Episode 19 For What It's Worth


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Episode 19

Antiques quiz show hosted by Fern Britton. Antiques expert Paul Laidlaw assists Fern as the three teams compete for the prize.


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Hello and welcome to For What It's Worth -

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the show that requires a quizzer's brain and an antique expert's eye.

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Three pairs of contestants are ready to play.

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Each team has a quizzer, who has to answer a general knowledge question

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correctly so that their partner, the picker,

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has a chance to choose an antique or collectable and build a collection.

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The aim of the game is to amass the most valuable collection.

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Joining us today, we have a man whose antique knowledge

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is matched only by his good looks.

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Or at least that's what he tells me.

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Would you, please, welcome Paul Laidlaw!

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APPLAUSE

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-You're a man who wears a tartan suit well.

-Thank you.

-That's gorgeous.

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Now, tell me, what have we got in our collection today?

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Specifically for your consideration, we have...

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a shovel.

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A toy.

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Some cups.

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A brooch.

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A tankard.

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A truncheon.

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A book.

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A spoon.

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A chair.

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A vase.

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A clock.

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And a hall stand.

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Now, one of those items is our top lot,

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which is worth a whopping £2,500.

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That's the lot to spot, teams, because at the end of the show,

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the winning pair will walk away with the cash equivalent

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of one of their items.

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But beware, because the lots decrease in value

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right down to our worthless lot,

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which is only a tenner or less.

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That, of course, is the lot to avoid.

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So, who's playing today? Let's meet our teams.

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Team one, who are you?

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Hi, I'm John. And this is my son, Tony.

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We like to collect anything and everything.

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Welcome, the pair of you. Team two, who are you?

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I'm Susan and this is my husband, Alan.

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And I like to collect anything moustache related,

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-and Susan collects anything elephant related.

-Aha! Good to see you.

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And team three, who are you?

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Hi, Fern. I'm Cynthia. This is my mum, Hilda.

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And we come from Whitley Bay, Northumberland,

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-and I collect cruet sets.

-Very nice to have you here.

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And good luck, teams.

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Earlier, our teams got to inspect our lots,

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watched over by expert Paul -

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but could they separate the rich from the kitsch? Let's see.

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-Wow.

-Look at that!

-Yeah.

-Cor, where do you start?

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Well...

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Two women on a mission!

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All reet! That's not my favourite thing.

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Let's have a look at the movement, movement is everything.

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-Tschiemer of Bordeaux.

-French.

-Clock.

-Yeah.

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-It's a hall stand, isn't it?

-Edwardian, Victorian?

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-I would have said Edwardian, possibly.

-I'd say about 1880.

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These guys are on it.

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I'd say Bohemian, possibly, Czechoslovakian.

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-The painting's not brilliant, is it?

-Yeah, but it's old!

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Now, are those Queen Anne legs?

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-With bunions.

-I shall use that as a cataloguing term henceforth.

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-It's been re-covered, though, hasn't it?

-Yeah.

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It's obviously been restored.

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-I'd have that.

-To be honest, it looks like mass produced to me.

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-It's transfer print, I think.

-Is it a mace, or is it a...?

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Yes, that's definitely a mace.

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-Across there, look.

-I'd say that's probably Chinese...

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-I reckon that's valuable.

-How interesting.

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The Happy Prince by Oscar Wilde. Illustrated by Walter Crane,

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-one of my favourite illustrators.

-Oh, we're in the zone, now!

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-Not my thing, books. You're more the book lady.

-No.

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It doesn't do anything for me.

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-A truncheon.

-Well, I had one of those when I was in the Specials,

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-didn't I?

-Feel how light that is.

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It's not got much wear to it, he hasn't used it much.

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A toy. It's got a box and the box is in reasonable nick.

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Well, a lot of these come over from Japan.

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It's from the television programme Highway Patrol.

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With Broderick Crawford, if I remember rightly.

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Very good!

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It's not very helpful calling it a shovel, is it,

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cos I think that's fairly self-evident.

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-It's got, there, a name.

-Vogel and Noot, of Wartburg.

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Never heard of them.

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This could be silver plate. Foreign silver, quite old.

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Could be Indian silver, Indian motifs.

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They've gone with medium, origin and condition there.

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You can't argue with that analysis.

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That looks like a mustard spoon, doesn't it?

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Hallmarks on there. Looks like George III.

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That could be diamonds and sapphires.

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There's obviously some symbolic reason

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for a crescent of sapphires and diamonds.

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It's got quite a nice setting, I can't see a hallmark on it.

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I think the top lot's the book.

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-I think the truncheon's the booby trap.

-I think the top lot is the

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spoon and I think the bottom lot is the truncheon.

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Cups or brooch, top. Bottom, like you're saying, tankard, over there.

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-OK?

-OK.

-Come on, then.

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-It must be fun spying on them, Paul.

-It is somewhat.

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Some people, it's all about heart. "I like, I don't like."

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Others - forget my own taste, analytical, what it's made of?

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When was it made? What's the market like for this? Onto the next.

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-Fascinating.

-And how are the values of these items decided?

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The values of each lot have been agreed by myself and an independent

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valuer. They're based on the hammer price we would expect them to reach

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at auction, but with no auction costs added.

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Just to add an extra twist, we have our mystery lot.

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Now, it could be worth thousands, or it could be worth peanuts.

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That is for our winners to decide, a little bit later.

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But for now, teams, it's time for round one.

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I'm going to ask eight general knowledge questions.

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Now, pickers, before each one,

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I'll ask you to select which lots you would like to be playing for.

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Quizzers, if you buzz in with a correct answer,

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you will get to add it to your collection.

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But beware, because if you buzz in incorrectly,

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you'll be frozen out of the next round.

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So, pickers, please make your first pick.

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Let's see what you want.

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John and Tony want the brooch.

