27/02/2017 Inside Out Yorkshire and Lincolnshire


27/02/2017

Phil Connell investigates whether a military badge found in France could help trace a fallen soldier's family, and Paul Hudson looks at how farmers in the Dales spend the winter.


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Transcript


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Hello, this week we are in search of the family of an unknown soldier

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who fell in the battlefields of France.

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Plus, I've been spending the winter with a couple of Dales farmers.

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Welcome to Inside Out, I'm Paul Hudson.

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This week, we are trying to identify a soldier who lost his life

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Will experts be able to find his family more than 100 years on?

:00:29.:00:35.

Also tonight, I meet two sheep farmers trying to contend

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with winter weather and the cold wind that Brexit might bring.

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They are going to lose the environmental benefits that have

:00:43.:00:45.

been created over the last 40 years through subsidies,

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and they are going to lose the cheap food policy,

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because people will go out of business.

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the Royal Shakespeare Company moves to Hull.

:00:53.:01:03.

Almost a million British families lost loved ones on the battlefields

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For some, what was even worse was that they never

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knew what happened, just that their father, son

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But for one in Yorkshire family, their wait may be coming to an end.

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Fred Holmes is about to give a sample of his DNA,

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a test that could explain what happened to his great-uncle,

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John, a soldier killed in 1916 and one of the many whose bodies

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I still feel very emotional about it.

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Because, you know, it was a very big thing, you know,

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all these people climbing over the trenches and going off

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To think, you know, a member of my family had succumbed

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in that particular battle, it was very, very

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And what would it mean to the family to find him?

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I know in my heart, if I wanted to go and be close to him,

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I could go to Thiepval and I could see his name on the, um,

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But, um, it would be nice to see a gravestone in a war cemetery.

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For similar reasons, Francis Storry is taking the same test.

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Along with his wife, Susan, he wants to know about a relative

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called Henry Parker, another great-uncle who never

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When they were in the trenches and this and that, you know,

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"Come on, out, lads, come on, get 'em."

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And all the bullets and that were coming over, it must

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Been thinking about it the other night, you know,

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I know what I think of it now, it's absolutely good

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Francis and Fred's great-uncles both served with the Yorkshire Regiment,

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who recruited soldiers from Yorkshire and the North East.

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In 1916, though, they were to lose their lives in one of the most

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I think if you ask anybody to name a battle from the First World War,

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they would all say the Battle of the Somme.

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The bloodiest battle in the history of the British Army.

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And here we have medals awarded to some of the men who fought

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there and in previous campaigns, all here in our medal room

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at the Green Howards Museum in Richmond, standing as testament

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And four particular medals here, awarded during the Somme campaign,

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four Victoria Crosses for individual acts of bravery.

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So, what would conditions have been like for these men?

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Pretty much as you imagine, you've seen it so many times.

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They're living in trenches, if food comes up and can get up,

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that's great, water is short, you are being sniped and shelled,

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and you know you've got to go over the top at some point in the future.

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Many of those who died are remembered here

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in the war cemeteries of northern France.

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But for 500,000 soldiers, including John and Henry,

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there is no recognised grave, as their bodies were never found.

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For one family, though, there is a glimmer of hope.

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100 years on, there is news that one long lost soldier

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Well, last year, in a field in France, human remains

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were discovered of a First World War soldier, and on him was a very,

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very distinctive cap badge, which means that we know

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which battalion of this regiment he served with.

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So, how unusual is it to find human remains with a cap badge like this?

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To get that starting point, that clue that helps us narrow it down,

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the possibilities of who this individual might be,

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So, how is it that a find in a field in France has brought

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hope to these families, 100 years on?

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Well, it is all down to a team of war detectives, based at this

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They work for the Ministry of Defence, and bit by bit,

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they are piecing together the story of this unknown soldier.

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After 100 years, identifying the soldier will not be easy.

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For the war detectives, though, the metal regimental badge

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It is from the 5th Battalion, the Yorkshire Regiment,

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the T is for territorial, because the 5th Battalion

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So, how much of a head start does something like this give you?

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If you did not have that insignia, you would not be able

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You have to determine what the regiment is before you can

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There were so many thousands of soldiers killed out there,

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there would be no way you could identify them

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without identifying an insignia like this.

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As enquiries continue, it emerges the mystery soldier

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could be related to one of 12 different families.

