06/01/2014 Inside Out Yorkshire and Lincolnshire


06/01/2014

Chris Jackson meets the woman who survived a fall from a North Sea ferry. Keeley Donovan reports on the efforts to improve the fortunes of a heritage railway.


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Transcript


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Welcome to a new series of Inside Out. Tonight we are in Sheffield.

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Good evening. Welcome to Inside Out. Tonight as the New Year opens up the

:00:26.:00:35.

borders to immigrants from Bulgaria and Romania, we sent a pellet to

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Sheffield, where people are struggling to get on with their

:00:43.:00:48.

neighbours. The way things are, they are dumping rubbish and it makes you

:00:49.:00:51.

almost not want to say that you live here.

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Also tonight, we hear the extraordinary story of the woman who

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fell from the North Sea ferry. And we jump aboard the steam railway

:01:03.:01:06.

trying to stay in business. Since the start of the New Year,

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Bulgarian and Romanian citizens have been unable to travel to the UK for

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work. Immigration has caused tension in places like Boston in

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Lincolnshire, close to where the poet lives. He has been meeting

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people here in Sheffield where and influx of Roma people is causing

:01:36.:01:46.

friction with the local population. Even if a Roma person has a tie made

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of gold the Roma is a dirty gypsy and should go and get lost.

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Six, seven, eight years ago we were winning Britain In Bloom awards...

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Do you think we would? You look back and think; in

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retrospect I probably wouldn't have said that.

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When my parents arrived in Britain from the Caribbean s this is where

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they first settled. It was number 22 Clun Street in the Burngreave area

:02:10.:02:13.

of Sheffield. It's long since been knocked down. But for the fact my

:02:14.:02:19.

mum got a job in the health service 90 miles away I'd have been born a

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Yorkshireman and not a Brummie. More than half a century later I'm going

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to see how some more recent immigrants are settling in less than

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two miles away. This is Page Hall. Back to back

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terraced houses packed closely together. It's become the focus for

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a heated national debate on immigration. It's where Ivan Pokuta

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and his wife Magdelena arrived with their four children Tatyana,

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Patrick, Ivan Junior and four year old Lissier in 2007.

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As a Roma family in Slovakia they say they faced hardship, poverty and

:02:56.:03:04.

prejudice. Despite having qualifications I

:03:05.:03:09.

couldn't live ` I had to go. We can be highly educated, it's pointless.

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There is prejudice against Roma. For the past decade Roma Slovak

:03:15.:03:17.

people have been coming to this area. It's reckoned as many as 2,000

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could live in this small area. It's not always been easy...and then this

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happened... If everything exploded and

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everything went really wrong, the community would obviously be

:03:34.:03:37.

devastated.. We saw this in Bradford, Burnley and Oldham.

:03:38.:03:40.

In this radio interview David Blunkett gave a stark warning about

:03:41.:03:46.

the rising tensions in the area. His words sparked a media frenzy and TV

:03:47.:03:49.

cameras and the international press descended on Page Hall.

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I am coming here for a better life. Disturbances, crowds, hanging around

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everywhere. David Blunkett agreed to meet me and

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give his first broadcast interview since those comments which some said

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were unwise. You have been an MP in this area for

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26 years and you have encountered the media all the time. Don't you

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think you should have chosen your words that are?

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If I had meant to say there would be riots, I would have used that word.

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. I've always said things as I've seen them. Could I have foreseen

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that somebody could have used it in this way? Probably... You look back

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and say in retrospect I probably wouldn't have said that...but I did

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mean that. I really do need to ensure that this community polls you

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never `` pulls together and saying it as it is makes sure that people

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listen. He visits some of the areas that the

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Roma come from in Eastern Europe. We have a persecuted minority, living

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on the edge. If the children go to school, they

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don't go to the same school as other children. They don't have refuse

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collection or inside toilets. They don't have that kind of experience.

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They are also suspicious of authority. In Slovakia, Roma goat

:05:27.:05:39.

stealing. It does happen ` they would have

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done it for their children but it's not like the politicians ` they

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steal money from people. Over there it's high unemployment.

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I have been praying to get work and I thank God I have found work at a

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hostage factory. The work injury now means I can can

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no longer do manual Labour. He says he has earned the right to claim

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state benefits that his family relies on.

