Episode 21 For What It's Worth


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS


Episode 21

Antiques quiz show hosted by Fern Britton. Antiques expert Charlie Ross assists Fern as the three teams compete for the prize.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Episode 21. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

APPLAUSE

0:00:130:00:14

Hello, and welcome to For What It's Worth, the show that quizzes you

0:00:140:00:18

with questions and asks you if you know the value of your vintage.

0:00:180:00:22

Three pairs of contestants are ready to play, and each team has a quizzer

0:00:220:00:26

who has to answer a general knowledge question correctly

0:00:260:00:29

so that their partner, the picker,

0:00:290:00:31

has a chance to choose an antique or collectable and build a collection.

0:00:310:00:35

Now, the aim of the game, of course,

0:00:350:00:36

is to amass the most valuable collection.

0:00:360:00:39

Now, some antiques are old and some antiques are gold.

0:00:390:00:43

So, please welcome our antiques expert and golden oldie,

0:00:430:00:46

Charlie Ross.

0:00:460:00:47

CHEERING AND APPLAUSE

0:00:470:00:49

Golden oldie?

0:00:490:00:50

-Welcome, Charlie.

-Lovely to be here, Fern.

0:00:520:00:54

Tell us about some of the lots that we've got here.

0:00:540:00:56

Well, what have we got today?

0:00:560:00:58

We've got some fascinating objects.

0:00:580:01:00

We've got a watch stand...

0:01:000:01:02

..a sculpture,

0:01:050:01:07

a book,

0:01:070:01:09

a doll,

0:01:090:01:11

a diary,

0:01:110:01:12

a stove,

0:01:120:01:15

a paperweight,

0:01:150:01:17

a dish,

0:01:170:01:19

a cup,

0:01:190:01:21

a chair,

0:01:210:01:23

a pendant,

0:01:230:01:25

and a milk churn.

0:01:250:01:28

Mm, what a great mixture.

0:01:280:01:31

Now, one of these items is our top lot,

0:01:310:01:33

which is worth a whopping £2,500.

0:01:330:01:36

That is the lot to spot, because at the end of the show,

0:01:360:01:38

the winning pair will walk away with the cash equivalent

0:01:380:01:41

of one of their items. But beware,

0:01:410:01:44

because the lots decrease in value, right down to our worthless lot,

0:01:440:01:47

which is worth a tenner or less.

0:01:470:01:49

That is the lot to avoid, teams.

0:01:490:01:52

So, who's playing today?

0:01:520:01:54

Let's meet them. Team one, who are you?

0:01:540:01:56

I'm Pat, and this is my friend, Eve.

0:01:560:02:00

We met at a church about four years ago.

0:02:000:02:02

We both preach in the church as well.

0:02:020:02:05

-Welcome, ladies, and good luck today.

-Thank you.

0:02:050:02:07

And team two, who are you?

0:02:070:02:09

I'm Gary. This is my wife, Silvana.

0:02:090:02:12

And Gary and I spent the first ten years of our married life

0:02:120:02:15

on board oil tankers sailing around the world.

0:02:150:02:18

Wow. Look forward to hearing more about that later.

0:02:180:02:20

Welcome, team two.

0:02:200:02:22

And, team three, who are you?

0:02:220:02:24

This is Jim, and I'm Charlie.

0:02:240:02:25

And we met through our love of antiques.

0:02:250:02:27

Very nice. Well, good luck.

0:02:270:02:30

OK, earlier, our teams got to inspect our lots,

0:02:300:02:33

watched over by our expert, Charlie.

0:02:330:02:35

But could they separate the posh from the tosh?

0:02:350:02:38

Let's see.

0:02:380:02:39

Wow.

0:02:410:02:42

Oh, Gary, look. My favourite, a chair.

0:02:420:02:46

Lovely things to look at.

0:02:460:02:47

It's a silver wedding, it says.

0:02:500:02:52

So we assume it's silver.

0:02:520:02:54

I can't see any hallmarks on it, so I think we'd probably accept

0:02:540:02:57

-the fact that it's plate.

-Yeah.

0:02:570:02:58

Why are they looking at the back of it?

0:02:580:03:00

There's the hallmark across the top.

0:03:000:03:02

-It's hallmarked across the top.

-Oh, that's a bit sneaky.

0:03:020:03:05

-It's well worn on these arms.

-But I love the legs.

0:03:050:03:08

It's a chair.

0:03:080:03:09

LAUGHTER

0:03:090:03:11

-Yeah.

-And we have a house full of them.

0:03:110:03:13

So have most houses! Otherwise you'd have to sit on the floor.

0:03:130:03:17

Sindy. Got an attic full of these.

0:03:180:03:20

Toys are very much in the offing now.

0:03:200:03:24

And the box is perfect.

0:03:240:03:25

That could be the one.

0:03:250:03:27

-Look at that.

-Oh, wow.

-That is beautiful.

0:03:280:03:30

Millefiori.

0:03:300:03:31

Showing a bit of knowledge here, girls.

0:03:310:03:33

Now, I've got quite a few paperweights.

0:03:330:03:35

That is quite modern.

0:03:350:03:37

It's a pretty standard piece.

0:03:370:03:39

-Willow pattern, is it?

-Blue and white. It is.

0:03:390:03:41

-It's a willow pattern picture.

