Indie Bundle. They let you pick your

:10:47.:10:52.

price for collections of indie games. You have got to put in at

:10:52.:10:55.

least a penny, but if you pay more than average you get extra perks to

:10:55.:11:01.

an end. -- thrown in. You can also choose how your money is to be

:11:01.:11:09.

dubbed. -- divvied up. In contrast to the studios, almost all the games

:11:09.:11:18.

have no copy protection. They are a DRM-free. With over $30 million in

:11:18.:11:23.

sales so far, it is looking like a what you want could possibly be onto

:11:23.:11:30.

something. I caught up with the guys behind it. One of the things that

:11:30.:11:34.

always strikes me with these pay what you want ideas, something that

:11:34.:11:41.

red had tried a furious ago, a lot of people are going to pay the

:11:41.:11:45.

minimum. Do you find that? One of the big distinctions of what we do

:11:45.:11:51.

is that we have a minimum. It changes the consumer's press pack.

:11:51.:11:57.

The first decision is, am I willing to pay or not? If they are, they are

:11:57.:12:02.

trying to encourage to feel good about what they are paying. The

:12:02.:12:08.

charity is an intrinsic part of that. As a human being, you will see

:12:08.:12:13.

what other people are paying and are influenced like that. ' or are

:12:13.:12:19.

provided without digital protection. Why did you decide to do that?

:12:19.:12:23.

mentality was that if you are not willing to pay a penny for the game,

:12:23.:12:28.

you're not willing to pay the game. I was pretty excited about playing

:12:28.:12:36.

in the soft title. I did not have my account. As a paying customer, I was

:12:36.:12:40.

not able to play the game. That is the crux of what we were trying to

:12:40.:12:47.

avoid. When you started including the big titles, the older titles, I

:12:47.:12:55.

am sure the houses that developed those really reacted against any

:12:55.:13:01.

kind of copy protection. That was a bit of a fight. It was the first

:13:01.:13:09.

time we had anything with DRM. into resting for the retailers.

:13:09.:13:14.

You're asking people what they think it is worth. I can best always

:13:14.:13:22.

surprises us with their generosity. -- are a fan base. Good luck with

:13:22.:13:30.

it. Continue being humble. If you make something into resting

:13:30.:13:37.

and unconventional, chances are it will be shown. And so-called maker

:13:37.:13:40.

affairs have been popping up around the world to give people a chance to

:13:40.:13:50.
:13:50.:13:53.

sell us their stock. We have been to the first minute to make a fairer.

:13:53.:13:58.

Maker Faire is more than a group of people showing off home-grown

:13:58.:14:03.

technology, it has become an international technology. Seven

:14:03.:14:07.

years after its inception in San Francisco, where else, it is time

:14:07.:14:13.

for London to hold this quirky take on a county fair. London's many

:14:14.:14:19.

Maker Faire is less of an exhibition and more offered international

:14:19.:14:23.

experience. For example, I cannot get in before I make my own name

:14:23.:14:29.

badge. I'd better get to work. Not exactly cutting edge but the great

:14:29.:14:35.

illustration of the ethos behind the culture. It is and more about

:14:35.:14:42.

attitude. Also, I willingness to give it a try. 1000 attendees of all

:14:42.:14:47.

ages and pocket size, the business is booming. I asked one man to

:14:47.:14:54.

explain the appeal. As consumers, we buy products that people have solved

:14:54.:14:58.

all the problems for. Sometimes it does not do everything you want. If

:14:58.:15:08.
:15:08.:15:09.

online. There are amazing online communities for this stuff. There is

:15:09.:15:12.

a definite correlation between making things and making noise. From

:15:12.:15:22.

renovated kids toys rigged up to make what can only be described as

:15:22.:15:27.

contemporary music to the vegetable synthesiser. This uses something

:15:27.:15:31.

called a Makey Makey device, crocodile clips at each end, but one

:15:31.:15:35.

end to the board and the other end to anything even slightly

:15:35.:15:39.

conductive. It uses a programming language Scratch to make the noises.

:15:39.:15:48.

If you don't like vegetables? Try a banana. This is where the seemingly

:15:48.:15:51.

frivolous becomes relevant. The technology becomes the basis for a

:15:51.:16:00.

customised experience. The perfect example of this is the 3D printing

:16:00.:16:05.

revolution. It is tailor made. This 3-D printer is hooked up to

:16:05.:16:09.

Minecraft, the popular game. With the help of an Esker, we're going to

:16:09.:16:16.

build something. -- an expert. We take the BBC local and print it out

:16:16.:16:21.

from Minecraft world into the real world. Alyssa is quite a bit better

:16:21.:16:28.

at Minecraft than I am. Once the design is built, pressing a button

:16:28.:16:33.

inside the world sends it to the printer. Six or seven minutes later,

:16:33.:16:39.

the finished version. Downstairs sees the rise of the machines

:16:39.:16:43.

courtesy of the RepRap community. They use the 3-D printers to make

:16:43.:16:48.

other 3D printing is. Those lime green bits have been printed. They

:16:48.:16:54.

also make other things. Today marks her second attempt to 3D printing

:16:54.:17:00.

bust of computer legend Alan Turing by the end of the day. We have had

:17:00.:17:08.

one attempt. We are doing a lot better today. The fact is, they can

:17:08.:17:16.

print whatever they want down here. But enough printers material, the

:17:16.:17:21.

culture fits making something to your requirements. The potential to

:17:21.:17:28.

make custom things. Everything can be one. No one needs to have

:17:28.:17:31.

something that is the same. It is amazing for applications like

:17:31.:17:37.

medicine. No two people are the same. If you need to hip

:17:37.:17:41.

replacement, your clipboard be the same as someone else's. With 3D

:17:41.:17:47.

printing is, you can get a custom hip. If you fancy organising your

:17:47.:17:53.

own Maker Faire, you can -- organising your own Maker Faire, you

:17:53.:17:59.

can get in touch. I wanted to make sure that we had a Maker Faire here.

