Devon Countryfile


Devon

Countryfile is in Devon, where Matt Baker explores Dartmoor and Anita Rani meets a sculptor who is inspired by the ancient trees in the Devon landscape.


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Dartmoor, Devon.

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A carpet of colour as far as the eye can see.

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A landscape of stark wilderness and beauty.

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It is stunning, this sweeping moorland,

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but it can also be inhospitable, and during World War II

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Dartmoor was the site of several tragic plane crashes.

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Because of that, this rugged earth

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holds the key to many unanswered questions.

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Anita will be discovering how the Devon countryside

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is helping to shape lives.

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LandWorks is a project that tackles the issue of criminals reoffending.

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It supports them as they try and break out of the vicious cycle

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and take their first steps towards getting work.

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Charlotte's across the border in Cornwall.

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Many people dream of owning a second home

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in the countryside or by the sea,

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but are these weekend retreats doing more harm than good?

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I'll be investigating.

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And Countryfile is now home to the legendary

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One Man And His Dog sheepdog trials,

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so Helen and Shauna are meeting

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the English and Irish teams hoping they'll be top dog.

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You going to be cheering him on all the way?

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OK, that's a good idea,

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but I'm going to do it right now. Go, Daddy!

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Nestled in Britain's south-west corner

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sits one of our most beautiful national parks.

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The granite which forms the uplands here dates back millions of years.

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We're on Dartmoor, South Devon,

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a purple heather-clad moor

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of wide open landscapes and obscure granite tors.

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There's one piece of granite that I am very keen to see,

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and I think it's just up here.

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Late in the evening of March 21st, 1941,

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a bomber took off from RAF Scampton in Lincolnshire

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to attack German U-boat pens in Lorient in France.

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On its way back, it crashed on Dartmoor.

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Looming large on the moor,

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high on the slopes of a whale back-shaped landscape,

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sits a granite memorial marking the spot where that plane came down.

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Well, this is definitely it.

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All these letters, look, carved into the stone.

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RAF, I'm assuming Squadron 49,

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and then the initials of those that died.

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But this isn't the only crash site.

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During World War II, Dartmoor was surrounded by airfields

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and more than 20 planes met their end here.

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But exactly who were the four men on board this aircraft?

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And why did it crash?

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I found the perfect person to help unravel the mystery -

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Former RAF policeman Jon Lowe.

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When and how did your connection with this stone start, John?

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Purely by accident.

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I'd come for a walk on the moor,

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found the stone as part of a navigation exercise,

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and then, as I turned away and went back down the slope,

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something was compelling me to find out who and what had happened here.

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It was a Hampden, one of the early bombers of the Second World War,

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but the staggering thing was the size -

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skin to skin on the cockpit.

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The internal width in which those men were working was that wide,

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and when you place that against your shoulders,

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-you'll see that there's hardly any spare capacity at all.

-Yeah.

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It was very, very tight and claustrophobic within there.

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And you think of all the stuff that was around them,

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-and even the gear they were wearing.

-Yeah.

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How old were they?

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The pilot was 25, the youngest was 22.

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The second pilot, Ellis, was 23, and Brames,

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who that night was acting as a wireless operator, he was also 23.

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The boys were becoming more than just a set of initials.

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There was the pilot, Robert Wilson,

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wireless operator Charles Lyon,

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gunner Ronald Brames,

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and navigator Richard Ellis.

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Although it wasn't difficult to find basic details

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relating to the four young crewmembers,

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finding anybody who knew anything else about them

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proved a whole lot harder.

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But John wasn't going to give up easily.

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After months,

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he received a breakthrough he'd been waiting for.

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The great niece of one of the crew

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came across John's work on the internet and got in touch.

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-Tanya, it is lovely to meet you.

-You too.

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You had a relative, didn't you, that was on board,

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-part of the crew?

-I did.

-Who was he?

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He was called Richard Ellis, and he was my great uncle,

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and he was from South Africa.

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This document down here, I mean,

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it looks absolutely beautiful.

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Oh, it is. This is amazing.

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This was made by his mother just after he died.

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You can see it's all hand drawn on the front,

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and here is a photo of him probably taken within a year before he died.

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And then there's a letter here,

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which we found, all of us found quite emotional

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when we were looking through it, especially.

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And there's a quote here which is amazing, where he says,

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"Darlings, I have had a wonderful life

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"and if the worst should happen then please may I say here

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"how terribly grateful I am for the way you both have brought me up

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"and for all the wonderful times you have given me.

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"I have no regrets to look back on and only hope to look forward to."

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'But, just 18 months after this letter was written,

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'sadly, the worst did happen.'

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This is an official copy of the Air Ministry form

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which records the details of that crash.

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Now, originally, there were three killed and one injured,

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so what it tells us is when this form was initially raised,

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the pilot was still alive.

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And what happened to him?

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He was taken by ambulance to Moretonhampstead Hospital,

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where he was operated on.

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At three o'clock on the Saturday afternoon, his mother arrived

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and he actually passed away at around about 10 o'clock that evening

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with his family by his bedside.

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And did his mum have something to do with this stone, then?

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She came here on the Tuesday morning in a howling gale

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and pouring rain, and she stood by the cockpit,

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and the words that she used are,

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"I settled to have a stone gatepost

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"placed where the cockpit finished.

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"And I want the initials and a simple cross of our boys."

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Evidence suggests the bomber crashed on its way back

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from its mission after the boys lost radio contact with base.

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They were coming up from Widecombe, which is just below the horizon.

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The cloud base was on the floor, so they couldn't see anything.

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It was 11 o'clock at night.

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And they impacted the slope here at around about 1,500 feet.

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Death was instantaneous.

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Travelling at around 180mph, the impact of the crash was massive.

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Later, I'll be joining scientists

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as they uncover the scars left on the landscape.

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Well, while we're exploring Devon,

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Charlotte is just over the border in Cornwall

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looking at the impact of second homes.

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An Englishman's home is his castle, or so the saying goes.

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And, if you can afford it, splashing out on a second one

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to use for holidays gives you the best of both worlds -

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a permanent residence and a house in the country

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or bolt hole by the sea to use...

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whenever you like.

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Whether the appeal is quality of life, a second income or both,

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it's an idea that many Britons have bought into.

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More than 1.5 million of us now have a second home in the UK.

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And the number one choice of where to have one?

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You guessed it, Cornwall.

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It's not surprising, is it?

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Stunning coastline, picture postcard villages.

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But now, in some of the most sought-after

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of Cornish coastal resorts, two in every five houses are second homes.

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And, while their owners have clearly fallen in love with Cornwall,

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the feeling's not always mutual.

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-Hiya.

-Patrick. Hello, I'm Charlotte.

-Hello, Charlotte, come on in.

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'Patrick, his wife, Becky, and their three children

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'live in the seaside town of Padstow on Cornwall's north coast.'

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Hi.

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'Their families have lived here for hundreds of years,

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'but things are changing.'

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We've got a massive influx of second homes in Padstow,

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and that second home, through no fault of their own,

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is decimating the local communities within Cornwall.

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'Despite both having jobs in the area,

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'Patrick and Becky live in social housing,

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cos they can't afford to buy a house in Padstow.'