-It's very Japanese.

-It's got the bridge with the little people on it.

0:03:410:03:45

Would you say that's Japanese or Chinese?

0:03:450:03:47

I'd say it's Chinese.

0:03:470:03:49

Don't hit it too hard, you'll break it!

0:03:490:03:51

-No.

-Well, there's no milk in it, for sure.

0:03:540:03:57

HE LAUGHS

0:03:570:03:58

I don't think there's much you can say about a milk churn, really.

0:03:580:04:01

-It's a very old milk churn.

-It is a very old one, yeah.

0:04:010:04:04

I'm sorry, but that piggy does absolutely nothing for me.

0:04:040:04:07

-Kinsella. Now, that's a name I've heard before.

-That rings a bell.

0:04:070:04:11

-It's well made.

-It's very well made.

-It's pewter?

0:04:110:04:14

You're not good on hallmarks, are you, guys?

0:04:140:04:16

-If he's got a hallmark, he's silver. He is heavy.

-It's proper silver.

0:04:160:04:19

Yeah. He's not junk by any means.

0:04:190:04:21

First edition. That could be valuable.

0:04:220:04:24

It's presentation copy, 1854.

0:04:240:04:28

Do you know, I think that's a red herring.

0:04:280:04:30

Charles Dickens is described as a red herring.

0:04:300:04:33

-It's a war diary.

-This is your area, Charlie.

0:04:340:04:38

-1916.

-SHE GASPS

0:04:380:04:40

Oh, that's amazing.

0:04:400:04:42

It's a watch stand.

0:04:430:04:44

Spotted!

0:04:440:04:46

Nothing special about it.

0:04:460:04:48

I don't think they're diamonds.

0:04:490:04:52

But they might be paste as well.

0:04:520:04:54

Yeah, could be.

0:04:540:04:55

Both my aunties had them in their homes.

0:04:590:05:01

This has seen a few hot cross buns.

0:05:010:05:04

-You think Sindy is the top?

-I do, yes.

0:05:040:05:06

The diary and the pig.

0:05:060:05:09

I think the pig might be worth quite a lot.

0:05:090:05:11

And I think the bottom lot will be the milk churn.

0:05:110:05:14

So, we're putting the cup at the bottom.

0:05:140:05:15

The bottom lot, I want to choose the cross.

0:05:150:05:17

I just hope you're right and that silver dish

0:05:170:05:20

is not worth a lot more than we think it is.

0:05:200:05:23

Interesting.

0:05:230:05:24

Charlie, how has the valuation on these lots been reached?

0:05:240:05:27

Well, Fern, the values for each lot have been agreed between myself

0:05:270:05:30

and an independent valuer.

0:05:300:05:32

They're based on the hammer price we would expect them to reach

0:05:320:05:35

at auction, but with no auction costs added.

0:05:350:05:39

Just to add an extra twist, we have our mystery lot.

0:05:390:05:42

Now, it could be worth thousands or it could be worth peanuts.

0:05:420:05:45

But that is for our winners to decide a little bit later.

0:05:450:05:49

But for now, it's time for round one.

0:05:490:05:51

APPLAUSE

0:05:510:05:52

I'm going to ask eight general knowledge questions.

0:05:550:05:57

Now, pickers, before each one,

0:05:570:05:59

I'll ask you to select which lot you would like to play for,

0:05:590:06:02

and quizzers, if you buzz in with the correct answer,

0:06:020:06:05

you'll get to add it to your collection.

0:06:050:06:07

But beware - buzz in incorrectly and you'll be frozen out

0:06:070:06:10

of the next question. So, pickers, please make your first pick.

0:06:100:06:14

Let's see what you've chosen.

0:06:170:06:18

Eve and Pat have gone for the sculpture.

0:06:200:06:23

Gary and Silvana have gone for the dish.

0:06:230:06:25

But Charlie and Jim have gone for the sculpture too.

0:06:250:06:28

So, quizzers, figures on buzzers. Question number one.

0:06:280:06:31

In The Wombles, the great uncle is named after which country?

0:06:310:06:35

Yes, Charlie?

0:06:350:06:36

-Bulgaria.

-Correct.

0:06:360:06:37

It is Bulgaria. The sculpture is yours.

0:06:370:06:40

Pickers, pick again.

0:06:410:06:42

Eve and Pat, you've chosen the book.

0:06:460:06:48

Gary and Silvana, you've gone for the dish again.

0:06:480:06:50

Charlie and Jim have gone for the diary.

0:06:500:06:53

Question two, quizzers.

0:06:530:06:54

After nitrogen, what is the second most abundant gas

0:06:540:06:57

in the air we...

0:06:570:06:58

-Yes, Charlie?

-Oxygen.

0:06:580:07:00

It is. The full question is - after nitrogen,

0:07:000:07:03

what is the second most abundant gas in the air we breathe?

0:07:030:07:05

And it is oxygen.

0:07:050:07:07

Well done. The diary is yours.

0:07:070:07:09

Pickers, make a pick.

0:07:090:07:11

Eve and Pat are sticking with the book.

0:07:130:07:15

Gary and Silvana have gone for the doll.

0:07:150:07:18

And Charlie and Jim have gone for the pendant.

0:07:180:07:20

Question three, quizzers.

