08/03/2014 Click


08/03/2014

Click investigates how hackers can use public wifi to steal sensitive information. Plus the latest 'smell' tech. Includes tech news and Webscape.


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Transcript


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LAUGHS EVILLY

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He's building his part up again.

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This week on Click, we're seeing double.

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But can your phone tell the difference between a good

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and an evil Wi-Fi hotspot?

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We'll ask if using public Wi-Fi is ever safe.

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We'll also sample the gadgets that stimulate your senses.

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But do they smell, or taste, as good as they sound?

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And we'll get a flavour of the Texan interactive festival

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that is South By Southwest.

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All that, plus a round-up of the biggest tech news of the week

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and a way to protect your property online, in Webscape.

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Welcome to Click. I'm Spencer Kelly.

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Over the past few months, we've been investigating an internet crime

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which is almost invisible and which, we've been told, is on the rise.

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Now, you don't have to be a spy to pull it off.

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In fact, all you need is a mobile phone.

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The hack relies on our desire to always be online.

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And specifically, those times

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when we want to hook up to a Wi-Fi hotspot.

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Now, hotspots are really easy to join, of course.

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You just select one on your phone by tapping the screen.

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And conveniently, most phones will remember

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the hotspots that you trust

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and reconnect to them automatically the next time they're in range.

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But, even the hotspots that you trust might not actually be safe.

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And that's because your device can be tricked into connecting

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to another network with an identical name.

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But one that's been set up by a criminal.

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It's called an Evil Twin attack.

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It certainly is, Evil Twin.

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And while he's actually been around for a little while now,

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we've since discovered just how easy it is for him

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to swipe my information using just a mobile.

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Which means your attacker could be standing right next to you.

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Dan Simmons reports.

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The busy lives of the often-spotted city dweller.

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These mammals are always on the go.

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Their social habits include fiddling with these peculiar devices.

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Thankfully, because they often use Wi-Fi,

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we can now see almost everything they do.

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In the park...

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Yeah, it's quite shocking, quite terrifying to think, you know,

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whatever I could have been looking at,

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someone could have found that stuff.

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Relaxing in the coffee shop...

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I thought it would happen in some sort of hi tech van outside.

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But just to see it on a normal laptop here is just a bit unnerving!

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And in the office...

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We could add cards, remove cards, buy items...

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Any functionality within Amazon, we could do pretending to be Caroline.

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City slicker Martin's hopping on to a Wi-Fi hotspot.

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But it's one set up by Nosey Pete, our security expert,

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who's curious to find out what these city folk do in their lunch hour.

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Here he is searching and he finds the website for Billy Elliot.

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There it is.

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We looked in on several other people's sessions,

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and it wasn't difficult to see what they were up to,

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including their passwords and other personal data along the way.

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By simply naming his hotspot the same as the one

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that Martin's expecting to find, Pete can dupe him into believing

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he's on the real one.

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But that's with a public, open Wi-Fi network hotspot.

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No username required, or password.

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Throw those in, and you'd think you'd be a bit more safe. Wouldn't you?

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An aptly-named coffee shop in trendy Shoreditch,

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home to London's tech hub, and one where the owners set up a hotspot

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with a password. A password that is written on the counter.

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And of course, nosy Pete is up to his old tricks again

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and can just as easily set up an identical Wi-Fi hotspot

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asking for the same password.

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This time, it's Lucy caught in the trap.

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We can see what flights you are planning to take,

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we'd know when you will be away from home, away from the office.

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And if it were a business arrangement,

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maybe we could predict what sort of meetings will take place,

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that could be important to the business.

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Yeah. Wow.

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This snooping on what others are doing isn't just nosy,

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it's illegal, which is why we did not set up an evil twin Wi-Fi here.

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Instead, we asked users to log on to our bogus network

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and explained to them what we could see.

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That's not nice. That's not nice at all! That is not nice, no.

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And it's not just websites.