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It's the dark side of tourism.

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People come to Padstow, they fall in love with the place,

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they want to buy a house here at all costs

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and that's pushing the prices of houses up and up,

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to the point where we've pretty much got absolutely no chance

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of buying a house in Padstow, ever, realistically.

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What impact does it have on you, Becky?

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I was made homeless about eight years ago.

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I was always private rented,

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and the house I was renting got sold.

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You used to be able to find private rent quite easy to come by,

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but now because of all the houses,

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there's more money to be made, I think, in holiday letting,

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and it's very hard to find a private let now in Padstow.

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We were put in bed and breakfast by the council

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for I think it was about six weeks,

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then we got put in temporary accommodation in Wadebridge.

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It must have been really stressful, though,

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with two young children at that point, to have nowhere to call home.

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Yeah, it was awful. It was really traumatic.

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I wouldn't wish it on anybody, it was just horrible.

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Padstow is now the country's

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fourth most expensive place to live by the sea.

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The average price of a house here?

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A cool £373,271 -

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well over £100,000 more than the national average.

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As a result, on average,

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a house in Padstow is 20 times the local annual salary.

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That's twice as much as in London.

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This is the biggest onion I have ever seen!

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The thing is, Patrick, you're really lucky to live here,

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in such a lovely place like Padstow,

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and you can't stop other people coming here, too, can you?

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No, you can't stop other people coming to Padstow, but, er...

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you can regulate it.

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I really just think that these massive influxes of people

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coming in the summer months, it's no good to anybody.

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It's not a stable economy for Cornwall.

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That's an economy built on sand.

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What about the children?

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What do you see for them in the future?

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I've got my fingers crossed that they will be able to find a job

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in Padstow and be able to earn enough money

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to buy a house here one day.

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There should be that opportunity for them

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but at the moment there just isn't.

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This isn't just about Cornwall.

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In many rural and coastal communities,

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from Yorkshire to the south coast,

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from the Cotswolds to the Western Isles,

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there are serious concerns about the impact of second homes.

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Take Coniston in the Lake District,

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where 35% of houses don't have permanent residents.

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Here they face many of the same problems as Cornwall.

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Villagers feel priced out and,

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with many homes lying empty for large parts of the year,

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the local primary school is now only half full.

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'But, for some people,

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'second homes play a vital role in supporting the rural economy.'

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What's their destiny?

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They are going into the store to be salted down for lobster bait.

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'Johnny Murt's family have been making a living

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'from fishing out of Padstow for four generations.'

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How important are the tourists to this business?

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Very important, certainly more important

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than they've ever been in the past.

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All the restaurants we have in Padstow now

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and in the surrounding area,

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it's become a bit of a Mecca for foodies

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and they want fresh fish and shellfish.

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So, what about the tourists who then like it so much

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they decide to buy here and they have second homes?

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How much is that a concern for you?

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It's not a huge concern for me, to be honest.

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I know lots of people in town do get very upset about it

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but, whichever side you're on,

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we do need the tourists and we do...

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You know, we need that money coming into Padstow

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keeping all the businesses alive.

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It used to be a six-week season, but now it's almost year-round.

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I mean, we've got a Christmas festival,

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we've got things going on throughout the year that seem

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to draw the tourists into Padstow, and everybody's got jobs.

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Everybody didn't used to have jobs in this town,

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and now there's a lot higher employment than there ever was.

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Across the countryside, where traditional industries

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like fishing are struggling, communities need tourism to survive.

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In Cornwall alone, it's an industry worth £1.8 billion.

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Across the UK, tourism brings in well over 100 billion every year.

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And, like them or not, second homes are part of that.

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But that means that in some of the UK's most charming villages

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nearly every other house belongs to someone

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who uses it as a second address.

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I do exaggerate sometimes, darling. It's a fault.

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'One of them belongs to Anne Lamb and her family,

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'who come to Cornwall in the summer holidays.'

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As you will be aware, there are now a lot of second homes in this area.

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Aren't you in danger of destroying that community

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because you're occupying a house

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-but you're not here?

-I don't think so.

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I don't think so, because we employ people.

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We've employed people and taken them to London, given them other jobs.

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The whole thing rejuvenates itself.

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When we came, we said to each other, my husband and I,

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we will never buy a property in order to make a profit.

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We will buy it because we love the place and want to go on living here.

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I love the church, I love the music, I love the place.

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Everything that goes on here, I love.

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And I have no regrets about it at all,

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it's one of the happiest things in my life.

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Not everyone invests quite so much in the community as the Lamb family,

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yet there's no doubting the fact that second home owners

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do provide a welcome boost to the local economy.

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But, despite the obvious benefits to businesses,

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there are many locals who feel the advantages brought

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by second homes are simply not worth the sacrifices they have to make.

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For some, second homes cast a shadow

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over some of the most beautiful parts of the UK.

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Demand raises prices,

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and many who live and work there can't afford to stay.

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But others say without the money that second home owners bring,

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these local economies wouldn't survive.

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How important is this boat yard to the village?

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It's enormously important to the village.

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'Edwina Hannaford is the Cornwall councillor

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'responsible for Environment, Heritage and Planning.

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'I'm meeting her in the coastal parish of Lanteglos-by-Fowey,

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'where in parts of some villages half the houses are second homes.'

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Are there too many holiday homes here, do you think?

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If you haven't got a home and you can't afford to buy one,

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then, yes, the answer is yes. But there is another side to this.

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Those holiday homes, they employ an army of people -

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the plumbers, the caretakers, the gardeners.

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All those people rely on the business that comes their way.

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But there are 28,000 people on the housing register in Cornwall...

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-Waiting for housing?

-..Waiting for housing.

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I think it's starting to tip the wrong way now.

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'To try and control the problem,

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'Cornwall Council has scrapped the 10% council tax discount

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'on second homes and invested millions in more affordable housing.

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'But councils in affected areas can only do so much

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'without national legislation.'

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Is there more that central government should be doing?

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Well, we've already asked once through a motion

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through Cornwall Council for government

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to put a separate use class for second homes

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that would restrict the number,

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so they'd have to apply for planning permission

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if you change from a full-time occupancy to a second home.

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We were knocked back on that but we're trying again,

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and we're working with South Lakeland Council

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up in the Lake District,

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who have a very similar issue to places like Polruan.

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The councils in Cornwall and the South Lakes

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were hoping for a change in the law so people would have to get

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council permission to create a second home.

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But the MP supporting them has now withdrawn his bid

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to change the legislation.

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The Government itself has no plans to step in.

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The Housing Minister, Brandon Lewis, told us...

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Instead, he pointed to the number of affordable homes

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the Government's delivered.

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Who wouldn't want to live here, even if only for part of the year?

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For some locals, second homes are a bonus.

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For others, they're ruining the place.

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The challenge for local councils and for government

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is to find a way of keeping a balance.

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Countryfile is once again proud to play host to One Man And His Dog.

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Next week, we're going to be bringing together

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the best shepherding talent the British Isles has to offer

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as they battle it out to win this coveted trophy.

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So far, we've met our Scottish and Welsh competitors.

