17/05/2017 The Election Wrap


17/05/2017

The essential guide to the day's election campaigning, with the latest from the BBC's teams around the UK.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 17/05/2017. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Hello and welcome to The Election Wrap, your essential

:00:22.:00:23.

guide to the day's campaigning across the UK.

:00:24.:00:25.

Roll-up, roll-up for a Brexit referendum sequel.

:00:26.:00:28.

An upbeat vibe as the Liberal Democrats launch their manifesto

:00:29.:00:33.

in the last hour, saying it's logical to have a second vote

:00:34.:00:36.

But critics say hang on, that's a do over.

:00:37.:00:40.

What a difference a day makes for Labour.

:00:41.:00:42.

Yesterday Len McCluskey of Unite said Labour were dead ducks

:00:43.:00:45.

But today he says no, Labour will be soaring eagles on June 8th.

:00:46.:00:50.

We will clear everything up, fear not. After June if you are

:00:51.:01:02.

re-elected, we used to be next-door neighbours?

:01:03.:01:06.

Philip Hammond and Theresa May had some awkward moments

:01:07.:01:08.

at a press conference today, but the pair have dismissed rumours

:01:09.:01:11.

How do you deal with a problem like Boris? He has not been seen too much

:01:12.:01:26.

on the campaign trail. But he has been out and about in Bristol. A

:01:27.:01:31.

campaign asset or a ticking time bomb? What about you?

:01:32.:01:35.

And we speak to the human and animal residents of Dumfries and Galloway

:01:36.:01:39.

to find out whether Scottish independence would be a deciding

:01:40.:01:41.

We will be getting the pet theories of our panel,

:01:42.:01:50.

Stephen Bush from the New Statesman, and the Sun on Sunday's

:01:51.:01:53.

Let's catch up on the latest developments from the campaign trail

:01:54.:01:57.

The Liberal Democrats have launched their party

:01:58.:02:01.

Leader Tim Farron called on voters to support his party and ensure

:02:02.:02:06.

they get a choice about Britain's future relationship with Europe.

:02:07.:02:11.

I believe that our children will have a brighter future

:02:12.:02:13.

That they will be safer and better off.

:02:14.:02:18.

That our economy will be stronger and our country will have more

:02:19.:02:21.

But just because I believe that doesn't mean I think people

:02:22.:02:26.

One of Jeremy Corbyn's key allies, the Unite leader Len McCluskey,

:02:27.:02:39.

says he is now full of optimism about Labour's general election

:02:40.:02:43.

hopes despite saying in an interview he could not see the party winning.

:02:44.:02:52.

It was against the backdrop of if the opinion polls are to be believed

:02:53.:02:58.

that I made those comments. Of course since then Labour have

:02:59.:03:02.

launched their manifesto, it is a fantastic manifesto.

:03:03.:03:03.

Theresa May has brushed aside questions about whether

:03:04.:03:07.

the Chancellor Philip Hammond will keep his job if

:03:08.:03:09.

The Green Party of England and Wales is promising free sanitary products

:03:10.:03:19.

And the Pirate Party launches its manifesto with a photo

:03:20.:03:33.

It describes itself as a civil liberties party and has fielded ten

:03:34.:03:45.

candidates and will be campaigning for copyright reform, opposing

:03:46.:03:47.

surveillance and fighting for a free and open Internet.

:03:48.:03:52.

We are trying to retain a lot of rights, especially human rights,

:03:53.:03:57.

that those before us have enjoyed and it is more a protectionist star,

:03:58.:04:03.

but we would like to see human rights expanded in general.

:04:04.:04:12.

The Scottish Labour Party has suspended all nine members

:04:13.:04:53.

of the Labour group in Aberdeen for breaching party rules.

:04:54.:04:54.

It comes after Labour joined forces with the Conservatives

:04:55.:04:55.

and independents to form a coalition to run the City Council.

:04:56.:04:56.

This isn't about positions or gold medals around

:04:57.:04:57.

the necks of councillors, this is about the job Labour

:04:58.:04:58.

councillors are elected to do to protect public services,

:04:59.:04:58.

to invest in and defend public services.

:04:59.:04:59.

