Episode 18 For What It's Worth


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Episode 18

Antiques quiz show hosted by Fern Britton. Antiques expert Natasha Raskin assists Fern as the three teams compete for the prize.


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APPLAUSE

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Hello, and welcome to For What It's Worth.

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It's the show that combines quizzing with our curiosity for antiques.

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We have three pairs of contestants who are ready to play.

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Each team has a quizzer,

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who has to answer a general knowledge question correctly so that their

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partner, the picker,

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has a chance to choose an antique or collectable and build a collection.

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So the aim of the game is to amass the most valuable collection.

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And every day, I'm joined by an expert in the field,

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and today is no exception.

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Like a Queen Anne chair, she's upright and elegant,

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and has fabulous legs.

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Would you please welcome Natasha Raskin?

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APPLAUSE

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-Lovely to see you.

-That's quite an introduction.

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-Did you like that?

-I did, I loved that.

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I'll use that again, thank you very much.

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Are you ready for a good game today?

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I am, I am ready.

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I just have a good feeling about today.

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Great antiques, and after such an intro, I'd better live up to it.

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Well, we have a dozen of these wonderful antiques and collectables behind you.

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And, Natasha,

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would you please tell us what lots we're playing for today?

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Yes, teams, for your consideration today, we have...

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..a model ship...

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a fossil...

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a bike...

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a dog collar...

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a stamp case...

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a cocktail shaker...

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a sundial...

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an oil painting...

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a cigarette case...

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a book...

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a necklace...

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and a clock.

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Now, one of these items is our top lot,

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which is worth a whopping £2,500.

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That is the lot to spot, because at the end of the show,

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the winning pair will not walk away with that antique,

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but they will walk away with the cash equivalent of one of their items.

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But beware, because the lots decrease in value right down to our worthless

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lot, which is about £10 or less.

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And that, obviously, is the lot to avoid.

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So who's playing today? Let's meet our teams.

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Welcome, team one, who are you?

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I'm Graham, and this is my friend Ian.

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I'm Ian. We met as teachers in 1978, and Graham was my boss.

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Really? Who's the boss today, then?

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-Me.

-LAUGHTER

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Old habits die hard?

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Welcome, team two, who are you?

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Hello, Fern, my name's Leslie, this is my lovely wife, Susan.

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Hello, Fern, I'm Susan.

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Before retiring to the beautiful Herefordshire countryside,

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we worked together in our own furniture manufacturing business.

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And, team three, welcome.

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-Who are you?

-Hello, Fern, I'm James, this is my grandma, Alison,

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and I'm from a town called Hinckley in Leicestershire.

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Hello, Fern, I'm Alison.

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I'm with my grandson, James.

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And I'm also from Hinckley in Leicestershire.

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Well, I wish all three teams lots of luck.

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And let's get a game going.

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Now, earlier, our teams got to inspect our lots,

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but they didn't know they were being watched over by our expert.

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Could the teams separate gems from the junk?

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Let's see.

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Oh.

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-Ooh.

-Ah.

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I would have thought that was late Victorian.

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1850, something like that.

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I don't really know much about clocks.

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-An impressive piece. That's nice.

-Very nice.

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Oh, it's an old bicycle.

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Still got the bicycle pump on.

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Could be a First World War, or 1920s, '30s, a little bit later.

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They haven't noticed that it folds.

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-Not many people collect bikes, do they?

-No.

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-I don't know whether I like that or not.

-No.

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It isn't signed, is it?

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If it was worth a lot, it would be still in its original frame,

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-I think.

-And they're right, it's not the original one.

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But what does that mean?

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-Oh, look.

-This is really cool.

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That, I wouldn't think, is worth very much, to be honest.

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-First published in 1890.

-Oh, wow.

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Do you know anything about diamonds?

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I know my wife likes them.

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It could be white gold or platinum with diamonds.

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It's paste.

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-Could it be paste?

-Couple of cynics here.

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-It's a fossil.

-Yes, yes, ammonite, isn't it?

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-You'd see that in a car boot.

-Don't call me a fossil.

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-What do you think it's made out of?

-Would it be...

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-brass, do you think?

-I wouldn't think it's gold.

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It's not gold, according to Graham.

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Cocktail shaker.

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I think that is solid silver.

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I think the anchor, I think that's when it's made in Birmingham.

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Nice work.

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-Well, it's Art Deco.

-A few hundred pounds?

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-Could be.

-Well, you could buy that in IKEA or somewhere.

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The Water Babies.

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Got to find out if it's a first edition.

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Two teachers intrigued by a book.

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Notice if it's done with gold leaf, look, around it.

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That's not the Titanic, is it?

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Oh, no, Queen Mary. Three red funnels.

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-Is it British?

-I don't know if it would go in water, though.

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-It would have rusted by now.

-It is an actual dog collar.

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-It is a dog collar. Yeah.

-I suppose it's not hard to figure that out.

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-I don't think any dog would enjoy wearing that much.

-No.

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It says it's a sundial, but it looks like a compass.

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I don't think I've ever seen anything like that before.

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-That's very old.

-This would date to 17-something.

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-I'll be quite honest, there's a few I haven't got a Scooby-Doo about.

-Top lot, I think, is the clock.

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The clock looks a very good possibility.

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-I like the bike, actually.

-And if think the ammonite...

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The ammonite is the least expensive.

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-I've dug them up in my garden.

-Possibly the tin ship.

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-I don't like the collar.

-The dog collar.

-No.

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-Yeah, that wasn't as easy as one expected.

-No, it wasn't. It wasn't.

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Natasha, what do you think of that?

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I loved watching it. I can't believe that none of you knew.

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I felt so sneaky. Watching it was horrible, but so fun at the same time.

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And do you know, all of you were completely different.

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Some of you approached it by, "How much is this going to be worth?"

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And some of you just whether you liked it or not.

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-So it'll be interesting to see how this plays out.

-Absolutely, and everybody always asks,

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-"How do we arrive at the valuation of the lots?"

-Well, it's a joint decision.

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The valuations have been agreed between myself and an independent valuer,

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and they're based on the hammer price that we would expect them to

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achieve at auction, but with no auction costs added.

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OK. And just to add an extra twist, we have our mystery lot.

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Now, that could be worth thousands of pounds,

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or it could be worth just peanuts.

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But that is for our winners to decide a little bit later.