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All of these documents say that the 5th Battalion

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were tasked with an attack, setting off from the trench

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where they came from, up to an attack on the enemy trench

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line here, which you can see, which is the wiggly line.

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I'd like to say it's very exciting, it's very exciting when you get

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the information and you find information in the diaries,

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and you can actually trace the movements.

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It is also very harrowing, it is very emotive,

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because as you take the case forward, if you can take it forward

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to identification and then to burial, you become acutely aware

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of what these young men had to deal with, and the enormity

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And here is where the science begins.

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have been brought to a government laboratory in Middlesex.

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But what are the odds of the family's DNA

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We are given a ratio, so, say, one in a million aspect,

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and then we put that information together with all the other

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information, such as the artefacts, details from the anthropology,

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and that all then links together to produce, hopefully,

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As a scientist, I guess you look at things in black and white,

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but in a case like this, do you get emotionally involved?

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You come across the aspect where you might be able to help

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identify someone who has died 100 years ago, yeah, you cannot take

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So, with emotions running high, an extraordinary investigation

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But will any family receive the news that brings

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In Yarm, there's disappointment for Fred.

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In Driffield, though, there is dramatic news

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The remains found are confirmed as those of his great-uncle,

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Private Henry Parker, who was 23 years old.

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Oh, we are going to have to give him a sendoff, aren't we?

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After everything he's gone through, that's what he needs,

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To find his remains, and it's come to this...

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Private Henry Parker will be buried in France with full

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A mystery solved through his regimental badge, the long lost

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soldier at last reunited with his family.

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And if you've got any comments about tonight's programme,

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or if you've got a story you think we might like to cover,

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you can get in touch on Facebook or on Twitter.

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The Royal Shakespeare Company come marching into Hull.

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Now, hill farming has never been an easy life,

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and many farmers struggle to make it pay.

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There is now uncertainty following Brexit about EU farming subsidies.

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Well, I've been to meet two farmers from this area who are preparing

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for an uncertain future, and coping with

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But if you had to eke out a living from this terrain,

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you might take a less romantic view of its charms.

:10:54.:10:59.

Starting in the dark, so that we can get all the cattle

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It's very pleasant when it's cold and crisp.

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It's a little bit wearing when it's wet.

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Tenant farmer Garry Schofield's day starts at 6am.

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To add to his income as a sheep farmer, he also

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The hours are long and the work is hard, but the economics

:11:25.:11:29.

of the business have never been tougher.

:11:30.:11:32.

The importance of efficiency has increased dramatically.

:11:33.:11:38.

Farming, I would say, has become much more of a similar

:11:39.:11:41.

business to what you would see in the middle of Leeds.

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It is very much now dependent on the food policy that needs to be

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developed by our Government for post-Brexit times.

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Because if they do go down the road of cutting subsidies

:11:52.:11:55.

to farmers across the country, which then drives farmers

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to food production on mass scale to fill the gap,

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then they are going to lose the environmental benefits that have

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been created over the last 40 years through subsidies,

:12:06.:12:08.

and they are going to lose the cheap food policy,

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because people will go out of business if they haven't got

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Some farmers get less for their livestock

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And until there's a government policy on how post EU

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agriculture will work, Garry is unsure whether he'll be

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That's a little heifer there, which is quite small,

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gets bullied out of the feed by the others.

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This is a ram, he broke his leg in the summer, so he has been no use

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this year for serving the sheep, so he is getting fattened

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20 miles to the south in Malham, Garry's friend Neil Hesseltine

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I took over from my parents, who farmed the farm prior to me,

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things are very different now, things are not necessarily

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about the production of food quite so much.

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We would still like that to be the case.

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But we are still extremely reliant on payments,

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environmental payments and subsidies and these sorts of things,

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so that is almost as big a part of the farming world

:13:17.:13:19.

But, you know, I love to be a farmer and although it

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doesn't look great today, this is a great place to be.

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Back in Buckden and Garry's finished on the farm

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and he's up on the moorside, checking on his sheep.

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We came here in 1995, when the National Trust bought

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the farm, so that's 20 years, isn't it?

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So, how has the job changed in the time that you've done it?

:13:45.:13:47.

There has been quite a few changes in comparatively

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All to do, probably, with the environmental side

:13:50.:13:55.

of the payments and the way that agriculture has been led

:13:56.:13:57.