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Susan and Alan, the cups.

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Hilda and Cynthia want the book.

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Quizzers, fingers on buttons.

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Question number one.

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Which famous physicist is known for his three laws of motion?

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Yes, Susan?

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-Newton?

-Isaac Newton.

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Correct. Isaac Newton, it is. The cups are yours.

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Oh, Susan, you were very quick off the mark, there.

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Look out, teams. Pickers, pick a lot.

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John and Tony going for the brooch,

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but Susan and Alan also want the brooch.

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Hilda and Cynthia still want the book.

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Question two. In the Beano, what is the name of Gnasher's son?

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Out of time.

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Gnasher's son is called Gnipper. Of course he would be.

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OK, here we go for question three.

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Pickers, please, make a pick.

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John and Tony going for the spoon.

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Susan and Alan still wanting the brooch.

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Hilda and Cynthia really want that book!

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Quizzers, question three. How many wheels does a unicycle have?

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-Yes, Susan?

-One.

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One it is. The brooch is yours.

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Pickers, make a pick.

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John and Tony still want the spoon.

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Susan and Alan, the hall stand.

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Hilda and Cynthia still really want that book.

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Question four.

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The katana was the main weapon of which Japanese warrior?

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Yes, Hilda?

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The samurai.

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Correct, the samurai. You've finally got the book in your collection!

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Well done. Pickers, make a pick.

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John and Tony still really want that spoon.

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Susan and Alan wanting the hall stand, but so do Hilda and Cynthia.

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Question five. Which US public figure is represented by the acronym

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FLOTUS?

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Time up. And that's an interesting one.

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Does anybody know?

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-Yes, Cynthia.

-First Lady Of The United States.

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It is! Very good. Here we go.

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Pickers, make a pick.

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John and Tony still want the spoon.

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Susan and Alan want the hall stand, but so do Hilda and Cynthia.

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Question six.

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Premiering in 1945,

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which Sergei Prokofiev ballet is based on a rags-to-riches fairytale?

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-Yes, Hilda?

-Cinderella.

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Correct, it is Cinderella.

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The hall stand is yours.

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Pickers, make a pick.

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Let's see what you want.

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John and Tony switched tactics. They want the tankard.

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Susan and Alan now going for the vase.

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Hilda and Cynthia want the toy.

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Question seven. In the popular computer game series,

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what type of creature is Sonic?

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Yes, Susan.

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Hedgehog.

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It is a hedgehog, correct. The vase is yours.

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Pickers, make your final pick in this round, please.

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John and Tony want the tankard.

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Susan and Alan want the spoon now.

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And Hilda and Cynthia want the clock.

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Final question in this round, quizzers.

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Which word is defined as the study of family history?

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-Yes, Hilda.

-Genealogy?

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Correct. Genealogy it is.

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You have got the clock in your collection.

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Well done, Hilda.

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OK. Let's have a look at how the teams are building

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their collections at the end of round one.

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John and Tony are waiting for the right moment.

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Susan and Alan have the cups, the vase and the brooch.

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And Hilda and Cynthia have the book, the clock, and the hall stand.

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OK, our teams have started to build their collections,

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but have they chosen wisely?

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Well, before they have the chance to add more of them,

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Paul is going to give each pair a fact about

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a lot of their choice, which should be everything they need to know

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to make a valuation. But let's hear more about you.

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John, what do you like to do?

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Well, I'm retired, now, so I just like collecting

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stamps and coins. Going around antique fairs.

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Fishing. In general, I keep myself busy and active.

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Tony, how old were you when you first started collecting?

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Well, really, I started collecting probably

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from when I was about six or seven.

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I like any antiques.

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They fascinate me, I think the history of an item,

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not always what it's worth.

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The provenance, where it's come from and if they could only talk.

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-That's the romance of it, isn't it?

-It is, it's wonderful, yeah.

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So, what would you both like to know more about?

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It could be in someone else's collection or on the board.

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-I would like to know more about the tankard.

-The tankard, OK.

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Now, we're off to the Orient,

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with a Chinese export porcelain famille rose armorial tankard.

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This beautiful design boasts floral sprays on either side,

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a decorative border on the rim

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and the arms of the Armstrong family of Newcastle upon Tyne enamelled to

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the front. It dates to around 1750

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and this piece was created during the reign of Qianlong,

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sixth emperor of the Qing Dynasty.

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Europe proceeded to decorate to their tables and houses

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with porcelain from China over the next 100 years -

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which explains the apparent strangeness of a Chinese-made

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object bearing a Geordie coat of arms.

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So, with this tremendous tankard up for grabs,

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the only question that's left is...

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will this be our contestants' cup of tea?

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Mm! Well, John and Tony, welcome.

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Have a little think about what Paul's told you,

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while we meet Susan and Alan, team two. Lovely to see you.

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So, Susan, how did you and Alan meet?

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I was joining the Special Constabulary

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and Alan was just leaving.

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-And did you like him, straightaway?

-No.

-Oh.

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No. We'd probably been going out about six months before I thought,

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"Well, actually, there's something special about him."

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Hang on! You've gone out with him for six months not liking him?

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-Yes.

-Well, he must have had something to have hooked you there,

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-you see.

-The moustache had something to do with it.

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Oh, well. We'll find out more about that in a minute.

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Alan, welcome. Tell me about the hat you're wearing.

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The hat, smoking hat, was made especially for

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members of the Handlebar Club, which is the oldest moustache club

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in the world. Obviously, due to the moustache,

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I started collecting moustache ephemera

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-and all sorts of bits and pieces.

-Very nice to have you here.

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What would you like to know more about from Paul?

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I would like to know about the cups in our collection,

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-if that's possible, please.

-OK.

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Well, these are a pair of silver plated drinking cups.

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It's not possible to tell exactly the origin and date of these.