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When a man finds work, he automatically gets benefits for

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children and it is quite normal. Helping families like this one to

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integrate is the job of Julie. She's a community cohesion worker employed

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part time with funding from the police crime commissioner.

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The area we live in, as you see, the houses are back`to`back, very close

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together. People feel as if they are living on top of each other so when

:06:40.:06:44.

you get newcomers, it is very noticeable.

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Julie normally patrols with a Slovak co`worker. Bert Outram, a local bus

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driver has something to report to Julie.

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There must have been 250 Roma on the street arguing and fighting. About

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six cop cars on the street. Bert filmed this footage of a Roma

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gathering in his street and says it's typical of what he and his

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neighbours have to contend with. Have you personally lost your pride

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of place? The way things are` the litter and

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dumping of rubbish, it makes you almost not to want to say you live

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in Page Hall. His complaints are all too common

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and many feel their concerns are not being addressed. I've come to an

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Islamic centre where a new residents association has been set up talk

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about the issues surrounding the Roma and I'm going to see if they'll

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let us film them. Thank you for coming on this cold

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evening... The Roma issue is the only one on

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the agenda tonight. Those assembled represent a pretty good cross

:07:56.:07:58.

section of the established community here. Most do not wish to be filmed

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but all feel their voices aren't being heard by the authorities.

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After some discussion we're allowed to film the first part of the

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meeting but then asked to switch off the camera.

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They were really concerned about the way that the Roma people, in their

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eyes, were taking over the street, playing loud music and littering.

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They talked about young kids being left out late at night and one of

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the things a lot of people talked about was house prices, which kind

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of surprised me. They were told that has prices had dropped. Ivan's

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17`year`old son Patrik prepares to go out for the evening to meet

:08:45.:08:47.

friends. But he has to be in by 9:30pm. There are many who have no

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such parental curfews and the noise they make causes anger.

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Kids go out and they shout and no one is stopping them but they should

:09:00.:09:02.

have some sense and respect. Roma people like to entertain themselves.

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If there was a centre or a club where they could congregate and

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someone could speak to them about what not to do.

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Hayat Shah is registered blind. They'll be stood around in groups

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and a lot of them will be drunk. You know there's also the arrogance

:09:21.:09:23.

issue whereby if they're stood on the street corner it's theirs now

:09:24.:09:28.

because they're occupying it. Nine times out of ten they won't move.

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He's lived in the area for more than 30 years. His parents live next

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door. But he would like to move out. I can't move due to the fact my mum

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won't move. I'm an only child so I'm not going to leave my mum and my

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dad's mentally incapacitated as well.

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Another British born Asian man who didn't want to appear on camera,

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told Inside Out he was moving out of the area because of the Roma and

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would not rent his house to them. So I find it quite ironic that not so

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long ago when Asian people were moving in white people were moving

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out because of them. So what are the solutions? One suggestion is that

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this area of waste ground could we developed to provide a building for

:10:20.:10:22.

the Roma to congregate off the streets that money is tight.

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It's big! It is deceiving from the outside.

:10:30.:10:33.

Because of the size of it, it will take a lot of money and people

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power. It is easy to say that there is no

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quick fix for Page Hall. It's run down and it's tense. But it's been a

:10:44.:10:47.

magnet for migrants for generations and will continue to be so.

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As the British`born child of immigrant parents I have to laugh

:10:52.:10:54.

when I hear my mother complaining about the number of Eastern European

:10:55.:10:57.

people there are in the country now. I find this urge to gently remind

:10:58.:11:01.

her that it wasn't that long ago when people were saying the same

:11:02.:11:02.

thing about her. If you have any opinions on that

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story or you think there is something we should the covering,

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get in touch on Twitter or Facebook. Coming up: Heritage railway trying

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to ensure it survival. Now, and incredible story about a

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woman who fell from a Northsea ferry. Jeni Anderson fell overboard

:11:41.:11:48.

with no life jacket and no idea if the boat would ever find her again.

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This is her story. My first memory is seeing the ferry

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and it being already a way away. And looking towards it and thinking,

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what do I do now, kind of thing. I was scared of drowning, but the most

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scary thing about it was that it was going to happen to me on my own.

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A tiny dot in a vast sea ` there's no worse nightmare. Yet Jeni

:12:27.:12:32.