We've had the climate change over the last 20 years,

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How do you cope with the extremes of weather?

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If you think back, last year was stormy and wet, relentless rain.

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2010, the coldest December since 1890 and, what,

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It must be the extremes that are difficult to cope with.

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In 2010, when that cold weather came in, early December, normally,

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we would not have been feeding sheep at that time of year.

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It kicked off the feeding time of the year a month early,

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and we had to continue feeding the sheep.

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Right the way through the winter, right the way into the spring.

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So, it was a knock-on effect, it was very, very expensive.

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And then last year, obviously, we had very, very little snow

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and an awful lot of rain, and that was more of a mental

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attitude, as in, do I have to get up and go out and feed

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Six weeks, you know, of blowing terrible wet weather,

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on both me and the sheep, it took its toll.

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Down in the valley at Heber Farm in Buckden, Garry and his wife Gill

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have had to look at ways of making the land pay.

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They hope this field will be open as a campsite this year.

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This was one thing that was open to us, which was reasonably simple,

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and hopefully is going to be quite effective and enable us

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to secure our business for the years to come.

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We had a campsite here for the Tour de France,

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And I think that's what inspired us and gave us the idea.

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The need for an alternative was huge.

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We have two children, we have one we are trying

:15:33.:15:34.

It was an absolute necessity, because we were looking at such

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a dramatic shortfall in payment, it was quite frightening.

:15:41.:15:45.

Farmers are not alone in facing post-Brexit uncertainty.

:15:46.:15:48.

But without the subsidies the EU provide to make

:15:49.:15:51.

food production viable, there are genuine

:15:52.:15:52.

Dales farming isn't just a business, it's a way of life.

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The bunk barn was something that my mum and dad converted,

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Some things never change, they saw that farming

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was getting tough at the time, and diversifying from sort of woman

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was getting tough at the time, and diversifying from sort of

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you know, a cattle shed into visitor accommodation was something they did

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Neil's wife Leigh is preparing the barn for the next set of guests.

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It's more proof that farming alone can no longer sustain the family.

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It has allowed me to stay on the farm and take a wage from it

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and run this business, because there is not always a lot

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It fluctuates, it is an industry that fluctuates,

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and incomes can drop, so it just gives us something

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else to spread the risk of our income, really.

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Without money from tourists, Leigh would have to go back to work

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in historic building conservation, taking her away from the farm.

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It would be a case of driving to a town or city, to take

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Most of my work was in local authorities, within their planning

:16:59.:17:04.

departments, so I would have to look into that and move away

:17:05.:17:07.

So, this allows me, I suppose, to be able to stay at home and be

:17:08.:17:15.

involved with the business, which is a really nice thing.

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And it allows Leigh to spend more time with her daughter,

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who would represent a fifth generation at the family farm.

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Is there pressure to keep on the family tradition of farming?

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My parents never put any pressure on me to become a farmer.

:17:34.:17:36.

It's what I felt I was interested in and it's what I wanted to do.

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But there is certainly a feeling, an aspect looking back

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and you're thinking, I'm actually doing what my

:17:44.:17:45.

forefathers have done that for me, and carrying on that tradition,

:17:46.:17:47.

But whether farming will remain economically

:17:48.:17:51.

viable for his children, a fifth generation,

:17:52.:17:53.

It was always slightly uncertain anyway, but the Brexit vote has

:17:54.:17:59.

thrown all that into chaos, you know, and I'm not even sure

:18:00.:18:02.

if the Government knows where we are going next,

:18:03.:18:04.

But you know, we've just got to farm through those uncertainties and hope

:18:05.:18:09.

It's a couple of months since I was up here last,

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We have been very lucky with the weather.

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I've come back to see what progress Garry and Gillian have

:18:24.:18:26.

They're already up against it with budget and time,

:18:27.:18:29.

We've been waiting for the Electric Board to come and put

:18:30.:18:35.

We've been waiting since the middle of September and we've just found

:18:36.:18:40.

out this morning that there is some paperwork gone amiss.

:18:41.:18:44.

So, we have probably another six weeks to wait before they can come

:18:45.:18:47.

So, it's just another of those things that have

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By Easter, this site needs to be ready for 22 tent pitches

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and there'll be three wooden camping pods.