The deal coming from Aberdeen didn't pass that test,

:05:00.:05:00.

that is why it was rejected by the democratic body

:05:01.:05:01.

of the Labour Party and that is why that must be respected and why

:05:02.:05:01.

we have moved to suspend these councillors.

:05:02.:05:02.

Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron wants to give power back

:05:03.:05:02.

That's what he said at the launch of the party's

:05:03.:05:04.

It's really obvious when you think about it.

:05:05.:05:06.

Someone is going to have the final say over the Brexit deal.

:05:07.:05:07.

It could be the politicians or it could be the people.

:05:08.:05:08.

You should have the final say on whether Theresa May's Brexit deal

:05:09.:05:11.

is right for you and your family in a referendum.

:05:12.:05:14.

And if you don't like that deal, you should have the choice to remain

:05:15.:05:17.

With me are our guests David Wooding and Stephen Bush

:05:18.:05:34.

and in a moment we'll talk to them about the manifesto in a bit

:05:35.:05:38.

more detail, but first the Liberal Democrats have promised

:05:39.:05:41.

to help young people get on the housing ladder

:05:42.:05:43.

The BBC's Chris Morris has been giving the figures a Reality Check.

:05:44.:05:50.

The biggest revenue raising proposal is to add 1p to income

:05:51.:05:52.

They estimate it will raise ?6.3 billion per year,

:05:53.:05:57.

money they would spend exclusively on the NHS, care services

:05:58.:06:00.

Then they want to reverse cuts in corporation tax,

:06:01.:06:06.

not by nearly as much as Labour proposed yesterday, but back up

:06:07.:06:09.

to 20% raising, they say, ?3.6 billion annually.

:06:10.:06:14.

There is also an eye-catching proposal to legalise

:06:15.:06:17.

The Lib Dems say this will raise another 1 billion per year.

:06:18.:06:23.

Overall this is a manifesto that will cost the country more.

:06:24.:06:27.

By 2020 the Liberal Democrats would spend 14.1 billion more

:06:28.:06:31.

in new day-to-day spending than they would raise in taxes.

:06:32.:06:35.

That would mean a small rise in the budget deficit

:06:36.:06:38.

But if you strip out the money going into longer-term investments

:06:39.:06:45.

in things like hospitals and roads, they say they would

:06:46.:06:47.

And they want to launch a package of infrastructure

:06:48.:06:52.

investment worth ?100 billion, including plans to build

:06:53.:06:55.

But the big thing in this manifesto, it's something that

:06:56.:07:01.

sets the Lib Dems apart from the Conservatives and Labour,

:07:02.:07:04.

is they want to hold another referendum on Brexit.

:07:05.:07:08.

This time the vote wouldn't just be in or out, it would be

:07:09.:07:11.

about whether to accept the terms of the deal on offer from the EU

:07:12.:07:15.

at the end of the Brexit negotiations in 2019.

:07:16.:07:19.

They will also put the option of staying in the EU

:07:20.:07:22.

Over the course of the next parliament the biggest factor

:07:23.:07:28.

in determining the health of the British economy

:07:29.:07:31.

and spending will be the outcome of the Brexit negotiations.

:07:32.:07:33.

The Lib Dems say they oppose a hard Brexit.

:07:34.:07:36.

There will be a vote on Parliament on the proposed deal,

:07:37.:07:39.

but in this manifesto Liberal Democrats argue

:07:40.:07:42.

it is the British people who should have the final say.

:07:43.:07:53.

Some are suggesting the Liberal Democrats have as much chance of

:07:54.:07:58.

winning the next election as Liverpool have of winning the

:07:59.:08:04.

Champions League. But there are some eye-catching pledges in this

:08:05.:08:10.

manifesto, not least the possibility that the British public would have

:08:11.:08:13.

the opportunity for a final say on Brexit. Actually, to turn away from

:08:14.:08:20.

Brexit, if the final deal is not good enough. The only unique selling

:08:21.:08:24.

point of the Lib Dems is they are going to be the campaign for the

:08:25.:08:28.

die-hard remainders. They are the only party who will offer you an in

:08:29.:08:33.

and out referendum marked two. The problem with that is that the Lib

:08:34.:08:38.