0:19:270:19:31

This week, we're going to be meeting the English and Irish teams

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who believe they have what it takes to become the champions of 2014.

0:19:340:19:39

First up, Helen's meeting

0:19:400:19:41

the mesmerising duo representing England.

0:19:410:19:44

In these parts, picturesque valleys

0:19:480:19:50

and silent hills gently roll into the distance.

0:19:500:19:53

This is Lancashire, in England's Northwest,

0:19:530:19:56

a rural county full of rich grassland.

0:19:560:19:58

It's perfect sheep farming territory.

0:19:580:20:00

Which means you need someone to show them who's boss. Away.

0:20:020:20:06

Class.

0:20:070:20:09

This northern corner of Lancashire is home to both

0:20:100:20:13

the senior and young pairings representing England.

0:20:130:20:17

First up, I'm meeting the old hand brimming with experience,

0:20:170:20:20

Richard Hutchinson and his dog, Sweep.

0:20:200:20:22

HE WHISTLES

0:20:240:20:26

Born and raised on the family farm in Littledale, Richard's

0:20:260:20:29

ancestors have been working this land for five generations.

0:20:290:20:33

'Today, he's managed to rope in yours truly as his little helper

0:20:330:20:37

'to give his ewes some vitamins.'

0:20:370:20:39

Yeah!

0:20:390:20:40

-Oh, good girl.

-That one liked it, actually.

0:20:400:20:42

She did like it.

0:20:420:20:44

'But when it comes to rounding them up, Richard needs

0:20:440:20:46

'a companion with a little more finesse -

0:20:460:20:49

'his loyal sheepdog, Sweep.'

0:20:490:20:50

Tell me a bit about Sweep. What's he like as a dog?

0:20:510:20:55

He's pretty reliable.

0:20:550:20:56

He tries hard. He's got a big heart.

0:20:560:20:58

That's probably his best attribute.

0:20:580:21:00

-And how old is he?

-He's six and a half.

0:21:000:21:03

I bred him and a friend of mine had him as a puppy.

0:21:030:21:05

and then I bought him off him when he was about a year old.

0:21:050:21:08

-So, you bred him, got rid of him and bought him back?

-Yes. Yes.

0:21:080:21:12

You must have seen something you liked, then.

0:21:120:21:14

Yeah, he was cheap!

0:21:140:21:15

'Richard may be a joker,

0:21:150:21:18

'but one thing he takes very seriously is trialling.'

0:21:180:21:21

Having first appeared as a young handler in 2000,

0:21:210:21:25

Richard became a regular face on One Man And His Dog,

0:21:250:21:28

with a hat trick of appearances in 2009, 2010...

0:21:280:21:33

Yeah, "In you go," he says. That way, that way, that's it.

0:21:330:21:37

..and then 2011.

0:21:370:21:38

So far, he's claimed a solid second,

0:21:380:21:41

but the gold has eluded him.

0:21:410:21:43

You're a bit of an old hand at this, then, aren't you?

0:21:440:21:47

-How many times have you done One Man And His Dog?

-Erm...

0:21:470:21:50

This will be my fifth,

0:21:500:21:51

and I still haven't won it, cos I'm not very good.

0:21:510:21:53

-Oh, shut up!

-Well, I still haven't. I still haven't.

0:21:530:21:56

No, I've just been second a few times but, yeah.

0:21:560:21:58

So, if you've been second a few times,

0:21:580:22:00

does that make you kind of more determined to go for the top spot?

0:22:000:22:03

I think I would be determined whatever, wouldn't I?

0:22:030:22:05

But it would be really tough this year

0:22:050:22:07

cos you've got Michael Shearer, Kevin Evans,

0:22:070:22:10

who are two of the best five handlers in the world.

0:22:100:22:12

And then James from Ireland -

0:22:120:22:14

I've competed against him and he's a proper good handler.

0:22:140:22:16

So I'm hoping I cause an upset but we'll see.

0:22:160:22:19

And Richard has a fair idea how he will be judged,

0:22:210:22:24

as when he's not competing in trials, he's helping set them up.

0:22:240:22:27

A poacher-cum-gamekeeper, if you will.

0:22:270:22:30

We run the trials ourselves.

0:22:300:22:32

We help set up courses. There is a local one tomorrow.

0:22:320:22:34

I think Alex Briggs, the young handler from England,

0:22:340:22:37

I think he's going to be there as well.

0:22:370:22:38

And, you know, we judge and we let the sheep out.

0:22:380:22:41

Generally, it's the competitors that run the trials.

0:22:410:22:43

When you're a judge, are you looking for certain things?

0:22:430:22:46

-Cos it's a subjective opinion, to a degree, isn't it?

-Yeah, it is.

0:22:460:22:49

It is. And it's all an opinion, that's what the judgment is.

0:22:490:22:53

You may disagree with the judge, and regularly people do,

0:22:530:22:56

but it's just someone's opinion, at the end of the day.

0:22:560:22:58

That sounds like the voice of experience!

0:22:580:23:00

Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah.

0:23:000:23:02

-Is Team England a force to be reckoned with?

-I hope so.

0:23:020:23:06

Tight-lipped. Poker face.

0:23:060:23:08

It's the only one I've got. Unfortunately.

0:23:080:23:11

The seasoned senior duo of Richard Hutchinson

0:23:110:23:14

and Sweep is clearly one to watch.

0:23:140:23:16

And to complete this year's England line-up,

0:23:160:23:18

they are bolstered by having a local alliance.

0:23:180:23:21

'And to meet the pairing of young handler and dog

0:23:250:23:28

'that completes Team England, I don't need to travel very far.

0:23:280:23:32

'That's because, this year, Team England are relative neighbours.

0:23:320:23:36

'Living just ten miles down the road in Wennington, Lancashire

0:23:360:23:39

'are 15-year-old Alex Briggs and his trusty sheepdog Rio.'

0:23:390:23:43

ENGINE STARTS

0:23:460:23:47

Hello.

0:23:550:23:56

-Hello.

-I can see Rio's already itching to get going.

0:23:580:24:01

-How old is he?

-Two in May.

0:24:010:24:03

That's quite young, isn't it, to take him into a competition?

0:24:030:24:06

It is, but I've got a lot of faith in him,

0:24:060:24:08

and hopefully he'll do me justice.

0:24:080:24:10

Why did you decide to put the faith in Rio, then?

0:24:100:24:13

He's just always raring to go, and what you want to do,

0:24:130:24:17

he's already clicked on to what you want him to do before you...

0:24:170:24:20

before you've actually done it.

0:24:200:24:22

So how much competing has he done?

0:24:220:24:25

I think I've been to one trial.

0:24:250:24:27

So it's a bit of a risk, but I'll give it a go.

0:24:270:24:31

'Despite his dog's limited experience,

0:24:320:24:34

'Alex clearly has a lot of faith in Rio the rookie.

0:24:340:24:38

'But, as a man of ambition,

0:24:380:24:39

'he's already training up some even younger potential puppy champs.'

0:24:390:24:43

Wow, they're keen, aren't they?

0:24:430:24:45

'And with pups of this age, you need to know how to handle them.'

0:24:450:24:48

-Let that one out.

-Whoa! Oh!

