22/03/2014 Click


22/03/2014

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Transcript


LineFromTo

This is going to be great. This is going to be SO good.

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First day on the job as a supply teacher.

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I've got my lesson plan sorted.

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I'm going to let the kids call me by my first name.

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No, my Twitter handle. They're going to love me!

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This week, Click goes to school at both ends of the tech spectrum.

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We'll get hands on with the simple phone that's teaching Afghans

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to read and write

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and we'll meet the Norwegian teacher who prefers Facebook

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to textbooks.

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And from kids in Norway to mummies in Sweden.

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Yes, we don't throw this show together, you know.

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We'll use 3D scanning to get under the skin of an ancient

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Egyptian priest.

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We take a look at the pen that teaches you how to write

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as you write.

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We'll also have the latest tech news

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and the website that helps you learn 12 different languages in Webscape.

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Trust me, it's all going to be very educational.

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Welcome to Click. I'm Spencer Kelly.

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How often do we talk about how technology can change the way

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that kids learn

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in and out of school?

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The problem is, there's only a handful of schools

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around the world which really are using next generation

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techniques to teach and inspire their pupils.

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Well, this week we have a brilliant opportunity to see one of them

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in action.

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Now, as part of the BBC's School Report project, students Mary

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and Olivia from Burntwood School here in London have travelled

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to Norway to meet a teacher who's tearing up her textbooks

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and replacing them with social media.

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This is their story.

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We're very excited to be here in Norway to meet

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the students at Sandvika High School.

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One teacher here is using technology

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instead of books to teach her lessons.

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I have some students who can answer your questions here

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now in front of you.

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Anne Michaelson is teaching International English.

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Her students are 17 to 18-year-olds

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so a few years older than me and Olivia.

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We are 14 and 13.

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This is very different to how we work in London

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where all of our lessons are taught from textbooks.

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Unlike in our classrooms,

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students here are encouraged to go on social media during their class.

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Everyone here is given a laptop by the Norwegian government.

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The students can access Wi-Fi during the lessons.

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Why did you decide to teach in this way?

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Because a textbook could be a book from 2006 and we're in 2014,

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so the content won't change in a book,

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but it will otherwise,

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things are happening in the world and with my subject, like

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International English, it's good to use the net

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and find resources there instead of going in a book.

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'The day started with a Skype call to a classroom in South Africa.'

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The Wi-Fi is going all the way over Europe, all the way over Africa...

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But the technology was not working perfectly,

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so we got to speak to the students without a video feed.

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But it would have been great to be able to see them,

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to get a picture of what their school was like.

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The students use blogs to write up their homework.

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They also use Twitter hashtags to share their lessons

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and help each other online.

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They have a Facebook group

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where Ann can post reminders about their homework,

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and where they can help each other with lessons.

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We thought this might be distracting for the students.

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If they are doing a task on the Facebook group,

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and a message popped up, do you think they would click that and check it?

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Yes, there is a risk.

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There is a risk if the teacher doesn't pay attention to

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what's going on in the classroom. There is a risk if I say,

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"Here is the task, I'll be back in a couple of hours."

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Then they probably would do a lot of other things.

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The students realise they are lucky

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to have access to all of this technology.

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All around the school are posters of students in Lesotho.

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Sandvika is fundraising to build a new school there.

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We spoke to one of the students, Leah,

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who is involved with the project and has been to Lesotho.

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The project funds their internet connection,

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and we've been sponsoring that since the beginning.

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Last time people from our school visited,

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they brought down a couple of laptops.

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When we visited, we brought down some more laptops.

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So we had to give them basic teaching how to use Word

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and how to open the internet,

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because they'd obviously never seen computers before.

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It's amazing really how little some people in the world know

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about internet and social media

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and everything like that.

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'The Norwegian students see us as having much less access to

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'technology in the UK as well.'

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Do you think we'd be at a disadvantage

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because we don't use as much technology?

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I think so, because when you start your work life,

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you are going to use computers all the time.

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But if you're not using and getting to know the computer

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as it is right now, you have a real disadvantage

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when it comes to your future life.

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'Seeing all the social media being used in the classroom, we wondered

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'whether technology will replace school life as we know it now.'

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Do you ever worry that, in the future,

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they are not going to need teachers to teach the lesson?

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-Everything will be just on the computer?

-That's a good question.

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I think teachers have to realise

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that students can learn without the teacher.

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So I think that schools need to be very relevant.

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You have to be an alternative to sitting alone in your home

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and working.

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You have to come to school because you know we're going to

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Skype with South Africa, we're doing some questions,

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we're working on a project that we need more people to be on.