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They're certainly not original Aztec pieces.

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They are obviously, however, Aztec inspired.

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The image on the cup is a representation

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of the Aztec god Xipe Totec, shown in a continuous dance

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as you revolve the tumbler.

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Here, he's portrayed in the guise of...

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Wait for it. ..Youalahuan,

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whose name translates as the night drinker.

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Now, would you dare enjoy a sip from Youalahuan's tumblers?

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-Yes, I think Alan's up for that.

-Yeah.

-Definitely!

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Well, you have a little think about that. And let's meet team three,

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Hilda and Cynthia. Lovely to have you here.

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You describe yourself as a collectable.

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Yes. Well, my daughter calls me a hoarder.

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-Oh!

-A hoarder more than a collectable.

-Oh, OK.

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So, welcome, Cynthia.

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What is in the house that is hoarding?

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Oh, where, where, where would you start with it?

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I mean, I've drawn the line at the beer mats.

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There are hundreds of beer mats. And now we've got the cruet sets.

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One of them is a reclining nude,

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whose bosoms form the salt and the pepper,

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-for example.

-Oh! That's genius, isn't it?

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-It's... in a beautiful flesh pink.

-Yes.

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So, what would you like to know more about?

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-I'd like to know more about the book, please.

-OK.

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Now, this next item is an 1888 first edition Oscar Wilde classic.

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The Happy Prince And Other Tales.

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This novel's beautifully illustrated by Walter Crane and Jacomb Hood.

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This book was printed by Ballantyne, Hanson and Co.

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Based in London and Edinburgh.

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Now, we all know first editions can be vastly valuable commodities.

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However, condition has a huge effect on the price,

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especially when talking about something as fragile as a book.

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This copy as a stain located on the front cover, rounded corners,

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creases and a tanned spine.

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There's also a few small tears.

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Now, if you choose this, will you end up happy with a princely sum?

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Or just another tall tale to tell?

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Hm. Thank you very much, Paul.

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Right, you all know a little bit more, so shall we play round two?

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In this round, the pickers will select a lot to play for

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and then the quizzers will again try

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and secure it by answering correctly.

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But this time around, the lots come

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with their own question categories. And here they are.

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So, for instance, if you wanted the toy,

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I would ask your quizzer if they'd like to answer a question in either

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Human Body, or The Weather.

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OK? At the end of this round,

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the team with the least valuable collection will be eliminated,

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so choose very wisely.

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John and Tony, you're up first. Good luck. Tony, what's your lot?

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The tankard, please.

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The tankard. John, Leonardo da Vinci or Fashion?

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Hm. Neither are my strong points.

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I'll go for Leonardo da Vinci.

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Leonardo da Vinci.

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Leonardo da Vinci was born in which modern day country?

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Italy.

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Correct. Italy it is. The tankard is yours.

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Your collection has started with something I think you really wanted.

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Alan, what lot would you like?

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The spoon, please, Fern.

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The spoon. Leonardo da Vinci, Susan, or Chinese Food?

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Oh!

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-Let's go for Chinese Food.

-OK.

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The name of which Chinese dish translates literally

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to mean fried noodles?

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First thing that comes into my head is dim sum,

0:17:160:17:19

but I don't think it's that.

0:17:190:17:21

Unfortunately, it's not dim sum, it's chow mein!

0:17:210:17:24

-Chow mein.

-Oh.

-Chow mein.

0:17:240:17:25

OK. The spoon stays on the board. Hilda and Cynthia.

0:17:250:17:28

-Cynthia, what's your lot?

-I think I'll go for the toy, please.

0:17:280:17:31

The toy. Hilda, the Human Body or The Weather?

0:17:310:17:36

-The Human Body, I think.

-Human Body.

0:17:360:17:39

What's the name of the substance

0:17:390:17:41

that gives skin and hair its pigment?

0:17:410:17:43

-No, I'm sorry, I can't...

-Melanin. Melanin.

0:17:450:17:48

-Of course it is.

-Of course. OK.

0:17:480:17:51

Now, teams, have you missed out on that one item you really wanted?

0:17:510:17:55

And so, here's your chance to get your hands on it,

0:17:550:17:58

because from now on, you can either go for what's left on the grid,

0:17:580:18:01

or you can try and steal it from a rival team's collection.

0:18:010:18:04

But, pickers, be warned.

0:18:040:18:06

If you choose to steal from another team,

0:18:060:18:08

they will get to choose which category your quizzer must face.

0:18:080:18:11

And just one more rule -

0:18:110:18:14

You cannot steal from a team who has only one lot in their collection.

0:18:140:18:18

John and Tony, do you want to pick or steal?

0:18:180:18:21

-Pick, please.

-Yes. What would you like?

0:18:210:18:24

-The spoon.

-The spoon!

0:18:240:18:25

Leonardo da Vinci, or Chinese Food, John?

0:18:250:18:29

I think I'll go for Chinese Food this time.

0:18:290:18:31

Yeah. Chinese Food. Which duck dish shares part of its name with the

0:18:310:18:36

English name for Beijing?

0:18:360:18:38

Bombay?

0:18:380:18:39

It's Peking duck.

0:18:390:18:41

-Oh, no!

-Yeah. Peking is now known as Beijing.

0:18:410:18:43

-Yeah, yeah, yeah.

-Alan, do you want to pick or steal?

0:18:430:18:48

I'll pick the spoon again, please.

0:18:480:18:50

The spoon. Leonardo da Vinci or Chinese Food, Susan?

0:18:500:18:53

I didn't do very well on Chinese food,

0:18:530:18:55

-so I'm going to go for Leonardo this time.

-OK.

0:18:550:18:59

How many people are featured in da Vinci's celebrated painting

0:19:010:19:04

The Last Supper?

0:19:040:19:07

13.