0:24:480:24:52

Just let them go.

0:24:530:24:55

I didn't want them to fall out.

0:24:550:24:57

You can see now they're already working.

0:24:570:25:00

So, how old are they when you first bring them out to meet the sheep?

0:25:000:25:03

Well, it depends.

0:25:030:25:04

If they're keen enough, that's when we'll take them out.

0:25:040:25:07

Is it a fine line, when you've got such a young dog,

0:25:070:25:09

between them being keen and too keen?

0:25:090:25:12

You don't want the dogs to frighten them, do you?

0:25:120:25:14

That's the difference between a top dog and not a top dog.

0:25:140:25:17

A lot of people say your dog is at its best

0:25:170:25:19

when it's six years old. So that's when they've calmed down,

0:25:190:25:21

they're a bit more experienced and they're just a bit more laid back.

0:25:210:25:24

Two-year-old Rio is clearly the exception to that rule.

0:25:260:25:29

With mature heads on their shoulders,

0:25:290:25:31

this duo is brimming with confidence,

0:25:310:25:34

and deservedly so.

0:25:340:25:35

-Do you enjoy competing?

-Yeah, I love it. I like the...

0:25:360:25:41

not the pressure, but the challenge

0:25:410:25:43

of a hard course or something, really.

0:25:430:25:45

And what would it mean to you to win?

0:25:450:25:48

It'd mean a lot.

0:25:480:25:49

I don't want to come last or second.

0:25:490:25:52

It's either first or nothing, really.

0:25:520:25:54

So that's our determined English duo -

0:25:540:25:57

the Lancashire lads who are in it to win it.

0:25:570:25:59

A combination of youth and experience -

0:25:590:26:01

Alex Briggs with Rio and Richard Hutchinson with Sweep.

0:26:010:26:05

The River Dart has its source in the soil of Dartmoor.

0:26:140:26:17

Rain water seeps through the centuries-old peat

0:26:170:26:20

before carving its way across South Devon to reach the sea.

0:26:200:26:24

Halfway along its journey, the river runs through the Valley of Totnes.

0:26:240:26:28

And here, in this rather magical spot, hardly anything has

0:26:310:26:34

changed for centuries, from the ruins of Berry Pomeroy Castle

0:26:340:26:37

to the trees that hold it up

0:26:370:26:39

and the ancient waters that surround it.

0:26:390:26:41

So it's the perfect spot to meet a sculptor who takes

0:26:420:26:45

inspiration from the old to create something very new.

0:26:450:26:49

Alarik Greenland is a local sculptor.

0:26:530:26:56

His muse - trees.

0:26:560:26:58

He painstakingly twists wires and jewels together

0:27:000:27:03

to create perfect replicas, each leaf a semiprecious stone.

0:27:030:27:08

These aren't just any trees,

0:27:130:27:14

they're ancient trees from his childhood surroundings.

0:27:140:27:18

Alarik, you can see that this is a very special spot.

0:27:200:27:24

It is, yeah. It's very special to me.

0:27:240:27:26

Everywhere I go around here, it stirs up memories for me just

0:27:260:27:30

because I've been here my whole life.

0:27:300:27:33

What is it about the trees in particular?

0:27:330:27:35

It's the sense that they have been here for so long

0:27:350:27:39

and that they've been touched by people that I've never known.

0:27:390:27:42

The ruined castle offers fantastic views of the woodland below.

0:27:480:27:52

A perfect spot for a lesson in tree sculpture.

0:27:520:27:55

Wow. How many hours to did take you to make this?

0:27:570:28:00

Altogether, it can take about four to five weeks to make a tree.

0:28:000:28:05

I can't promise you four weeks of my life,

0:28:050:28:07

-but I certainly fancy having a go.

-Yeah.

-Shall we?

0:28:070:28:09

This is gold-plated copper wire.

0:28:120:28:14

-Right, so don't mess up, Anita, cos it's expensive.

-Yes!

0:28:140:28:18

Pinch the two bits of wires.

0:28:180:28:21

And then make about three to four twists.

0:28:210:28:25

-OK.

-And how many beads would one tree have?

-One tree?

-Yeah.

0:28:250:28:30

The latest one that I've got is 10,000. Over 10,000 stones.

0:28:300:28:35

-10,000 stones!

-Yeah.

0:28:350:28:37

I don't know about this, though.

0:28:370:28:39

I might have just wasted a bit of gold.

0:28:390:28:41

THEY LAUGH

0:28:410:28:43

This is an incredibly intricate work of art,

0:28:460:28:50

but the piece of wood it sits on has a fascinating life of its own, too.

0:28:500:28:55

Alarik salvages these centuries-old pieces of wood

0:28:560:28:59

from the depths of the River Dart.

0:28:590:29:01

But how did they get their remarkable appearance?

0:29:010:29:05

I was excavating a Bronze Age site on the top of Dartmoor...

0:29:050:29:08

'Dr Ralph Fyfe, an expert on fossilised plants,

0:29:080:29:12

'is casting his eye over one of Alarik's finds.'

0:29:120:29:14

This end here was down in the silts in the bottom of the river.

0:29:160:29:20

-So a bit like this.

-Let's spin it round. So it was like this?

0:29:200:29:23

-This was out in the water column.

-So why is the top bit black?

0:29:230:29:28

What's happened is, as this piece of wood has been

0:29:280:29:31

sitting in the water, there are tannins in the wood,

0:29:310:29:34

and those tannins are reacting with the slightly acidic waters

0:29:340:29:37

and the iron in the water as well.

0:29:370:29:39

That means that a chemical process occurs, which means the wood

0:29:390:29:42

draws the iron into the actual structure itself.

0:29:420:29:45

So it begins life as a tree, then it sits around in the water

0:29:450:29:49

for a few hundred years and it becomes this,

0:29:490:29:52

and then it gets given a new life by an artist.

0:29:520:29:55

I'm keen to find a piece, and Alarik knows just what to look for.

0:29:580:30:02

Sometimes it can be too rotten, not bogged enough,

0:30:040:30:06

so it's just sort of quite new, and another thing is it's not

0:30:060:30:09

the right shape, so we've got to really look carefully.

0:30:090:30:11

We've got to look for a really nice piece.

0:30:110:30:13

-But, first things first, we've got to get me in the water.

-Yes.

0:30:130:30:16

-How do you plan on doing that, then, Alarik?

-Running!

0:30:160:30:19

'The sun's shining and I'm all out of excuses.

0:30:200:30:23

'Time for an underwater forage.'

0:30:230:30:25

Go for it!

0:30:250:30:27

Ooh!

0:30:310:30:32

It's freezing!

0:30:330:30:34

OK, let's swim.

0:30:350:30:36

On three. One, two, three.

0:30:400:30:43

I can't see anything. It's just black.

0:30:460:30:49

Where's he gone?

0:30:490:30:50

'Enough fun. We've got a job to do.'

0:30:530:30:56

HE EXCLAIMS

0:31:140:31:16

Oh, my God.

0:31:160:31:17

-I want to get out and look at it.

-Let's pull it out. Hey!

0:31:200:31:23

-God!

-That is lush.

-Look at that.

0:31:240:31:27

-That's brilliant.