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So I think teachers should realise that

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students are learning on their own as well.

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Back in our school in London, the older students already use blogs.

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We think we should use technology more in our classrooms.

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It would be great to have iPads and laptops for our lessons.

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But it wouldn't be as easy to fund this in the UK.

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It would also be great if we could use technology to share

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our ideas in the same way they do in Norway,

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through a group discussion board

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or an app that is accessible only to students in the school.

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We don't think it is good to combine our personal social media

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with schoolwork in the same way they do in Norway.

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Olivia and Mary in Norway.

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You can see that film, along with thousands of other reports

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from schools around the UK, from this Thursday, School Report Day at:

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Now, whether you use social media, video conferencing or just

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plain old books, it is easy to take education for granted.

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But in many parts of the world, anything is better than nothing.

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In Afghanistan, 75% of people are illiterate, and many institutions

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are trying to throw sophisticated and expensive technology

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at the problem.

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However, the solution may actually lie in a much simpler device.

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You might not know this, but Click has a sister programme

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which broadcasts to Iran, Afghanistan and Tajikistan.

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The team there discovered some software that allows the simple

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and, importantly, very plentiful candy bar style mobile phone to

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teach someone to read and write.

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In Afghanistan,

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the Ministry of Education has distributed 5,000 laptops

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for the One Laptop Per Child project to schools in Kabul and elsewhere.

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It's hoped that the cheap Indian laptop, called Aakash,

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will be added to these soon.

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But with so many people to teach,

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this is, of course, nowhere near enough.

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Unfortunately, the laptops are still pretty expensive by Afghan standards,

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so we came up with the concept of this mobile here, which is putting

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the same education experience with audio, video, quizzes and games into

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35-40 cheap mobile phones, candy bar style,

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that are commonly owned by Afghans.

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With financial help from the US State Department,

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the Paiwastoon company produced a course using the Ustad Mobil

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application for teaching Dari and Pashto literacy.

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People assumed that these phones didn't have any real capabilities,

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yet I knew, as a programmer, that those phones that support what you

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call Java Micro edition are almost the same as 1997 computers that can

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store information, process, run programs, run quizzes, run games,

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connect to the internet.

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All of this was possible.

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From the beginning,

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Ustad Mobil has been designed as an open source project.

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There's also an Android app version for smartphones and tablets,

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and an iOS version is in development.

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Perhaps the coolest thing about Ustad Mobil

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is it's genuinely an Afghan export.

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We took it from what worked in Afghanistan and went to Zambia,

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trained people there, and they are now using the same software, the same

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systems, to make courses for literacy in the seven languages of Zambia.

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Instead of education technology being about some shiny particular device,

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it's about the content and the learning.

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The device is whatever device you want to use.

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Of course we'd love to hear your thoughts on what you've just seen,

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so e-mail Click:

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Get in touch with us on Twitter.

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Next up, it's a look at this week's tech news.

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Google is eyeing up the smartwatch market.

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It's released a new version of its operating system

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Android For Wearables.

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These smartwatches give a taste of the style that Google is aiming for,

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together with its manufacturing partners and fashion brands.

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The first devices, which will make use of the voice-controlled

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Google Now interface, are expected later this year.

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Sony has unveiled a virtual reality headset for its PlayStation 4.

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Project Morpheus has been three years in the making.

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The device features a full HD display with a 90-degree field of view,

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and is equipped with positional head-tracking.

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Sony admits it's counting on innovative developers to help

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make the games that will sell the hardware.

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Can't put a name to a face?

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Ask Facebook, which is

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now using the world's largest collection of photos, its own,

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to develop a program that can recognise a face before it's tagged.

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DeepFace can determine whether two photos of the face

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are the same person, claiming 97% accuracy.

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The tech brings Facebook's current facial recognition software to

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an accuracy level almost on par with humans.

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And finally, for anyone that wants to use social media's power to

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disconnect, a new app called Cloak helps you avoid your friends.

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The antisocial service uses public location data from social networks

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such as Foursquare or Instagram to alert users

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when "friends" are believed to be nearby.

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Useful for avoiding the boss.

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Tapping on screens and keyboards is all very well,

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but we do still need to learn how to write with a pen.

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At least for the moment.

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Well, next month, a new German-based outfit will introduce a pen

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into schools in the UK, Austria and Germany,

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which it claims will warn us if we make a mistake.

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Dan Simmons has been to try out the pen that could help us

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learn as we write.