0:19:070:19:09

13 is correct. Yes, the spoon is finally yours.

0:19:090:19:12

Cynthia, do you want to pick or steal?

0:19:170:19:19

-I think we'll have another go at the toy.

-OK.

0:19:190:19:22

Human Body or The Weather, Hilda?

0:19:220:19:24

-I'll have a go at The Weather.

-The Weather.

0:19:240:19:28

In November 2015, the first UK storm to be officially named

0:19:280:19:32

by the Met Office was given what girl's name?

0:19:320:19:35

There was a Katrina, but I don't know whether that was British.

0:19:360:19:40

This is hard. It's not Katrina.

0:19:400:19:42

It's Abigail.

0:19:420:19:44

Right. We've got one more go at this.

0:19:440:19:46

And you're all being very kind. I want to see

0:19:460:19:48

some ruthlessness in you. John and Tony, pick or steal?

0:19:480:19:52

I'd like to steal, please.

0:19:520:19:54

-What do you want to steal?

-I'd like to steal the spoon.

0:19:540:19:56

The spoon! Susan and Alan,

0:19:560:19:58

what category do you think John is going to have difficulty with?

0:19:580:20:03

-Musicals.

-Susan says Musicals.

0:20:030:20:05

Musicals?

0:20:070:20:07

He's playing this quite close to his chest.

0:20:100:20:12

OK. John, first performed in 1983,

0:20:120:20:15

who wrote the musical Blood Brothers?

0:20:150:20:19

No, it's not Andrew Lloyd Webber.

0:20:210:20:25

-No.

-No.

-It isn't Andrew Lloyd Webber, I'm so sorry.

0:20:250:20:27

It's Willy Russell.

0:20:270:20:29

-Oh.

-You don't get the spoon, but Susan and Alan,

0:20:290:20:32

that was very well defended.

0:20:320:20:33

Now, Alan, pick or steal?

0:20:330:20:35

I'm not going to be mean. I'll go for the chair, please.

0:20:350:20:38

The chair, Hobbies or Fashion, Susan?

0:20:380:20:41

Ooh.

0:20:410:20:44

Oh. Let's go Fashion,

0:20:440:20:47

although I'm not really into Fashion, either.

0:20:470:20:50

See what you can make of this one.

0:20:500:20:52

Which renowned Malaysian fashion designer is best known

0:20:520:20:56

for his handmade women's shoes?

0:20:560:20:58

The only one I can think of is Jimmy Choo.

0:20:580:21:02

Well, that was lucky, because it's correct!

0:21:020:21:04

Congratulations, the chair is yours.

0:21:040:21:06

Cynthia, pick or steal?

0:21:090:21:11

-I think I'll steal the cups, please.

-Steal the cups.

0:21:110:21:15

They are with Susan and Alan.

0:21:150:21:17

What category do you want to give Hilda?

0:21:170:21:19

-(Weather again?)

-Yeah.

-Go for The Weather again, please.

0:21:190:21:23

The Weather. The Weather, Hilda, here we go.

0:21:230:21:28

What is the name of the traditional device used to indicate

0:21:280:21:30

the direction of the wind?

0:21:300:21:32

A weather vane?

0:21:360:21:38

Weather vane is the correct answer. Hilda, the cups are yours.

0:21:380:21:41

Susan and Alan, you've lost them.

0:21:410:21:44

Right, that is the end of the round.

0:21:440:21:48

So, let's see how the collections are looking.

0:21:480:21:51

John and Tony have the perfectly formed tankard.

0:21:510:21:55

And that's it.

0:21:550:21:56

Susan and Alan have the brooch, the spoon, the chair and the vase.

0:21:560:22:01

Hilda and Cynthia have the book, the clock, the cups, now,

0:22:010:22:05

and the hall stand. OK. For one team, it is now the end of the road.

0:22:050:22:10

Paul has been keeping tabs

0:22:100:22:11

and the team with the least valuable collection will now be eliminated.

0:22:110:22:15

Paul, who is leaving us first?

0:22:150:22:17

Well, Fern, I can reveal the pair leaving us first is...

0:22:170:22:23

-Alan and Susan.

-Really!

0:22:280:22:30

That's quite a shock when you have four things in your collection.

0:22:370:22:41

But before you leave us, you want to know

0:22:410:22:43

the value of each of the things in your collection, don't you?

0:22:430:22:46

-So, Paul, shall we start with the chair?

-OK.

0:22:460:22:48

Here we have an example of a Victorian prayer chair,

0:22:480:22:51

or prie dieu.

0:22:510:22:53

Prayer chairs were made initially for private worship.

0:22:530:22:57

They then became very popular during the Victorian era

0:22:570:23:00

when most were made.

0:23:000:23:01

This handsome example has an ebonised frame

0:23:010:23:04

and is pleasingly upholstered, very much good to go.

0:23:040:23:08

Value?

0:23:080:23:10

Just £75.

0:23:100:23:12

Now, next, the brooch.

0:23:120:23:15

Here we have a brooch from the Victorian area

0:23:150:23:17

with the jewel encrusted face

0:23:170:23:20

completely saturated with varying sized diamonds and sapphires

0:23:200:23:25

in a gold setting.

0:23:250:23:27

The brooch itself is in good condition

0:23:270:23:29

and fastens with a simple pin and hook catch.

0:23:290:23:32

This piece certainly has charm and elegance,

0:23:320:23:34

but did it have enough to turn your head?

0:23:340:23:37

Well, clearly not.

0:23:370:23:38

Its value?

0:23:380:23:41

£340.

0:23:410:23:43

Wow!

0:23:430:23:45

Next, the vase.

0:23:450:23:46

This is a 19th-century vase made of enamelled cranberry glass.

0:23:460:23:50

Decorated with a floral motif

0:23:500:23:53

and portrait of an unidentified woman.