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But now, it's time for round one.

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I'm going to ask eight general knowledge questions.

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Pickers, before each one,

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I'll ask you to select which lot you would like to play for, and, quizzers,

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if you buzz in with the correct answer,

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you will get to add that to your collection.

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But beware, because if you buzz in incorrectly,

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you'll be frozen out of the next question.

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All clear? Pickers, please make your first pick.

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Let's see what you've chosen.

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Graham and Ian have gone for the clock.

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Susan and Leslie have gone for the clock.

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James and Alison have gone for the painting.

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So, quizzers, fingers on buzzers.

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Question number one, here we go.

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In which decade did Neil Armstrong become the first man to set foot...?

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-Ian?

-'60s.

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In which decade did Neil Armstrong become the first man to set foot on the moon?

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It is the 1960s.

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Correct, well done, the clock is in your collection.

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OK. Pickers, would you like to pick another lot, please?

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Ian and Graham have gone for the book,

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Susan and Leslie have gone for the stamp case,

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and James and Alison have gone for the book as well.

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Question number two. Which punctuation mark is used to indicate the

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possession of something?

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-Yes, James?

-Colon?

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Oh, incorrect, it's apostrophe.

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That means you are frozen out of the next round.

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You do not get to pick anything, and the book goes back on the grid.

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Graham and Leslie, please make a pick.

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Both gone for the book.

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OK. Question three.

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In the 1920s,

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a competition was famously created in which sport by Samuel Ryder?

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-Yes, Ian?

-Golf.

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Correct, the book is yours.

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OK, everyone's back in play again.

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So, pickers, choose a lot.

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Ian and Graham, you have gone for the sundial,

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Susan and Leslie for the necklace, and James and Alison the stamp case.

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Question four, quizzers.

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In 2005,

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Tom Cruise jumped up and down on the sofa of which US talk-show host?

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-Yes, Ian?

-Oprah Winfrey?

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It was. The talk show host was Oprah Winfrey, well done.

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The sundial is yours.

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OK. Pickers, make a pick.

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Ian and Graham have gone for the cocktail shaker.

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Susan and Leslie sticking with the necklace.

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James and Alison have gone for the bike.

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Here is the question, quizzers.

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The name of which colour is derived from Old French and means

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"Turkish stone"?

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-Yes, Susan?

-Turquoise?

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It is turquoise. The necklace is yours.

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Well done.

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Pickers, pick another choice.

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Ian and Graham have gone for the oil painting,

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But Susan and Leslie have gone for the oil painting.

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James and Alison, however, have gone for the oil painting.

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Here's the question for the quizzers.

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The Great Barrier Reef lies off the coast of which Australian...?

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-Yes, Ian?

-Queensland.

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The Great Barrier Reef lies off the coast of which Australian state?

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It is Queensland.

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The painting is yours.

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Ian, very good.

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-Are you pleased with him, Graham, so far?

-Very good, and keep this up.

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Yeah, it's a fluke. It's a fluke.

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Well, it might be. We don't know, do we? OK, here we go, then.

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This is the penultimate pick, pickers.

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Ian and Graham have gone for the bike,

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Susan and Leslie for the stamp case,

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James and Alison for the stamp case.

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Question seven. Which device with a magnetic needle is used to aid

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navigation...? James?

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-Compass.

-Which device with a magnetic needle is used to aid navigation in

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orienteering? It is the compass.

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Well done. James and Alison, you're off the blocks,

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you've got the stamp case.

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And this is the final question in this round.

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Pickers, make your pick.

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Ian and Graham have gone still with the cocktail shaker,

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Susan and Leslie like the look of the cocktail shaker.

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James and Alison have gone for the bike.

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Here's the question. Traditionally,

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a salade nicoise is made from tuna and which other small fish?

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-Yes, Susan?

-Anchovies?

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Get in! Yes, it is anchovies.

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The cocktail shaker is yours.

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So at the end of round one, let's see who's got what.

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Ian and Graham have the clock, the sundial, the oil painting

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and the book.

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Susan and Leslie have the necklace and the cocktail shaker.

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And James and Alison, you have the stamp case.

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Well done. Well, our teams have started to build their collections,

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but have they chosen wisely?

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Before they have the chance to add more of them,

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Natasha is going to give each pair a fact about a lot of their choice,

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which should give them everything they need to know to make a valuation.

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So, team one, tell me a bit more about yourselves, Ian and Graham,

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because you both have a big interest in Cornish pottery, I think,

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-don't you?

-Yes.

-Yes, yes.

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I was interested in Troika pottery for many, many years.

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I thought it was incredible stuff. It was so different and so unusual.

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That's sort of like the slabs that are put together, isn't it?

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-Yeah.

-And then something called Lipper, Leper?

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-Leaper.

-Leaper.

-Leaper.

-What's that?

-Well, again, it's Cornish pottery.

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It's quite an unknown potter.

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And I went into Ian's class on one occasion and he had some Troika there.

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And he also had a manual from an exhibition, which identified Leaper.

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And I just said out of the blue,

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"I'm going to collect Leaper," and it just grew from there.

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OK. What would you like to hear more about? It could be in your collection, anyone's collection,

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-or still on the board.

-I think I'd like to know more about the book.

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-Natasha, the book?

-This is a first edition,

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first issue copy of a classic children's book,

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The Water Babies by Charles Kingsley.

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It was first published in 1863.

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This copy still has its original green cloth,

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although it has been re-backed using the original spine,

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suggesting that the covers or spine were once loose.

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However, with some uncut pages,

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believe it or not, this copy may never even have been read.

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Goodness me.

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Susan and Leslie, tell me more about your furniture designing.

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What sort of style were you making?

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Well, I was more of, perhaps, a maker than a furniture designer.

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But I did a three-year degree course at the London College of Furniture.

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In the late '60s, early '70s.

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And in the last eight years of my working life,

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Susan and I had our own factory,

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where we were making pine and painted furniture.

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OK. What lot would you like to hear more about?

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I'd like to hear more about the sundial.

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The sundial, yeah, interesting. It's like a pocket one, isn't it?

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That's what we have here, a pocket sundial, and compass as well,

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which you all spotted.

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It dates from the early 18th century,

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and it's actually of European origin.

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Now, pocket sundials would have been popular around this time as they were cheap,

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and it was an easy way to tell the time.