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Nowadays, the apps we use seem to love automatically

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updating in the background, so it's now possible for our data to

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be hacked without our phone leaving our pocket.

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This photo-sharing app is typical.

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It is sending out the user's e-mail address list, password

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and phone contacts to make sure it's up-to-date.

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Pete has got the lot.

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But what he is not is very mobile himself.

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The evil twin Wi-Fi scam has been around for a while

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but all that kit has made Pete's job, well, a bit tricky.

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But it turns out you can carry out the same attack

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with an ordinary mobile smartphone.

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This is mobile Mike

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and he is using his to spoof the local pub's Wi-Fi hotspot.

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With some software from the web,

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he is recording everything Caroline is doing.

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So how worried should we be?

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The head of Europol's cyber crime unit told us

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users simply should not use public Wi-Fi networks for anything

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financial or sensitive but instead wait until they get home.

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Charlie Mcmurdie headed up the UK's police effort against online crime

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until last year.

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She told me Wi-Fi providers should now carry out regular checks

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as snooping becomes easier.

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Whereas, previously, we have really focused on the sort of

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stand-alone attacks and compromises of big databases, now, a lot of

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mainstream criminals have identified there are easy opportunities

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and vulnerabilities just walking down the street and exploiting

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Wi-Fi networks that exist in every coffee shop,

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every premises you go to.

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Back at the cafe, Letty is checking her e-mail.

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But, this time, our snoopers are not so lucky.

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Thankfully, most e-mail and retail sites are encrypted.

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It's slower but much safer.

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Encrypted sites show up with the letters HTTPS in the address bar.

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Your browser might also add a padlock to reassure you.

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If your session is encrypted this way,

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no-one else should be able to snoop.

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But our security experts have found a way to bypass even that,

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using an app that can be simply downloaded to a mobile phone.

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Caroline is shopping.

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In this attack, Mike doesn't need to spoof a hotspot,

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he just needs to be on the same genuine Wi-Fi network.

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But the app he has got manages to tell his victim's handset to

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send all of its web requests to his own mobile.

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He will act as a man in the middle, again seeing everything

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because he is now able to strip out the encryption that Caroline

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is relying on.

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Many other encrypted websites would be just as vulnerable.

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It means if you are using Wi-Fi with just a mobile,

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your attacker could be sitting right next to you.

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You can see them all sitting on benches, and they wouldn't be

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given a second thought to the potential that those communications

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are being picked up and read by the person sat on the bench next to them.

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Dan Simmons reporting.

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And just to reiterate, there was nothing intrinsically unsafe,

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insecure or unusual about the websites featured in that report.

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The hack happens because of the way that our phones recognise

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and connect over Wi-Fi networks.

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Joining me is Mick Paddington,

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from one of the security firms who worked with us on that report.

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-Hi.

-Hi.

-What can we do? We can't give up using public Wi-Fi, can we?

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No, and there's some simple steps you can take.

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You would not read out your credit card on the train

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aloud over the phone with an audience.

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so you've got to be aware that

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when you are doing these kind of transactions or working on the web

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you should be limiting the sort of behaviour you're doing online.

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Just to clarify - the mere fact that you have to enter a password

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to join a Wi-Fi network does not make it secure.

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No. Definitely not.

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In fact, a lot of these passwords are in the public domain because these

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companies that own these hotspots

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don't actually change these passwords.

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The sort of passwords you should be looking for

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which are more secure are dynamic, one-use passwords.

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If you are in a hotel room, it will ask you for your name

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and room number and then issue you with a password.

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Rather than you going into a well-known coffee shop, for instance,

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and the Wi-Fi address and the password is up on the wall.

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So those one-time passwords can't be obtained by some hacker

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who is setting up a spoof Wi-Fi network?

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They would have no idea what that password is and if they were

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issued with it, you would be issued with a different one.

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Right. That is the theory, OK. Obviously, nothing is 100% secure.

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What we are putting in practice is behaviour

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that reduces your risk online.