0:23:530:23:55

This cranberry glass is likely bohemian.

0:23:550:23:58

In what is now the Czech Republic,

0:23:580:24:00

bohemian glass-makers of the 17th and 18th centuries

0:24:000:24:03

were not only experimenting with gold tinting,

0:24:030:24:06

but they were learning how to apply enamel to glass,

0:24:060:24:09

and that's what we see here.

0:24:090:24:12

After all that, its value?

0:24:120:24:15

£800.

0:24:150:24:16

Wow!

0:24:160:24:18

And then the spoon.

0:24:180:24:20

This is a silver salt spoon from around 1823.

0:24:200:24:24

It has a mark for Sheffield, with the maker Thomas Turner and Co.

0:24:240:24:29

Traditionally a silver spoon was given as a Christening present to a newborn baby.

0:24:290:24:33

Now, the tradition of giving apostle spoons

0:24:330:24:37

has its origins in the Tudor period,

0:24:370:24:39

and it's thought to be the origin of the phrase -

0:24:390:24:41

born with a silver spoon in his or her mouth.

0:24:410:24:45

Value of this little period spoon as we see it today?

0:24:450:24:49

Would you believe it's worthless?

0:24:490:24:51

-That's extraordinary.

-Isn't it just.

0:24:530:24:55

And that brought the total value of your collection to a very healthy

0:24:550:25:00

£1,215.

0:25:000:25:02

Susan and Alan, you collected a fantastic set of things there.

0:25:030:25:07

Thank you for getting rid of the worthless lot,

0:25:070:25:10

but now it is time to bring the hammer down on your collection

0:25:100:25:13

and say thank you for playing For What It's Worth.

0:25:130:25:16

And also, the unclaimed items in the grid are now leaving the game.

0:25:200:25:24

So, let's find out from Paul what they're worth,

0:25:240:25:26

and if the top lot is still in the game.

0:25:260:25:29

What we have here is a traditional police truncheon.

0:25:290:25:32

This particular piece dates back to the Victorian era

0:25:320:25:35

when the idea of a constable being armed with nothing more than

0:25:350:25:38

a truncheon was the norm.

0:25:380:25:39

This particular piece is made of rose wood.

0:25:390:25:42

A testament to the material, it's in good condition

0:25:420:25:44

and has a handsome turned wooden handle.

0:25:440:25:47

It has a few minor surface dents to it,

0:25:470:25:49

but we won't go into how they may have come about.

0:25:490:25:54

Value for such a thing?

0:25:540:25:55

-£30.

-Hm.

0:25:550:25:58

A bit of nostalgia here, with the toy.

0:25:580:26:00

It certainly appealed to Cynthia,

0:26:000:26:02

who remembered it from her youth in a television programme.

0:26:020:26:06

This vintage Ichiko highway patrol car

0:26:060:26:10

was the peak of toy car engineering in 1959,

0:26:100:26:14

produced by the Japanese company Ichiko

0:26:140:26:18

and one of the first toy imports from the east.

0:26:180:26:21

Made of tin plate, this 13 inch long car

0:26:210:26:23

has a multitude of different gadgets to delight

0:26:230:26:26

and entertain children of yesteryear and indeed today.

0:26:260:26:30

This is a rare find indeed.

0:26:300:26:32

Value?

0:26:320:26:34

£60.

0:26:340:26:36

And lastly, the shovel that had you perplexed.

0:26:380:26:40

I think the thought process was,

0:26:400:26:41

"Why on earth is there a shovel here?

0:26:410:26:43

"There must be a good reason for it, surely."

0:26:430:26:45

Well, this is a fascinating object.

0:26:450:26:47

A German entrenching tool that was used during World War I.

0:26:470:26:51

Yes, this item has recently celebrated its 100th birthday.

0:26:510:26:56

Manufactured by the Austrian couple Vogel and Noot,

0:26:560:27:00

this shovel would have been used in the front line

0:27:000:27:02

by Imperial German Army.

0:27:020:27:05

On the handle of this shovel

0:27:050:27:06

you can see the emblem of Vogel and Noot,

0:27:060:27:08

a heart in fire pierced by an arrow.

0:27:080:27:11

Its value? Lowly old shovel?

0:27:110:27:13

£100.

0:27:130:27:15

Thank you. So that means the top lot, worth...

0:27:170:27:21

£2,500.

0:27:210:27:24

..is still in play.

0:27:240:27:25

Ooh! And of course we have the mystery item there too,

0:27:250:27:29

which may be worth even more.

0:27:290:27:31

So, teams, congratulations on getting this far.

0:27:310:27:34

You now have one last chance to pick our expert's brains.

0:27:340:27:37

Which lot do you need to know more about?

0:27:370:27:40

Let's start with John and Tony.

0:27:400:27:42

Could I ask more about the...

0:27:430:27:45

Is it the hall stand, please?

0:27:450:27:48

Now...

0:27:480:27:50

Here we have a 19th-century brass mounted hall stand.

0:27:500:27:53

The hall stand was beautifully handcrafted in around 1860

0:27:530:27:57

by James Shoolbred and Co.

0:27:570:28:00

James Shoolbred was established in the 1820s as a draper's shop

0:28:000:28:04

at Tottenham Court Road, London,

0:28:040:28:06

creating textiles for the furniture market.

0:28:060:28:08

In the 1860s,

0:28:080:28:10

the company started to design and manufacture their own furniture,

0:28:100:28:13

and went on to earn a fine reputation in London society

0:28:130:28:17

for being a provider of quality pieces.

0:28:170:28:20

But should this make an elegant stand in your collection?

0:28:210:28:26

Mmm.

0:28:260:28:28

Hilda and Cynthia, what would you like to know more about?

0:28:280:28:31

Well, I think we've heard about everything so far except the clock.