Dems are extremely unlikely to get into power and deliver that and

:08:39.:08:42.

people have to weigh that up against what is being dubbed by the

:08:43.:08:45.

Conservatives as a coalition of chaos between the SNP and the Labour

:08:46.:08:50.

Party. But also I think more than half the people would vote to leave

:08:51.:08:54.

the EU now if they were given a second referendum. A lot of those

:08:55.:08:58.

who voted to remain did so because of project fear and now they have

:08:59.:09:03.

seen the sky has not fallen in and they would probably vote to leave

:09:04.:09:08.

anyway. I am not sure how well being the remain party in this general

:09:09.:09:13.

election will work. Stephen, they got into a lot of hot water over the

:09:14.:09:18.

decision to back tuition fees after pledging not to in their 2010

:09:19.:09:25.

manifesto. Now they are going after younger voters, helping young people

:09:26.:09:29.

get on the housing ladder, they want to legalise cannabis. They want to

:09:30.:09:33.

push a few things that will attract younger people, but is it going to

:09:34.:09:38.

work? Is the toxicity of the whole tuition fee issue one that is too

:09:39.:09:44.

much? That is the big question. We thought from the Richmond

:09:45.:09:46.

by-election and the Whitney by-election that people had forgiven

:09:47.:09:49.

them for the things they did not like about the comic coalition, but

:09:50.:09:54.

now we are looking at the local elections and the polls and it seems

:09:55.:09:58.

people are not perhaps ready to give the Lib Dems a second go. But we are

:09:59.:10:02.

not too sure and it is difficult to say one way or another.

:10:03.:10:04.

Now the Unite leader Len McCluskey insists he is "now full of optimism"

:10:05.:10:08.

about Labour's general election hopes despite saying in an interview

:10:09.:10:11.

The union boss had told Politico a Labour victory would be

:10:12.:10:15.

"extraordinary" and suggested winning just 200 seats would be

:10:16.:10:17.

The interview I did with Politico was a conversational piece

:10:18.:10:23.

and it was against the backdrop of if the opinion polls are to be

:10:24.:10:27.

Of course since then Labour have launched their manifesto,

:10:28.:10:33.

it is a fantastic manifesto, a manifesto for workers,

:10:34.:10:37.

ordinary working people, a manifesto that will change Britain

:10:38.:10:40.

for the good and the response that we have had from Unite members

:10:41.:10:45.

That is why I was checking our polls that we did, constant rolling polls,

:10:46.:10:53.

and the response has been like something we have

:10:54.:10:55.

If I was having an interview today, I wouldn't be making those comments.

:10:56.:11:07.

Now one of the most interesting places to watch on General Election

:11:08.:11:10.

night could be Dewsbury in West Yorkshire.

:11:11.:11:12.

It's also one of the most unusual constituencies,

:11:13.:11:14.

taking in rural villages and the very diverse areas around

:11:15.:11:16.

The seat has changed hands several times over the past ten years

:11:17.:11:27.

flip-flopping between Labour and the Conservatives.

:11:28.:11:30.

There can be few constituencies more diverse than this one.

:11:31.:11:37.

On the outskirts of Dewsbury town centre is the largely Muslim

:11:38.:12:10.

I just tend to think they probably do more for the working class.

:12:11.:12:48.

I am thinking of voting for Labour because of Jeremy Corbyn.

:12:49.:12:49.

I would just kind of like that whoever is interested in a family

:12:50.:12:52.

But even those who do not feel passionately about the politics

:12:53.:12:55.

certainly feel passionately about the issues.

:12:56.:13:17.

Education is one thing I am concerned about,

:13:18.:13:26.

It is the local issues that are important, the fact the health

:13:27.:13:29.

service is changing, the fact we are losing a hospital,

:13:30.:13:32.

the fact we may lose a library in the area,

:13:33.:13:34.

the fact they are wanting to build on what is

:13:35.:13:36.

But yet you want to stick with a Conservative government?

:13:37.:13:40.

I am not quite sure what the difference would be

:13:41.:13:42.

I also feel very strongly about the north - south divide.

:13:43.:13:49.

I think there needs to be much more realisation that we exist up here.

