12/03/2016 Click


12/03/2016

Created entirely using 360-degree footage, this special episode of Click takes you from the snow-covered research base high on the Swiss Alps to the depths of CERN.


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Transcript


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Now on BBC News, it's time for Click.

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I there. I'm Spencer Kelly and welcome to a world first. For years

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now everyone's been banging on about virtual reality and how amazing it

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will be one day when someone thinks of something interesting to do with

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it. We are fed up with the talk so this week we're going to do

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something interesting with it. This week's Click has been filmed

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entirely in 360 degrees to be enjoyed in virtual reality. If you

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go to this address you can find out how you can watch this programme on

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a 360 website or on a virtual reality smartphone app or on a pair

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of VR goggles like these. Now, that's great news for you because

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you don't have to look at me if you don't want to, you cannot in any

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direction you want. OK, so at the moment you're watching this in the

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warm old boring TV, but don't worry, we're going to attempt to bring you

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some of the VR experience, we're going to move your viewpoint around

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for you. Excuse me, I haven't finished yet. Thank you. So, get

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ready, enjoy the view, this Click 360.

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To get to our first location we need a little left.

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And then we'll need to walk. So enjoy the view. And even though

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you're only watching this into DD, the fact that we filmed it in 360

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means we can do some pretty do things with your picture. -- 2d. So

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why not enjoy this extreme view? Well, what better place to start

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macro a two than here. Welcome to the glacier in these Swiss Alps. --

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Aletsch Glacier about a metre below this note is some very important

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monitoring technology that we've got to dig up, and this is cloudier over

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here, she started digging. Your have to give us a few minutes for my lips

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to thaw and also for us to get in. We're looking for evidence of things

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called ice breaks, tremors caused by the glacier as it sticks and bumps

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along the underlying rock. The theory is that if the glacier melts

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faster the increased melt water acts as a lubricant which then causes the

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glacier to slip ever more quickly. I tell you what, cloudier, you

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didn't have to make me take the whole hole, did you? I'm joking. So,

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this is the box, can we open it? Yeah, we can. Right, so what is in

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here? In here there is actually... There is an orange box where you

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have the receiver of the seismic metre. This is taking measurements

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from a seismometer which is taking measurements from the glacier

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itself? Yes. And you have the wave forms of the seismic meters and that

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is what is recorded from below. And if we do this... Something happens.

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You probably can't see from there but something happened, that was a

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cloudier quake. What causes the vibrations in the glacier? The

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vibrations are normally caused by the movement of the glacier because

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the glacier flows, and then the ice cracks when it flows. And then it

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creates the crevasse is and when it cracks it also creates the seismic

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signal. And how will that help our greater knowledge of glaciers and

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these kind of conditions? The goal at the end is... When we can

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understand how the glaciers flow we can better predict what happens in

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the future, especially when we have a warmer climate, we have more

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meltwater especially. Cool. All right, carry on about your work,

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thank you. Thank you. And just to point out, Matterhorn over there.

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Jungfrau over there. That's if you want to look around.

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The research is being conducted by ETH, the Swiss Federal Institute of

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technology, and will return to ETH later in the programme. -- we'll.

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For now, as we leave the glacier, let's all sit back and enjoy a

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ride. Spectacular stuff. Now at this point

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you might be wondering what kind of kit we are using to capture

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everything in 360. That last shot, the one inside the helicopter, was

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filmed using one of these, a seater, two cameras, one facing that way and

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the other facing the other way. For better results you're going to need

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what you're wearing right now. Smile, you're currently a

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constellation of six GoPro camera is which together capture their entire

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surroundings. This man here if you haven't noticed him is soul rogers,

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our 360 and VR expert, thanks for having us. No problem. I'm glad it

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all worked. Would you consider this to be the best in class at the

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moment? This is the go to solution for our shoots. They are consumer

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cameras, GoPros, they are 4K, they get really close together, when used

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in anger you can make some amazing images. This is one camera, very

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wide angle lens, and it produces a pretty good image. It can shoot

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almost 360? A bit at the bottom, but we don't have a professional camera

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system yet, there's a few about to come out but I'm hoping for someone

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to invent a spherical sensor, one sensor that shoots in all

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directions. Is that even possible? Scientifically. At the moment the

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industry is having to cobble together hardware from the 2D

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industry. Our hardware, our software, even skilled artists are

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coming from the games industry, other industries, leveraging their

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knowledge and tools into something brand-new but it's not set in stone

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yet. And I'm guessing that applies to content as well as the

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equipment? Absolutely, we took 130 years to make film, we're very good

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at it now, but we've only done VR for two years so the directors have

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only had a couple of projects under their belt, it will take time to get

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it right but it's super exciting. It certainly is and we think we've done

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another world first for you this week, we have filmed what we think

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is the world's burst 360 degrees magic trick. So what we're going to

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do is we're going to show you in 2D as you would see it on TV first, and

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then later on we'll show you in for 360 so you can see everything that

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happened in the room. So have a think about how it might have been

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done. I'm just going to pop up over there and hand over to our friendly

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magician then heart. Thank you, Spencer. Hello, my name is Ben Hart

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and I'm a magician, welcome to this, the inside of my brain, desolate,

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cavernous, bleak. Anyway, we're not here for therapy, we're here for a

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miracle, and nothing says miracle like a plastic glass of orange

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squash and a cardboard tube. Orange juice, chew, concentrate.

