Gigafactory Click


Gigafactory

Click visits Tesla's new Gigafactory, chats to the boss Elon Musk and helps set a Guinness World Record. Plus 3D printed death masks in China.


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Transcript


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cope with another financial crisis. The ECB said the World Bank for more

:00:00.:00:00.

resilient, but more work was still needed.

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This week, cartoon cowboys. Futuristic funerals. And... And

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enormous battery farm! And a lovely lie down.

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Imagine a world where your car runs on electricity and it drives itself.

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Yeah, not so much of the stretch these days, is it? Batteries are

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getting better and cars are getting smarter. The two biggest revolutions

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in transport are electric occasion and autonomy. Those are the biggest

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innovations since the moving production line and they are both

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happening at about the same time. -- electrification. It is Tesla that

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has been spearheading the drive to electric. We first took on for a

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spin in 2007 and since then the electric vehicle has gone from

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sporty status symbol to a slightly less sporty status symbol. But

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dominating the conversation at the moment, not Tesla's latest models,

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but concerns over the safety of its driver assist autopilot feature,

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after it was involved in two crashes and one fatality. But while the law

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is get to work on the autonomous site, they are getting ready for a

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electric prime time. The space in the floor is full of batteries and

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Tesla is going to need a lot of them. Dave Lee has been to Nevada to

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witness the opening of the Gigafactory. Welcome to Reno, in

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Nevada, which if you have never been here is like a less glamorous

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version of Las Vegas. They call this place the biggest little city in the

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world and soon the city will be overrun I these things. Tesla are

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building what will be one of the biggest factories ever made. Say

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hello to the Gigafactory. Right now it is only 14% finished, if you can

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believe that, and when it is finished the complex will cover over

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3000 acres. This factory is the crucial part of the master plan set

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out the boss of Tesla. When he published his latest Idlib master

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plan for what to do with Tesla he said he now want to do things like

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lorries and buses. -- latest master plan. The do that he need to make a

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lot more trees, which is what this place is for. In total the plant is

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expected to cost around $5 billion to build. We were given a sneak peek

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of what was inside. Most of the factory was sadly off-limits to our

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cameras. The plan is to basically speed things up a little bit. Right

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now Tesla have to ship battery sales across the ocean from Asia, which

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takes a long time and is very expensive. Do they want to make

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battery cells right here instead. A promised that by 2018 bid will be

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able to produce enough batteries for 500,000 cars each year. And it won't

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just be car batteries. Their home and business energy storage unit

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will be put together here. I believe we are on track to meet the 500,020

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18. Long-term this will make sense, to have a Gigafactory in Europe and

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one in China and probably one in India. Very big plans, although he

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might want to concentrate on finishing this factory first. Tesla

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has meant a lot of deadlines in the past and I would be surprised if

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something is slipped. I went to the Fremont factory before it opened and

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it was a ghost yard there as well, but they've done some amazing thing

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there and I think they will do amazing things here as well. But not

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everything is going smoothly. Do you have any regrets about how Tesla

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rolled out autopilot? No, I think we did the right thing. We have the

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internal data to know that we improved people's safety, not just

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in fatalities but also injuries. It is pretty fair to say that only Elon

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Musk could pull off something like the Gigafactory and of all the

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things he is working on it is surely this project that will make or break

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it. That was Dave Lee at the

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Gigafactory. Along with electric and self driving cars, and other trend

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which is quietly chugging its way towards changing the world is 3D

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printing. It is still niche but already the variety of things that

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can be 3D printed is impressive. Just this week Food Ink bought its

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3D printed restaurant in London, where diners could tuck into 3D

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printed food, while using 3D printed cutlery and 3D printed chairs. They

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told me it was fish and chips but I was very curious how it looked like.

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I think it is the future for the restaurants, yes. Almost anything

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you can imagine and anything you can put into pure a form or paste can be

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moved so elaborate leap right 3D printed, and then it can be further

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improved or solidified by other manual steps later. We are already

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developing such printers that can combine these steps in one, so the

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next step will be printers that have a built-in microwave or offered and

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some of these steps chefs won't have to manually. But here is a useful 3D

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printing that I wasn't expecting to hear about any time soon. In China,

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the most important ceremony of your life is module verse and not your

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wedding, it is your funeral. Dan Simmons has been to Shanghai to see

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how some new ideas are being brought to those final moments.

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This is such a sacred moment in Chinese culture that we've not been

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allowed to film the open cofffin. Here, seeing the dead body

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face-to-face is a fundamental part of saying goodbye. But what happens

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when there's nothing left to say goodbye to? These devastating

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explosions rocked a port city last August. Hundreds of people died

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horrifically in one moment. What was left of the bodies bore no

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resemblance to the victims when they were alive. And there were far too

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many dead for the traditional model is in China to recreate the faces in

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good time for all of the funerals. The disaster was the reason one firm

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turns to making 3D printed faces of the dead. More lifelike than party

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and cutting the waiting time from one or two weeks to a single day.