0:28:310:28:35

-So, the clock, please.

-Now, this is a 19th-century bronze mantle clock.

0:28:350:28:41

It's mounted with a statue of the Roman goddess Diana,

0:28:410:28:44

who is shown holding the lyre and laurel wreath of her brother Apollo.

0:28:440:28:49

Now, in Roman mythology, Diana's the goddess of the moon

0:28:490:28:52

and Apollo the god of the sun,

0:28:520:28:54

so the joining of them together on top of the clock

0:28:540:28:58

creates a perfect symbolism of night turning into day.

0:28:580:29:01

It's made in Germany

0:29:010:29:03

by the respected clock manufacturer Tschiemer,

0:29:030:29:06

but so were many others - a prolific manufacturer.

0:29:060:29:09

This is clearly a very ostentatious mantle clock,

0:29:090:29:13

which commands your attention.

0:29:130:29:15

You'll either love it or you won't.

0:29:150:29:18

Do you think it could command the same sort of attention

0:29:180:29:21

-in the sale room?

-Hm.

0:29:210:29:24

It's now time for our final round,

0:29:240:29:26

and at the end of this we will have our winners.

0:29:260:29:29

Now, in this round I'll show you a category and 12 possible answers.

0:29:320:29:36

Nine answers are correct, three of them are not.

0:29:360:29:39

Each of you will then take turns to choose an answer

0:29:390:29:41

you think is correct.

0:29:410:29:43

And as it's the final round, both quizzers and pickers will play.

0:29:430:29:46

Pick a wrong answer

0:29:460:29:48

and your opponent will be able to steal a lot from your collection.

0:29:480:29:51

If all nine correct answers are given

0:29:510:29:53

then the team that gives the final correct answer will be the winners.

0:29:530:29:58

We'll play three questions in total.

0:29:580:29:59

The pair with the most valuable collection

0:29:590:30:01

can choose to go first or second.

0:30:010:30:04

Paul, who is that at the moment?

0:30:040:30:06

Well, I can reveal that the team that currently has

0:30:060:30:09

the most valuable collection is...

0:30:090:30:11

..Cynthia and Hilda.

0:30:150:30:17

Well done. Cynthia and Hilda, the first question is...

0:30:170:30:22

World War II British Military Aircraft.

0:30:240:30:27

You need to find the names or nicknames for

0:30:270:30:29

types of British military aircraft used during the Second World War.

0:30:290:30:33

-Would you like to go first or second on this question.

-First.

-First?

0:30:330:30:36

-Yes.

-First? Right. Here we go. Let's have a look at the answers.

0:30:360:30:40

Hmm.

0:30:420:30:43

Hilda, give me an answer?

0:30:430:30:45

Hawker Hurricane.

0:30:450:30:47

Hawker Hurricane. If this goes green, it's correct.

0:30:470:30:50

Correct! Yes, the Hurricane played a major part in the Battle of Britain.

0:30:510:30:55

John, give me an answer.

0:30:550:30:57

De Havilland Mosquito.

0:30:570:30:59

De Havilland Mosquito.

0:30:590:31:00

The Mosquito, correct!

0:31:020:31:04

Known for its bomber's sting and the whine of its engines.

0:31:040:31:08

Cynthia?

0:31:080:31:10

Oh, crumbs, I was hoping for the Mosquito myself.

0:31:110:31:15

I'll go for the F-14 Tomcat, please.

0:31:150:31:18

F-14 Tomcat.

0:31:180:31:19

Incorrect.

0:31:230:31:25

That's the plane from Top Gun, the film.

0:31:250:31:28

-Oh, of course it is!

-A long time after World War II.

0:31:280:31:30

OK, let's have a look at the other wrong answers.

0:31:300:31:33

Buxton Blue is a British cheese.

0:31:340:31:37

And the Crafty Cockney is the nickname of Eric Bristow,

0:31:370:31:42

the darts player.

0:31:420:31:43

John and Tony, you're now in a very good position.

0:31:440:31:47

What would you like to steal from Hilda and Cynthia?

0:31:470:31:51

-What do you reckon?

-I reckon the book.

0:31:510:31:53

Actually, I'm more tempted by the clock.

0:31:530:31:56

-OK.

-I'm going to go for that.

-Yeah.

-The clock?

0:31:560:31:59

-The clock.

-OK, the clock is yours.

0:31:590:32:03

Oh, I'm sorry, Hilda and Cynthia.

0:32:030:32:06

Right, John and Tony, this time it's your question, and here it is.

0:32:060:32:11

Cities In Spain.

0:32:130:32:15

You need to find the names of cities which are part of Spain.

0:32:150:32:18

-Would you like to go first or second?

-First.

-First, please.

0:32:180:32:21

First? OK. Here are the answers.

0:32:210:32:23

John? Give me an answer.

0:32:270:32:29

-Valencia.

-Valencia.

0:32:300:32:32

Yes, correct. It's in eastern Spain.

0:32:350:32:38

-Hilda?

-Malaga.

0:32:380:32:41

Malaga.

0:32:410:32:42

Correct. A city in Andalucia.

0:32:450:32:47

Tony?

0:32:470:32:49

-Bilbao.

-Bilbao.

0:32:490:32:50

Yes, correct. Bilbao, up in the north.

0:32:540:32:57

-Cynthia?

-Cordoba.

0:32:570:32:59

Cordoba.

0:32:590:33:01

Correct. Founded by the Romans.

0:33:030:33:05

-John?

-Alicante.

-Alicante.

0:33:050:33:08

Correct. Very popular holiday destination.

0:33:120:33:15

-Hilda?

-Toledo.

0:33:150:33:18

Toledo.

0:33:180:33:20

Correct. That was the capital of Spain until the 1560s.

0:33:230:33:27

Tony?

0:33:270:33:28

-Anadama.

-Anadama.

