Spy Special Click


Spy Special

Click reports from Defcon in Las Vegas, the world's largest hacking convention.


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Transcript


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Now on BBC News, Click.

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This week, international espionage.

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Shark fishing in Vegas.

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Spooked out in London.

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The way you walk can be used against you.

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And, I spy in Hong Kong.

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conventions have just taken place.

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We've seen ATMs conned into spewing out cash and solar panels controlled

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from the other side of the world.

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And while Black Hat is the conference for the security

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professionals, the hobbyist hackers hang out at Def Con,

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and they're not all good guys.

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There are all night parties and challenges to hack

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into visitor's phones or laptops with the victim's details posted up

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here, on the notorious Wall of Sheep.

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What these big events expose is the vulnerability of anything

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that's connected to the internet.

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And, of course, we are moving towards a world where everything

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will be connected to the internet from the infrastructure,

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to your car, to your home appliances, to your clothes.

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Yet there's always something new in the world of hacking and this

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week we'll show you some of it.

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But first, Dan Simmons is off gambling.

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When Click was offered a rare opportunity to film how a top casino

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has used its own tech to catch the cheats,

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we sent him in with a simple brief - get the story and come home safely.

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But with Sin City this full of bad guys, it didn't quite go to plan.

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I'm on the inside, but who can I trust?

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A big company boss was caught cheating at the tables only

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last month here.

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In the old days, they'd have had agents casually observing suspects

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on the gaming floor or even snooping through a ceiling made of glass.

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Today, this $20 million security set-up is all about the cameras,

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and this casino has some new ones.

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Can you see it?

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There.

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He's got it on his finger.

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Watch how he handles the cards, and that's him putting the mark.

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It's that subtle.

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It's just that little scratch on the back.

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There.

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I can actually see it.

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He put it on pretty heavy, so we can see it here.

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That's why they call it a visible mark.

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And the idea is, when he sees the card -

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a Queen, King, Ace - come up, he's going to bet as much

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as he can.

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So this is just the perfect example.

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Let's see when the cards come over.

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There's an Ace and a King.

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Of course it's appropriate to bet the most he can when he gets

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those good cards.

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The biggest thing that's happened is the addition

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of the 360 degree cameras.

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They take the place of 400 hand-tilt zoom cameras.

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I can replace 400 of those with 50 oncam 360 cameras.

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I can literally follow the bad guy every step he took in this building.

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Look at that, how far that thing goes.

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This is two megapixels, the new ones are 12.

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So, from this shot here, I would be able to identify that person.

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Ted says reliable, automatic facial recognition is just a year

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or two away.

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The cameras can already analyse and report the general movements

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of people, but it's still the skill of the operators in catching a cheat

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in the act that's his trump card.

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Ted's enthusiasm has led him to hack together some unique

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and revealing tech himself.

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You can see right here this card, if you're looking at with your naked

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eye, you cannot see through it.

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But once you put it up to the right light and the right lens,

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you can see right through it, like it's...

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Look, he's got - nine, nine.

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So this is a mark that I had printed on this card,

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but I could apply this type of ink on the fly while I'm sitting

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on a game.

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The thing is, all you need is the right light source

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and the right lens.

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This device here has nine different lenses in it

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which I can cycle through.

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I don't know if your camera can catch it, but I can.

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This lens is in the glasses or in their contacts.

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So they don't need a camera like we have, they can do this

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with manual devices, just like my glasses.

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So this is just a cheap phone that I had the camera modified.

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Let me see if I can find a good one.

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You can see through that card with this phone.

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Casinos buy cards, they have to be careful not to buy the cheapest card

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because this is what you get sometimes.

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Our casinos would never have a card like this on the floor.

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Our cheat is at it again.

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This time he's gambled too much on what turns out to be a poor hand.

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That was a great move.

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So it looked as if he's tucking the cards and he's actually knocking

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the chip back into his hand and therefore he lost less money

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than he was going to lose.

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This is the most popular way to con the casino,

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but the cameras have caught it, and Ted's seen enough.

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Excuse me, sir, how are you doing?

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I need you to step away from the table and come with us.

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Our cheat's a plant.

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For legal reasons we can't show you an actual pick-up but,

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while we were filming, Ted caught one guy doing exactly

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the same cheats we've just shown you.

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And that's payday for the good guys.

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But you can't catch them all.

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Drones can be used as a threat factor against not only stationary

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targets, like industrial wireless, but also against moving

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targets as well.