-Are you happy with that?

0:31:270:31:29

-My mind's ticking over already about how I can use it.

-That's wonderful.

0:31:290:31:33

So, in a few months' time, this could look like that.

0:31:330:31:36

-It could well be, yes.

-Wow.

0:31:360:31:38

-I feel like we've done a good day's work today.

-Yeah, we have.

0:31:380:31:41

-Well done.

-Thank you.

0:31:410:31:43

-Shall we get back in?

-Yeah!

0:31:430:31:45

Alarik's beautiful sculptures, combined with the deadwood from

0:31:460:31:50

the river, are giving Devon's ancient trees an artistic afterlife.

0:31:500:31:55

I'm on Dartmoor - sometimes dangerous, always beguiling...

0:31:580:32:03

as former RAF policeman John Law found out

0:32:030:32:06

when he started to investigate the crash site of a 1941 bomber.

0:32:060:32:11

So, John, you've been researching this site,

0:32:130:32:15

then, for the past three years.

0:32:150:32:17

You've now reached a very critical stage.

0:32:170:32:20

And we're surrounded by all sorts of gadgets and beeping.

0:32:200:32:22

What's going on?

0:32:220:32:24

-The culmination of this is a geophysical survey...

-Right.

0:32:240:32:27

..to establish where the aircraft actually impacted.

0:32:270:32:32

All we've got is hearsay.

0:32:320:32:34

-So they're basically scanning the ground, then?

-Absolutely.

0:32:340:32:38

After the crash, the wreckage was cleared away.

0:32:380:32:41

But the impact would have been so strong, John believes

0:32:410:32:44

fragments of the plane may still lie beneath the soil.

0:32:440:32:48

Fragments that today's survey might reveal.

0:32:480:32:50

Has anyone ever kind of stumbled across anything?

0:32:530:32:56

Yes, the Perspex of this aircraft was pinched or stolen by young boys

0:32:560:33:02

and turned into a ring, usually to give to the sweethearts.

0:33:020:33:06

Wow. Look at that.

0:33:060:33:07

So that would have been from maybe

0:33:100:33:12

-the windshield of the cockpit or something.

-Yeah.

0:33:120:33:15

Do you know what? I'm going to get involved in all the stuff

0:33:150:33:17

that's going on behind us and I've been told, because there's

0:33:170:33:20

lots of magnetic waves flying around, I've got to get rid of

0:33:200:33:23

-all things metal.

-Everything that's...

-So if I give you my watch.

0:33:230:33:26

-Lovely.

-And then I might just pop my wedding ring

0:33:260:33:31

over the top of there.

0:33:310:33:32

There we are.

0:33:320:33:33

'Time for me to get stuck in.

0:33:350:33:37

'Archaeologist Mark Edwards

0:33:370:33:38

'hooks me up to a piece of kit called a magnetometer.'

0:33:380:33:42

-OK, and what's my route?

-Just press that.

-Where am I headed?

0:33:420:33:44

You're heading down to the pole.

0:33:440:33:46

OK. And I just walk,

0:33:460:33:48

I don't have to shove it in the ground or anything?

0:33:480:33:50

No, you just walk and it'll take eight readings per metre.

0:33:500:33:53

'The magnetometer uses sensors to detect magnetic objects

0:33:530:33:57

'and disturbances to the soil,

0:33:570:33:59

'which may have been caused by a sudden impact

0:33:590:34:01

'such as a plane crash.'

0:34:010:34:03

And how big is the area, then, that you've been wandering over?

0:34:060:34:09

-Cos you've been doing this for three days now.

-Three days.

0:34:090:34:11

We started off originally as half a hectare

0:34:110:34:13

and I think we've got up to about three hectares now.

0:34:130:34:16

We started off over here to here and we've extended this way

0:34:160:34:21

because we found a large concentration of what we believe is

0:34:210:34:24

iron in the south-west corner.

0:34:240:34:27

-Must be an interesting project, this, for you, though.

-This is...

0:34:270:34:29

-Yeah, this is a bit different.

-Yeah. Right.

0:34:290:34:32

-It's a nice story with it as well.

-Exactly.

-Which is good.

0:34:320:34:35

-We've arrived at our destination.

-We've arrived.

0:34:350:34:37

The team uses another bit of kit to get a more detailed

0:34:380:34:41

reading, before printing out and analysing the revealing results.

0:34:410:34:46

As soon as we started, we started seeing this, as you can see,

0:34:460:34:49

high and low readings.

0:34:490:34:51

These are just different parts of the same data,

0:34:510:34:54

they show different parts of that data.

0:34:540:34:56

-So high and low readings of what?

-Of the magnetic response of the soils.

0:34:560:35:00

-Yeah.

-We started here. It's very low on this site,

0:35:000:35:02

about one. And it's coming in, it starts to rise.

0:35:020:35:05

That looks pretty natural but then it just keeps rising and rising.

0:35:050:35:08

We're up to 50 or 60, which is five or six times what we expect.

0:35:080:35:12

I think that's steel or iron buried in the ground.

0:35:120:35:16

We need to confirm this, and the next stage of this process,

0:35:160:35:19

we get down there with the metal detector

0:35:190:35:21

-and run it across just to see if that's the case.

-Yeah.

0:35:210:35:23

The team thinks it is likely this dense patch of metal could be

0:35:240:35:28

the plane's wheels, or even the engine.

0:35:280:35:31

-What do you make of all this, then, John?

-It's just amazing.

0:35:340:35:37

Honestly, it really is.

0:35:370:35:39

What's exciting is what Ross has said

0:35:390:35:42

with this section here.

0:35:420:35:44

And we need to go back

0:35:440:35:46

and really, really investigate these areas.

0:35:460:35:50

Something tells me there's plenty more detective work

0:35:500:35:52

for John to do here in future.

0:35:520:35:54

It's fascinating to think that, more than 70 years on,

0:35:570:36:01

through the work of people like John and Ross, the story

0:36:010:36:05

and lives of the four men who died are not forgotten,

0:36:050:36:09

but live on in this beautiful Dartmoor landscape.

0:36:090:36:12

Earlier, Helen met the team hoping to win this year's

0:36:170:36:20

One Man And His Dog for England.

0:36:200:36:22

Hoping they're on a winning streak are current titleholders Ireland.

0:36:230:36:27

Shauna's meeting this year's optimistic Irish contenders.

0:36:270:36:31

Hailing from its wild Atlantic coastline

0:36:350:36:38

to its tranquil, lush, green hills,

0:36:380:36:40

over the years, the Emerald Isle has produced

0:36:400:36:43

an impressive pedigree when it comes to sheepdog handling.

0:36:430:36:46

After their success in last year's tournament,

0:36:470:36:50

Ireland are defending champions, but hopes of retaining the title

0:36:500:36:53

lie with a couple of One Man And His Dog first-timers.

0:36:530:36:57

I've come to the picturesque Inishowen Peninsula in County Donegal

0:36:570:37:01

to meet the potentially perfect pairing of senior handler

0:37:010:37:05

and dog who are hoping to keep the title in Ireland yet again.

0:37:050:37:09

It's James McLaughlin and four-year-old Ben.