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And much more cost-effective than buying a clock,

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which at the time would have been comparatively very expensive.

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This piece has a glass-covered circular compass,

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which is protected by the surrounding brass body.

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I think a few of you were wondering what it was made of.

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Now, the item is in decent condition, considering its age,

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and still has its original case.

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The question is, will it lead you to success?

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Team three, welcome.

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So, Alison, James is the model grandson, would you say?

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He's an absolutely wonderful grandson.

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And so are all my other four grandchildren, and I've got to say that,

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haven't I?

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And I hear he brings you cake and flowers.

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-He does. He's very considerate.

-James, I am almost a grandmother.

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-Have you brought me anything?

-No, not today, Fern.

-I was getting to like you.

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It's gone now. Right, what would you like to hear more about?

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I'd like to hear more about the model ship, please, the Queen Mary model toy.

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-Yes.

-It's a tin plate clockwork toy of the famous ship the Queen Mary,

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that sailed from 1936 to 1967.

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Now, the toy is quite small at just over 30 centimetres in length.

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It has a hollow body - I'm sure you gave it a tap -

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and a basic mechanism to propel the boat forward.

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But the paint is chipping. It looks a little worn.

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And anyone who wanted to play with it these days would struggle,

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as the key is missing from the wind-up mechanism.

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So it's not set to go.

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But the toy's history may tempt you to sail away with this lot.

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OK, it's time to play round two.

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APPLAUSE

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Now, in this round, the pickers will select a lot to play for,

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and the quizzers will, again, try and secure it by answering correctly.

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But this time around, the lots come with their own question categories.

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Let's have a look at those categories.

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So for example, if you wanted to go for the bike,

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you could choose between football and outer space questions.

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OK? At the end of this round,

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the team with the least valuable collection will be eliminated.

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So choose as wisely as possible.

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Team one, you are up first, so, Graham, pick a lot for me.

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-The bike.

-The bike, OK.

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Well, Ian, football or outer space?

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-Outer space.

-Outer space, here we go.

0:16:170:16:19

What was the nationality of the first woman in space?

0:16:190:16:22

-Russian.

-Yes, the bike is yours, well done.

0:16:220:16:26

Susan and Leslie. Leslie, would you like to pick?

0:16:270:16:31

I'll have the cigarette case, please.

0:16:310:16:32

Cigarette case. Susan, British art or rivers?

0:16:320:16:36

-British art, please.

-British art, here we go.

0:16:360:16:40

Thomas Gainsborough is famous for a painting featuring a boy dressed in

0:16:400:16:44

-which colour?

-Blue.

0:16:440:16:45

It is blue. The famous Blue Boy.

0:16:450:16:47

So the cigarette case is coming into your collection.

0:16:470:16:51

Very good. James and Alison.

0:16:510:16:53

Alison, this is your turn to pick, what would you like?

0:16:530:16:56

-I've got to go with the ship, haven't I?

-The model ship, absolutely.

0:16:560:17:00

James, football or rivers?

0:17:000:17:01

-Definitely football.

-Football, good.

0:17:010:17:03

Here we go. Which English footballer of the mid 20th century was know as

0:17:030:17:08

"The Wizard of the Dribble?"

0:17:080:17:10

-George Best?

-Oh, Sir Stanley Matthews.

0:17:100:17:14

So, unfortunately, the model ship doesn't come to you this time.

0:17:140:17:17

Now, teams, here is a chance to get your hands on the thing you really

0:17:170:17:21

want. Because from now on, you can either go for what is left on the grid,

0:17:210:17:25

or you can try to steal a lot that is in a rival team's collection.

0:17:250:17:29

But, pickers, be warned, because if you choose to steal from another team,

0:17:290:17:34

they will get to choose which question your quizzer must face.

0:17:340:17:38

Just one rule here - you cannot steal from a team who has only one lot in

0:17:380:17:43

their collection. So you're safe, James and Alison, with your stamp case.

0:17:430:17:47

So, Graham, do you want to pick from the grid, or steal from a rival?

0:17:470:17:51

-I think steal.

-What would you like to steal?

0:17:510:17:53

I'd like to steal...

0:17:530:17:56

-the necklace.

-The necklace from Susan and Leslie?

0:17:560:18:00

There it is.

0:18:000:18:02

Susan and Leslie, which category which you like to choose for Ian?

0:18:020:18:06

Oscar winners.

0:18:060:18:08

Oscar winners? Feeling OK?

0:18:080:18:10

-Thank you.

-Right, here we go.

0:18:100:18:12

In 2005, Clint Eastwood became the oldest recipient

0:18:120:18:16

of an Oscar in which category?

0:18:160:18:19

Producer?

0:18:190:18:20

-Director.

-(Director!)

0:18:200:18:22

Oh, well defended, Susan and Leslie.

0:18:220:18:25

The diamond necklace is still yours.

0:18:250:18:28

Leslie, would you like to steal or take something from the grid?

0:18:280:18:32

I would very much like to steal.

0:18:320:18:34

-What would you like to steal?

-I will have the clock, please.

0:18:340:18:36

The clock is in Ian and Graham's collection.

0:18:360:18:39

Ian and Graham, what category would you like to pick for Susan?

0:18:390:18:43

UK number ones.

0:18:430:18:44

UK number ones.

0:18:440:18:47

Susan, here's your question.

0:18:470:18:48

Which artist had her first UK number one single in 1977 with I Feel Love?

0:18:480:18:55

-Donna Summer?

-Yes.

0:18:550:18:57

-Get in.

-Well done. You've got the clock.

0:18:570:19:00

James and Alison, do you want to steal,

0:19:000:19:02

-or would you like something from the grid?

-Er...

0:19:020:19:05

I'm still going for the ship.

0:19:050:19:08

Good, OK. James, football or rivers?

0:19:080:19:10

-I'll try football again, please.

-Football again, here we go.

0:19:100:19:13

The goal-line is located how many yards away from the penalty spot?

0:19:130:19:17

-Penalty spot - 12?

-Correct!

0:19:170:19:20

You've got the model ship into Alison's collection.

0:19:200:19:24

Well done.

0:19:240:19:25

OK. We're going to do the same again.

0:19:250:19:28

So, Graham, steal from someone or pick from the grid?

0:19:280:19:32

Yes, I think we'll have a go at stealing.

0:19:320:19:34

-Would it be the clock?

-Yes.