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Leon loves his toy helicopter,

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and it proved to be the inspiration his father needed to help Leon,

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and potentially millions more, learn how to write.

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I have these small helicopters in mind that fly around,

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and they have motion sensors on it.

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If these helicopters can fly around with these motion sensors,

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we can have a pen with the same motion sensors getting

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the handwriting - that's the core of the idea.

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Leon makes some mistakes doing his homework,

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and my wife says, "Oh, the pen should give him a signal.

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"It can be an electric shock or whatever."

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I say an electric shock is a bit much

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but a small vibration should be perfect,

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so you can also use it in the classrooms.

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This is one of the first prototypes of the Lernstift, or learning pen.

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The final version, once calibrated to its owner's handwriting,

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will use an internal gyroscope to recognise what's being written.

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Unlike a teacher's red pen that corrects long after mistakes are

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made, or a tutor publicly pointing out his errors, Leon's pen

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tells him candidly through vibrating when it thinks something's wrong.

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Hooked up to a phone, an app would give more detail.

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The pen uses normal ink refills,

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but it doesn't actually need any ink to work at all.

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And because there are no optical sensors in here,

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it doesn't need any expensive special paper to work.

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In fact, it doesn't need paper to work at all.

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It will work perfectly well in thin air.

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So how easy is it to make a pen that can read what you write?

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We tested out the latest working prototype which uses wires

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so hardware adjustments can be made more easily.

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It's far from top of the class, although, once trained,

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it matched most of software developer Adam's simple words.

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Like voice recognition, the software will also take

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account of the context of what we are trying to write too.

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Opening up possibilities for other uses like learning a new language.

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Future plans are to have developers come in and develop their own apps

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because it's an open system.

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As well we have the pen detect grammar mistakes,

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so that means it will correct the word order.

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But, also like word recognition,

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this system needs more refinement to be able to adapt to each individual.

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Beta tests in schools with fully wireless models will begin in spring,

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and if that goes well, it is hoped that a fully working pen that quietly

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tells us when we get it wrong will go on sale by the end of the year.

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Dan Simmons learning how to write.

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At least his handwriting is better than mine,

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I can tell you that for nothing!

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Anyway, next lesson today is history.

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And specifically, a new exhibition which has opened in Stockholm

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in which you can unwrap an Egyptian mummy virtually

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while standing right next to the real thing.

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Now, it uses technology designed by Swedish developers

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and originally intended for use in virtual autopsies.

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Neil Bowdler is your teacher.

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Underground in the vault of a former bank in central Stockholm

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lies an Egyptian priest.

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His remains are one of eight mummies which belong to

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the Museum of Mediterranean and Near Eastern Antiquities.

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He lived in the 3rd century BC in Thebes, modern-day Luxor.

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We know how important he must have been from the coffins

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he was sealed in and the sheer splendour of his decorated mummy.

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We know that his mother's name was Takerheb.

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And we can also see that he belonged

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to the upper classes of Egyptian society

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because he could afford an expensive mummification. Not everybody could.

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And he also has a gilded cartonnage.

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He has two coffins and he has a lot of amulets.

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The museum's Egyptian collection

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has just undergone a radical transformation

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which involved disturbing Neswaiu

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and the other mummies from their slumber.

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They were taken to a hospital to undergo CT scanning

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to see right inside the bodies and wrapping.

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Next, the coffins and mummies were photographed from multiple angles

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and the 2D pictures used to build a 3D surface map

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using recap photo from software company Autodesk.

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All the data was fed into this virtual autopsy table

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which sits in a room next to Neswaiu's body

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in the new permanent exhibition.

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We can actually look at the mummy in greater detail.

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Beginning with the outer coffin.

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And then just peel off layer after layer.

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The inner coffin with all the inscriptions,

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then we have the cartonnage covering the head and the entire body.

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And then the wrappings

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and the bead net protecting the mummy from anything evil.

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And then down to the skeleton.

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With details about, for example, dental health, dental status.

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We can actually see the infection in one of the teeth.

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And then we'll just dress him again, back to the outer coffin.

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CT-scanning Neswaiu doesn't just allow us to unwrap the mummy,

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it also allows us to find objects like this.

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This is a 3D printout of a falcon-shaped amulet

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that was seen inside the mummy, the real one is still in there,

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during the scanning process.

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It was thought it was put there to protect Neswaiu in the afterlife.

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The virtual autopsy table

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is the work of a Swedish research institute.

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They first built the software, called Inside Explorer,

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for autopsies in hospitals and for use by medical students.

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But they have since moved into the museum business.