0:37:130:37:16

Brought up on the family hill farm near the town of Carndonagh,

0:37:180:37:22

James and Ben's sheep herding prowess

0:37:220:37:24

have given them local celebrity status.

0:37:240:37:27

-Hello, James.

-Hi, Seamus. How are you?

-Good luck to you.

0:37:270:37:30

-I hope you bring the trophy back to Carndonagh.

-Hope I can do it.

0:37:300:37:33

-Do us all proud for One Man And His Dog.

-Thanks now.

0:37:330:37:36

Everybody knows what's happening now and I hope I don't let them down.

0:37:360:37:40

The local community are firmly behind them, but how will

0:37:430:37:46

they fare with the pressure of representing the whole of Ireland?

0:37:460:37:49

James, this will be your first time on One Man And His Dog,

0:37:500:37:53

whereas the other senior handlers from England, Scotland

0:37:530:37:56

and Wales have all been on it before. How do you feel about that?

0:37:560:38:00

A little nervous. A little nervous.

0:38:000:38:03

A bit like the pup in with the old dogs,

0:38:030:38:06

but I'm confident in Ben

0:38:060:38:08

so I'll give it our best shot.

0:38:080:38:10

HE WHISTLES

0:38:100:38:12

James may consider himself to be an underdog,

0:38:120:38:15

but he isn't facing the pressure on his own.

0:38:150:38:17

He'll be with his loyal sidekick, Ben -

0:38:170:38:19

a dog that's adept with sheep of any breed...or colour.

0:38:190:38:23

-What's with the pink?

-Yes.

0:38:250:38:27

It assures good visibility for out on the mountain there.

0:38:270:38:31

So, Ben is four now. When did you notice something special about him?

0:38:310:38:35

Eight, nine months to ten months old,

0:38:350:38:37

I knew he had something that I was always looking for, you know.

0:38:370:38:40

At a young age, he was quite capable of doing a lot of nice work.

0:38:400:38:45

He would have exceptional balance.

0:38:450:38:47

He would make the moves himself without me excessively

0:38:470:38:50

commanding him. With a ewe just trying to break,

0:38:500:38:54

-he can move himself using his own initiative, you know?

-Right.

0:38:540:38:57

-So, he's got a natural ability, would you say?

-Yes. Yes.

0:38:570:39:00

-And is that quite rare to find at such a young age?

-Oh, yes. Yes.

0:39:000:39:05

I would... I haven't found it in previous dogs that I would have.

0:39:050:39:09

HE WHISTLES AND CALLS COMMANDS

0:39:120:39:15

So, a hard-working dog in the field. What's he like out of the field?

0:39:170:39:20

The kids love him, you know?

0:39:200:39:22

-Your ultimate good dog with kids, you know?

-Kids adore him.

0:39:220:39:24

-And he's a dad himself, isn't he?

-Yes, he is.

0:39:240:39:27

This last litter I've recently kept. I have three there, you know,

0:39:270:39:32

-which are showing me good...

-Good promise already?

-Good promise.

0:39:320:39:36

And the next generation looks bright, as James's own offspring,

0:39:420:39:46

nine-year-old Caitlin and six-year-old Coran,

0:39:460:39:49

are training up a potential future champ in Ben's son Rock.

0:39:490:39:53

Come by.

0:39:530:39:54

-Rock is doing amazingly. How old is he?

-Just four months.

-Wow.

0:39:540:40:01

Hey, Caitlin, can you give me some advice,

0:40:020:40:04

some tips on how to do some trialling?

0:40:040:40:07

Erm...

0:40:070:40:08

left is "come by", right is "keep out"...

0:40:080:40:13

..and to leave the sheep is "lie down" and...

0:40:140:40:20

Have you got your list?

0:40:220:40:25

"Stand" is another way to stop your puppy.

0:40:250:40:28

Very good.

0:40:300:40:31

How do you feel about your dad being on One Man And His Dog?

0:40:310:40:34

I feel so proud of him cos that way it makes me smile all the time.

0:40:340:40:38

Oh, that's so sweet.

0:40:380:40:40

Are you going to be cheering him on all the way?

0:40:400:40:42

OK, that's a good idea but I'm going to do it right now. Go, Daddy!

0:40:420:40:47

The Irish challenge with James McLaughlin and Ben is shaping

0:40:540:40:57

up to be quite formidable, but what about Ireland's young handler?

0:40:570:41:01

From the remote and rugged Atlantic coastline in the north-west

0:41:070:41:10

to the rich river valleys, hills and picture postcard towns

0:41:100:41:14

of County Kilkenny in the South.

0:41:140:41:16

And it's here, in the agricultural highlands of Mullinavat, that

0:41:160:41:20

I'll be getting an insight into the world of those representing

0:41:200:41:23

Ireland in the young handlers class.

0:41:230:41:25

It's 17-year-old Caleb O'Keefe and Tess.

0:41:300:41:33

Growing up on the family farm, when Caleb is not at school,

0:41:380:41:41

he can be found helping his dad with their 140 Suffolk cross ewes.

0:41:410:41:46

In you go. Right. There we go.

0:41:480:41:50

Did you know from a young age that this is what you wanted to do?

0:41:550:41:58

I always, always wanted to do this, yeah.

0:41:580:42:00

'And when it comes to working with sheep, Caleb's future

0:42:030:42:06

'looks bright, thanks to his partnership with five-year-old Tess.'

0:42:060:42:10

-So how long have you had Tess for, Caleb?

-Since she was six months old.

0:42:100:42:14

-Have you been trialling her since she was a pup, then?

-Yes.

0:42:140:42:17

Well, Daddy trained her and I've been trailing her since then,

0:42:170:42:20

-since she was about two years old.

-And what's her character like?

0:42:200:42:24

She's awful friendly, like. She's a very pleasant bitch.

0:42:240:42:27

Ireland, obviously, are the reigning champs at the moment.

0:42:270:42:31

How do you feel about representing them this time?

0:42:310:42:34

Yeah, it's a once-in-a-lifetime chance to do this,

0:42:340:42:37

so hopefully it'll go well. Tess'll give me 110% anyway.

0:42:370:42:41

Oh, look at her. There she is.

0:42:410:42:43

She obviously enjoys her work.

0:42:430:42:45

She is lovely.

0:42:450:42:46

WHISTLING

0:42:480:42:50

So that's our team from Ireland.

0:42:500:42:53

Young handler Caleb O'Keeffe with his sheepdog, Tess,

0:42:530:42:56

and James McLaughlin with Ben.

0:42:560:42:58

The lush countryside of the Dartington Estate in South Devon.

0:43:120:43:16

An inspiring place to think and reflect,

0:43:160:43:19

and a beautiful place to work.

0:43:190:43:21

'This combination of work and space are the key ingredients

0:43:230:43:27

'in a unique project tackling one of society's biggest problems -

0:43:270:43:31

'crime.'

0:43:310:43:33

Nearly 50% of prisoners will reoffend

0:43:330:43:36

within their first year of release.

0:43:360:43:38

It's a huge figure, but the cost to the economy is equally as huge -

0:43:380:43:41

around £13 billion a year.

0:43:410:43:44

But, at this place, they're using the countryside to try

0:43:440:43:47

and reduce those figures.