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Concentrate! I told you, they're not going to laugh at that. I will cover

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the glass with the tube. Now the producers tell me I need to bring a

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bit of pizzazz to the whole thing so I have a collapsible magician's top

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hat. Now, if I cover the top of the glass and squeeze very tightly I can

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turn the whole thing upside down and no liquid will escape. That's just

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science. But this is the bit that's magic as I make the glass vanish

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completely. OK. You got it yet? The big 360

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reveal is coming later in the programme. But for now we're going

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back to Switzerland heading underground.

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Welcome to the largest particle physics laboratory in the world.

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Right now you're standing inside Srna, the European organisation for

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nuclear research, and you've got a view that many few people will ever

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see -- Cern. We're about 100 metres beneath the Swiss French border and

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above you is just one of the experiments at the Large Hadron

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Collider. Itself the largest machine in the world. In a few minutes we

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will head up there, yes, on that cherry picker to see what happens

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when you smash particles together at close to the speed of light. But

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before we do, let me show you what kind of kit you need to get things

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going that fast. So here we are walking along part of the Long

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circular tunnel that houses the LHC. And that's it next to you, that

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is the Large Hadron Collider, that collection of magnets. It's a 27

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kilometre long loop. There are four experiments on the LHC and ten

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accelerators in the complex, which together accelerate bunches of

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particles up too close to the speed of light. Each section in the tunnel

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performs a very specific function, from cooling things down two -271

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Celsius, or focusing the beam. More specifically beams that fly around

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the ring. Because there are actually two parts running in opposite

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directions, and that's so eventually you can smash the two sets of

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circulating beams together and create conditions similar to those

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at the birth of the universe. So, would you like to see what that

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looks like? Yes, I thought so, me too. This cavern contains the CMS

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experiment, a compact new solenoids, although there's nothing

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compact about it if you ask me. This is one of the places that helped to

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discover the Higgs boson. So that big, shiny pipe above you is

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connected to the tunnels that we were just in and when the beams of

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particles are going fast enough, tiny adjustments are made to bring

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those to beams together until right here they collide. In an instant,

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the particles are smashed to pieces. And it's these even smaller

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particles that the CMS can detect. It's an enormous sense that looks

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for the fundamental building blocks of the universe. By using even

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higher energy collisions, the macro one size tests hope to find other

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particles and explain mysteries like dark energy and dark matter that

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makes up 95% of the matter in our universe. This is big science

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performed on the tiniest of scales. OK, we have learned so much about

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making an filming programmes in 360. I couldn't begin to tell you

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what we are going to do now. We are going to get technical and dirty for

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a second. Once you have filmed in 360 on these six go pro cameras you

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don't just automatically get a virtual reality experience out of

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it, you have got to stitch those pictures together into some kind of

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ball that we can then put you in -- GoPro. The man nodding on my right

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is the man who has spent the last couple of weeks stitching together.

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His name is Steve. How was it? Awful. Horrible. I hate it. How much

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work is it? In one sense, surely, you can get the software to glue the

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pictures together. That would be the dream. With normal TV you put it

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together and it would take a day or two. With this you have an extra

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step in the middle where you have to stitch of this ball you mention. It

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looks fine now but the problem is caused by gaps between the cameras,

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between the six cameras. If you go into the new term into a ghost. --

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U-turn. The thing that is a huge effort. We have found if you go too

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close to the cameras there is no way you can stitch it. That would look

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terrible. Goodness knows what you are seeing right now but I will see

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it later. Whether or not the art will be a success isn't just down to

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the text -- VR. What you can watch and experience will be almost as

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important. If I was on an ordinary television programme I would say

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that it was about 40 metres long, which is as long as three

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double-decker buses in line, and it could reach up to the top of a

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5-storey building. We can see for ourselves. Shall we? We may be the

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first lot crazy enough to make a whole show in 360 but there are

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certainly other people out there making really interesting 360

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stories. A titanic saws brought back to life in this recent documentary

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short by the BBC -- Titanosaur. A great example of how VR can immerse

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you in any spurious that would be otherwise impossible. It can also

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transport you write to the middle of the act and like no other medium can

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-- immerse you in and experience. It can even let him eat people and see

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things that you otherwise never would. I am an urban beekeeper. The

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idea of viewing programmes in 360 degrees may be a new idea but

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looking all around themselves in a videogame as a player is not. Here

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is what we think is another first, a videogame preview in 360. So, while

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we've been warping space, Mark is about to walk time. This is a

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preview of a game unlike any you have seen before -- warp time. It is

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in 360 degrees, it is for a title which supports virtuality headsets

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but I suppose most people will play it on a PC or iMac looking at their

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normal screen. The premise behind Super What is a faster you move, the

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faster time moves in the game. The player is dropped into a variety of

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perilous scenarios. The environment like this is stark and drained of

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colour. The opponents, faceless, crimson enemies, like this fellow.