0:07:200:07:22

Which US singer and actress is sometimes known

0:07:220:07:25

as the Divine Miss M?

0:07:250:07:26

It was Bette Midler.

0:07:290:07:31

Pickers, make a pick.

0:07:310:07:32

Eve and Pat are going for the dish.

0:07:360:07:37

Gary and Silvana are going for the dish.

0:07:370:07:40

Charlie and Jim are going for the book.

0:07:400:07:42

Question four, quizzers.

0:07:420:07:44

In which British port city was Charles Dickens born?

0:07:440:07:47

-Yes, Eve.

-Chatham.

0:07:480:07:50

Incorrect.

0:07:500:07:51

He did live there, but he was born in Portsmouth.

0:07:510:07:55

Eve and Pat, you're frozen out of the next question.

0:07:550:07:57

Silvana and Jim, please make your pick.

0:07:570:08:00

It's a battle for the doll.

0:08:020:08:04

In ballet, a pas de deux is a dance for how many people?

0:08:040:08:09

Yes, Charlie?

0:08:090:08:10

A wild guess, two.

0:08:100:08:12

Correct. Well done, the doll is yours.

0:08:120:08:15

Eve and Pat, you're back in.

0:08:150:08:17

Pickers, make a pick.

0:08:170:08:19

Eve and Pat have gone for the book.

0:08:200:08:22

Gary and Silvana, the dish.

0:08:220:08:23

Charlie and Jim, the watch stand.

0:08:230:08:25

The question is, who was the first Norman king of England?

0:08:250:08:29

-Yes, Charlie.

-William the Conqueror.

0:08:290:08:31

Yes! You're good at this.

0:08:310:08:33

OK. The watch stand is yours.

0:08:330:08:36

And into your collection.

0:08:360:08:38

We've got two more questions on this round. Pickers, make a pick.

0:08:380:08:41

Eve and Pat have chosen the book.

0:08:440:08:45

Gary and Silvana, the chair.

0:08:450:08:47

Charlie and Jim, the dish.

0:08:470:08:48

Eve and Pat, you really want that book, don't you?

0:08:480:08:52

Question seven.

0:08:520:08:53

Which 1977 Queen album

0:08:530:08:56

shares its name with a now-defunct newspaper?

0:08:560:08:59

No?

0:09:030:09:04

The answer is the News Of The World.

0:09:040:09:06

Ah!

0:09:060:09:08

1977. Gosh.

0:09:080:09:09

OK, this is the final pick and final question.

0:09:090:09:12

Pickers, make a pick.

0:09:120:09:13

Eve and Pat have gone for the book.

0:09:150:09:17

Gary and Silvana, the dish.

0:09:170:09:19

Charlie and Jim, the chair.

0:09:190:09:21

Question eight.

0:09:210:09:23

In a standard game of Twister,

0:09:230:09:25

the mat contains spots of green, red, yellow and which...

0:09:250:09:29

-Yes, Eve?

-Blue.

0:09:290:09:30

Correct.

0:09:300:09:32

In a standard game of Twister, the mat contains spots of green,

0:09:320:09:35

red, yellow and which other primary colour?

0:09:350:09:37

You said blue. It's correct.

0:09:370:09:39

-The book is finally yours.

-Hurray!

-Hurray!

0:09:390:09:42

Let's have a look at the end of round one.

0:09:420:09:45

We have Eve and Pat with the book.

0:09:450:09:47

Gary and Silvana, still to get off the mark,

0:09:470:09:50

but you've got plenty of time.

0:09:500:09:52

Charlie and Jim, you have the sculpture, the doll,

0:09:520:09:56

the watch stand and the diary.

0:09:560:09:59

So, our teams have started to build their collections,

0:09:590:10:01

but have they chosen wisely?

0:10:010:10:03

Well, before they have the chance to add more of them,

0:10:030:10:05

Charlie is going to give each pair a fact about a lot of their choice,

0:10:050:10:09

which should be everything they need to know to make a valuation.

0:10:090:10:12

You can choose something that's in your collection,

0:10:120:10:15

in someone else's collection, or still on the grid.

0:10:150:10:18

Eve and Pat, you're up first, and let's find out more about you.

0:10:180:10:21

So Eve, you say you're a church preacher.

0:10:210:10:24

-Yes.

-But is that the same as being an ordained vicar?

0:10:240:10:27

No. The church we go to

0:10:270:10:29

is sort of a nonconformist type of church,

0:10:290:10:32

and various people, laypeople, will preach in the church.

0:10:320:10:36

And Pat, you're a preacher too?

0:10:360:10:38

I'm a local preacher in the Methodist church,

0:10:380:10:41

so I go around a circuit of some 24 different little churches,

0:10:410:10:44

and I try to keep all the little village chapels open.

0:10:440:10:47

I once did a whole sermon in character as Nicodemus.

0:10:470:10:50

Oh, yes, I remember.

0:10:500:10:52

LAUGHTER

0:10:520:10:53

I'd like to see that!

0:10:530:10:54

OK, which lot would you like to know more about from Charlie?

0:10:560:10:59

I would like to know more about the sculpture, please.

0:10:590:11:02

The sculpture.

0:11:020:11:04

Well, it's a limited edition sterling silver seated pig

0:11:040:11:09

sculpted by - well spotted - Lucy Kinsella,

0:11:090:11:15

an English artist specialising in animalia.