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My name is Jeff Melrose.

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For about 16 years I worked on designing secure systems

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for the US Department of defence as well as the US intelligence

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community.

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Jeff's research, revealed last week in Las Vegas,

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shows a drone carrying an electromagnetic disrupter

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could create what he calls "a cone of silence" around a moving target.

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The drop off co-ordinates are one, three, seven,

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four, seven, two, nine.

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It locks on automatically without the need for an operator

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and is a threat, he believes, many aren't ready for.

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The ability to provide persistent degradation and navigation signals

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as well as communications is something that would be quite

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useful if you wanted to redirect cargo, redirect a ship,

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potentially causing an environmental disaster in a port, those

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types of things.

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As well as killing coms, interfering with the car's

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telematics or GPS could cause serious problems, especially if it's

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a self-driving vehicle.

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Thankfully, Jeff is on my side.

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OK, maybe making it blow up is a bit of a stretch!

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What happens now, Jeff?

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Just follow the drone.

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What, all the way to London?

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You could have sent a chopper.

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Hello, and welcome to the Week in Tech.

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This was the week that 1,007 miniature robots danced their way

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into the record books.

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Google revealed an experiment to try and combat trolling in virtual

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reality, by making players look like dogs.

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And in honour of International Cat Day, Facebook unveiled research

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showing that cat people have fewer friends and are more likely to be

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single than dog people.

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Happy Cat Day everyone.

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Facebook also announced it will begin bypassing ad blockers

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used by some people on its network.

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The company, which made $17 billion from selling ads last year,

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said it will offer users more options to control what sort

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of ads they see.

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I'm pleased to bring you news that the flying bottom has finally

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emerged from its lair.

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Also known as the Airlander 10 by its creators, Click visited this

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gigantic airship earlier in the year, when it was still

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locked up indoors.

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Now it's outside and, once tests are complete,

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the plan is for it to fly continuously for up to two weeks

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at a time.

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NASA really treated us this week.

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First, they gave us this spectacularly detailed footage

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of a rocket burn, captured with their new high dynamic range

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camera and then, sticking with the spectacular theme,

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they released a smorgasbord of new Mars imagery.

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And, finally...

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Ah, the joy of cycling, the wind in your hair,

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the sun on your back.

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Games developer, Aaron Pewsey, is on a mission to bike the length

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of Britain, all without leaving his front room.

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By hooking up his exercise bike to a pair of virtual reality goggles

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and Google's Street View imagery, he's hoping he'll spice

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up his exercise routine and cycle 1,500 virtual kilometres

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in the process.

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If you've reset your Facebook or your Google password recently

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or you've made a payment on line, you may have received one of these.

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It's a text message to confirm that you're not just some hacker trying

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to access the account from somewhere else in the world.

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The theory being that most hacking is done by someone thousands

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of miles away from you, who doesn't actually know you.

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So although they can try and log on as you,

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they won't have access to your phone and can't see the text message.

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This belts and braces approach, called two factor authentication,

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has worked very well at stopping malicious software from just

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rinsing your bank accounts.

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But it turns out it's not as secure as many think.

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In fact, the US government's National Institute of Standards

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and Technology has recently advised against services using SMS

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confirmation codes in the future.

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The UK's National Crime Agency agrees.

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I'm about to be shown one of the reasons why,

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at Positive Technologies in London.

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It's a weakness in the global mobile phone network,

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the part called SS7, which allows hackers to intercept

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phone messages to a given phone number.

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We can intercept phone calls.

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We can redirect phone calls.

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We can attack a particular subscriber, so that subscriber

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will not be available to make phone calls.

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We can attack a particular infrastructure.

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Yeah, and not only can a hacker disrupt and listen to your calls,

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they can also track you to the nearest phone tower, too.

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It's been known about for a few years and the means to do it

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are available for sale on the dark web for really not that much money.

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But arguably the most powerful thing they can do

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is redirect your text messages.

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To show you how it worked a researcher, somewhere else

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in Europe, is about to intercept a text message and use it to gain

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access to my Facebook account.

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That's my brand new Facebook account, not the real one -

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thanks very much.

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Shall we mail?

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And this is the important bit, I'm going to put in the mobile

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number which Facebook can contact me on should I forget my password.

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Now it's time to unleash our guy.

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Now, we're watching his actions on this screen here.

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He's going to tell Facebook he's me and pretend that I have

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forgotten my password.