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Nothing is 100% secure and, if it was,

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it would probably be totally unusable.

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What about the idea of not using Wi-Fi

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but using the cellular network, the mobile network, to connect to your bank, for example?

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Is that safer?

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Yes, but the trouble is that most people connect to Wi-Fi

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or automatically connect.

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You have got to be aware of what your device is connecting to

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and if you have it set up to connect automatically.

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In terms of using the cellular network, yes, it is inherently more secure.

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The connection from your device to the mast is encrypted.

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The trouble is Wi-Fi is more convenient, it tends to be a lot more faster.

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4G isn't everywhere yet

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so people will default to a Wi-Fi network.

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Thank you very much. Wise words. Good advice there.

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If you have advice or experiences of your own that you

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would like to share, e-mail us.

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Next up, a look at this week's tech news.

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A Japanese-American man has been named by Newsweek magazine

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as the creator of Bitcoin.

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Dorian Satoshi Nakamoto, who shares part of his name

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with the mysterious figure behind the digital currency,

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was chased by reporters through Los Angeles after the news broke

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only to tell the Associated Press he had nothing to do with Bitcoin.

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He said he hadn't even heard of the currency

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until three weeks ago when his son was contacted by a reporter.

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Ever wanted the physical strength of a superhero?

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Well, engineers in Italy have created a powered exoskeleton

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that can do just that.

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The body extender tracks the movement of the person

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wearing it and can lift 50 kilos in each of its metal hands.

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Its modular design means it could be rapidly reconfigured to perform

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a large number of different tasks

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such as work in factories or emergency rescue scenarios.

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Finally, thinking of getting new business cards?

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American programmer Kevin Bates

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has certainly made an impression with his.

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It sports an in-built Tetris game.

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Made up of a tiny Arduino computer, an OLED screen

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and capacitive sensor controls, a user or business associate

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can play for up to nine hours before changing batteries.

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Programmable to play other games,

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Bates is already working on a Pokemon variant.

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In recent years, it has made us sit up

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and take notice of everything from Twitter to lifelogging.

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So the big question is

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what does Austin's South By Southwest Interactive Festival

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hold for us this year?

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LJ Rich is our reporter on the ground,

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she's just landed and this is what she has found so far.

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One trend that shows no sign of abating

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if this festival's obsession with eating.

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Look at all these restaurants along sixth street.

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Down the road, something new is being cooked up.

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It can't hurt to be more creative in the kitchen

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and that's exactly what researchers at IBM's Watson Group decided.

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They're using cognitive computing,

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which is like a machine learning as opposed to programmed,

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to help put unexpected ingredients together.

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How does it work?

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You choose an ingredient you like, like asparagus,

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and then Watson does millions of calculations, comparing asparagus

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for thousands of other ingredients, then decides which ingredient would

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fit perfectly with asparagus that humans would not normally think of by themselves.

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Now, this may just be a nice way of trying different foods but actually

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the science behind this can be widened out

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to things like travel itineraries or even making perfume.

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The whole idea behind cognitive computing is, of course, to do things a little bit differently.

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So, what does a real chef make of ingredients being put together by a machine?

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Creativity is based on previous experience.

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For chefs, it is something we tasted, it's a smell from our childhood,

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something we remember that spurs us to create a new dish.

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Now, working with this system, that's erased.

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It's all based on new information.

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We are starting with a blank slate looking at a set of ingredients

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that seemingly have no relationship, no memory, nothing to spur us on,

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just the ingredients themselves are the inspiration.

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-There it is. Russian beet salad.

-Thank you very much.

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Mmmm. Mmmm!

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Beets, prunes, pickles, cucumbers - who would have thought?

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I liked it more when you didn't tell me what was in it.

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LJ Rich - and LJ will have more from South By Southwest next week.

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Now, a feast for your senses.

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Computers have traditionally played to only two of our five senses,

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sight and sound.

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And while these have become increasingly immersive over the years,

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the other senses are much harder to cater for.