0:11:150:11:19

The use of animals as a subject matter for silver sculptures

0:11:190:11:23

is a tradition that reaches back to the Victorian

0:11:230:11:25

and, indeed, Edwardian periods.

0:11:250:11:28

This little chap has been sculpted

0:11:280:11:30

in Kinsella's instantly recognisable style

0:11:300:11:33

and, like the rest of her work,

0:11:330:11:36

is a highly collectable item.

0:11:360:11:39

But is it worth more

0:11:390:11:42

than its weight in silver?

0:11:420:11:44

Hmm. I can see there's quite a lot of chin-rubbing there.

0:11:450:11:48

Charlie's looking at that with enormous interest.

0:11:480:11:51

Mind you, it is in his collection.

0:11:510:11:53

So we'll see what happens.

0:11:530:11:55

Thank you very much indeed, Eve and Pat.

0:11:550:11:57

Now, Gary and Silvana, lovely to meet you.

0:11:570:12:00

Gary, I understand you were at sea on and off for years?

0:12:000:12:03

Yes, I started off with a cadetship, four years,

0:12:030:12:07

and then at sea till '86.

0:12:070:12:11

Silvana, I understand YOU went to sea on and off for several years?

0:12:110:12:15

I certainly did. For my sins!

0:12:150:12:18

It was certainly exciting visiting all these countries,

0:12:180:12:21

but I have to say - you know, Fern, when you're at sea,

0:12:210:12:24

sometimes for three months, with 48 men and no sign of land,

0:12:240:12:29

-life's quite tough.

-I can imagine!

0:12:290:12:32

Welcome, Gary and Silvana.

0:12:320:12:34

What would you like to know more about from Charlie?

0:12:340:12:36

I would like to know more about the dish.

0:12:360:12:38

It is an Art Nouveau dish.

0:12:380:12:40

Classically stylised by intricate linear designs and flowing curves.

0:12:400:12:46

It's made from Britannia silver, which is an alloy of silver.

0:12:460:12:49

It's actually 95.8% silver.

0:12:490:12:52

Britannia silver is a finer metal than sterling silver.

0:12:520:12:56

It's in good condition with no visible damage.

0:12:560:12:59

However, it is a large ornate piece, and although collectable,

0:12:590:13:04

it may not be to everybody's taste.

0:13:040:13:07

This piece is big and bold and certainly doesn't go unnoticed,

0:13:070:13:11

but in terms of its value, is it a case of bold is beautiful?

0:13:110:13:15

Ooh.

0:13:160:13:17

OK. Well, let's leave Gary and Silvana to think about that

0:13:180:13:22

while we meet team three. Charlie and Jim, welcome, gentleman.

0:13:220:13:25

Charlie, you work for a charity called Wings for Warriors?

0:13:250:13:29

That's correct. Wings for Warriors teaches disabled

0:13:290:13:32

and medically discharged ex-servicemen and women

0:13:320:13:36

-how to take up a new career in commercial aviation.

-Amazing.

0:13:360:13:40

And Jim, you and Charlie haven't known each other very long,

0:13:400:13:43

-have you?

-No, not too long.

-How did you get together as a team?

0:13:430:13:45

Last December, I was doing a show on local radio,

0:13:450:13:49

and Charlie came in to look for a partner to come on this show,

0:13:490:13:54

and during the course of the conversation,

0:13:540:13:57

I happened to say to him, "I know a little bit about antiques.

0:13:570:14:00

"A very little bit. If you can't find anybody, I'll accompany you."

0:14:000:14:04

And here we are today.

0:14:040:14:06

We've become very good friends in that short time.

0:14:060:14:08

So, what would you like to know more about?

0:14:080:14:10

I'd like to know more about the diary, please.

0:14:100:14:12

This is an original World War I manuscript trench diary

0:14:120:14:17

of Lieutenant Hugh Stanley Hopcraft,

0:14:170:14:20

who lost his leg in the Somme.

0:14:200:14:23

There are daily entries from 22 December 1915

0:14:230:14:28

until 12 July 1916.

0:14:280:14:31

The entries offer an account of the life of a junior officer,

0:14:310:14:34

including his courtship of Kitty,

0:14:340:14:37

who, in the end, despite injury and adversity,

0:14:370:14:40

he marries.

0:14:400:14:42

It's a wonderful, sentimental piece.

0:14:420:14:45

But how much is it worth?

0:14:470:14:48

I don't think a huge amount.

0:14:480:14:50

Charlie, thank you very much indeed.

0:14:500:14:53

Well, I hope that's helped a bit,

0:14:530:14:54

and that you are now ready to play round two.

0:14:540:14:58

APPLAUSE

0:14:580:14:59

In this round, the pickers will select a lot to play for

0:15:000:15:03

and the quizzers will again try and secure it by answering correctly,

0:15:030:15:07

but this time around, the lots come with their own question categories,

0:15:070:15:10

and here they are.

0:15:100:15:12

So, for instance, if you wanted the paperweight,

0:15:120:15:15

I would offer the quizzers a choice of questions on the Beatles

0:15:150:15:18

or Civil Rights. Now, at the end of this round,

0:15:180:15:21

the team with the least valuable collection will be eliminated,

0:15:210:15:24

so choose wisely. Team one, you're up first.