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The way Facebook checks that it really is me who's asking is,

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of course, by sending a code to my phone and asking me to enter

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that onto the website.

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Facebook has sent a text to that phone over there.

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Apart from, it hasn't...

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That text has been redirected to our guy's phone elsewhere

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in the world.

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In fact, there's the text message on our guy's computer screen.

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He now has all he needs to reset my password and wreak havoc

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on my account.

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OK, let's see what's been done to me.

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There I am.

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I'm lucky it's just a flower that I've been changed to.

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The thing is, this is actually nothing to do with Facebook.

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Any service that uses texts is vulnerable.

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The way Facebook checks that it really is me who's asking is,

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of course, by sending a code to my phone and asking me to enter

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that onto the website.

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That could be your bank.

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I'll say that again - your bank!

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That's where your money is, remember.

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We asked Facebook whether it should rethink its use of SMS verification.

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It said that the technique we witnessed requires significant

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technical and financial investment and so it's very low-risk for most

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people, although it does offer a more secure log-in feature

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called log-in approvals.

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We also asked the British intelligence and security

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organisation, GCHQ, for advice and we were told that the SS7 system

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is old and doesn't have modern security protections built in,

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but they assured us they are working on building up its resilience.

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But why is the SS7 network so open to abuse?

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To find out, I met up with Professor Alan Woodward,

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long time security adviser to Europol.

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We choose a park bench because, well, it just felt a bit spyie.

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A lot of people talk about SS7 having a security flaw in it,

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but it was never designed to be secure because at the time

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it was designed, which was, you've got to remember,

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nearly 40 years ago, the networks inherently

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trusted each other.

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So they didn't think they had to validate talking to each other,

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they just naturally assumed tht they were the only ones talking.

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Can they fix it?

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They could, but I don't think they will.

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It's not within even the law enforcement agencies gift to do

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anything about it.

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Nobody mandates this standard, it's all by agreement amongst

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the telecommunication providers and I don't see them changing it

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any time soon because it's very targeted, so somebody has

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to want to come after you.

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Plus, one of the reasons that some intelligence agencies won't want it

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fixed is because SS7 allows you to be tracked.

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I, personally, would recommend not using SMS because you have to assume

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it could be intercepted and use something like e-mail only

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or ideally move to one of the online services

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which is encrypted.

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You're crazy, old man.

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You have no idea.

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Get ready.

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Now, from hacking to tracking.

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We wondered whether it was possible to escape state snooping

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when the Intelligence Services are trying to track your every move.

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Lara Lewington tracked down an ex-spook to find out how you can

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shake off any unwanted attention.

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Listen up.

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The suspect's name is Special Agent Elizabeth Keen.

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She was my partner but, as of today, she's a fugitive wanted...

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OK, it may be a glamourised version, but this scene is only too familiar

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to former MI5 officer Annie Machon, who went on-the-run after quitting

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the secret service to go public on her experiences.

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I suppose we were the sort of 1990s version of Edward Snowdon.

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Tracking someone's whereabouts may not always look as exciting as this,

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but doing so has become easier than ever.

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So how simply can we hide?

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How easy is it, using modern technology, to find out

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where someone is and what can we do to protect ourselves from that?

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Now we're looking at programmes, such as Trap Wire, which was one

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of the disclosures over Wikileaks a few years ago,

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where you get meshing of your GPS, from your phone, facial recognition

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technology via Google and also Facebook photo tagging,

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which can be fed into the CCTV network around the UK.

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So in live-time you can be tracked, you can be photographed,

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you can be idnetified and then, the icing on the cake,

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which is Trap Wire, they've written algorithmic predictive programmes

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and if you're loitering or walking in a suspicion manner,

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and you've already been identified, then you might be

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about to commit a crime.

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You might be about to be a terrorist, so then they can swoop

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and get you.

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The way you walk can be used against you.

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The only way to get around that, as well as disguing yourself,

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is to perhaps put a stone in your shoe, so it forces

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you to walk differently.

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But you said you wanted to know when Mrs Hargrave

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contacted your office.

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Put her through.

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Turn it up.

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You're on with Mrs Hargrave.

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Annie also provides us with a reminder as to how the spies

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can snoop on phone calls and e-mails.

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Since 1998 they have been able to do bulk data hacking,

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which means they can gather all our information,

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be it travel, be it finance, be it health, be it work,

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be it social life on Facebook, whatever, and amalgamate it.

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So our entire lives are just laid open to whoever wants to look

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at that information.