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But, after recently finding something that simulates touch,

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it is time to turn my attention and my tongue to something rather tasty.

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This is what is being billed as the world's first electric lollipop.

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It doesn't look like it but bear with me.

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You stick your tongue between these two electrodes

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and they pass an electric current through it.

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What the researchers here at City University London have found

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is that by varying the amplitude and frequency of that current

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they can stimulate the different taste receptors.

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That means they can simulate the four basic tastes - sweet,

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sour, salt and bitter.

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The question is does it work? Time to find out.

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By far the easiest taste to create is a sour, lemony taste.

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It's the same sensation you get when you taste some metals. Ughhh!

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HE GIGGLES

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That's so weird. That's lemon. Lemon?

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The theory is that animals have developed a strong response

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to sour taste in order to detect food that's gone bad.

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The other tastes are certainly harder to judge.

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I can't really taste anything.

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One thing is for sure - it is a weird experience.

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While this thing can only ever simulate basic tastes,

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it could be used in combination with a mouth-worn device

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that stimulates your nose,

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at which point you should be able to detect many, many more flavours.

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In fact, that is where we are off to next.

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We have ticked off sight, sound, touch and taste.

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It is now time for Lara Lewington to hit the fifth sense,

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as she heads to Madrid to see what's cooking.

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This may be a feast for the eyes

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but the rest is left to the imagination.

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Spanish chef Andoni Luis Aduriz hopes that could change.

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With two Michelin stars,

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his restaurant, Mugaritz, ranks in the world's top five year on year.

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And he wants to bring the scent of this molecular gastronomy to your phone.

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HE SPEAKS SPANISH

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Here, I am learning to make one of his signature dishes,

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a broth that is all about the full sensory experience.

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The smell is a lot stronger since I have been doing this.

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I can smell saffron and peppercorns, mixed with some seeds.

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The saffron is the most overwhelming smell.

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Watching this on TV, you could see what the soup looked like,

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you could hear me making it,

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but of course you have no idea how it taste or smells

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which, let's face it, when it comes to food, is pretty important.

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Here is some technology that could change things.

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This app allows you to virtually create what

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I made in the kitchen, so let's get going.

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You move the phone around, which effectively mixes up

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the ingredients, the peppercorns and the seeds are being crushed.

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It looks pretty similar and the sound is the same.

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But the most exciting bit is, once you are finished,

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you press OK, and the smell comes out.

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And I can tell you, that also smells of saffron

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and is pretty similar to the real thing.

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We get to enrich all our information with taste and smell.

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We will enhance and improve, particularly not our membranes

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but our feelings in the very moment when we are watching

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something together with the smell and taste of it.

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The app's software sends signals to a moving motor in the device,

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which attaches via the earphone jack to puff out the smell.

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This version only omits one scent.

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But, as the device's creator explains, it's merely the start.

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What we are working on for the long-term

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is a device that you put inside your mouth.

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It will have magnetic coils

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which will directly stimulate your olfactory bulb,

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producing electrical currents to produce the artificial smell

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sensation in your brain.

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Once we can do that, the range of smells we can generate will be infinite

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because they are not going to be limited chemicals.

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And then, well, you may be left hungry

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but the full sensory experience could be yours anywhere, any time.

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Lara Lewington with her portable pongs.

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From smells back to pictures now. Publishing photographs online

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that don't belong to you can be a costly business.

0:19:450:19:48

Certainly if you're BuzzFeed, Getty Images or Perez Hilton,

0:19:480:19:52

all of whom have had copyright infringement lawsuits filed against them in the last year.

0:19:520:19:58

Coming up with some tips to help you protect your online images

0:19:580:20:01

and stay on the right side of the law, here comes Kate Russell with Webscape.

0:20:010:20:05

Copyright protection for digital content is a complex issue

0:20:080:20:12

with no straightforward solution.