:17:59.:18:05.

I did not know how to start. I e-mailed a few people that might be

:18:05.:18:10.

interested. It is learning something new. I never used to be able to do

:18:10.:18:14.

electronics or engineering or anything like that. My skill set

:18:14.:18:19.

comes from a creative perspective. lot of the trends on display here

:18:19.:18:25.

are home-made. You can see the innovation and are behaviour around

:18:25.:18:29.

it when you look past the DIY. We are capable of shaping our own

:18:29.:18:39.

future. If she can make it they are, she can make it anywhere. Onto web

:18:39.:18:43.

Skip know. If you have ever been married, if you still are, you will

:18:44.:18:48.

know that your wedding day is the most photographed the off your life.

:18:48.:18:52.

If you can't afford the often expensive wedding photographer, what

:18:52.:18:56.

some of my friends have done in the past is to make an album out of the

:18:56.:19:00.

best snaps that their guests have taken. The problem is getting hold

:19:00.:19:03.

of all those photos from all those different people can be just like

:19:03.:19:10.

herding cats. Kate Russell has an application for that. Not herding

:19:10.:19:17.

cats, collecting wedding pictures! Brides always look beautiful, but

:19:17.:19:20.

often it is the informal photos that capture the really precious moments.

:19:20.:19:26.

At the back pics .com, you can make your own private space to invite

:19:27.:19:30.

wedding guests to share all their photos from the day so that you can

:19:30.:19:35.

make sure you save the very best of them to create the perfect album to

:19:35.:19:45.
:19:45.:19:45.

share. -- at Wedpics.com. Guests with an iPhone or Android handset

:19:45.:19:50.

can download the application and get access to a real-time sharing are

:19:50.:19:53.

commentating network during the special day. Not ideal for everyone

:19:53.:19:57.

to be tapping away on their phones throughout the ceremony but a great

:19:57.:20:01.

way to make sure you can share in any chitchat at the woods. Those

:20:01.:20:05.

that the smart phone can upload their photos and view the album

:20:05.:20:09.

through your browser. You can download and print invitation cards

:20:09.:20:15.

and posters with instructions free of charge. But some high-quality

:20:15.:20:25.

options available if you want to pay. -- printed options. For a

:20:25.:20:32.

totally different perspective on life, Google Earth is hard to match.

:20:32.:20:38.

Plan of attack .com have been experimenting with ways to play with

:20:38.:20:42.

this amazing 3-D model of the four years and have a stunning collection

:20:42.:20:49.

of toys to shore for their efforts. -- Planetinaction.com. From mapping

:20:49.:20:56.

the tides in the oceans, what this company does mapping together other

:20:56.:20:59.

people 's immense collections of data is truly mind blowing and

:20:59.:21:08.

really quite beautiful. -- from crossing the mountains. I found the

:21:08.:21:12.

shipping sim little sketchy to control and instructions are scant

:21:12.:21:16.

to say the least but this application to visualise the tidal

:21:16.:21:21.

flows around the world using data collected by NASA's perpetual ocean

:21:21.:21:31.
:21:31.:21:37.

study last year is fascinating and beautiful in equal measure. A free

:21:37.:21:43.

Android app, don't touch, takes a novel approach to security by making

:21:43.:21:49.

a large alarm noise when the handset is disturbed. -- Don't Touch My

:21:49.:21:59.

Droid! It has a set of abrasive alarms which are set off if your

:21:59.:22:02.

phone is disturbed by anyone. As well as being a great security

:22:02.:22:05.

feature, you can use this application to keep your friends in

:22:05.:22:10.

check on a fun night out. You know the type, you leave your phone on

:22:10.:22:14.

the table, go to the bathroom and come back and find they have text is

:22:14.:22:19.

your boss or set your interface language to Japanese. You can also

:22:19.:22:22.

use it for extra security in old Eldon by propping your up against

:22:22.:22:32.
:22:32.:22:34.

the door at night or placed under your phone at dinner, it could let

:22:34.:22:40.

you someone is trying to steal it. It easy to deactivate at it is an

:22:40.:22:43.

instant deterrent is someone who was not expecting your phone to start

:22:43.:22:52.

shouting at them. It could just do the trick. YouSendIt Is changing its

:22:52.:22:58.

name to Hightail to reflect a move away from a simple file transfer

:22:58.:23:06.

service to more complete client operating with signature features

:23:06.:23:11.

for some customers. It has 43 million users and has been announces

:23:11.:23:21.
:23:21.:23:25.

2004. For the time being, you can still find it at YouSendIt .com. And

:23:25.:23:30.

another intriguing automation for your Android was released this week.

:23:30.:23:37.

Snap cat is an add-on to the IM app we looked at a few weeks ago. It is

:23:37.:23:42.

a dancing. On your screen to encourage cats to tap it and take a

:23:43.:23:46.

self photograph. I don't know of my cats are camera shy or just a bit

:23:47.:23:51.

dim but I did not have much joy getting them to play. Maybe he is

:23:51.:24:00.

just getting ready for his close-up. Thank you, Kate. Kate Russell's web

:24:00.:24:04.

skip. Those links are on the website along with everything else you have

:24:04.:24:10.

seen today and our entire archive. If you would like to comment on

:24:10.:24:16.

This week Click looks at online safety as seen through the eyes of kids, to find out just how aware children are of the dangers of the web.

London gets its chance to join the maker movement and Click explores what geeks can do with a bit of time on their hands.


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS