06/02/2016 Click


06/02/2016

A comprehensive guide to all the latest gadgets, websites, games and computer industry news. Click tries out the world's tiniest printer and checks out high-tech home security.


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Transcript


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This week, giant drone blimp football.

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A virtual peacock.

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A hot, cold shiny tank thing.

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And magic water.

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This week, we are snowed in in Zurich, Switzerland's largest city

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nestled away on the northern edge of the country and famous for its

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Fs, finance, Fifa and the Federal Instituate of Technology, but here

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it is known as ETH, that's the Eidgenossische Technische Hochschule

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if you're trying to show off.

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ETH is Switzerland's most prestigious university.

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Its number one in Continental Europe and it's in the top ten

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in the world and in my humble opinion, right now it's

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one of the coolest, about -8 cool.

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Clapping like a seal.

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Yes, and genuine applause is much deserved here because researchers

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at ETH have been awarded a respectable 21 Nobel prizes

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in its 160-year history.

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Here's one laureate you might recognise.

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Yes, Albert Einstein walked these halls as an undergrad

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and then professor while ruminating his theory of general relativity.

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100 years later, we are here to meet some of the researchers who may one

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day follow in his footsteps.

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You know what they say, it doesn't have to be big to be beautiful.

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So prepare to be amazed by something you can't even see with

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the naked eye.

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Wow.

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That's incredible.

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And how big is that image?

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It's 270 micrometres.

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So that's 0.27 of a millimetre?

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Yes.

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The whole image?

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The whole image, yeah.

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This is the world's highest resolution inkjet printed image.

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And Doctor Patrick Gallagher has made it using quantum dots just

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for us.

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That is insanely small.

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I would have thought that's a fake.

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But...

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Can I move this?

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Oh yeah, it's gone.

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That's real, I just knocked it a tiny bit and it's gone.

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It's 270 pixels by 270 pixels.

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Each one is one micrometre across.

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Wow.

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So you've got 1000 pixels per millimetre?

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Yeah.

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High five?

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And we could do it even smaller.

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I bet you could.

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It took around ten hours to print.

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Here under the microscope you can see that image being built up

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a layer by layer, colour by colour.

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To the human eye, the printer itself doesn't look

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like it's moving at all of course.

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It doesn't really look like a printer to be honest.

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It's the result of six years of research.

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But Patrick hasn't invented this so you can just run off

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your e-mails before your meeting.

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One field where it could already be interesting is

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in security applications.

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It's creating something that you cannot fake.

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You could print stuff that would look a bit like a hologram

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on a security document.

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And with improvements in the print speed, this could be

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a way of printing incredibly fine and complex electronic circuitry

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onto flexible materials.

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And you know how sometimes you find yourself inventing side projects to

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aid your research that then become cool in their own right?

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Well, here's Patrick's homegrown replacement

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for the big 10,000 euro microscope.

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It's a smart phone attachment controlled by an app

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which can do a similar job.

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Yes, it offers lower magnification but it also only costs 175 euros.

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Wow.

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There they are.

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It's amazing how hypnotic something so tiny can be.

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Bring it back into focus.

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No way.

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Personally I'm sold.

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I get the feeling in the next few years this could be massive.

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I could look at this all day.

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Have you seen this?

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Oh, you have.

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And just down the way, something else that's about to blow my mind.

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This surface is afraid of water.

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It is hydrophobic.

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Now, we've seen this sort of thing a few times in the past.

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Surfaces nano-coated to make them completely water repellent.

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But this is the lab where much stranger things can happen.

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These researchers wanted to find out whether hydrophobic surfaces would

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still repel water in extreme conditions, for example in a vacuum.

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The answer turned out to be yes...

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And then some.

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Oh my God!

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Apparently out of nowhere the water jumps, bouncing higher and higher.

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Something these guys are calling trampolining.

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But hold that Nobel Prize just for a second, we haven't just

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created energy out of nothing here.

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What's actually happening is the water is evaporating very quickly.

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And it's the pressure of the resulting vapour against

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the hydrophobic surface that makes it jump over and over and over.

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But every time it jumps it gets smaller because some is evaporating,

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so it is getting smaller and smaller and smaller and then go away.

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And eventually it will be gone but before that you still saw

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the cool behaviour.

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Can you do super cool stuff with droplets that just start bouncing

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and then bounce higher and higher and higher,

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even if it's only for a small time?

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We did it with small motors, we tried to create little tiny levers

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were these droplets could make mechanical motion at smaller scales.

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Did it work?

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It did work.

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But will it be useful?

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We don't know.

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And this is how some world changing things happen,

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completely by accident and without a clue as to how they

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might be used in the real world.