:13:50.:13:53.

Of course although many of these women might be voting Conservative,

:13:54.:13:59.

the village they live in does have plenty of Labour supporters.

:14:00.:14:02.

It seems this constituency really could go either way.

:14:03.:14:16.

Here is the full list of candidates standing in that constituency.

:14:17.:14:28.

Let's take the pulse of the Labour Party. Len McCluskey, yesterday he

:14:29.:14:34.

said they would be rubbish in the election, 200 seats would be seen as

:14:35.:14:38.

a victory, that is losing more than 30. Today he says they could win.

:14:39.:14:44.

What is going on? It is the usual Len McCluskey dance. Don't forget

:14:45.:14:48.

that Trade Union Bill Eden is our elected politicians who need to

:14:49.:14:51.

balance their own voting interests. He came very close to being defeated

:14:52.:14:56.

by a candidate who did not have much time for Jeremy Corbyn so is trying

:14:57.:15:06.

to have his cake and eat it. He is saying things are not good, hinting

:15:07.:15:08.

by saying 200 seats, if Jeremy can't get that he might be out. Today he

:15:09.:15:12.

is giving something to his left by saying the manifesto is great. Len

:15:13.:15:16.

is a politician, he is acting like any politician would. Dave, that is

:15:17.:15:19.

a hostage to fortune? It is a bit of managing

:15:20.:15:29.

expectations. They always go below what they think it might be so that

:15:30.:15:35.

when they get more it looks good. If he does under 200 seats, it is even

:15:36.:15:41.

worse for them. Stephen, do you believe that the clear plan now,

:15:42.:15:46.

barring a wipe-out, is for Jeremy Corbyn to stay on? Yes, the

:15:47.:15:53.

leadership... No question about it? There is no doubt in my mind. Some

:15:54.:15:57.

believe they can turn it around and go on to win, but you do not give up

:15:58.:16:02.

the keys to the castle willingly is they're lying. But people are

:16:03.:16:05.

underestimating Lent when he thinks that Labour will get 200. I would be

:16:06.:16:10.

very worried if I was in the leader's office and I was seeing Len

:16:11.:16:15.

McCluskey say, you have got to get 200 to be a success. I do not

:16:16.:16:20.

believe for a moment Len McCluskey believes they are on course to get

:16:21.:16:24.

200 seats, so I think Jeremy Corbyn will find it harder to stay leader.

:16:25.:16:31.

So the unions are the power brokers. If Len McCluskey says, sorry,

:16:32.:16:39.

Jeremy, that is it? Do not forget that Len McCluskey is from the same

:16:40.:16:42.

hard left wing of the party as Jeremy Corbyn and he has been even

:16:43.:16:48.

described as his puppet master. He is a big backer and so if he loses

:16:49.:16:52.

Len McCluskey, then the sound will be shifting from underneath his

:16:53.:16:54.

feet. OK, let's move on. Meanwhile, on the eve of the launch

:16:55.:16:57.

of the Conservative party manifesto, the chancellor Philip Hammond has

:16:58.:17:02.

sought to play down reports of a rift with Theresa May

:17:03.:17:05.

and her team of advisers. He dismissd it as "media

:17:06.:17:07.

tittle tattle". Look, we work very closely together.

:17:08.:17:16.

The Prime Minister and I have known each other for many years. We work

:17:17.:17:21.

closely together, she has got an extremely strong team around town

:17:22.:17:25.

and I work very closely with her team and some of them are people I

:17:26.:17:29.

have known for many years. We do work very well together as a team.

:17:30.:17:35.

There is all this media to do that and it is just that, media tittle

:17:36.:17:41.

tattle. Sharp analysis. Noted all tattle on the election wrap.

:17:42.:17:43.

Noted all tattle on the election wrap.

:17:44.:17:46.

Now we've not really seen or heard much from the Foreign Secretary this

:17:47.:17:49.

week but there's been criticism of Boris Johnson after

:17:50.:17:51.

an uncomfortable election campaign stop in Bristol.

:17:52.:17:53.

He was taken to task for talking about boosting sales of alcohol

:17:54.:17:56.

Members of the community were also unhappy with other aspects

:17:57.:18:00.