Anderson lived to tell me her story. This is sister ship, but can you

:12:33.:12:34.

work out where you were? Yeah I was on the other side, just

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up there. I want to go up there and be able to walk back inside and be

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fine. Jeni has been back to finish the

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journey she started. The Princess Seaways operating from Newcastle to

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Ijmuiden in the Netherlands. In September 2011, Jeni, who'd been a

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student at Northumbria University, was on board with her friends. I'd

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graduated in July that year so it was kind of a last celebration

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myself and three friends decided to go to Amsterdam to celebrate

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graduation. It was three hours into the crossing. I had been drinking, I

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have never denied that. We just wanted to have a bit of an explore

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and go out. We would have stood outside on deck. Talking amongst

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ourselves. One of my friends got a phone call. She was on the phone

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when it happened. I was not messing around. I remember being near the

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barrier looking out at sea, looking down and I don't know whether I

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leaned too far, or the ferry moved on was a gust of wind, but the next

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thing I knew I was going over the barrier. I did actually managed to

:14:17.:14:32.

hold on for a little while. Jeni had fallen 60 feet into the black of the

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North Sea. Just the fall alone would've killed many a person. What

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happens when you fall into the North sea? Well initially you get a

:14:43.:14:44.

condition called cold shock. Involuntary gasping in of air. If it

:14:45.:14:51.

goes into your lungs, you are going to be coughing and spluttering. It

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can also cause a heart attack. But Jeni had survived the fall and the

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cold shock. Now began the fight to stay alive. I remember shouting

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after the ferry, asking for it to come back. Just the sheer terror of

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what had happened. I was getting more and more hysterical, like,

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begging it's a comeback. Bash dash`mac begging it's a comeback and

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find me. When I heard that I expect that that we would not find anyone.

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Four minutes from the time that she fell, the engine started turning

:15:38.:15:43.

round. The captain alerted the Humber coastguard. My first thought

:15:44.:15:48.

was we needed assistance from a helicopter. So that we had a chance

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to see in the water. A search and rescue seeking from RAF Leconfield

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was scrambled. We're talking about a person not equipped at all, going

:16:01.:16:04.

into the water at night in cold seas, the drug dash`mac survival

:16:05.:16:08.

times gone to be dramatically reduced in that situation.

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The chances there are probably quite slim. It would take 30 minutes by

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helicopter, 20 minutes to turn the ferry around, and every minute, it

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came harder to stay alive. I remember that cold when going across

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my face. Just trying to keep from going under. But it was getting more

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and more difficult and I was spending more and more time just

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being knocked under the water, and trying to pull myself back up again.

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35 minutes had now passed. I definitely came to the realisation

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that my time was up, but even then I don't think I ever gave up. In a

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way, I felt quite calm. It was like, there is not a lot that I can do

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about it. You feel a responsibility, and a.... Huge urge to find her, but

:17:12.:17:24.

still you know you're looking for that needle in a haystack so it's a

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mission impossible. He'd traced the ship back to where Jeni fell.

:17:28.:17:30.

Passengers and crew gathered on deck to help the search. We realise that

:17:31.:17:39.

we could actually see her screaming. A rescue lifeboat is launched. And

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an off`duty ambulance crew ` on the ship as passengers ` offer

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assistance. To our surprise, we saw a body lying in the boat. Pretty

:17:50.:17:52.

motionless to be fair, we actually thought it was a dead body. Made

:17:53.:17:55.

ourselves known to customer services, explained we were

:17:56.:17:57.

ambulance crew and would they like any help. They did snatch our hand

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off and we just flicked into work mode. When we first got her off the

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lifeboat, she actually opened her eyes and looked at me. I don't

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remember the point that I was rescued. I don't even remember being

:18:20.:18:22.

pulled out of the water. I just remember not being in the water and

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people around me and voices and noises and light. Despite the fall

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and the time she'd spend in the water, Jeni had no injuries. The RAF

:18:33.:18:36.

rescue crew had feared they'd come to retrieve a body. Instead it was a

:18:37.:18:42.

routine pick up. Jeni was discharged from hospital in Scarborough just a

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few hours later. I realise that it was all over the news and that I had

:18:50.:18:55.

to tell my mum. If she hears about a 23`year`old from Herts has fallen

:18:56.:18:58.

off the ferry from Newcastle to Amsterdam she might at least worry

:18:59.:19:04.

that it's me. And it was me. You ok? Yeah. Two and a half years later,

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she's ready to do something she never thought she'd be able to. When

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I felt, I was facing the barrier, whereas right now I am side on. I

:19:14.:19:21.

don't know if I can... It is a very strange feeling. But you have just

:19:22.:19:34.

done that. Yes. Well, we made it to Amsterdam. What's left for you?