0:15:240:15:28

Pat, tell me, what's your lot?

0:15:280:15:30

I would like to choose the stove, please.

0:15:300:15:33

The stove. OK, Eve,

0:15:330:15:35

how are you on either Civil Rights or Festivals And Holidays?

0:15:350:15:38

Erm, I think I'll go for Festivals And Holidays.

0:15:380:15:41

OK. Your question is this -

0:15:410:15:43

what name is given to the Hindu religious holiday

0:15:430:15:46

also known as the Festival of Lights?

0:15:460:15:48

-Diwali.

-Diwali it is,

0:15:480:15:51

and the stove is yours.

0:15:510:15:53

Very good.

0:15:530:15:54

Silvana, what would you like?

0:15:540:15:56

I'd like to select the dish, please.

0:15:560:15:58

The dish. Civil Rights or Flags Of The World, Gary?

0:15:580:16:02

We'll try Flags Of The World.

0:16:020:16:03

Flags Of The World. Here's your question.

0:16:030:16:05

How many stars are depicted on the flag of Australia?

0:16:050:16:09

Seven.

0:16:090:16:11

Oh! Six.

0:16:110:16:12

Unlucky, sorry. The dish is not yours.

0:16:120:16:15

It's still up for grabs.

0:16:150:16:17

Charlie and Jim. Jim, please pick a lot.

0:16:170:16:20

The pendant, please.

0:16:200:16:22

OK. Charlie, Plays or The Beatles?

0:16:220:16:25

-The Beatles.

-The Beatles.

0:16:250:16:28

On the cover of their 1969 album,

0:16:280:16:30

The Beatles are pictured walking across a zebra crossing

0:16:300:16:33

on which London street?

0:16:330:16:34

-Abbey Road.

-Correct.

0:16:340:16:36

The pendant is yours.

0:16:360:16:38

OK. Now, we're going to hot things up a bit.

0:16:380:16:40

Teams, have you missed out on that one item that you really wanted?

0:16:400:16:44

Because if so, here's your chance to get your hands on it.

0:16:440:16:47

From now on, you can either go for what's left on the grid,

0:16:470:16:50

or you can try to steal a lot that is in a rival team's collection.

0:16:500:16:55

If you choose to steal from another team,

0:16:550:16:57

they will get to choose which category your quizzer must face.

0:16:570:17:01

Eve and Pat, do you want to pick or do you want to steal from a rival?

0:17:010:17:06

I would like to go for the sculpture again, please, and steal that one.

0:17:060:17:11

Charlie and Jim, which category do you think

0:17:110:17:13

Eve would have most difficulty with?

0:17:130:17:15

-Rugby Union.

-Rugby Union.

0:17:150:17:17

My husband is an avid follower of rugby union.

0:17:170:17:21

Get in! Right.

0:17:210:17:23

-Here we go.

-I'd better get it right!

0:17:230:17:24

Right. In rugby union, loosehead and tighthead

0:17:240:17:28

are different types of what playing position?

0:17:280:17:31

Prop.

0:17:310:17:32

Oooh, that sculpture's yours!

0:17:320:17:34

LAUGHTER

0:17:340:17:36

APPLAUSE

0:17:360:17:37

Phew!

0:17:390:17:40

Ooh, well done.

0:17:400:17:42

Right, so Eve is not to be underestimated, boys.

0:17:420:17:44

You see that. LAUGHTER

0:17:440:17:46

Gary and Silvana, pick or steal?

0:17:460:17:48

I'd like to steal the doll.

0:17:480:17:51

The doll. Charlie and Jim,

0:17:510:17:53

find a category that you think Gary will have difficulty answering.

0:17:530:17:57

-Civil Rights.

-Civil Rights.

0:17:570:18:00

All right, Gary, here we go.

0:18:000:18:01

The UK's Civil Partnership Act

0:18:010:18:04

was approved by Parliament in which year?

0:18:040:18:07

Was that '15? 2015?

0:18:070:18:11

-Incorrect. I'm so sorry.

-Thought it would be.

0:18:110:18:13

It's actually 2004.

0:18:130:18:16

The doll stays firmly with Charlie and Jim.

0:18:160:18:19

And it's Jim's turn now - pick or steal?

0:18:190:18:21

Can we steal the sculpture back?

0:18:210:18:23

Funny that, isn't it? OK. LAUGHTER

0:18:230:18:25

Eve and Pat, what category is going to baffle Charlie?

0:18:250:18:29

I reckon Silent Films.

0:18:290:18:31

Yeah, go on. Let's try with that and go with Silent Films.

0:18:310:18:34

Silent Films.

0:18:340:18:36

Charlie, silent film star Rudolph Valentino

0:18:360:18:40

was born in which country?

0:18:400:18:41

America.

0:18:440:18:45

Incorrect. Italy. I'm sorry,

0:18:450:18:48

but for you, the sculpture doesn't come home.

0:18:480:18:51

It stays with Eve and Pat.

0:18:510:18:53

Do you want to pick from the grid, team one, or steal?

0:18:530:18:56

Erm, I think I would like to pick the paperweight, please.

0:18:560:18:59

The paperweight, yes.

0:18:590:19:01

Eve, Civil Rights or The Beatles?

0:19:010:19:03

I'll try The Beatles. It's my era.