0:33:320:33:34

Oh! That's a type of yeast bread.

0:33:390:33:42

Let's have a look at the other wrong answers.

0:33:420:33:45

Arbol is the Spanish word for tree.

0:33:460:33:50

Mato is a type of Spanish cheese.

0:33:500:33:53

Well, Hilda and Cynthia, you can steal.

0:33:530:33:58

Do you want the clock back, or shall we have their tankard?

0:33:580:34:00

Cos their tankard was worth a fair bit, and to be fair,

0:34:000:34:03

-we are from Newcastle and it is an armorial from Newcastle.

-Oh, yes!

0:34:030:34:06

-Well, we'll have that, then.

-We'll have their tankard, please.

0:34:060:34:09

Well, the tankard it is, then. Coming into your collection.

0:34:090:34:13

Sorry, boys.

0:34:130:34:14

OK. Third and final question.

0:34:140:34:18

Hilda and Cynthia, here it is.

0:34:180:34:20

Bond Girls.

0:34:210:34:23

Which of these names are female characters appearing in any of

0:34:230:34:27

the official James Bond films?

0:34:270:34:28

First or second, Hilda and Cynthia?

0:34:280:34:30

-First, please.

-First? OK. Here are the answers.

0:34:300:34:33

Interesting. Hilda, give me an answer.

0:34:350:34:38

Erm...Tiffany Case?

0:34:380:34:40

Tiffany Case.

0:34:400:34:42

Sounds good.

0:34:420:34:43

Correct. From Diamonds Are Forever.

0:34:430:34:46

John.

0:34:460:34:47

Not my strong point. May Day.

0:34:490:34:52

May Day.

0:34:520:34:53

Correct. Grace Jones played her in A View To A Kill.

0:34:560:35:00

Cynthia?

0:35:000:35:01

I think it's got to be Kissy Suzuki.

0:35:010:35:04

Oh, I hope so. Kissy Suzuki.

0:35:040:35:06

Yes. From You Only Live Twice.

0:35:080:35:11

Tony?

0:35:110:35:12

-Wai Lin.

-Wai Lin.

0:35:140:35:16

Correct. From Tomorrow Never Dies.

0:35:180:35:21

-Hilda?

-Sydney Bristow.

0:35:210:35:24

Sydney Bristow.

0:35:240:35:26

I haven't got a clue.

0:35:270:35:28

Oh!

0:35:310:35:33

She's from the television show Alias.

0:35:330:35:36

Let's have a look at the other wrong answers.

0:35:360:35:38

Sabina Pleasure is an Alex Rider character, from Stormbreaker.

0:35:400:35:44

And Vanessa Kensington,

0:35:440:35:46

she was a character in the Austin Powers movies,

0:35:460:35:50

played by Liz Hurley.

0:35:500:35:52

John and Tony, that means you can steal a lot from your opponents.

0:35:520:35:57

What would you like?

0:35:570:35:58

-Got to be, isn't it?

-Got to be the tankard, eh.

0:35:580:36:00

It has to be the tankard. The tankard is yours.

0:36:000:36:03

This could be a make or break decision for our teams.

0:36:030:36:08

That's it. Your collections are now complete

0:36:080:36:11

and will determine which team is victorious.

0:36:110:36:13

Paul, who are today's winners?

0:36:130:36:15

I can reveal that the pair with the most valuable collection

0:36:150:36:19

and the winners today, are...

0:36:190:36:21

..Cynthia and Hilda!

0:36:260:36:28

Oh!

0:36:280:36:30

I'm amazed.

0:36:350:36:36

Well, congratulations, Hilda and Cynthia.

0:36:360:36:39

But many commiserations to you, John and Tony.

0:36:390:36:41

You obviously didn't create a valuable enough collection,

0:36:410:36:44

but you played that to the death, both teams, brilliant.

0:36:440:36:47

Before we say goodbye to you though,

0:36:470:36:49

you want to find out what those items were worth, don't you?

0:36:490:36:52

-Absolutely, yeah.

-So, here we go. Paul, let's start with the clock.

0:36:520:36:56

The clock... What a joy of an object, in every regard.

0:36:560:37:02

The medium, gilt bronze ormolu.

0:37:020:37:04

Value? Unsurprising, four figure sum, £1,000.

0:37:040:37:10

From the ostentatious to the elegance of the Baluster tankard.

0:37:100:37:16

18th century, Chinese, and highly collectable.

0:37:160:37:20

Your humble pint pot there is worth...

0:37:200:37:25

£1,400.

0:37:250:37:28

Ooh!

0:37:280:37:30

Total value, £2,400.

0:37:300:37:34

John and Tony, you almost got away with

0:37:340:37:36

the value of the top lot there! That is amazing.

0:37:360:37:38

You've played so well, I hope you've enjoyed it.

0:37:380:37:41

-Indeed!

-Yeah, indeed.

-It's been lovely to have you,

0:37:410:37:43

and thank you for playing For What It's Worth.

0:37:430:37:46

So, well done, Hilda and Cynthia!

0:37:490:37:52

That was so well played.

0:37:520:37:54

All you need to do is pick one of the lots in your collection

0:37:540:37:58

and we will give you its value in cash.

0:37:580:38:00

You make it sound so easy.

0:38:000:38:02

"All you've got to do..." But it's actually extremely difficult to do.

0:38:020:38:05

From the very outset, I have loved the book.

0:38:050:38:09

I collect books, I adore books, it's a first edition,

0:38:090:38:13

I love Walter Crane, his illustrations are fabulous,

0:38:130:38:16

but then you said it had some damage...

0:38:160:38:19

Mum fancies the hall stand cos she's your furniture girl,

0:38:190:38:22

but gut instincts, first instincts, we're sticking with the book.