But Mr Johnson has since apologised for the unfortunate incident.

:18:01.:18:09.

I think if I remember correctly, she said she had some personal

:18:10.:18:16.

experience of alcohol abuse within her family. I said I was sorry to

:18:17.:18:20.

hear about that will stop that was the issue.

:18:21.:18:22.

This is not the first time that Boris Johnson has done or said

:18:23.:18:26.

something that has caused controversy or embarrassment.

:18:27.:18:29.

Let's remind ourselves of some of his greatest hits...and misses.

:18:30.:18:36.

Here's the then Mayor of London hanging around

:18:37.:18:39.

near the Olympic Park in East London.

:18:40.:18:43.

Don't think he made the team though - not sure of his

:18:44.:18:47.

Another team he won't be making is the British Lions -

:18:48.:18:52.

here is on a trade visit to Japan - talk about picking on someone

:18:53.:18:56.

And credited with winning the Brexit vote by many,

:18:57.:18:59.

here he is milking it at an cattle auctioneers in Lancashire.

:19:00.:19:06.

David, are they hiding Boris? Well, this campaign has been completely

:19:07.:19:16.

dominated by Theresa May. They are hiding the party! Yes, but Boris is

:19:17.:19:25.

high risk, but he is also box office. You put Boris out there and

:19:26.:19:30.

he attracts a crowd. He is probably the biggest crowd puller of any of

:19:31.:19:35.

the Cabinet. Getting him out there, they like him. Even traditional

:19:36.:19:40.

Labour voters like him. They are prepared to forgive him for the

:19:41.:19:46.

gaffes. But he is a risk. Some are suggesting he is a risk. The flip

:19:47.:19:51.

side for Labour is that they are all too happy to talk about the party

:19:52.:19:55.

and not about Jeremy Corbyn. If you have got a popular leader, you put

:19:56.:19:59.

them out front, if not you talk about your brand. Boris is a bit of

:20:00.:20:07.

an appendix. An appendage. No, an appendix. He should be cut out?

:20:08.:20:13.

David Cameron could not reach out to the country and Theresa May is

:20:14.:20:18.

hugely popular, which means what is the point Boris Johnson in an

:20:19.:20:21.

election campaign when you have got a Conservative leader who a great

:20:22.:20:24.

number of people seem to like great deal. How are Philip Hammond and

:20:25.:20:31.

Theresa May getting on? The suggestion is it is not very good. I

:20:32.:20:39.

have been involved in this tittle tattle over the last few years. You

:20:40.:20:42.

have to stop it. It is no secret they do not really see eye to eye.

:20:43.:20:46.

He lives next door and he does not get into the half past eight Downing

:20:47.:20:51.

St meetings which George Osborne used to go into when David Cameron

:20:52.:20:55.

was Prime Minister. He says he is happy with that and he has got a

:20:56.:21:00.

direct line to the Prime Minister. But there has been some friction

:21:01.:21:05.

over things he has said about the economy, he wants more wriggle room

:21:06.:21:09.

in the economy, and there have been arguments over taxation policy. This

:21:10.:21:15.

little slip, you talk about Boris making a gaffe, but Philip Hammond

:21:16.:21:20.

made a gaffe by saying sometimes he is reduced to swearing when he is

:21:21.:21:25.

dealing with him and tittle tattle was the case when Len McCluskey was

:21:26.:21:31.

hosing down his own outspoken gaffe. Is it because they do not see eye to

:21:32.:21:35.

eye philosophically about the way to Reza make this taking the party,

:21:36.:21:40.

perhaps a little bit more interventionist, a bigger role of

:21:41.:21:44.

the state, cutting back on private enterprise? That kind of classic

:21:45.:21:50.

Tory thing, or is it also to do with Brexit, that Philip Hammond is not

:21:51.:21:53.

pushing in any way for any kind of hard Brexit. And Theresa May say

:21:54.:22:02.

that is the way forward? It is both. The role of the Treasury and the

:22:03.:22:06.

government is in many ways the weakest it has been under Theresa

:22:07.:22:09.

May and it is partly about that institutional friction as well.

:22:10.:22:14.