0:19:340:19:37

OK, Susan and Leslie, you've got to pick a category for Ian to answer.

0:19:380:19:44

-Rivers, then, please.

-Rivers it is.

0:19:440:19:47

Ian, at 634 miles long,

0:19:470:19:49

what is the name of the longest river in France?

0:19:490:19:52

-The Loire.

-It is the Loire.

0:19:520:19:55

Goodbye, clock.

0:19:550:19:56

-Going home.

-Come back!

0:19:560:19:59

Susan and Leslie, what will you do, steal or pick?

0:20:010:20:04

-We'll steal again.

-I wonder what it could be.

0:20:040:20:08

We'd like to steal...

0:20:080:20:11

-the book.

-The book!

0:20:110:20:13

Ooh.

0:20:130:20:14

Ian and Graham, what category would you like to give Susan?

0:20:140:20:17

-We'll try football.

-Oh, you horror.

-That could be a low blow, yes.

0:20:170:20:22

-Below the belt.

-Playing dirty.

-Susan, at the 1986 World Cup,

0:20:230:20:28

which player committed an offence

0:20:280:20:30

that came to be known as "the hand of God"?

0:20:300:20:33

-Maradona!

-Yes!

0:20:330:20:35

-You've got the book.

-I don't know a thing about football.

0:20:350:20:38

Sorry, Ian and Graham.

0:20:380:20:40

Well done. James and Alison,

0:20:400:20:42

are you stealing or taking one of the last two things on the grid?

0:20:420:20:45

The dog collar or the fossil?

0:20:450:20:46

-I'll steal the necklace, please.

-Oh, the necklace.

0:20:480:20:50

Susan and Leslie, you've got to defend the necklace.

0:20:500:20:53

So what category would you like to give James?

0:20:530:20:55

British art, please.

0:20:560:20:58

British art? James,

0:20:580:21:00

which 20th-century British painter created stylised scenes

0:21:000:21:03

of the industrial areas around Pendlebury and Salford?

0:21:030:21:07

-Manet?

-Almost.

0:21:080:21:10

LS Lowry.

0:21:100:21:11

-I knew that.

-You knew that?

0:21:110:21:13

You knew that.

0:21:130:21:15

Well, I'm so sorry that you are not winning the necklace for Alison.

0:21:150:21:20

That's the end of the round. Let's see how the collections are looking.

0:21:200:21:23

Ian and Graham, they have the sundial, the bike,

0:21:230:21:26

the clock and the oil painting.

0:21:260:21:28

Susan and Leslie have the necklace, the cigarette case,

0:21:280:21:31

the book and the cocktail shaker.

0:21:310:21:33

And James and Alison have the stamp case and the model ship.

0:21:330:21:37

OK, for one team, sadly, it's the end of the road.

0:21:370:21:40

Natasha has been keeping tabs,

0:21:400:21:42

and the team with the least valuable collection will now sadly

0:21:420:21:46

be eliminated. So, Natasha, who is leaving us first?

0:21:460:21:50

The pair leaving us first is...

0:21:500:21:53

-..James and Alison.

-Thank you.

0:21:580:22:00

And not only are you leaving the game,

0:22:000:22:03

but the items you've had in your collection are eliminated, too.

0:22:030:22:07

Before you go, though,

0:22:070:22:08

you want to find out what your collection is worth.

0:22:080:22:12

Now, the stamp case was invented by Lewis Carroll himself.

0:22:120:22:17

It was designed for holding stamps, of course, of all denominations.

0:22:170:22:22

It dates from around 1888,

0:22:220:22:25

and the case itself is made of folding card,

0:22:250:22:28

but it's got this lovely, reinforced cloth decoration on the outside,

0:22:280:22:33

and it's decorated by illustrations

0:22:330:22:35

from Carroll's own Alice's Adventures In Wonderland.

0:22:350:22:38

Now, this copy is of the third edition, the latest addition,

0:22:380:22:41

so it's not the earliest example that you can find.

0:22:410:22:44

The stamp case itself is in very good condition, but its envelope,

0:22:440:22:48

as you saw, is rather torn.

0:22:480:22:50

And as a result, what's it worth?

0:22:500:22:52

Only £60.

0:22:520:22:54

Wow. Yeah.

0:22:540:22:56

I think you all loved that one, but you loved that ship.

0:22:560:22:59

Alison, you had to have it. You fought for it, as well.

0:22:590:23:02

You came back to it. And actually,

0:23:020:23:04

nobody else really was interested in it.

0:23:040:23:07

Just you, I have to say.

0:23:070:23:08

The boys and their toys, not so drawn to it.

0:23:080:23:10

But were you drawn to a very valuable lot?

0:23:100:23:14

Not hugely - £200.

0:23:140:23:16

So altogether, the total value of your collection was £260.

0:23:160:23:20

-Thank you very much.

-Not too shabby.

0:23:200:23:22

James and Alison, it has been a delight to have you here.

0:23:220:23:25

But it is time now to bring the hammer down on your collection,

0:23:250:23:28

but say thank you for playing For What It's Worth.

0:23:280:23:30

Thank you.

0:23:300:23:31

APPLAUSE

0:23:310:23:34

Well, not only have we said goodbye to James and Alison,

0:23:350:23:38

we're now going to say goodbye to the things left on the grid.

0:23:380:23:40

Only two things, Natasha. Would you like to tell us about them?

0:23:400:23:44

I'd love to tell you more about them.

0:23:440:23:46

This dog collar is an antique brass dog collar, obviously,

0:23:460:23:50

and it dates to the early 19th century.

0:23:500:23:53

It's an 18th-century design.

0:23:530:23:55

The 18th century signified the arrival

0:23:550:23:58

of the pampered pooch in England.

0:23:580:24:00

And people came to keep dogs as pets

0:24:000:24:02

and as objects to spoil and treat.

0:24:020:24:04

Not with a collar like that, I wouldn't suppose,

0:24:040:24:07

but would this lot have added

0:24:070:24:09

a little bit of bite to your collection?

0:24:090:24:12

Its value, believe it or not,

0:24:120:24:14

£350.

0:24:140:24:16

-Wow.

-I know.

0:24:160:24:17

But let's move on to...

0:24:170:24:19

We're still talking species, but we're not talking animals.