0:38:220:38:25

Well, before we tell you what that's worth,

0:38:250:38:28

Paul is going to tell you the worth of the things you haven't won.

0:38:280:38:33

Let's start with the cups. Paul?

0:38:330:38:35

Well, exotic, are they not?

0:38:350:38:37

And they really do look rather handsome up there.

0:38:370:38:39

However...

0:38:390:38:41

not solid silver and likely nowhere near that old.

0:38:410:38:47

All you lost there was £50.

0:38:470:38:50

And then it comes down to the hall stand.

0:38:530:38:56

It happens to be extremely elegant, in every regard.

0:38:560:39:02

And, rather importantly,

0:39:020:39:03

it's attributable to a cabinet-maker of some note.

0:39:030:39:08

That was the big one.

0:39:100:39:11

£2,500!

0:39:110:39:13

-Oh, sorry, Mum! Sorry, Mum!

-It doesn't matter.

0:39:130:39:17

It's nice to be proved right!

0:39:170:39:19

LAUGHTER

0:39:190:39:21

Yes, that's what mums like, isn't it?!

0:39:210:39:24

-Yes!

-"Hey, never mind, I was right."

0:39:240:39:27

OK. It all comes down to the book.

0:39:270:39:29

You've won the value of this book.

0:39:290:39:32

Before we tell you what it's worth,

0:39:320:39:34

maybe we could tempt you with our mystery lot,

0:39:340:39:38

which may be worth a great deal more...or not.

0:39:380:39:43

Hilda and Cynthia, here is your lot.

0:39:460:39:49

This beautiful Oscar Wilde first edition.

0:39:490:39:52

As things stand, you have won the value of this book in cash.

0:39:520:39:56

But before we tell you its value,

0:39:560:39:58

Paul is going to tempt you with today's mystery lot.

0:39:580:40:01

Paul, what have you got for them?

0:40:010:40:04

Behold, ladies.

0:40:040:40:06

-Oh!

-Ooh!

0:40:070:40:09

So, I can tell you that today's mystery lot is

0:40:090:40:15

an English made 19th-century officer's sword.

0:40:150:40:19

It was issued to an officer of the Kirkcudbright Rifle Volunteers,

0:40:190:40:23

a unit established in Galloway in 1860

0:40:230:40:26

in response to unrest in Continental Europe at the time.

0:40:260:40:31

Now, its blade is exquisitely etched, the decoration incorporating

0:40:310:40:37

the original owner's armorial crest and monogram.

0:40:370:40:41

Now, this opens up the possibility of further research,

0:40:410:40:46

identifying this officer's identity and service history,

0:40:460:40:50

which of course adds value.

0:40:500:40:53

Now, does this beautiful blade cut the mustard

0:40:530:40:58

or are you going to stick to your guns with the book?

0:40:580:41:01

Hmm.

0:41:010:41:02

Do you like the sword better than the book?

0:41:020:41:05

Bearing in mind the hall stand.

0:41:070:41:09

And then I'll get the blame if we choose that

0:41:100:41:13

-and the book was more valuable.

-Yeah.

0:41:130:41:17

Well, somebody's kept it from 1850,

0:41:170:41:20

and it may have belonged to somebody famous.

0:41:200:41:23

Shall we go with the sword then?

0:41:230:41:24

-Go on, then.

-We'll go with the sword.

0:41:240:41:27

Final decision is...

0:41:270:41:29

-Yes, the sword.

-..the sword.

0:41:290:41:30

OK. You're going with the mystery lot.

0:41:300:41:33

-Shall we find out what you've thrown away...

-Yes.

-..with the book?

0:41:330:41:39

-Paul?

-Well,

0:41:390:41:40

Hilda's instinct was so strong and so right for the hall stand.

0:41:400:41:46

-And I've got to say, Cynthia...

-Was right over the book.

0:41:460:41:48

..your instinct, from the off,

0:41:480:41:51

you pretty much walked into that gallery

0:41:510:41:53

and the book just cried out at you.

0:41:530:41:55

-It did, it did.

-We can't change our minds.

0:41:550:41:57

Walter Crane illustrated, 1888...

0:41:570:42:01

I don't know what to say.

0:42:010:42:02

Well, I'll say this.

0:42:040:42:06

It's worth...

0:42:070:42:08

..£300.

0:42:100:42:11

But...what's the value of the sword?

0:42:140:42:17

-Paul, put us out of our misery.

-OK.

0:42:170:42:19

This is 1860, volunteer movement.

0:42:190:42:23

There are tens of thousands of volunteers

0:42:230:42:28

that signed up at that time.

0:42:280:42:31

I could say mass produced,

0:42:310:42:33

and I should also say that a lot of the volunteers at this time

0:42:330:42:37

were the great and the good.

0:42:370:42:40

And this chap, with an armorial crest and the smart monogram,

0:42:400:42:45

really does bring value to this piece.

0:42:450:42:47

It's worth...

0:42:480:42:49

-..£400!

-Oh!

0:42:520:42:55

So that was £300, and that's £400.

0:42:550:42:58

-That's better.

-It was the right decision though!

0:42:580:43:01

It was the right decision, and I'm glad you made it jointly.

0:43:010:43:05

Congratulations! You go home with £400.

0:43:050:43:08

You've been great fun.

0:43:080:43:09

Thank you, Paul, for lending us all your expertise and knowledge.

0:43:090:43:12

And thank you very much, hope you've enjoyed it.

0:43:120:43:15

We'll see you next time, when more teams will be trying to spot

0:43:150:43:17

the lot to win the lot on For What It's Worth.

0:43:170:43:19

Goodbye for now! Well done!

0:43:190:43:22

Paul Laidlaw assists Fern Britton, giving her expert insight into the wonderful world of antiques and collectibles as the three pairs of contestants answer general knowledge questions, hoping for the chance to add antiques to their collections and win the game.