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Money has been spent, money needs to come back in,

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it will be open for Easter, there's no choice.

:19:03.:19:06.

I was very anxious to hear that the electricity was going to be

:19:07.:19:09.

On top of running a farm full-time and Gillian working as a nurse,

:19:10.:19:14.

they're having to ponder pricing, promotion and how to operate

:19:15.:19:16.

Both Garry and Neil have had to look long and hard at the books.

:19:17.:19:23.

And they've had to get better at being small businessmen

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Imagination is going to be key if hill farming

:19:27.:19:30.

Now, you should all know by now that Hull is the UK City of Culture,

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and nothing is more cultured than the Royal Shakespeare Company.

:19:43.:19:46.

And they have moved actors, technicians and some really

:19:47.:19:49.

interesting props northwards for a brand-new production.

:19:50.:19:52.

Anne-Marie Tasker has been taking a look.

:19:53.:19:57.

It is a play that boasts star names...

:19:58.:20:03.

The Hypocrite, starring Caroline Quentin and Mark Addy,

:20:04.:20:14.

had its world premiere in Hull this weekend.

:20:15.:20:18.

Why is there a Frenchwoman in the bedroom?

:20:19.:20:25.

But the journey getting it from page to stage has been a long one.

:20:26.:20:29.

And a pause there, please, for lighting.

:20:30.:20:35.

One of the first jobs was to find the Royal Shakespeare Company

:20:36.:20:38.

A draughty, disused church on a housing estate.

:20:39.:20:44.

I suspect that we probably don't need all the pews. No.

:20:45.:20:48.

Unless one of the members of the company is getting

:20:49.:20:50.

And by January, the pews have been replaced by cast and crew,

:20:51.:20:56.

including the leading lady, Caroline Quentin.

:20:57.:20:59.

For people that don't know, it is all about the beginning

:21:00.:21:10.

of the Civil War, which happened in Hull, the Beverley Gate is the

:21:11.:21:13.

The play is frantic, funny, and there is a lot of us in it.

:21:14.:21:22.

For those of us that come from a time when it was too

:21:23.:21:25.

expensive to have a lot of people on stage, who were normally involved

:21:26.:21:28.

with five-handers and things, it is really exciting to be able

:21:29.:21:30.

And this play is Hull through and through.

:21:31.:21:37.

Written by a playwright from Hull, it is being rehearsed and premiered

:21:38.:21:39.

here and is based on a key moment in Hull's past.

:21:40.:21:45.

So, this is a very historic spot for Hull, isn't it?

:21:46.:21:47.

So, in 1642, Hull was a walled town, a very secure fortress town.

:21:48.:21:56.

And Sir John Hotham stood on the Beverley Gate low wall

:21:57.:21:59.

and spoke directly to the King and refused him entry.

:22:00.:22:04.

At that moment, he became treacherous and a traitor

:22:05.:22:06.

The writer, Richard Bean, started researching his lead

:22:07.:22:13.

You would think that would be enough for anybody, wouldn't you?

:22:14.:22:30.

But rather than a historical drama, he has turned the events or 1642

:22:31.:22:38.

into a comedy. Villa I thought I would be doing all the politics.

:22:39.:22:48.

Villa but what you hear, it is like reading a Feydeau farce, a French

:22:49.:22:54.

farce. That final thing of the town is chaste, I'm not going to say

:22:55.:22:59.

Benny Hill, but... I wasn't going to say that! But you were thinking it

:23:00.:23:04.

Richard Bean had found his central character, and he's been plagued

:23:05.:23:08.

with another Yorkshireman, TV and film star Mark Addy. -- being

:23:09.:23:14.

played. I've spent the last two days running around inside a cardboard

:23:15.:23:21.

box, which represents a commode, for reasons that are too complicated to

:23:22.:23:26.

go into. But yes, farce is ultimately a physical form. I am

:23:27.:23:35.

tricked, I'm done! I do sometimes think, am I too old for this? But we

:23:36.:23:40.

are getting there and it will be... I think it is one of those, it is a

:23:41.:23:48.

gift of a show. While the actors rehearse, work has started on the

:23:49.:23:51.

week-long project of building the set. The largest Hull Truck Theatre

:23:52.:23:58.

has ever made. To accommodate the biggest professional cast the

:23:59.:24:02.

theatre has ever had, they are building more dressing rooms, even

:24:03.:24:07.