0:24:190:24:23

This particular ammonite you see dates from the Cretaceous period,

0:24:230:24:27

the very end of the Mesozoic Era,

0:24:270:24:30

and the end of the dinosaurs themselves.

0:24:300:24:33

And these are the most commonly found fossils,

0:24:330:24:36

as they are the youngest, and usually the most well preserved.

0:24:360:24:39

As is the case with this fossil, which I can reveal to you

0:24:390:24:43

is today's worthless lot.

0:24:430:24:45

Nothing at all, no value whatsoever.

0:24:450:24:47

So the bottom lot has gone,

0:24:470:24:49

which means the top lot is still here somewhere.

0:24:490:24:53

Teams, congratulations on getting this far.

0:24:530:24:55

You now have one last chance to pick our expert's brains.

0:24:550:24:59

So which lot do you need to know more about?

0:24:590:25:02

Team one. Ian and Graham.

0:25:020:25:04

-The necklace.

-I'm interested in you choosing this one, Graham,

0:25:040:25:07

cos you dismissed it, the necklace.

0:25:070:25:09

You just said, "It's paste."

0:25:090:25:11

Well, it's an Edwardian diamond necklace.

0:25:110:25:14

And it dates from around 1900.

0:25:140:25:17

This period is perhaps best known for its use of filigree techniques,

0:25:170:25:21

which is another design feature of this necklace,

0:25:210:25:24

that nice pierced style.

0:25:240:25:26

Although we don't know for sure exactly who made the necklace,

0:25:260:25:29

it's a very fine example of the time.

0:25:290:25:31

It's made of... 18-carat white gold.

0:25:310:25:35

And the weight of the diamonds is 1.8 carats.

0:25:350:25:40

So how will it weigh in when it comes to its value?

0:25:400:25:43

Food for thought, Ian and Graham?

0:25:430:25:45

-Yes.

-Yes.

-And possibly for Susan and Leslie, too.

0:25:450:25:49

Susan and Leslie, what would you like to know more about?

0:25:490:25:52

We'll go with the oil painting.

0:25:520:25:54

The oil painting please, Natasha.

0:25:540:25:55

Ah, yes. I was watching you,

0:25:550:25:57

waiting for the superlatives, and all I got was, "nice", "decent".

0:25:570:26:02

It didn't really set you on fire, but you all had a look at the back

0:26:020:26:05

and discovered that the painting is entitled The Runners

0:26:050:26:09

by British artist Lancelot Myles Glasson,

0:26:090:26:12

who lived between 1894 and 1959.

0:26:120:26:16

The majority of his paintings are of people

0:26:160:26:19

caught in the midst of everyday activity,

0:26:190:26:22

usually sporting in nature, like his most celebrated work,

0:26:220:26:25

which you may have seen, The Rowers.

0:26:250:26:28

Now, however, The Runners is also a fine example of this work

0:26:280:26:31

and the painting has clearly been sold and reframed several times.

0:26:310:26:35

It also has a framer's label from James Bourlet & Son Ltd

0:26:350:26:39

and two modern plywood panels inserted to fill out the gap

0:26:390:26:44

between the canvas and this rather ill-fitting frame,

0:26:440:26:48

which is clearly a much later addition.

0:26:480:26:51

-Thank you.

-It's time now for our final round.

0:26:510:26:54

And at the end of it, we'll have our winners.

0:26:540:26:56

APPLAUSE

0:26:560:26:59

Now, in this round,

0:26:590:27:00

I'm going to show you a category and 12 possible answers.

0:27:000:27:04

Nine of the answers are correct.

0:27:040:27:06

Three are not.

0:27:060:27:08

Each of you will then take turns to choose an answer

0:27:080:27:11

that you think is correct. As it's the final round,

0:27:110:27:15

both quizzers and pickers will play, so there's nowhere to hide.

0:27:150:27:19

Pick a wrong answer and your opponents will be able to

0:27:190:27:22

steal a lot from your collection. We'll play three questions in total

0:27:220:27:26

and the pair with the most valuable collection

0:27:260:27:29

can choose to go first or second.

0:27:290:27:31

Natasha, who has the most valuable collection at the moment?

0:27:310:27:34

Yes, I can reveal to you that

0:27:340:27:36

the team with the more valuable collection is...

0:27:360:27:41

..Graham and Ian.

0:27:430:27:45

-Oh...

-Ooh! OK.

0:27:450:27:47

Graham and Ian.

0:27:470:27:49

The first question is...

0:27:490:27:52

World War II rations.

0:27:520:27:54

Now, can you find the items which were officially rationed in the UK

0:27:540:27:58

by the Ministry of Food between the start of the war in 1939

0:27:580:28:02

and the end of the war in May 1945?

0:28:020:28:06

Ian and Graham, would you like to go first or second?

0:28:060:28:09

We'll go first.

0:28:090:28:11

OK. Let's reveal the possible answers.

0:28:110:28:15

Ian. Would you give me a correct answer?

0:28:170:28:20

-Petrol.

-Let's have a look.

0:28:200:28:22

If it turns green, you're OK.

0:28:220:28:24

Well done. Susan, your turn.

0:28:240:28:26

Sugar.

0:28:260:28:27

Is this correct?

0:28:280:28:29

Yes, it is.

0:28:300:28:32

Graham.

0:28:320:28:33

-Eggs.

-Eggs.

0:28:330:28:35

Yes, that's right.

0:28:360:28:38

-Leslie.

-Fish.

0:28:380:28:40

Fish.

0:28:400:28:41

I'm afraid fish is incorrect!

0:28:420:28:45

Where were the right ones?

0:28:450:28:46

Ah, there you go.

0:28:470:28:48

Fish, wood and cauliflower were never rationed.

0:28:480:28:51

Everything else was.

0:28:510:28:53

Therefore, Ian and Graham, you may steal from Susan and Leslie.

0:28:530:28:58

I fancy the necklace.

0:28:580:28:59

LAUGHTER

0:28:590:29:01

-Now.

-Now.

0:29:010:29:02

I'm so sorry.

0:29:040:29:05

The diamond necklace is now in Ian and Graham's collection.

0:29:050:29:08

Wahey!

0:29:080:29:10

Susan and Leslie, here you go.

0:29:100:29:12

This is your chance.

0:29:120:29:13

The question is species of butterfly.

0:29:130:29:16

You need to spot the names of butterfly species.

0:29:160:29:19

Would you like to go first or second?