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They've worked with the Smithsonian in Washington

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and the British Museum in London,

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but the Neswaiu project represents the most advanced work yet.

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We started the process by CT scanning.

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It describes the interior, but it doesn't give you any colour or surface information.

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So we continued the process by doing laser scanning and photogrammetry.

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And that process gave us information about the surface

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and the textures and colours of the mummy.

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Then we are taking all of that data and putting it onto the table

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to make it accessible for museum visitors.

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For the Egyptian curator at the Mediterranean Museum,

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the digital-scanning project offered an unique chance

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to enhance both her understanding of the mummies

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and pass on what they learned to the visitors.

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We wanted partly to get more information about them,

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but we also wanted to include them into this virtual autopsy table

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so that the visitors themselves

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could see this information first-hand

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and not always have to count on researchers

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explaining what can be found on this mummy.

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You can simply unwrap it virtually yourself.

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Wow! If only history was that exciting when I was at school.

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Still, the only thing left for this education special

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is to get a quick lesson from our very own web monitor, Kate Russell.

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Here comes Webscape.

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# School's out for summer...#

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School's never out online.

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"Ciao. Come stai?"

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Busuu is a social-learning platform that teaches 12 languages

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using colourful buttons, clicks and drag-and-drop interactivity.

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It's social because users connect with each other

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to assess and monitor results.

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In this increasingly-mobile world,

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the addition of the smartphone apps is a great idea

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as it allows users to make the most

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of time spent on the train or the bus.

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And mobile app usage in general increased 115% last year.

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And already, Busuu are reporting over half its users

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logging on to learn through the apps.

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There are lots of initiatives

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to encourage youngsters to learn coding right now.

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Code.org is a great starting point,

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serving up practical lessons you can complete in your bedroom

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that give you real results really quickly.

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Like this interactive lesson to make your own Flappy Bird game.

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"Drag-and-drop programming is the easiest way to learn.

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"It's even how university students start learning to code.

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"Each of these blocks is represented by real code.

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"If you take a look at the work space,

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"there are some green blocks that are filled in for you.

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"These are event handlers."

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Just so you know, the creator of Flappy Bird

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was making about 50,000 a day in advertising

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before he took the iPhone app off the market.

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Or how about 17-year-old Nick D'Aloisio,

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who can not only count uber-famous

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tech-evangelist Stephen Fry among his friends,

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but also sold the news app he created, Summly,

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to Yahoo last year for almost 30 million?

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There is no reason why that couldn't be you

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if you're prepared to work hard enough.

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The Year of Code is a project running this year

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to nurture the coders of the future

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with great support, advice and loads of other resources,

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where you can pick up computer skills free of charge.

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# I know she can beat them

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# Oh, Yoshimi. #

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A couple of resources for educators next.

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Get Kahoot lets you make quizzes, discussions and surveys

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to encourage interactivity in the classroom.

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# A, B, C

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# Easy as 1, 2, 3

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# As simple as... #

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The quizzes can be run on any platform,

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so if you have students who won't put their smartphones away,

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what better way to focus their attention on the lesson

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than getting them to interact on their own devices?

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Before you know it, Snapchat and Facebook will be forgotten

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and a whole lot more learning can begin.

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And if you're still hungry for education resources,

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this blog by a teaching professional

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has compiled over 193 teaching

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and learning activities for you to dip into.

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# 1, 2, 3, you and me. #

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Learning isn't just for the young ones, though.

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On 31st March, the Spring Online digital inclusion campaign

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begins for another year.

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Helping thousands of older and less confident computer users

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take their first steps with technology.

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# Show a lot of these and those

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# Springtime's here again. #

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"So, are there any positive effects?

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"Can video games actually make you smarter?"

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Some children and adults would rather play video games than study,

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but perhaps that's not as bad as you think.

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This week's video comes from AsapSCIENCE

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and investigates whether playing video games can make you smarter.

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"One study in particular had participants play Super Mario 64

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"for 30 minutes a day over two months.

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"Afterwards, the brains of these participants

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"saw an increase of grey matter in areas associated with memory,

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"strategic planning and fine motor skills of the hands,

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"compared to those who had not played.

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"These are particularly encouraging results

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"for mental disorders which cause these brain regions to shrink."

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Thank you, Kate, great video. I can feel my IQ moving as we speak.

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I won't tell you which way, though.

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Anyway, that's it. Kate's links, more from us,

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and your regularly updated digest of tech news

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are all available at our website.

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Please get in touch about anything and everything you've seen today.

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Don't forget to check out the BBC's School Report project from Thursday.

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Thank you very much for watching. It's home time!

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