:19:35.:19:40.

Well, finish my journey, see what's to be seen. It would mean a lot to

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me, to meet the people who helped me that night. Captain Kristensen is

:19:49.:19:53.

waiting back in England. I'm sorry I caused so much drama! That's OK! One

:19:54.:20:02.

of your friends had been calling on a phone so we knew the exact time

:20:03.:20:09.

you fell overboard. Normally, I would not expect it to end like

:20:10.:20:17.

that. Thank you, for everything. It is such a cliche to say it, but life

:20:18.:20:24.

really is so short. You do not have time to be unhappy and miserable

:20:25.:20:36.

about anything. The North Yorkshire Moors Railway is one of the busiest

:20:37.:20:40.

had heritage lines in the world, with steam trains taking passengers

:20:41.:20:44.

from Pickering to Whitby. But now, it is struggling for money. Keeley

:20:45.:20:50.

Donovan has been finding out about a new plan to keep it on track. It's

:20:51.:21:02.

5:00am and a steam engine is being fired up. For 150 years, steam

:21:03.:21:13.

trains have run across the North York Moors, and the people who work

:21:14.:21:17.

on them have always had to get their hands dirty. By 8:00am, the engine's

:21:18.:21:20.

almost ready. Soon it'll be full steam ahead! It has taken four hours

:21:21.:21:32.

to get ready. Now the first train from Pickering to Whitby already to

:21:33.:21:35.

go. 9:00am at Pickering station. Passengers like me are looking

:21:36.:21:38.

forward to a day out in Whitby on a trip through some of Yorkshire's

:21:39.:21:41.

loveliest countryside. And it's not just a railway ` we're taking a

:21:42.:21:46.

journey back in time. It is going to take 90 minutes to get to Whitby.

:21:47.:21:54.

Let's get on board. The North Yorkshire Moors railway employs 150

:21:55.:21:57.

staff, helped by 850 volunteers. And they've all got a passion for the

:21:58.:22:07.

railways. These engines talk to you, if you listen to them. They tell you

:22:08.:22:13.

when they are going to sleep. You drive these with your ears. 40 years

:22:14.:22:22.

ago, the North Yorkshire Moors Railway was launched, after British

:22:23.:22:27.

Rail's passenger service was axed. But the recession has brought the

:22:28.:22:30.

biggest threat to the line's future since the days of the Beeching cuts.

:22:31.:22:37.

This is a tourist attraction but it is a business as well, and it needs

:22:38.:22:41.

to make money times have been tough for the last couple of years as for

:22:42.:22:47.

many businesses. Tourism is some of those things that we do not have to

:22:48.:22:51.

spend money on. If you are struck for cash you will spend it on

:22:52.:22:55.

essentials, so we are affected like everybody else. How bad has it

:22:56.:23:01.

been? We were carrying 350,000 passengers a year in 2010, and it

:23:02.:23:07.

has dipped down to 320,000, but it is the busiest heritage railway in

:23:08.:23:11.

the world, but the drop of 10% has had an effect. For years, there's

:23:12.:23:22.

been a possible answer to the railway's problems. Run more steam

:23:23.:23:25.

trains to the seaside. But it's not straightforward. The last seven

:23:26.:23:28.

miles of the route, from Grosmont to Whitby, are operated by another

:23:29.:23:32.

company, Network Rail. And they have to allow the Moors Railway to run

:23:33.:23:36.

more trains. Times are hard for the tourist industry and it is not an

:23:37.:23:41.

easy for the railways. One way to survive is to get more passengers.

:23:42.:23:44.

For now, just three trains a day make the full 24`mile trip from

:23:45.:23:47.

Pickering to Whitby. In this carriage, there seem to be more dogs

:23:48.:23:53.

than people. Why did you choose to come by train? Just to go to Whitby

:23:54.:23:59.

on holiday. He likes trains, so this was the perfect day out. These two

:24:00.:24:05.

bearded collies, Molly and Duncan, are making their first`ever train

:24:06.:24:11.

journey. How is she doing? She was a bit apprehensive to start with but

:24:12.:24:14.

she has settled down quite well. I have never been to Whitby. I love

:24:15.:24:17.

these trains. They are amazing. We pass through Levisham, Goathland

:24:18.:24:27.

and Grosmont ` let's hope the weather stays good. You look like

:24:28.:24:32.

you are expecting some sunshine at the seaside today. Yes, I always

:24:33.:24:40.

expect sunshine estimation mark dash`mac!