Eddie Price is continuing her tour of the UK with lots of balls,

:22:15.:22:18.

speaking to voters about what really matters to them. She asked people in

:22:19.:22:24.

the SNP held constituency of De Vries and Galloway if the issue of

:22:25.:22:29.

Scottish independence is a crucial issue for them in the forthcoming

:22:30.:22:33.

general election, with some interesting results. Dashed

:22:34.:22:43.

Dumfries. I am proud to be Scottish. I am very proud to be British and I

:22:44.:22:49.

am very proud to be European and you can't have all of them. What about

:22:50.:22:55.

you? School, educating, NHS, things like that. Not independence? No. I

:22:56.:23:02.

am a staunch campaigner for the union and I will be voting

:23:03.:23:04.

Conservative to remain as part of that. Why yes? I am voting

:23:05.:23:10.

independence and I have always voted yes. The election, if it included a

:23:11.:23:17.

yes or no vote for independence, I would vote that way. It is not about

:23:18.:23:23.

independence for me. What is it about? Who would be best running

:23:24.:23:30.

this country. I have believed in independence all my life, so I will

:23:31.:23:35.

not vote for anyone else except SNP. I do not want independence, I do not

:23:36.:23:39.

think anyone in Scotland should either.

:23:40.:23:58.

Dumfries and Galloway, make some noise. Thank you very much. Would

:23:59.:24:18.

you like one? Oh! Nicola Sturgeon is just hell-bent on independence. You

:24:19.:24:20.

want to bow to make sure she cannot have that? Yes. What is the most

:24:21.:24:27.

important issue in this election? It would be Brexit. Scottish

:24:28.:24:32.

independence is not a burning issue? Definitely not. What is? Helping the

:24:33.:24:41.

working class. I think this must be the first in our history, I verified

:24:42.:24:49.

dead heat in the mood box. Thank you, Dumfries and Galloway and thank

:24:50.:24:53.

you Robbie Burns. Ellie and her balls. There are

:24:54.:24:58.

several other different kinds of chocolate bars that you can get from

:24:59.:25:03.

all kinds of confectioners. A little bit of a health warning. Anyway...

:25:04.:25:10.

This is a crucial issue for the Scottish Nationalists because the

:25:11.:25:17.

whole idea of a second independence referendum, if that plays against

:25:18.:25:22.

them, they are in trouble. Yes and the Conservatives are unusually

:25:23.:25:27.

making big gains in the polls in Scotland and there are suggestions

:25:28.:25:30.

they could win five or more seats up there. If that happens, that will

:25:31.:25:35.

give more strength to Theresa May's hands to say you will not have

:25:36.:25:39.

another referendum on independence. But like the Lib Dems were remain is

:25:40.:25:45.

a big selling point for them, just most people voted to leave, so how

:25:46.:25:51.

good a unique selling point is it in the same weight for the SNP,

:25:52.:25:53.

independence. Most people just voted independence. Most people just voted

:25:54.:26:00.

is playing to just half of the is playing to just half of the

:26:01.:26:07.

Scotland, rather than looking at the looking at the record of the SNP

:26:08.:26:25.

Scotland, rather than looking at the slightly higher issues some would

:26:26.:26:25.

argue of the referendum and the role of Westminster in Scottish politics?

:26:26.:26:26.

I think why they won in 2011. They are quite

:26:27.:26:28.

good at running Scotland. But they have been NPower for a decade. Think

:26:29.:26:33.

about how Labour looked when Tony Blair had been in power. We kind of

:26:34.:26:39.

expect the SNP to be a bit mouldy. They are doing quite well for a

:26:40.:26:43.

government that has been in that long. But it is still not as good as

:26:44.:26:49.

they would ideally like. It looks like a straight fight between the

:26:50.:26:52.

Conservatives. It is difficult for them. We will leave it there. It is

:26:53.:26:58.

good to see you. I am sure we will be seeing you over the next three

:26:59.:27:03.

weeks. We will be back with more from the campaign trail tomorrow at

:27:04.:27:05.

7:30pm. Goodbye. Time for the latest weather update.

:27:06.:27:23.

You wait weeks for a proper rain to come and you get lots of

:27:24.:27:25.