0:19:040:19:06

Here we go.

0:19:060:19:08

Which member of the band joined The Beatles

0:19:080:19:10

when he was just 14 years old?

0:19:100:19:12

Ringo Starr.

0:19:130:19:15

Incorrect. George Harrison.

0:19:150:19:17

The paperweight stays.

0:19:170:19:19

Gary and Silvana, would you like to pick or steal?

0:19:190:19:21

I'd like to steal, please.

0:19:210:19:23

And I'd like to steal the doll.

0:19:230:19:25

The doll. OK, Charlie and Jim,

0:19:250:19:27

what category would you like to give Gary?

0:19:270:19:29

-Civil Rights.

-Worked the last time.

0:19:310:19:33

Poor Gary! LAUGHTER

0:19:330:19:35

The American civil rights activist Malcolm Little

0:19:350:19:38

replaced his surname with which letter of the alphabet?

0:19:380:19:41

An X.

0:19:410:19:43

-Yes!

-Hallelujah!

0:19:430:19:46

The crowd went...

0:19:460:19:48

All that for a doll.

0:19:480:19:50

Yes, all that for a doll, but she's yours. Here she comes.

0:19:500:19:54

Right. Charlie and Jim, pick or steal?

0:19:540:19:56

Steal the sculpture.

0:19:560:19:58

OK.

0:19:580:20:00

Eve and Pat, what category do you want to give Charlie?

0:20:000:20:04

Try Plays. It could be anything, couldn't it?

0:20:040:20:06

-Could be, yes.

-Try Plays.

-Plays.

-Plays.

-Yeah.

0:20:060:20:08

Charlie, how are you on plays in the theatre?

0:20:080:20:10

Aye, all the world's a stage.

0:20:100:20:12

LAUGHTER

0:20:120:20:14

I like it. OK, here we go.

0:20:160:20:18

Which play by Arthur Miller

0:20:180:20:20

is set during the Salem witch trials?

0:20:200:20:23

Erm...

0:20:240:20:25

Crucible.

0:20:270:20:29

Yes. Well done!

0:20:290:20:31

The sculpture is coming back to you.

0:20:310:20:34

Ooh. The girls are waving it goodbye.

0:20:340:20:37

Well done. That is the end of this round, so let's see

0:20:380:20:41

how the collections are looking.

0:20:410:20:43

Eve and Pat have the book and the stove.

0:20:430:20:47

Gary and Silvana have the doll.

0:20:470:20:49

Charlie and Jim have the diary, the pendant,

0:20:490:20:53

the sculpture and the watch stand.

0:20:530:20:56

OK, for one team, it is now sadly the end of the road.

0:20:560:20:59

Charlie has been keeping tabs, and the team

0:20:590:21:01

with the least valuable collection will now be eliminated.

0:21:010:21:04

So, Charlie, who are we saying goodbye to first?

0:21:040:21:07

Well, I'm afraid somebody has to leave,

0:21:070:21:09

and the pair leaving us first...

0:21:090:21:11

..is Gary and Silvana.

0:21:150:21:17

Aw.

0:21:170:21:20

ALL: Awwww.

0:21:200:21:22

APPLAUSE

0:21:220:21:23

Sorry about that.

0:21:230:21:25

Good luck. Good luck.

0:21:260:21:28

So, Gary and Silvana, we will miss you.

0:21:300:21:33

Not only are you leaving the game, but the one lot in your collection

0:21:330:21:36

is also leaving the game, and it is, of course, the Sindy doll.

0:21:360:21:39

But you want to find out how much that's worth, don't you?

0:21:390:21:42

-Yes.

-Yeah.

0:21:420:21:43

This is a lovely, lively Sindy doll from 1973.

0:21:430:21:48

Sindy is a British fashion doll, a rival to Barbie.

0:21:480:21:52

Sindy was the best-selling toy in the United Kingdom in 1968,

0:21:520:21:56

and again in 1970.

0:21:560:21:58

The Sindy doll is very popular among collectors,

0:21:580:22:01

including your good self, I believe, Fern.

0:22:010:22:04

I do love a Sindy doll. Yes.

0:22:040:22:06

And naturally, mint condition dolls are the most sought after.

0:22:060:22:10

Now, this one is boxed,

0:22:100:22:12

which suggests she's never been played with.

0:22:120:22:15

And the charm bracelet is still included.

0:22:150:22:18

So she's pretty, but is she worth a pretty penny?

0:22:180:22:21

We're not looking at something that is earth-shatteringly valuable here.

0:22:220:22:26

We're looking at £80.

0:22:260:22:29

-Oh.

-Aw.

0:22:300:22:31

So, Gary and Silvana, thank you for playing For What It's Worth.

0:22:310:22:35

-Thank you.

-Thank you for having us.

0:22:350:22:37

APPLAUSE

0:22:370:22:39

And also, the unclaimed items in the grid are now leaving the game.

0:22:410:22:44

So let's quickly find out from Charlie what they're worth

0:22:440:22:47

and if the top lot is still in the game.

0:22:470:22:50

-Charlie?

-Well, we'll find out, Fern, won't we?

0:22:500:22:53

The milk churn - this particular milk churn dates from the 1930s,

0:22:530:22:57

when the first cylindrical types were introduced.