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This discovery, though, already has more obvious applications.

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Is you freeze the water in the vacuum on the hydrophobic

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surface it melts off.

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So, ice-proof surfaces anyone?

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Plane wings and cars that refuse to freeze?

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Well, give it a few years and this research may lead to exactly that.

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A lot of the stuff, though, we deal with in technology happens at the

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other end of the temperature scale.

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Computers get hot.

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And we actually use an awful lot of energy trying to keep them cool.

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That's why everyone is moving their data centres to cold parts

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of the world.

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And in fact, not even Switzerland qualifies for that because it's not

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like this all year round.

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They are working on one thing here, though, that is very hot

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and that makes it very cool.

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Here's LJ Rich.

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Being cool is especially the important

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when it comes to competing.

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Components get hot when they work hard, not unlike

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humans, some humans even jump into the sea when they're too hot.

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So why not put a datacentre at the bottom of the sea,

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which is very cold.

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This is a Project Natick which puts chips along with fish

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in this nature-proof container for three months.

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A nifty proof of concept that you actually can have clouds underwater.

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But what if you didn't need anything cold to keep something cool?

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The people at IBM are using the heat produced

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by a computer to cool it down.

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Yes, using heat to cool something down actually sounds

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rather counterintuitive.

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Likely Patrick at IBM Research is here to explain everything.

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How does this work?

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The goal is to have a technology that can produce

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cooling without any moving parts.

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The way we do this is by using materials like desiccants that you

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frequently find in these desiccant packs and these materials take up

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a lot of moisture, as we know.

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If this happens in a cooler system then it produces a cooling effect.

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To explain, Patrick has set up a simple experiment in front

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of a thermal camera.

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The bottle on the left contains water, water is used in lots of

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computer cooling systems often to take heat away from hot components.

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At the moment it is room temperature.

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The bottle on the right contains desiccant, basically

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the stuff that dries things out.

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You've probably got a pouch or three of these in your home.

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It turns out that desiccant spontaneously sucks

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in or adsorbs water.

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This process evaporates the water taking heat out, and it leaves the

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remaining water colder, so we can remove heat without doing anything.

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So how does this relate back to keeping things cool?

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Going from this two-bottle demo to a technical system you would install

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now in an actuall adsorption chiller, you would need to apply

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the desiccant to a heat exchanger.

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And this kind of heat exchanger can look like the following.

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That does look quite big.

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Sending hot or cold water through that massive heat exchange system

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changes how it works.

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Cold water makes the desiccant coating suck

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in water and hot water restarts the process by drying the desiccant

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out ready to do it all over again.

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If this is making no sense, try this.

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The water takes the heat away from the computer servers by heating up.

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The desiccant sucks this water up causing

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the cooling effect we saw earlier.

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All great so far but now we have desiccant saturated with water

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so it can't carry on cooling.

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But never fear as now the waste heat from the

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servers is used to dry this out, and as the water evaporates away and the

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desiccant dries, the whole process can begin again and thus computers

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can be cooled using their own heat.

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Incredible.

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Currently this test rig can only cool a system the same size, so it

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does need to be a little smaller.

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Patrick says once it's finished the system should pay for itself

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in saved electricity bills over just a couple of years.

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By introducing another technology that can use waste heat

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by satisfying cooling demand is a very sustainable

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and energy efficient approach.

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Hello and welcome to the week in tech.

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It was the week BT broadband went down, leaving several hundreds

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of thousands of customers without Internet access.

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The outage lasted most of the day before being restored

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and BT apologised, blaming a router problem.

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Microsoft bought UK-based predictive keyboard company SwiftKey

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for over ?170 million.

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The ever elusive mixed reality firm Magic Leap was valued at ?3 billion.

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Google's parent company Alphabet overtook Apple

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as the world's most valuable public company at a cool ?370 billion.

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It was also the week that GoPro revealed a new promo video

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for its upcoming 4K Karma drone.

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Again without actually showing it, but it did give away some clues

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about its features, specifically its apparent ability to carry on

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flying after its operator releases it, even while on the move.

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It was also the week that Uber got a facelift.

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And if you ever thought you weren't getting the most out

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of your leaf blower, ex-NASA engineer Mark Roper has turned his

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into a snowball firing machine-gun.

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The wearable contraption can fire up to 15 icy balls

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at once with a magazine reload load speed of three seconds.

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Ghostbuster getup not compulsory.

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Now, while you're away from home, have you ever wondered what's going

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on?

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Hopefully not this.

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Although this intruder was caught by a free home security app,

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this one called Manything.

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As connectivity and cameras improve, it's a fast expanding area, as Lara

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Lewington has been finding out.