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The player punches and shoots and by moving really, really slowly, they

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can avoid the deadly accurate shots of the bad guys.

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It is a really, really difficult game. If you are hit once, that is

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it, it is game over. Practice reveals that it is often necessary

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to chain attacks to gain the upper hand over the enemies. You have to

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throw an object at them, grab their weapon and turn it against their

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crystalline colleagues. One of the easiest ways of describing it is

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perhaps like a game designed by the movie director Christopher Nolan at

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his most insane. This isn't so much of a shoot them

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up, it is more of a slow them up with tactical problems generated by

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the temporal trixiness of the title become combat puzzles that are

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solved by repeated trial and error and almost endless restarts, until

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you manage to get to the end of a level and you are greeted with the

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words... Super Hot. That was marked. Now, back to ETH in Switzerland,

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where things are getting wet. You are flying above the laboratory of

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hydraulics, hydrology and glaciology. Although you is a model

:19:05.:19:12.

of the patronage damn in Pakistan. You are en route to an Ethiopian dam

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which is even more spectacular and why are they building them Bass the

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point is when the massive full-size versions are built, they will

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withstand the huge pressures they will be under -- Patron Damn. --

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Patron Dam. Right, we are half full now, and I have Professor Robert

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Boes with me and I am just going to move up here... LAUGHS.

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Water is creeping over to where we were going to have a chat. You are

:19:46.:19:50.

the director of this lab? Yes, I am. And we have to Mac scale models of

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the outlet pipes underneath the dam, deep in the earth, underneath the

:19:55.:20:01.

dam. These are important safety devices for the lowering of the

:20:02.:20:07.

reservoir level. And they are from 100 metres below the maximum water

:20:08.:20:12.

level. So, the water is going to be 100 metres... So, the pressure of

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the water that comes through these pipes is going to be huge. It is

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tremendous. It is very challenging from a hydraulic design point of

:20:23.:20:27.

view, because if this structure fails, the whole dam would be at

:20:28.:20:31.

risk. Now, it is important to note what we are seeing here, this is

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just... We are just filling this area at the moment. This is not the

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pressure or speed the water will be coming out of the dam when it is

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full. That is the next thing we are going to show you and that is pretty

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impressive. That is right. What is worrying me is over the other side a

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man is playing... LAUGHS. That says Timmy got to get out of

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here... Before we get wet. It is a question of time. -- he says it is a

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question of time. And this is what full flow looks like, and remember

:21:12.:21:16.

this is just a scale model. If this were the real thing I am pretty sure

:21:17.:21:21.

you wouldn't want to be standing, or even swimming, anywhere near it.

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This view is good enough for me. OK. That is nearly it for Click 360. One

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thing left to do. You may remember earlier we showed you the magician

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Ben Hart's magic trick in 2D and we asked you how you thought it might

:21:45.:21:52.

have been done. Here is the answer, we will take you back to his studio

:21:53.:21:55.

this time in 360 so you can see everything that happens in the room.

:21:56.:22:00.

Thanks for watching Click 360. This is how we did it. Out of the space,

:22:01.:22:09.

please. 360 magic, scene one, take eight. Lovely, quiet, please,

:22:10.:22:19.

everybody. Ready? And action. Thank you, Spencer. Hello, my name is Ben

:22:20.:22:23.

Hart and I am a magician. Welcome to this, the inside of my rain,

:22:24.:22:29.

desolate, cavernous, bleak... Anyway, we are not here for therapy,

:22:30.:22:33.

we are here to do a miracle and nothing says miracle like a plastic

:22:34.:22:43.

cup of squash and a tube. -- brain. Concentrate. Concentrate. I told

:22:44.:22:46.

you, they were laughed at that. I will cover the glass with a tube.

:22:47.:22:51.

The producers tell me I need to bring a bit of pzzazz to the whole

:22:52.:22:55.

thing, so I have a collapsible magician top hat. -- pizzazz. If I

:22:56.:22:59.

cover the top of the glass and squeeze very tightly I can turn the

:23:00.:23:02.

whole thing upside down and no Likud will escape, and that is just

:23:03.:23:06.

science. But this is the bit that his magic as I attempt to make the

:23:07.:23:11.

glass vanished completely. -- vanish.

:23:12.:23:36.

Hello again. A bit like last night there is some more mist and fog

:23:37.:23:41.

around as we

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