0:22:570:23:00

With their mushroom-shaped lids,

0:23:000:23:03

they have since become an iconic design in their own modest way.

0:23:030:23:07

I'm not surprised that this churn went past-your-eyes.

0:23:070:23:10

GROANING AND LAUGHTER

0:23:100:23:12

Oh, dear.

0:23:120:23:13

I do apologise.

0:23:140:23:16

Value £30.

0:23:160:23:18

-Ah!

-Ah, yes!

0:23:180:23:19

Now, the chair.

0:23:210:23:22

Here we have a Victorian wingback armchair.

0:23:220:23:25

It has a typically low seat, cabriole-style armrests and legs.

0:23:250:23:30

Traditionally found in an upper class home during the 19th century,

0:23:300:23:33

these chairs were a symbol of wealth and comfort.

0:23:330:23:37

But does this still ring true today?

0:23:370:23:40

Yes, it would have made quite a lot more money some years ago,

0:23:400:23:44

and so we've priced it at a reasonable £150,

0:23:440:23:48

so you haven't missed anything enormous.

0:23:480:23:51

Now, the paperweight.

0:23:510:23:53

It's a medium paperweight by the French glass-maker Baccarat.

0:23:530:23:57

This paperweight has a millefiori design.

0:23:570:24:00

Millefiori can loosely be translated from the Italian

0:24:000:24:03

as "a thousand flowers".

0:24:030:24:05

Pat and Eve, you liked this

0:24:050:24:06

and came up with the millefiori word, didn't you?

0:24:060:24:09

Well done. Charlie, you've got several of these at home, have you?

0:24:090:24:13

Yes, but I don't think they go back that far.

0:24:140:24:17

They're more modern ones, are they?

0:24:170:24:18

Yeah. This is a pretty good paperweight,

0:24:180:24:21

and you've passed by £800.

0:24:210:24:23

-Oh.

-Ooh.

0:24:230:24:25

Another cup - this is a piece

0:24:250:24:27

of Staffordshire blue and white transfer printed earthenware.

0:24:270:24:30

This willow patterned cup is quite old, as you can see

0:24:300:24:33

from the copious cracking and yellowing of the porcelain.

0:24:330:24:36

It was made certainly no earlier than 1820.

0:24:360:24:39

The willow pattern is instantly recognisable

0:24:390:24:42

because of the popularity of the pattern

0:24:420:24:44

and the sheer quantity of objects that it adorns.

0:24:440:24:48

And value - well, let's cut to the chase.

0:24:480:24:52

This is worth the best part of nothing.

0:24:520:24:54

-Oh!

-Wow.

0:24:540:24:56

Now, we have one more item left, don't we?

0:24:560:24:59

And that's this magnificent dish.

0:24:590:25:02

We talked about it already.

0:25:020:25:03

We know it's 1906.

0:25:030:25:05

It is from the Art Nouveau period of the late 19th century.

0:25:050:25:09

Yes, it wasn't that easy to find the hallmark

0:25:090:25:12

because it was right up on the top.

0:25:120:25:14

I think you spent more time looking at the back of it

0:25:140:25:16

than the front of it. It was made by Aldwinckle and Slater.

0:25:160:25:19

Design by Latino Movio,

0:25:190:25:22

another wonderful designer.

0:25:220:25:24

And if you think of that period,

0:25:240:25:26

we think of Klimt, we think of Tiffany,

0:25:260:25:28

we think of Gaudi,

0:25:280:25:30

we think of Lalique,

0:25:300:25:32

and it's a fabulous item, and it's still there.

0:25:320:25:36

And I rather wished it had been here.

0:25:360:25:39

Because it is worth £2,500.

0:25:410:25:45

Oh!

0:25:450:25:46

But it's gone. It was missed.

0:25:480:25:50

Right, teams, congratulations on getting this far.

0:25:500:25:53

You now have one last chance to pick our expert's brains,

0:25:530:25:57

so which lot do you need to know more about?

0:25:570:25:59

-Team one.

-I'd like to know about the watch stand, please.

0:25:590:26:02

The watch stand.

0:26:020:26:04

Now, it's a late 19th century gilt brass watch stand,

0:26:040:26:08

designed in the Gothic Revival style, circa 1880.

0:26:080:26:12

Pocket watch stands were commonplace at the time.

0:26:130:26:15

They served a simple yet practical purpose.

0:26:150:26:18

You pop your pocket watch into the stand, and voila -

0:26:180:26:22

you've got yourself a bedside or desktop clock.

0:26:220:26:27

This is a particularly rare example,

0:26:270:26:30

designed so that the watch becomes the window

0:26:300:26:33

of a Gothic cathedral.

0:26:330:26:35

The fantasy of the knight standing guard under one's pocket watch

0:26:350:26:39

is frankly rather charming.

0:26:390:26:41

But is it valuable?

0:26:410:26:43

That's for you to think about.

0:26:430:26:45

Charlie and Jim, what would you like to know more about?

0:26:460:26:49

-The book, please.

-The book.

0:26:490:26:51

Published, as I think you spotted, in 1854,

0:26:510:26:55

it's a first edition copy of Hard Times,

0:26:550:26:59

the 10th novel written by Charles Dickens, who, of course,

0:26:590:27:02

was regarded as one of the greatest novelists of the Victorian era.