0:29:190:29:21

First, please, Fern.

0:29:210:29:22

First, very good. Susan.

0:29:220:29:24

Here are the answers.

0:29:240:29:25

Nine of these are correct. Three of them are not.

0:29:250:29:28

Can you see a correct answer there, Susan?

0:29:280:29:30

I'd like to pick Painted Lady.

0:29:310:29:33

Painted Lady. Let's have a look.

0:29:330:29:36

Correct. Ian.

0:29:360:29:38

Seen them in my garden.

0:29:380:29:39

-Brimstone.

-Brimstone.

0:29:390:29:41

Correct. Leslie.

0:29:420:29:45

Spotted Chorus?

0:29:450:29:47

Spotted Chorus.

0:29:470:29:48

-And again?!

-Oh, Leslie.

0:29:500:29:51

Well, that's why Susan is your quizzer, of course.

0:29:530:29:55

OK, that is incorrect.

0:29:550:29:57

Let's have a look where the other incorrect answers were.

0:29:570:30:00

Spotted Chorus. I'm afraid that's a frog.

0:30:000:30:04

Would you have known that?

0:30:040:30:05

Busy Lizzie, of course, is a plant.

0:30:050:30:08

-And Heather Shimmer is a lipstick colour.

-Lipstick.

-Yeah.

0:30:080:30:12

So, Ian and Graham, you have to choose something

0:30:120:30:15

from Susan and Leslie.

0:30:150:30:16

I think we'll have the book back.

0:30:160:30:18

The book is on its way.

0:30:180:30:20

Right. Final question.

0:30:200:30:22

Here it is. Roald Dahl characters.

0:30:220:30:26

Can you find the names of characters which appear in Roald Dahl's books

0:30:260:30:30

for children? Ian and Graham, first or second?

0:30:300:30:33

-First.

-First.

0:30:330:30:34

OK. Let's reveal the answers.

0:30:340:30:36

Can you spot the correct ones from the incorrect?

0:30:370:30:41

Ian. Give me an answer.

0:30:410:30:43

I think I recognise Veruca Salt.

0:30:430:30:46

Veruca Salt.

0:30:460:30:47

Yes, of course that's correct.

0:30:470:30:50

Susan. Give me an answer.

0:30:500:30:52

I think Jennifer Honey was Miss Honey the schoolteacher in Matilda.

0:30:520:30:58

Jennifer Honey is correct.

0:30:580:31:01

-Graham.

-This is a guess now.

0:31:010:31:04

Oh, don't.

0:31:040:31:05

Mr Wormwood.

0:31:060:31:07

Mr Wormwood.

0:31:070:31:09

Oh!

0:31:100:31:11

-Well done.

-Correct, that is also from Matilda.

0:31:110:31:14

Leslie.

0:31:140:31:15

The Fleshlumpeater.

0:31:150:31:17

The Fleshlumpeater.

0:31:170:31:19

Let's have a look. Yes!

0:31:190:31:21

-That was from...

-A green one!

-Do you know?

0:31:210:31:23

BFG. The Big Friendly Giant.

0:31:230:31:25

There we go. Ian.

0:31:250:31:28

I've got a feeling Mike Teevee

0:31:280:31:30

is the one that gets shrunk

0:31:300:31:32

-in Charlie And The Chocolate Factory.

-Is it correct?

0:31:320:31:35

Yes. And it is Charlie And The Chocolate Factory.

0:31:350:31:39

Susan.

0:31:390:31:41

I think he wrote a book called The Twits,

0:31:410:31:44

so it would follow that Mrs Twit may be a character,

0:31:440:31:48

-so I'll go for that one.

-Mrs Twit.

0:31:480:31:50

Correct. Graham.

0:31:500:31:53

Hmm.

0:31:540:31:56

You've got a 50-50 chance.

0:31:560:31:58

Three are correct and three are wrong.

0:31:580:32:00

Jack Bunsby.

0:32:000:32:02

Jack Bunsby.

0:32:020:32:03

Is that correct?

0:32:030:32:04

-Oh.

-He's a Charles Dickens character.

0:32:050:32:08

-Oh.

-Yeah.

-Yes.

0:32:080:32:09

Oh, well. Let's have a look at all the answers.

0:32:090:32:13

Dirk Creswell, Jack Bunsby and Anne Featherstone

0:32:130:32:15

were the incorrect ones.

0:32:150:32:17

Everyone else was a Roald Dahl character.

0:32:170:32:19

Susan and Leslie.

0:32:200:32:21

What would you like to steal from Ian and Graham?

0:32:210:32:24

This is a big moment. Last steal of the game.

0:32:240:32:27

-I know.

-It's one of three things.

0:32:270:32:29

It's either the necklace, the clock or the sundial.

0:32:290:32:35

-You don't think the book, because it was the first edition?

-Or the book.

0:32:350:32:38

-Or the book. You choose.

-Do you want to go for the book, then?

0:32:380:32:42

-Yeah, go for the book.

-Right, we've got to make a decision,

0:32:420:32:45

-so we'd like to go for the book, please.

-Please.

-OK.

0:32:450:32:49

The book is now yours and it's in your collection.

0:32:490:32:53

That's it. Your collections are complete,

0:32:530:32:55

and will determine which team is victorious.

0:32:550:32:57

I think we might have worked out -

0:32:570:32:59

have you at home? - what has happened here.

0:32:590:33:01

Natasha, who are today's winners?

0:33:010:33:04

Yes, I can reveal to you

0:33:040:33:05

that the pair with the more valuable collection

0:33:050:33:09

and the winners of today's programme are...

0:33:090:33:12

-Graham and Ian.

-Well done.

0:33:120:33:15

APPLAUSE

0:33:150:33:18

Well, commiserations, Susan and Leslie.

0:33:200:33:23

You did not create a valuable enough collection.

0:33:230:33:25

So before we say goodbye, of course,

0:33:250:33:27

we want to find out what your items are worth. Natasha.

0:33:270:33:30

Let's start with the cocktail shaker.

0:33:300:33:32

Now, Leslie, straightaway you spotted it was silver.

0:33:320:33:35

Not everyone did. They had to kind of look for those hallmarks.

0:33:350:33:37

You knew it was silver. You knew it was Art Deco.

0:33:370:33:40

And you were bang on with that.

0:33:400:33:41

It's the cocktail shaker from the Art Deco period

0:33:410:33:44

and it was made by Turner and Simpson.