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The latest home security gadgets are closer to another pair of eyes

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and ears than ever before.

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Many have remote access via the Web and some even add a spot of

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artificial intelligence to the mix.

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Myfox is one way of simplifying the whole home security experience.

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As soon as you enter your house, this key fob will connect via

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bluetooth to the home security system and automatically disarm it.

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Up to four cameras can be used at once, and if you are at home

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and want a spot of privacy, you can simply close the shutter.

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There are also these sensors, that can be attached to doors or

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windows, which monitor vibration.

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A clever algorithm will tell whether it is just, say, a ball

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hitting the window, or someone trying to force their way in.

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Netatmo's prototype camera comes complete with a floodlight,

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and also aims to spot suspicious signs ahead of any problem.

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Its software can decipher between people, cars and animals,

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so it will provide alerts of only relevant incidents.

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You can also watch videos back via the app at a later date.

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As well as the LED light, it also has night-vision,

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so there is no risk of missing anything taking place at night.

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If the camera gets stolen, the footage on the card can only be

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viewed with the phone the camera has been synced to.

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There is also the option of backing up all

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of the content to a secure server.

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With over half of UK break-ins quite surprisingly occurring

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at the front of houses, it makes sense to be focusing on that area.

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This HD video doorbell allows every member of the family to receive

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an alert each time someone comes to the door, so as long as they have

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internet connection, wherever they are in the world, they can remotely

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answer the door, see who's there, speak to them, and if they have

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an electronic door lock, they can let them in, which could come in

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handy if you are late for guests.

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I will be there in a couple of minutes.

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Just drying my hair!

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The camera's face recognition will identify members of the family, or

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if a person seems undesirable, you can sound an alarm and shine a light

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on them to hopefully scare them off.

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For something a bit different, this remote control robotic ball is

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actually a wide lens HD camera.

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It also records sound, and it means instead of setting up

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various cameras throughout your home, you can just move this

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to whatever you want to look at.

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It's only a beta at the moment.

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There will be an app available soon when it is released.

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Right now, you have use a fiddly website.

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But it is fun once you see the camera up and running.

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The prototype is tricky to control, but the finished product should be

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a little smoother.

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If you don't want to shout out on a full-scale device,

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one option is using an app that will re-purpose an old smartphone

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to turn it into a security camera.

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All you need to do is make sure the device is connected to the home

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Wi-Fi, then you can log into it anywhere in the world via the web.

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Presence works this way, and after a successful launch last year,

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sensors and even smart bulbs can now be integrated into the system.

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Manything is another, free to download and easy to set up.

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When you open it, you'll be presented with the option

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of continuous recording or just recording motion.

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If you have something like a window in shot or a fish tank

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that will set off alerts too often, then you can set up a detection

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zone so that area is blocked out.

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Watching your home from a distance does not make

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for a very relaxing holiday.

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But this tech could give that extra peace of mind to rest

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a little more easily.

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The one good thing about virtual reality taking so long to go

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on sale is that researchers have had a massive lead time in order to

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work out the full capabilities of VR kit.

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We will take a break from snowy Switzerland now

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and head to sunny California.

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The University of Southern California's Institute

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for Creative Technologies is where the brains behind Oculus Rift

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used to work before he hit the big-time,

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and they are on the cutting edge of VR research.

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We have been to see what they are up to.

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While most of us wait for VR headsets to hit the shops,

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engineers and researchers at the University of Southern California

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are already thinking about the next stage of VR's revolution.

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We're inside USC's Mixed Reality Lab, and just through here,

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they are working on taking a limited amount of space and turning it

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into an almost unlimited amount of space using virtual reality.

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If that sounds a little bit complicated and difficult to get

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your head around, imagine this room is the very first version

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of the holodeck from Star Trek.

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This warehouse is fitted with motion tracking sensors, which wirelessly

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communicate with a computer attached to a VR headset.

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Here's the laptop.

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This little thing is a communication device for our tracking system, and

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we pack it up inside a backpack.

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You will be touring the virtual village.

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We will guide you around.

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You'll see the green waypoints there.

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Think of it as GPS.

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It shows you where you would like to go.

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Occasionally, the system might decide to switch paths

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and change waypoints.

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You look for the new one and go there.

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I will not just be walking around.

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I also have to take panoramic photos while inside the virtual world.

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I do this by moving my head and clicking

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the hand controller at the same time.

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So there are elements of a game as well as exploration.

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Exactly.

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Why did you introduce the gaming elements?

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To give people something else to do as they explore the space?

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Partially it is to make it more interesting but also to

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make sure we can reorient you.

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It is a bit of a trick.

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Smoke and mirrors.

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As the panoramic photo is taken, the computer is recalculating my route.