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One Shanghai funeral home claims to be able to reconstruct a face to

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within 95% accuracy. And the impressive part is that they don't

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need videos on seven clean shots of the person from several different

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angles, they just need one good picture of the person who has died.

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The masks, if you like, are cut from blocks of compressed powder, before

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a top layer of powder is added and bake storm. 2-D eye it looks like it

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should have the texture of rubber. I think it looks pretty

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photorealistic. This is a hard shell, it isn't a soft surface, but

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from almost any angle it just looks an movingly real. -- unnvervingly.

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What do you think? Pretty good. The chief technician used himself to

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perfect the system. He is building a database to speed up the process.

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The basic service costs around $1000, but touchups to make the dead

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look their best are also possible. TRANSLATION: We are trying to make a

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person who say died at the age of 70 looked the way he did on his wedding

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day when was perhaps in his 30s. But the lead engineer with the

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service doesn't want to stop at creating a perfect match.

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TRANSLATION: In the future we are looking to make the 3D printed head

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be able to talk at his own funeral using voice analysis to speak his

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last words to his descendants and even plant the deceased's head on

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his tomb so he can speak his family from the grave when they come to

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visit him. Even if it proved popular, reanimating the dead is

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likely to be a long way off. But having more control over how you

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look, regardless of how you died, is for people here now and affordable

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reality. Welcome to the week in tax. It was

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the week of playing powered only by the sun circumnavigated the globe.

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-- Week in Tech. Apple sold its new iPhone and an emotional farewell

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from this lander. The while, 3D screenings without glasses would

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come to a cinema near you, although already possible on a smaller scale,

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MIT's prototype could provide the eyewear free big-screen solution.

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The technology only allows viewing through a limited range of movement,

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so best sit still. It also needs a more practical solution to its many

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lenders before going on general release. Feel your computer game

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characters need more emotion? This is a face tracking VR headset which

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hopes to recreate the way you are feeling in virtual reality. The

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built-in infrared cameras track your eyes, eyebrows, jawbone and mouth,

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so your avatar can react accordingly. And it was a good and

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bad week for smart home devices. Good because a security camera

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alerted a homeowner to this fire, so the fire brigade could be called.

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But bad as some smart pet feeder is working to buy a server outage,

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meaning some hungry dogs and cats. -- feeders were hit.

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Every so often the world goes crazy for a brand-new app and in the last

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couple of weeks something amazing has hit our phones. This is an app

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which does something brilliant two pictures. Mark, you've been playing

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with it. Explain more. It applies really extreme filters to still

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images. Filters that make a photograph look like an illustration

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or a painting. It is an application that can make

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your photos look like they were painted by Picasso. How does it

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work? I talked to the creator on Skype. You take a photo on your

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phone. Then we process it on a device. Then you send a photo to the

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cloud and we have several people doing different parts of the image

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processing. Then we redraw your image based on a style you choose.

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Then you get the result on your device. You haven't just stopped at

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photos, have you? I was playing with it and thought, this is Click and we

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tend to take technology to the extremes and push stuff to the age

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so it gets a nosebleed. It would be nice to apply this to moving images

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as well. Unfortunately this application does not support video,

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only for still images. But moving images are just lots of stills put

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together, right? Film is just a series of still images played in

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sequence very quickly. So I took an old sketch with Spencer and I as

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cowboys and exported every single frame as a still image. Once they

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were imported back on my phone I applied the same filter to each

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individual frame. I used a particular filter called Eisenberg.

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This created a hand drawn effects which created a short film that

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looks like it had been rotoscoped, an old technique that traces over

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footage of real movement by artists. Then it is animated similar to a

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flip book. Exporting them into imaging software and playing them

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one after the other and you get a short animated film. And it looks

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like I have turned my phone into a flipbook. That is brilliant. How

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long did that take you? Nine days. Full marks for perseverance. We will

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put the whole worker Vaka on line. Here is a brief taste of what it

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looks like. Prisma have plans to make its

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filters work on 360 degrees photos as well as working on video footage.

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That means in the future you won't have to go through that process that

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I just had to. PIANO MUSIC. Did you know we get up to two hours

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less sleep a night than people did in the 1960s? Well, distractions

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from our gadgets and even the specific wavelengths of light from

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our mobile devices are taking some of the blame. But at the same time,

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technology to help that our sleep has upped its game. If you share a

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bed with someone who gets up at a different time to you then these

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earplugs could help because they mean that the alarm goes off only in

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the years of their wearer. At the same time they should block out any

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unwanted noise. They can also play soothing sounds as you go off to

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sleep. Even though I don't normally wear earplugs I could get used to

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the feeling of them. The only issue is that I need to wake up when my

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three-year-old does. But if you would rather cover your eyes then

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your tea is then you may be interested in this, this mask. --

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ears. It has been a long time in the making and I first got my hands on

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it at The Consumer Electronics Show earlier this year. It has these

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electronic lights to help you go to sleep and will give you advice as to

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when you should go to sleep to get the best results. It may add buys

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you to take a power nap in the day and to make sure you don't get into

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too deep a sleep. It claims to recalibrate your sleep pattern by

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using sunlight to trick your body into a new routine, useful for shift

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workers or those in different time zones. My real issue with it was

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that it wasn't very comfortable so it actually is stopped me from

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sleeping well. It isn't just about wearable devices. This aims to track

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the room you are sleeping in to monitor the sound, light, and

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temperature to make sure you have the perfect environment for a good

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night's sleep. If it is green you have an ideal state. Otherwise,

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opened the application to see what isn't right. -- open. There is an

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appeal in the precise numbers for data lovers. At the same time, the

:17:36.:17:45.

coin sized device will wake you. For a more drastic solution, this is the

:17:46.:17:53.