converting offices. Before we have really struggled, but it was our

:24:08.:24:14.

meeting rooms, changing rooms, like Windows, changing it purely into

:24:15.:24:18.

dressing rooms. But now, people have been here all the time. It is now

:24:19.:24:26.

two days until opening night, and everyone is heading through to the

:24:27.:24:29.

stage for a technical rehearsal. It is the last chance for everyone to

:24:30.:24:33.

practise and practice the trickiest bits of the play until they are

:24:34.:24:40.

perfect. War is inevitable now. On your conscience! They are working 12

:24:41.:24:47.

hour days, going over every detail with a fine toothed comb. And as

:24:48.:24:52.

with any farce, the physical jokes and timing have to be perfect. A new

:24:53.:25:00.

play is always difficult, it is the best kind of theatre to do but

:25:01.:25:03.

you're dealing with a developing script and it has never been done,

:25:04.:25:06.

there is no production history. On top of that, you have songs, there

:25:07.:25:11.

are physical comic routines, of which require some death-defying

:25:12.:25:18.

bravery from the actors. With Hull being the City of Culture, to be

:25:19.:25:25.

involved in the big opening show, for that year, it is terrific. She

:25:26.:25:34.

swallowed a key, I was sucking it out!

:25:35.:25:38.

Richard Bean is probably our best comedy writer at the moment.

:25:39.:25:42.

Especially in terms of farce. He can write a farce like nobody else.

:25:43.:25:47.

The more careful next time, you stupid Mayor! I read four of five

:25:48.:25:56.

pages in bed and I said, I have got to do this play. I could not bear

:25:57.:26:00.

the thought of somebody else laying Lady Sarah before I did. I am really

:26:01.:26:07.

glad I am doing it first. -- playing. The play is filled with

:26:08.:26:12.

tricks and illusions. From a sword through the neck, to mark Addy being

:26:13.:26:17.

beheaded on stage. The man in charge of pulling it off work on the Harry

:26:18.:26:21.

Potter play in the West End of London and says this show is proving

:26:22.:26:26.

just as tough. You have people watching from three different sites,

:26:27.:26:29.

so sometimes you can do things with magic and you do not want people to

:26:30.:26:33.

be able to see from the sides, but with this, you have to think about

:26:34.:26:37.

those things because people are up close. A lot closer than in a

:26:38.:26:41.

conventional theatre. At one point there is a sword that gets put

:26:42.:26:45.

through the ghost's neck. And this is a big solid thing. Yes, that was

:26:46.:26:51.

the challenge. It is a solid sword through a neck but we are doing it.

:26:52.:27:06.

Tell us how. I can't, it's magic! It has finally arrived, opening weekend

:27:07.:27:09.

for the fastest selling show in Hull Truck Theatre's history. There does

:27:10.:27:20.

come a point where there is a character missing from the play, and

:27:21.:27:28.

that is the audience. Liver-mac it is very nerve wracking, I think it

:27:29.:27:31.

kind of gets worse the older you get. You do not know the lines as

:27:32.:27:37.

well. So it is nerve wracking. It is nerve wracking. But I am really

:27:38.:27:42.

looking forward to the people of Hull seeing this play. At the play

:27:43.:27:50.

about Hull getting its world premiere in Hull, went down a storm.

:27:51.:27:55.

I'm getting a sense of the audience that they cannot load the story,

:27:56.:28:02.

this is our story, and I am slightly ashamed that I kind it into a sex

:28:03.:28:10.

farce! I am more interested in them following the story, but I love it.

:28:11.:28:24.

Big stars, except, a big cast and a big response from the audience. It

:28:25.:28:31.

went way better than I expected. The best thing I have ever seen. Coming

:28:32.:28:34.

together to create the biggest theatrical moment in Hull's year as

:28:35.:28:38.

City of Culture. That's all from us here at the top

:28:39.:28:47.

of this very bleak hill! Make sure you join us next week.

:28:48.:28:54.

We will find out what research in Bradford could do to help asthma and

:28:55.:28:59.

how we could help other countries prevent air pollution.

:29:00.:29:02.

Presented by Paul Hudson.

Phil Connell investigates whether a military badge found in a French field could help trace a fallen soldier's family, and Paul Hudson looks at how farmers in the Dales spend the winter months.


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