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It should fool me into making me think I am walking

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around in a larger space than I am.

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Put the headset on.

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If I look around I can see what looks like a mediaeval village.

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If you follow those little arrows on the edges to see where

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the first waypoint is.

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It is really unusual being inside this virtual space

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knowing I am in...

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Oh!

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..knowing I am in a warehouse.

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This is the clever bit these guys have introduced

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into their environment, where it

0:20:300:20:31

recalibrates and makes use of the limited space by making me

0:20:310:20:34

think there is more space here.

0:20:340:20:36

This view shows me the route I am actually walking

0:20:360:20:39

if viewed from the top down.

0:20:390:20:40

Part of my brain is worried I will end up walking into a wall,

0:20:400:20:44

even though I'm pretty sure there is not much chance of that happening.

0:20:440:20:47

That is really, really cool.

0:20:470:20:52

Let's see if I can walk back the way I came.

0:20:520:20:55

I just walked into a wall.

0:20:550:20:57

LAUGHTER.

0:20:570:20:57

Next up, the team showed off their version

0:20:570:21:03

of a VR art gallery, complete with 3-D stop motion exhibits.

0:21:030:21:06

It is not wireless, as I am tethered to a computer by cables, but it does

0:21:060:21:09

have a trick up its sleeve.

0:21:100:21:19

I have been instructed to walk towards

0:21:190:21:21

a stop motion animated museum.

0:21:210:21:22

My hands have appeared on screen.

0:21:220:21:23

I wasn't expecting that.

0:21:230:21:24

So this is a mixture of a whole bunch of different technologies.

0:21:240:21:27

They have strapped an Elite Motion motion tracking sensor to the front

0:21:270:21:30

of the headset, which monitors what my hands are doing, seamlessly

0:21:300:21:33

introducing them into the virtual world and further

0:21:330:21:35

making me feel like I have disappeared down a VR rabbit hole.

0:21:350:21:48

A giant leap for VR, and just like the holodeck, safety protocols

0:21:480:21:51

need to be observed at all times.

0:21:510:21:53

That was Mark, and we'll finish our trip to ETH in a giant hangar,

0:21:530:21:56

where something big is in the air.

0:21:560:22:06

Meet Project Skye, an inflatable drone that

0:22:060:22:08

the team are hoping will entertain and film audiences at concerts

0:22:080:22:10

and other large indoor venues.

0:22:100:22:19

Is it wise to have it fly over there?

0:22:190:22:21

It is not wise, but it is not a problem.

0:22:210:22:46

Full of helium and protected from punctures by a double-layered

0:22:460:22:49

hull, this is being billed as a heck of a lot safer than a normal drone.

0:22:490:22:53

This could go anywhere.

0:22:530:22:54

There we go.

0:22:540:22:54

LAUGHTER.

0:22:540:22:55

It is ever so slightly heavier than air,

0:22:550:22:56

which means if it loses power, there is no high-speed crash.

0:22:560:22:59

And this does, in my mind at least, qualify as a drone rather than just

0:22:590:23:03

a blimp, because if you give it a push, it intelligently maintains

0:23:030:23:06

its orientation.

0:23:060:23:08

If it were outside and armed with GPS, it could also

0:23:080:23:10

in theory keep its position.

0:23:100:23:12

Now, about that control system.

0:23:120:23:13

Can I have a go?

0:23:130:23:14

You want to fly it?

0:23:140:23:21

Let's try it first.

0:23:210:23:22

Here is the ground station.

0:23:220:23:24

Sorry, serious.

0:23:240:23:24

I am a very good drone pilot.

0:23:240:23:26

I have only ever seen three crashes and two of them were my fault.

0:23:260:23:29

So anyway...

0:23:290:23:32

So it turns out you fly with a 3-D mouse that is usually used

0:23:320:23:35

for computer-aided design, and delicate movements are the order

0:23:350:23:38

of the day, ladies and gentlemen.

0:23:380:23:45

Just like any drone, it is important not to panic and jam the thing

0:23:450:23:48

in the opposite direction.

0:23:480:23:49

Apart from that, if I'm honest, it is just plain fun.

0:23:490:23:52

That is it from Click in Zurich.

0:23:520:23:56

Thank you very much for watching.

0:23:560:23:58

I hope you've had a good time.

0:23:580:24:01

If you can't tell by my face, I have.

0:24:010:24:04

So we'll see you soon.

0:24:040:24:05

I will just try a landing.

0:24:050:24:09

Come on.

0:24:090:24:11

A comprehensive guide to all the latest gadgets, websites, games and computer industry news. Click tries out the world's tiniest printer, checks out high-tech home security and visits a holodeck (sort of).


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