Beluga interactive smart bed. It tractor asleep and the way you are

:17:54.:17:56.

lying down to take the real-time data to make the bed more

:17:57.:18:02.

comfortable. -- tracks your sleep. The firmness of each part can be

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changed manually or a light on the algorithm to change areas too soft

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or hard. And you can switch into the masse Jamon as well. I feel like I

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am on an aeroplane wing. -- massage mode. It also tracks snoring, so it

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will change the height of your head ever so slightly too hopefully make

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you stop. It also knows to wake you at the perfect moment in your sleep

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cycle, has temperature controls for air, and also a motion sensor

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activated light for getting up in the night. That is nice if you are

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willing to change your actual bed. Ironically, testing the wearable

:18:54.:18:56.

device has left me more sleep deprived than normal. But it is

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probably good to be more relaxed when you and reviewing then. And I

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did manage to get some sleep while actually filming. It just so happens

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she isn't the only one who enjoys a little bit of a lie down on the job.

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At this laboratory in Switzerland at there is a bed that will rock you to

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sleep. -- Switzerland,. This is the SomnoMat. The idea is to use rocking

:19:33.:19:35.

movements to get to sleep and shorten the time of sleep onset and

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to improve quality during the night. What works for children also works

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for adults, though little is known about which rocking techniques work

:19:48.:19:52.

best. That is what the team here have been studying. What have you

:19:53.:19:56.

discovered so far? What is the best rocking method? That is a good

:19:57.:20:02.

question. We found there is one best movement. A rocking movement like

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now you see. But there is a different preference for each

:20:11.:20:14.

person. That makes a challenging to make a product for the people. Can I

:20:15.:20:21.

have a go? Of course. The bed is actually a classic example of how

:20:22.:20:25.

research sometimes accidentally creates a new invention. The team

:20:26.:20:29.

needed to study different rocking movements, so they built a bed that

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could do different rocking movements. GROANS. And they needed

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motors that were quite enough to sleep on top of. So they invented

:20:42.:20:49.

them. -- quiet. It is smooth. It was challenging to develop that smooths

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movement without any sound. -- smooth. Carry on talking. And the

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sound level is below the level suggested by the World Health

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Organization which is very silent. Keep talking. Boquete...

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LAUGHING. We can now stop the rocking movement. So, in summary,

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your closing thought, your closing thought, a pithy comment, and now we

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will end to the next item. We are off to the royal in the two and two

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participate in the world largest game of Pong. -- Royal Institution.

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So large it will make a new record. Or those of you living under a GGI

:21:43.:21:49.

rock for the last 20 years, this is Pong. I don't really need to explain

:21:50.:21:54.

the rules, do I? And the people responsible for gathering these

:21:55.:22:02.

players? It is a way to connect on a Wi-Fi network so that we can beam

:22:03.:22:09.

games at them. Welcome to Wi-Fi Wars. To make the magic happened

:22:10.:22:16.

they need a mean computer hooked up to a router daisychained around the

:22:17.:22:20.

room. The amount of routers depends on the amount of layers. The

:22:21.:22:24.

audience is divided into two teams. Which team am I on? BBC Red. Each

:22:25.:22:32.

player gets an up and down arrow beamed to their phone. That makes

:22:33.:22:38.

the corresponding slider move up or down based on votes from players.

:22:39.:22:43.

Please stand by. De Vroome went crazy. And Stephen emerged. There

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were two world-record holders that appeared. Just in the neck of time.

:22:52.:22:58.

APPLAUSE. The Guinness World Record adjudicators arrived. They needed

:22:59.:23:03.

concentration. APPLAUSE. You have to hold it. Hold

:23:04.:23:16.

it down. Down! Up! Yes! APPLAUSE. Come on! Come on! Phones

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flashed, people cheered, and a mighty match of long was played. --

:23:27.:23:32.

Pong. But the real question... Have we broken a record of a with a total

:23:33.:23:45.

of 286... You have! APPLAUSE. We did it. One of the

:23:46.:23:51.

greatest world records ever achieved by any single person in the world.

:23:52.:24:01.

That is me. I did that. It was all me!

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LAUGHING. Always game for a laugh. That is Nick. That is it for this

:24:07.:24:12.

week. At Twitter we are live at BBCClick. That is it. See you soon.

:24:13.:24:25.

THEME SONG PLAYS. The hot weather is in the south

:24:26.:24:36.

and east of europe. Here at home it will feel

:24:37.:24:41.

warm when the sun is out

:24:42.:24:45.

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