0:33:440:33:46

That was the "T and S", the maker's mark, circa 1934.

0:33:460:33:50

They were quite prominent in Birmingham as silversmiths.

0:33:500:33:54

Art Deco shakers are chic, sleek and stylish,

0:33:540:33:57

but they are also quite simple to manufacture.

0:33:570:34:00

However, this particular shaker, simple in its style,

0:34:000:34:03

is made out of solid sterling silver,

0:34:030:34:07

making it more unusual,

0:34:070:34:08

and it's also in top condition with no visible damage whatsoever.

0:34:080:34:13

But what's its value?

0:34:130:34:15

Leslie, you said a few hundred pounds?

0:34:150:34:18

You were right. £600 to be exact, so well done.

0:34:180:34:22

You have very good taste.

0:34:220:34:24

And then we moved on to the book.

0:34:240:34:26

Now, as soon as I said first edition, you were really dithering.

0:34:260:34:31

"Do we go for the clock? Do we go with the necklace?

0:34:310:34:34

"It's got to be that book, because of first edition."

0:34:340:34:37

But it's rarity that counts.

0:34:370:34:39

Age, rarity, condition, condition, condition

0:34:390:34:41

and taking it all into consideration, believe it or not,

0:34:410:34:44

the book is only worth £100.

0:34:440:34:46

Can you believe that? £100.

0:34:460:34:49

1863. Anyway, let's move on to that cigarette case.

0:34:490:34:53

-Now, everyone dismissed this as gold plate.

-So did we!

0:34:530:34:56

-But let me tell you, it's a solid gold...

-Oh!

0:34:560:34:59

..Art Deco cigarette case. Guffaw there from you, Leslie.

0:34:590:35:03

It's nine-carat gold, the hallmarks are on the inside,

0:35:030:35:06

so it's marked 375 for nine carat gold, meaning it's 37.5% pure gold.

0:35:060:35:13

But it has its original soft case that goes along with it.

0:35:130:35:16

It's in good condition.

0:35:160:35:18

You didn't quite think it was solid gold, but it is.

0:35:180:35:21

It's worth £2,000, that cigarette case, so...

0:35:210:35:25

-Wow.

-I know, it is a wow, actually.

0:35:250:35:27

So, well done, well done.

0:35:270:35:30

But there was some very good choosing there.

0:35:300:35:32

That takes the value up to...

0:35:320:35:34

£2,700 in total.

0:35:340:35:37

That was excellent. Excellent.

0:35:370:35:38

Susan and Leslie, thank you very much

0:35:380:35:40

for playing For What It's Worth.

0:35:400:35:42

APPLAUSE

0:35:420:35:44

Well done, Ian and Graham.

0:35:470:35:49

You are today's winners,

0:35:490:35:51

and we know that the top lot is somewhere in your collection.

0:35:510:35:55

All you've got to do now is claim your prize.

0:35:550:35:59

You've got to pick one of your lots, that we hope is the top lot,

0:35:590:36:03

and then we will give you the value of whichever you pick in cash.

0:36:030:36:07

So, talk amongst yourselves. Which one would you want to choose?

0:36:070:36:11

I think the necklace was already in their collection.

0:36:110:36:17

And that, even with that in their collection, didn't help?

0:36:170:36:20

It didn't help to outbid us. Yeah. Good point.

0:36:200:36:24

So it would suggest that the clock and the sundial...

0:36:240:36:27

Because the oil painting, it wasn't a professional.

0:36:270:36:30

-It was an amateur.

-Unless the bike belonged to Winston Churchill

0:36:300:36:34

or something, which I don't think it did.

0:36:340:36:36

No, we dismissed that.

0:36:360:36:37

-The clock and the sundial.

-I still think it's the clock.

0:36:370:36:40

-You think it's the clock?

-Yeah.

0:36:400:36:42

-Always did.

-So, shall we just go with the clock?

0:36:430:36:45

-Yeah.

-We'll go for the clock.

0:36:450:36:47

-Go for broke.

-Final answer is you've chosen the clock.

0:36:470:36:51

Before we let you know what it's worth,

0:36:510:36:54

Natasha is going to tell us what you haven't won.

0:36:540:36:57

Let's start off with the bicycle.

0:36:570:36:59

And look, here it is folded out and there it is on the screen folded up.

0:36:590:37:03

What a unique thing.

0:37:030:37:05

Invented in late 1943 by BSA Cycles in Birmingham.

0:37:050:37:10

And the bike was designed to be dropped by parachute -

0:37:100:37:13

amazing to think - down to accompany paratroopers.

0:37:130:37:17

With two turns of the attached butterfly screws,

0:37:170:37:19

the bike is unfolded and it's good to be ridden off to face the enemy.

0:37:190:37:25

Now, sometimes these bikes were sold cheap as army surplus

0:37:250:37:29

and sometimes they became valuable collectables.

0:37:290:37:33

So, cheap army surplus?

0:37:330:37:36

Valuable collectable?

0:37:360:37:38

At £800, I would say the latter.

0:37:390:37:41

Now, The Runners is the painting that we've already discussed

0:37:420:37:45

and discussed and discussed, but do you know what?

0:37:450:37:48

I was watching you two hum and haw over this painting.

0:37:480:37:51

Neither of you liked it.

0:37:510:37:53

But there is something about the realism of it.

0:37:530:37:55

It's the subject matter that counts here.

0:37:550:37:57

And its value is in four figures.

0:37:570:38:00

It weighs in at £1,200.

0:38:010:38:04

So not the top lot.

0:38:040:38:06

Panic not. Panic not.

0:38:060:38:09

But then we get onto the necklace. We've already discussed the fact

0:38:090:38:12

that you dismissed it as small diamonds to start off with,

0:38:120:38:15

then, "Hang on, maybe it's paste."

0:38:150:38:17

But then I told you it was set in 18-carat white gold

0:38:170:38:20

and all of a sudden, like those diamonds,

0:38:200:38:22

your eyes started to sparkle.

0:38:220:38:25

But is the price as sparkly as those diamonds?

0:38:250:38:29

We've had £800.

0:38:290:38:31

We've had £1,200.

0:38:310:38:32

-Am I going up in value?

-Yes.

-I'm going back down.

0:38:320:38:35

-Oh.

-To £700 for this necklace.