0:43:470:43:48

At LandWorks, the idea is simple.

0:43:520:43:54

A group of offenders come here four days a week,

0:43:540:43:57

work the land and gain new skills.

0:43:570:43:59

With any luck, they'll go on to find work within the community,

0:44:010:44:05

without reoffending.

0:44:050:44:06

-Hello, Chris.

-Hi, Anita. Nice to see you.

-Pleased to meet you.

0:44:080:44:11

'Chris Parsons is in charge.'

0:44:110:44:13

What is LandWorks?

0:44:140:44:17

Well, the purpose, really, is to provide a work placement,

0:44:170:44:19

a real work placement where people who may not have worked before can

0:44:190:44:23

find their feet and start to take some responsibility

0:44:230:44:26

and progress back into the community.

0:44:260:44:28

Well, I've got a lot of questions and I'm quite keen to explore it.

0:44:280:44:32

-Why don't you have a look round?

-Yeah.

0:44:320:44:34

Why don't you go round and meet everyone who's out here. Perhaps we

0:44:340:44:37

-can meet up later and you can tell me what you found out.

-Thank you.

0:44:370:44:40

To earn a place here,

0:44:430:44:44

you must show a genuine desire to change your life.

0:44:440:44:48

Tony's been here for ten weeks.

0:44:480:44:50

I'm remembering old skills being here but also I'm learning new

0:44:510:44:55

-skills at the same time as well, like, you know?

-Yeah.

0:44:550:44:58

-And do you enjoy it?

-Yeah.

0:44:580:44:59

The people here are just brilliant people.

0:44:590:45:02

Really easy to get on with.

0:45:020:45:03

And Dartington the area itself is just a beautiful area.

0:45:030:45:06

And everyone wants to get involved with the projects, like, you know?

0:45:060:45:09

-So, how many times have you been in prison?

-This is my fourth sentence.

0:45:090:45:13

-Fourth sentence.

-Yeah.

0:45:130:45:14

Some people watching this, Tony,

0:45:140:45:16

might think you've been in and out of prison, four sentences,

0:45:160:45:19

you could have destroyed quite a few lives, certainly upset

0:45:190:45:23

a lot of people, why should we let him, you know, grow vegetables?

0:45:230:45:27

-Surely you should be being punished for what you did.

-Yeah.

0:45:270:45:30

Well, I mean, I've done my prison sentence

0:45:300:45:33

and people need a chance, if they want to, to change their lives,

0:45:330:45:37

because otherwise they're just going to go back into crime.

0:45:370:45:41

LandWorks is a place full of character, filled with art

0:45:430:45:47

and expressions from current and former trainees.

0:45:470:45:50

It also offers offenders a chance to rub shoulders with people

0:45:500:45:54

they may not normally mix with.

0:45:540:45:56

Today, Lee is working with artist Sarah on a tunnel

0:45:560:45:59

based around the idea of a beehive.

0:45:590:46:01

Hello. Hiya, Lee.

0:46:010:46:03

If someone said to you about a year ago you'd be out here building

0:46:030:46:07

an art piece called Fragments Of Society, based on a honeycomb...

0:46:070:46:11

No. THEY LAUGH

0:46:110:46:13

-No.

-..what would you have said?

-About a year ago...

0:46:130:46:17

-What were you up to a year ago?

-A year ago... Er...

0:46:170:46:23

-I was having a breakdown. I...

-Why? Where had you got to in life?

0:46:230:46:29

What...? Where were you?

0:46:290:46:31

Basically, I was a fully qualified scaffolder and I lost my job,

0:46:310:46:35

I had an accident at work.

0:46:350:46:38

I had a privately rented house and three kids and a missus,

0:46:380:46:43

and, basically, I hit rock bottom.

0:46:430:46:45

Lost my house, my career, from the accident at work,

0:46:450:46:49

spiralled out of control, and I ended up in prison.

0:46:490:46:52

And then I moved on to here,

0:46:530:46:55

and it's ended up being the best thing that I've done in a long time.

0:46:550:46:59

There is a light at the end of the tunnel, like, you know?

0:46:590:47:01

So, I can see there's a job at the end of it.

0:47:010:47:04

I've seen other people come through this.

0:47:040:47:06

So it's a route back into society without being judged along the way.

0:47:060:47:13

'One of the key parts of the scheme is developing softer

0:47:220:47:24

'skills like respect and teamwork.

0:47:240:47:28

'So lunch is a very important part of the day here.

0:47:280:47:31

'It's a chance to mix in and share stories.'

0:47:310:47:35

It gives me the chance to socialise, meet new people.

0:47:350:47:38

It's been a real keystone of the project.

0:47:380:47:40

-So it's a good experience for us all.

-Food for the soul.

-Yeah.

0:47:400:47:43

This place is being transformed into something of which

0:47:470:47:50

those who come here can be proud.

0:47:500:47:52

But the scheme's greatest achievement is its graduates.

0:47:520:47:56

'With LandWorks' help, Rich has changed his life.'

0:47:560:48:00

-We are sitting on your legacy, aren't we? Cos you made this.

-Yes.

0:48:000:48:03

Did you have any carpentry skills before you got here?

0:48:030:48:05

-None whatsoever.

-Have you ever had a job before this?

-Before now, no.

0:48:050:48:10

-In 40 years of your life, you've never had a job?

-No. Never.

-And now?

0:48:100:48:14

I managed to get onto this project

0:48:140:48:17

and good things started happening to me. Now I work 12 hours a day.

0:48:170:48:21

If you work, you know that every fortnight

0:48:210:48:23

I've got that guaranteed money. It's mine.

0:48:230:48:26

I can pay my rent, I can pay my council tax and feel good.

0:48:260:48:29

-I can't even believe I'm saying that.

-I know, listen to you!

0:48:290:48:32

I've spoken to a few people here today at LandWorks,

0:48:320:48:34

and you are the role model. You do realise that, don't you?

0:48:340:48:37

People say, "We want to be like Rich.

0:48:370:48:39

"We want to get out of here and get a job."

0:48:390:48:42

Which is good, and I encourage

0:48:420:48:43

them all to work, but I don't want them to feel they need to be like me.

0:48:430:48:47

But it's good, and if I can pass my experience on to the boys,

0:48:470:48:50

I can tell them the road they should go down.

0:48:500:48:53

It's been a fascinating day,

0:48:560:48:57

and manager Chris wants to know what I think.

0:48:570:49:01

-Hi, Chris.

-Hi, Anita.

0:49:010:49:03

-How did it go?

-Yeah. Amazing.

-Good.

-What an eye-opener.

0:49:030:49:07

I'm surprised at how open everyone is.

0:49:070:49:10

Yeah, I think honesty comes through here as the guys settle in

0:49:100:49:16

and spend some time here and develop a sense of ownership for the project.

0:49:160:49:20

They start discussing subjects

0:49:200:49:22

that might not normally be discussed or even, you know,

0:49:220:49:24

starting to take responsibility for their crime.

0:49:240:49:26

This is an opportunity to start afresh.

0:49:290:49:32

I've got more shame and guilt than anybody that I know and I've

0:49:340:49:39

had to learn to deal with that myself and I need a chance, you know? I do.