0:20:120:20:14

Stipple can help you by creating a unique fingerprint that stays

0:20:140:20:18

connected to it wherever it travels within the website's network.

0:20:180:20:22

There is the extra bonus that you can add interactive content to tell

0:20:220:20:27

the story behind the image

0:20:270:20:29

and get detailed analytics about views and shares.

0:20:290:20:33

If anyone wants to repost your images,

0:20:330:20:35

this site makes the process super-easy, with a ready-made embed code

0:20:350:20:39

equipped with full attribution details as set by you.

0:20:390:20:43

There is even a free iPhone app to protect your mobile uploads,

0:20:430:20:47

which is a notoriously thorny part of intellectual property rights online.

0:20:470:20:51

If you want to stay on the right side of copyright law

0:20:540:20:57

when reposting a non-attributed image you find,

0:20:570:21:00

you can use the site's reverse image search.

0:21:000:21:03

Even though this website makes it super-easy to use and attribute images legally,

0:21:030:21:08

it is not a fail-safe method for protecting your photos online.

0:21:080:21:12

In truth, the only way to keep them safe is not to post them at all.

0:21:120:21:17

But that's not a satisfactory option for most

0:21:170:21:20

so I have some other suggestions.

0:21:200:21:22

You could try adding a subtle watermark detailing your ownership.

0:21:250:21:30

Most editing packages will let you do this by adding a translucent layer

0:21:300:21:35

and you will find lots of tutorials online.

0:21:350:21:37

If you want a quick and simple tool, try uMark Online

0:21:370:21:41

but bear in mind that positioning the attribution

0:21:410:21:44

on the edge of your picture so it doesn't spoil the view

0:21:440:21:47

will make it pretty easy to crop out before reposting

0:21:470:21:50

if someone is determined to rip you off.

0:21:500:21:53

Make sure you are clear about your terms for anything that you post

0:21:540:21:59

by linking it to a licence.

0:21:590:22:01

From all rights reserved,

0:22:010:22:03

meaning no-one has permission to repost,

0:22:030:22:05

to public domain, where you are happy for it to be shared without attribution.

0:22:050:22:10

And everything in between.

0:22:100:22:12

A Creative Commons licence is an easy and standardised way

0:22:120:22:16

of detailing permissions so that no-one can claim ignorance.

0:22:160:22:20

If you think your images are at risk of copyright theft,

0:22:230:22:27

it is not a bad idea to run them through a reverse image search,

0:22:270:22:31

like TinEye, every now and then.

0:22:310:22:33

It will trawl the web detailing where the image has been found online.

0:22:330:22:38

A quick way to check a whole website is to run the address through

0:22:390:22:43

Copyscape, which will tell you

0:22:430:22:45

if any other web pages are using the content posted on it.

0:22:450:22:49

If you do find a violation, there are steps you should take to tackle it,

0:22:510:22:55

rising in escalation depending on how the violator responds.

0:22:550:22:59

Firstly, contact them directly and keep it simple

0:22:590:23:02

and non-confrontational.

0:23:020:23:05

It could be that they are not aware they have done anything wrong

0:23:050:23:08

and the matter can be resolved swiftly.

0:23:080:23:11

How about we finish with a real-world hack

0:23:180:23:21

for this week's video of the week?

0:23:210:23:23

Illusion specialists Brusspup have a brilliant 3D T-rex video

0:23:230:23:27

on their YouTube channel,

0:23:270:23:29

complete with a link to download and print your own.

0:23:290:23:33

Thank you, Kate. Loving those dinosaurs.

0:23:440:23:46

They are so simple yet so very, very effective.

0:23:460:23:49

If you missed any of Kate's links,

0:23:490:23:50

you will find them all on our website as usual.

0:23:500:23:52

If you would like to get in touch about anything you have seen today,

0:23:530:23:57

please do e-mail or tweet us.

0:23:570:23:59

That's it for now though.

0:24:010:24:02

Thank you very much for watching and we'll see you next time.

0:24:020:24:05

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