:24:41.:24:46.

It is not just about steam trains. Passengers bring money to local

:24:47.:24:53.

businesses. How important is the railway to the local economy? The

:24:54.:25:00.

turnover is about ?5,000 a year. We had work done by the Yorkshire

:25:01.:25:04.

tourist board that indicated we were bringing about ?30 million into the

:25:05.:25:09.

local economy and that figure will not have reduced much in recent

:25:10.:25:13.

years. There was a lot of money at stake and a lot of jobs, but now the

:25:14.:25:17.

railway is fighting back. It is striking a deal with network rail to

:25:18.:25:21.

run twice as many trains into Whitby station. We want to open a second

:25:22.:25:29.

that form, that would enable us to one more trains, and we're looking

:25:30.:25:33.

to run about five trains, when there are three that return `` that one

:25:34.:25:40.

currently. At Whitby Station, a platform first removed 30 years ago

:25:41.:25:43.

would be restored at a cost of ?2 million. We believe there is market

:25:44.:25:49.

for us to tap into if we can get to increase capacity so it is critical

:25:50.:25:53.

for future sustainability. And we all know that, when you get to

:25:54.:25:56.

Whitby, there's plenty to do. Even if the weather isn't what it could

:25:57.:26:04.

be. Should have seen this coming. The minute we arrived, it starts to

:26:05.:26:09.

rain. It is a wet day. How are you enjoying it? It is good, good. Good

:26:10.:26:17.

choice of outfit? Well... OK, it's not exactly ice`cream weather. But

:26:18.:26:19.

the dogs seem to be enjoying themselves. It is nice to see a

:26:20.:26:27.

working fishing port with lots going on. Walking from the station to the

:26:28.:26:34.

fish and chip shop. It's time to head home. For me, it's the best

:26:35.:26:41.

part of the trip ` I'll be in the cab all the way back to Pickering.

:26:42.:26:48.

It is warm in here. Paul that Labour, once. `` pull the lever.

:26:49.:26:56.

It's a rural route, but the driver's got to be alert. There's always a

:26:57.:27:00.

danger animals ` and people ` could get onto the railway. What are you

:27:01.:27:15.

thinking about when you are in the cab? The pedestrians on this

:27:16.:27:21.

crossing. Ian is looking out for his side, I am looking out for this

:27:22.:27:27.

site. Once we are over the crossing began accelerate. I will give it

:27:28.:27:28.

more steam. Like that. It's exciting, but it's hard work

:27:29.:27:39.

too. It's a lot easier being a passenger. Now it's time to get my

:27:40.:27:47.

hands dirty. I'm about to have a go at being a fireman. Hang on, this is

:27:48.:27:58.

heavy. That's it. Don't let go of the shovel, just put it in there.

:27:59.:28:04.

That is it. And another one. That is it. Write down the front. That's

:28:05.:28:13.

it, there you are, you can do it. I tell you what, it is hard work. It

:28:14.:28:19.

is hard work. You ought to try it in the summer. The railway's starting

:28:20.:28:23.

work on the new platform in Whitby. It'll be open for the summer season,

:28:24.:28:26.

and they're hoping it will be a financial lifeline. Somehow, I don't

:28:27.:28:29.

think the age of steam is over just yet.

:28:30.:28:36.

That is all from here in Sheffield. Make sure you join us next week. I

:28:37.:28:43.

will be on the trail of the financial transactions made by

:28:44.:28:49.

Arthur Scargill and the National union of Mineworkers from the 80s up

:28:50.:28:50.

until the present day. The Welsh coast was among areas

:28:51.:30:04.

hardest hit. Hello. I'm Amy Garcia with the latest from Look North. The

:30:05.:30:06.

speed

:30:07.:30:07.

This week, Benjamin Zephaniah visits the Page Hall area of Sheffield which has been in the news for all the wrong reasons, Chris Jackson meets a woman who miraculously survived a fall from a North Sea ferry and Keeley Donovan follows efforts to improve the fortunes of a heritage railway.


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