0:49:390:49:45

I need a chance. Because I'm not bad.

0:49:450:49:47

There should be more places like this, because if you want to

0:49:470:49:52

change then somewhere like this will give you the opportunity to do so.

0:49:520:49:56

If these guys take their chance out here,

0:49:580:50:01

they'll experience a sense of freedom in more ways than one.

0:50:010:50:05

This week, we're in South Devon -

0:50:120:50:14

a place with an unusual draw, as we've been finding out.

0:50:140:50:18

From scientists uncovering secrets of a Second World War plane crash,

0:50:180:50:22

to artists inspired by the natural wonders of the landscape.

0:50:220:50:27

But there's one group of people that have been based

0:50:290:50:31

here on Dartmoor for over 6,000 years - farmers.

0:50:310:50:36

Meet the Retallick family.

0:50:370:50:39

There's grandfather Maurice, son Russell and his wife, Carol,

0:50:390:50:43

and grandchildren Anneliese, Max, Harold and Olivia.

0:50:430:50:47

This family's been farming on Dartmoor for over 100 years.

0:50:470:50:50

In recent times, something exciting has happened

0:50:550:50:57

which has had a real impact on Russell's farm.

0:50:570:51:01

In 2007, he joined the Dartmoor Farmers' Association.

0:51:010:51:05

Supported by the Duchy of Cornwall,

0:51:050:51:07

it's an ambitious cooperative of over 50 farms working together.

0:51:070:51:11

How did the cooperative come about, then, Russell?

0:51:140:51:16

There was a group of Dartmoor farmers who decided this would be

0:51:160:51:20

a good idea to get together to market

0:51:200:51:24

our produce, our beef and lamb.

0:51:240:51:27

-And is it a model that you'd seen working elsewhere?

-Yes.

0:51:270:51:31

We found an association in Lenk in Switzerland that were doing

0:51:310:51:35

-a very similar thing.

-Not that close to home, then.

-Well, no.

0:51:350:51:38

It was a very similar sort of topography to what we've got here.

0:51:380:51:43

With autumn approaching,

0:51:470:51:49

Russell and his family have an important job to do - bringing

0:51:490:51:52

their cattle down from the moorland to graze on lower pastures.

0:51:520:51:56

En route, we meet up with fellow cooperative farmer

0:51:580:52:01

Ed Williams, who's come to lend a hand.

0:52:010:52:03

So, Ed, you're not part of the family

0:52:050:52:06

but you are part of the cooperative.

0:52:060:52:08

The Dartmoor Farmers' Cooperative, yes. Yes.

0:52:080:52:10

In what ways, then, has your business now changed?

0:52:100:52:13

It's just everything has been brought back a lot more local.

0:52:130:52:16

All of a sudden, you've got a bit of pride in the job

0:52:160:52:18

and it's great to go in the pub of a Friday night and somebody says,

0:52:180:52:21

"I had a piece of your meat out of the village shop

0:52:210:52:23

"and it was fantastic." When we started,

0:52:230:52:25

we thought we were going to sell everything in a box

0:52:250:52:27

on the internet, a delivery van was going to come

0:52:270:52:29

and collect it and send it off. It's completely the opposite.

0:52:290:52:32

If you look at Dartmoor as a hill of food producing, or beef

0:52:320:52:36

and lamb producing area, with market towns all around the outside,

0:52:360:52:40

butchers shops in each, we don't need to reinvent the wheel.

0:52:400:52:43

We've just got to try and sell to those shops.

0:52:430:52:46

And we are doing eight local towns now where we're

0:52:460:52:50

-available in butcher shops.

-And pasties as well, I understand.

0:52:500:52:52

-Oh, yes. Pasties, pies.

-I can't wait for one of these pasties.

0:52:520:52:55

Oh, well, later. After you've done your work!

0:52:550:52:57

They obviously sell well cos I haven't had one yet!

0:52:570:52:59

THEY LAUGH

0:52:590:53:01

Right, time to get the cows.

0:53:010:53:03

There we go, King.

0:53:040:53:05

The cowboys and cowgirls of England.

0:53:050:53:08

Cooperative rules state that members must only farm native breeds.

0:53:120:53:16

Livestock must be born, raised and finished on Dartmoor.

0:53:160:53:19

Russell's cows are all Aberdeen Angus, Aberdeen Angus cross.

0:53:220:53:26

So, these black ones here and the occasional rusty-coloured one.

0:53:260:53:29

So now we're just going to take them nice and gently round here

0:53:290:53:33

and down to the lower ground.

0:53:330:53:35

-Come on.

-Go on!

0:53:380:53:40

And, in true Countryfile cooperative style,

0:53:480:53:51

Ed and co-pilot Anita are keen to get in on the action.

0:53:510:53:54

That's the end of the road. There we are.

0:53:580:54:01

Hang on. Hang on.

0:54:010:54:03

I feel like a Horse Guard with the Queen arriving.

0:54:030:54:05

Yes, well, that's about right, Matt.

0:54:050:54:08

Let me jump down.

0:54:080:54:10

-That looked incredible. How was it?

-Anita, it's absolutely beautiful.

0:54:100:54:14

Now, the big question is did you bring a bale of hay for King here?

0:54:140:54:16

I've got a pasty. Does King eat pasties? I brought you it.

0:54:160:54:19

-Shall we share a bit of this pasty?

-Good idea.

-That was wonderful.

0:54:190:54:22

-So this is...

-From the cooperative?

-Yeah.

0:54:220:54:24

-The fruits of our labour, really.

-That's how much you're getting.

0:54:240:54:27

-It's lovely.

-Yeah, really good.

0:54:270:54:29

Just hold King cos we can't be doing with this. Hang on.

0:54:290:54:31

-Oh!

-There we are. We're all happy now.

-Everyone's happy.

0:54:330:54:36

So that is about it from glorious, glorious Dartmoor in Devon.

0:54:360:54:40

Next week, we're going to be at Byland Abbey, where the best

0:54:400:54:43

shepherding talent from across the British Isles will be coming

0:54:430:54:45

together to go head-to-head, hoping to be crowned champions

0:54:450:54:48

of One Man And His Dog 2014.

0:54:480:54:51

But which nation will be top dog?

0:54:510:54:53

-You'd better tune in and find out.

-See you then.

-King will.

-Bye-bye.

0:54:530:54:56

Countryfile is in Devon, where Matt Baker explores Dartmoor. He discovers the story of a WWII bomber which crashed on the moor and hears about one man's mission to find the truth behind what happened on that fateful night. Matt helps with a geophysics search of the site to see if the key to the crash can be unearthed. He also meets with a farmers' co-op in Dartmoor, where 50 farmers work together. Matt takes to horseback to help them with a cattle round-up.

Anita Rani meets a sculptor who is inspired by the ancient trees in the Devon landscape. She dons her snorkel to help him look for one vital ingredient in the River Dart - bog oak. She also finds out about a groundbreaking countryside project which aims to turn lives around and get offenders back into work.

Many people dream of owning a second home in the countryside or by the sea. But are these holiday retreats doing more harm than good? Charlotte Smith investigates.


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