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Now as soon as you do something which might trigger an interest,

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they will specifically look at you - if you get involved in a political

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campaign, or whatever.

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So this is very difficult to try and avoid.

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There are certain tools you can use, the privacy tools.

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In fact, Edward Snowdon has said if you use all of these together,

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and you use them effectively, you can protect your privacy.

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If someone discovers they are being snooped on,

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what should they actually do about it?

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Yes, get a Faraday cage wallet and then lock their phone

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in the fridge or in a biscuit tin overnight.

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The other solution is to go back to the old tech.

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You get pre-2008 computers, you get very old burner phones

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with pre-paid SIMS, and that gives you a fighting chance.

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In terms of the people that we communicate with,

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obviously knowing someone's network and connections is actually

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quite valuable information.

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Hugely valuable.

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I mean, it's probably the key information

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for any intelligence agency.

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We would take weeks, if not months, to try and pull together a full

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picture of a target's networks and who they're in relationships

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with, what their activities are and where they live,

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where they work and where they go, and that was very,

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very resource intensive.

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It could involve human agents.

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It could involve mobile surveillance, teams following them

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around a city.

0:20:380:20:42

Now, of course, they can just could do it by triangulating

0:20:420:20:45

information by hacking all our information on the internet,

0:20:450:20:48

and they've got us.

0:20:480:20:49

Only recently Edward Snowdon has been involved in designing a phone

0:20:490:20:51

case aiming to track when data is being sent or received,

0:20:510:20:54

so a user can tell if it's happening unexpectedly.

0:20:540:20:56

This may all sound a bit extreme to most of us,

0:20:560:20:59

but if you ever do need to go under the radar,

0:20:590:21:02

at least now you may know how.

0:21:020:21:04

Um...very useful to know.

0:21:040:21:10

But then there are those people who've actually put themselves under

0:21:100:21:13

surveillance without realising they're on show to everyone.

0:21:130:21:15

This is backdoored.io, an exhibition filled with images

0:21:150:21:17

from webcams whose passwords haven't been changed from admin.

0:21:170:21:19

It's funny what people put security cameras

0:21:190:21:21

on, though, isn't it?

0:21:210:21:34

Yeah.

0:21:340:21:35

That's been one of the really interesting insights.

0:21:350:21:36

I mean, here people are watching their laundry,

0:21:360:21:39

so you can just imagine, you know - is my laundry dry?

0:21:390:21:42

I'll just go and check the security camera.

0:21:420:21:43

I've got one of plugs.

0:21:440:21:45

Is that plug still plugged in?

0:21:450:21:46

You know?

0:21:460:21:53

Artist Nye Thompson and curator Kosha Hussain have sifted

0:21:530:21:55

through 7,000 images which have been collected by search engines

0:21:550:21:57

from unprotected cameras.

0:21:570:21:58

Why have you got a whole area dedicated just to one street in Hong

0:21:580:22:02

Kong?

0:22:020:22:05

So when the images come in, they all come in with geolocation

0:22:050:22:08

data, so you can actually pinpoint where they are,

0:22:080:22:16

and I noticed there was a disproportionately large number

0:22:160:22:18

of images coming in from just this one location.

0:22:180:22:20

I think somebody just blanket installed surveillance cameras

0:22:200:22:22

in this tower block.

0:22:220:22:23

You know, the same person did all of them and they didn't really

0:22:230:22:26

know what they were doing.

0:22:260:22:39

Many of us use webcams to monitor the things that we're anxious about,

0:22:390:22:43

but I wonder how anxious these people would be if they knew

0:22:430:22:45

who was really watching?

0:22:450:22:47

That's it from Wing Lee Street in Hong Kong.

0:22:470:22:57

On behalf of the residents, thank you for watching,

0:22:570:22:59

even though I don't think they realise.

0:22:590:23:01

And curiously, over the next two weeks, we are going back to China

0:23:010:23:04

with another chance to see two of our China programmes

0:23:040:23:07

from earlier this year, as we take a well-deserved summer break.

0:23:070:23:16

'Made in China' is becoming 'designed in China'.

0:23:170:23:19

That's going to cost him at least a minute.

0:23:190:23:22

Underneath that helmet, he's going to be absolutely fuming.

0:23:220:23:24

So, China, one and two, coming in the next fortnight.

0:23:240:23:27

In the meantime, follow us on Twitter, as always, @BBC Click.

0:23:270:23:29

Thanks for watching and we'll see you soon.

0:23:290:24:09

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