0:38:350:38:37

-So...

-700?

0:38:370:38:39

I think you knew it wasn't worth a huge sum, the necklace.

0:38:390:38:42

Now, this one. I think a couple of teachers,

0:38:420:38:44

this is something that would have piqued your interest.

0:38:440:38:47

Imagine if you'd brought this in in front of a class

0:38:470:38:49

and asked them to discuss it. You know that they would have loved it.

0:38:490:38:52

It's old. It's interesting.

0:38:520:38:54

It's useful. It's valuable.

0:38:540:38:57

£1,500.

0:38:590:39:02

You are out of rough seas, don't worry.

0:39:020:39:04

-Don't worry.

-So, you've done the right thing!

0:39:040:39:08

You chose the clock, Ian and Graham.

0:39:080:39:10

It's today's most valuable lot.

0:39:100:39:12

It's worth £2,500. Well done.

0:39:120:39:14

APPLAUSE

0:39:140:39:15

£2,500!

0:39:180:39:20

But it's not over yet.

0:39:210:39:23

-Ohh...

-We have the mystery lot lurking under the red cloth there.

0:39:230:39:28

And that could be worth even more.

0:39:280:39:31

Oh, Ian and Graham, you've done so well.

0:39:360:39:38

Here is your lot. Take a good look at it.

0:39:380:39:40

As things stand, we know that you have won £2,500

0:39:400:39:44

because you chose our top lot.

0:39:440:39:46

Very well done. However,

0:39:460:39:49

we like to tempt you.

0:39:490:39:50

Would you swap it for something that might be worth even more?

0:39:500:39:54

Our mystery lot. Natasha, what have you got for them today?

0:39:540:39:58

I've got something awfully fragile, so before I reveal it to you,

0:39:580:40:00

I'm going to get a steady grip on it.

0:40:000:40:03

Are you ready? Here goes.

0:40:030:40:05

OK.

0:40:050:40:08

A Chinese purple glass vase, as you can see.

0:40:080:40:11

But the decoration on the front and back

0:40:110:40:14

are moulded with 100 characters.

0:40:140:40:16

Now, those are "shou" characters written in various scripts all over.

0:40:160:40:21

Now, the Chinese character "shou" stands for longevity.

0:40:210:40:25

Very important in East Asian culture.

0:40:250:40:28

This particular vase was given as a diplomatic gift to...

0:40:280:40:32

..Margaret Thatcher,

0:40:340:40:36

in 1995, by the People's Republic of China

0:40:360:40:40

for her role in the transfer of sovereignty over Hong Kong.

0:40:400:40:43

Now, Margaret Thatcher was obviously a very polarising figure.

0:40:430:40:46

Many loved her and many didn't.

0:40:460:40:49

So what does her connection do to the value of this vase?

0:40:490:40:54

Gentlemen, what's it worth?

0:40:540:40:56

It could be worth millions. It could be worth nothing.

0:40:560:41:00

It's beautiful. I'm concerned that stuff of Margaret Thatcher's

0:41:000:41:04

was turned down recently for a museum, but I don't know.

0:41:040:41:08

That's the only thing it's got going for it.

0:41:080:41:10

-Its history.

-Its history. It's the fact that it's related to

0:41:100:41:13

-Margaret Thatcher.

-And sentimental only to her.

-We hope.

0:41:130:41:17

But that, I think, is beautiful.

0:41:170:41:19

So, your final decision is...?

0:41:190:41:21

-The clock.

-Keep the clock, dump the vase?

0:41:230:41:26

-Yeah.

-Dump the vase.

0:41:260:41:27

So now, Natasha's just going to rub salt into the wound

0:41:270:41:30

and tell you the worth of the vase.

0:41:300:41:33

Before I do that, I'm going to question you, gentlemen,

0:41:330:41:36

because haven't you heard about the East Asian market?

0:41:360:41:39

It's booming.

0:41:390:41:41

But Graham, you just said something really important.

0:41:410:41:43

You sort of said it in a flippant way. You said, "it's history".

0:41:430:41:46

"It's just a bit of history." But it's history.

0:41:460:41:50

It's the way you play it.

0:41:500:41:51

This...the Iron Lady herself was presented this vase.

0:41:510:41:56

There is only one of these in the world.

0:41:560:41:58

Gentlemen...

0:41:580:42:00

You had today's top lot.

0:42:000:42:02

And the mystery lot...

0:42:040:42:05

..is only worth £400!

0:42:070:42:08

LAUGHTER AND APPLAUSE

0:42:080:42:10

Well done, gentlemen!

0:42:120:42:14

-Well done.

-He's good.

-Isn't he?!

0:42:140:42:17

Oh, my goodness.

0:42:170:42:19

-Hang on, hang on.

-Yeah, all right.

0:42:190:42:22

Someone put the kettle on, please.

0:42:230:42:25

Right, OK. Do you want to hear a little bit more about the clock?

0:42:250:42:28

-What can you tell us?

-Sure. I mean, these clocks

0:42:280:42:31

are serious 17th and 18th century designs.

0:42:310:42:33

This one is late 18th, early 19th century,

0:42:330:42:36

but the reason for those handles, you clocked straightaway,

0:42:360:42:39

is because clocks were too expensive to have in every room,

0:42:390:42:43

so these bracket clocks were designed with the caddy top -

0:42:430:42:46

that's how you describe the handled top -

0:42:460:42:48

to be moved from room to room so you could show off your wealth

0:42:480:42:52

with just one clock. It's cracking.

0:42:520:42:54

And it's worth £2,500.

0:42:540:42:58

And that money is yours!

0:42:580:43:00

Congratulations!

0:43:000:43:03

Fantastic. Absolutely...

0:43:030:43:05

APPLAUSE

0:43:050:43:07

Ian and Graham, you played the game absolutely spot on.

0:43:070:43:12

-Lovely to see you, Natasha.

-You too.

-I hope to see you again soon.

0:43:120:43:15

And we want to see you, too, when more teams will be playing

0:43:150:43:18

to try and spot the lot to win the lot on For What It's Worth.

0:43:180:43:22

I'll see you next time. Goodbye for now.

0:43:220:43:25

Natasha Raskin assists Fern Britton, giving her expert insight into the wonderful world of antiques and collectibles as the three pairs of contestants answer general knowledge questions, hoping for the chance to add antiques to their collections and win the game.