0:27:020:27:06

Inside it is a portion clipped from the front of an envelope

0:27:060:27:10

signed "Charles Dickens"

0:27:100:27:11

and addressed "Mr Hicks, Mrs Bradbury and Evans."

0:27:110:27:15

Mr Hicks was Charles Hicks,

0:27:150:27:17

a foreman printer, and is mentioned in Dickens' correspondence.

0:27:170:27:21

However, the condition leaves a little to be desired,

0:27:210:27:25

as it has some fading to the spine and edges.

0:27:250:27:28

What's it worth?

0:27:300:27:31

Mm.

0:27:310:27:32

Well, it's now time for our final round, and at the end of it,

0:27:320:27:35

we will have our winners.

0:27:350:27:36

APPLAUSE

0:27:360:27:37

In this round, I'm going to show you a category

0:27:390:27:42

and 12 possible answers.

0:27:420:27:44

Nine of the answers will be correct, three are not.

0:27:440:27:47

Each of you will then take turns to choose an answer

0:27:470:27:50

you think is correct, and as it's the final round,

0:27:500:27:52

both quizzers and pickers will play, so there's nowhere to hide.

0:27:520:27:56

Pick a wrong answer and your opponents will be able

0:27:560:27:59

to steal a lot from your collection.

0:27:590:28:01

If all nine correct answers are given,

0:28:010:28:04

then the team who gives the final correct answer will be the winners.

0:28:040:28:07

We'll play three questions in total,

0:28:070:28:10

and the pair with the most valuable collection

0:28:100:28:12

can choose to go first or second on this one.

0:28:120:28:15

So, Charlie, who is that at the moment?

0:28:150:28:17

I can reveal that the team who currently

0:28:170:28:19

has the most valuable collection...

0:28:190:28:21

..is Charlie and Jim.

0:28:260:28:29

Charlie and Jim, the first question is...

0:28:290:28:31

The Simpsons Guest Stars.

0:28:330:28:36

Can you find any of the actors or public figures

0:28:360:28:38

who played themselves on the show?

0:28:380:28:41

Just to clarify, we are looking for people

0:28:410:28:43

who have specifically provided their voice, not their likeness.

0:28:430:28:48

Would you like to go first or second?

0:28:480:28:50

-We'll go first.

-Let's see the answers.

0:28:500:28:53

Nine of those names will be correct answers, three of them are wrong.

0:28:540:28:57

Charlie, give me an answer.

0:28:570:28:59

Meat Loaf.

0:28:590:29:01

Meat Loaf.

0:29:010:29:02

And it's wrong. He never did.

0:29:060:29:09

Let's have a look at what the other answers are.

0:29:090:29:12

The wrong answers were Brad Pitt and Prince Charles,

0:29:130:29:18

neither of whom have lent their voice to the Simpsons.

0:29:180:29:21

Well, Eve and Pat, what are you going to steal from Charlie and Jim?

0:29:210:29:25

I guess it's no surprise -

0:29:250:29:27

please could I have my piggy sculpture back?

0:29:270:29:29

-We had it first!

-The poor piggy.

0:29:290:29:32

He really is piggy in the middle, isn't he?

0:29:320:29:34

Piggy sculpture, go. Back to Eve and Pat.

0:29:340:29:37

Now, then, Eve and Pat, this is your question.

0:29:370:29:40

Have a look at this.

0:29:400:29:41

Moons Of The Solar System.

0:29:420:29:44

You need to find the moons of the planets in our solar system.

0:29:440:29:49

Would you like to go first or second?

0:29:490:29:51

-First, please.

-First.

0:29:510:29:52

Here are the answers.

0:29:520:29:53

Eve, give me an answer.

0:29:560:29:57

-Phoebe.

-Phoebe.

0:29:570:29:59

Yes, that's the moon of Saturn.

0:30:010:30:03

Charlie.

0:30:030:30:04

-Ganymede.

-Ganymede.

0:30:050:30:08

It's correct. It's a moon of Jupiter.

0:30:090:30:12

Pat.

0:30:120:30:13

Citrine.

0:30:130:30:15

-Ah!

-Oh, incorrect. It's a quartz-like stone.

0:30:170:30:20

-A yellowy colour, I think, mostly.

-I know that.

0:30:200:30:22

I thought it might be a moon as well!

0:30:220:30:24

Oh, well, it's not a moon as well, sadly.

0:30:240:30:26

Let's have a look where the other wrong answers are.

0:30:260:30:29

Apollo, which was a space mission, and Esmeralda -

0:30:290:30:32

she was in The Hunchback Of Notre-Dame.

0:30:320:30:35

LAUGHTER

0:30:350:30:36

So Charlie and Jim, what are you going to steal from Eve and Pat?

0:30:360:30:40

-Gosh, that's a hard one.

-That's a really hard one.

0:30:400:30:42

Can we confer?

0:30:420:30:43

LAUGHTER

0:30:430:30:45

-Oink.

-Yeah. It has to be the sculpture.

0:30:450:30:48

It has to be the sculpture. This pig's grown wings.

0:30:480:30:51

Come along, piggy.

0:30:510:30:52

And he's back in your collection.

0:30:530:30:56

Final question now.

0:30:560:30:57

Team three, Charlie and Jim, here is the question.

0:30:570:31:00

British Unesco World Heritage Sites.

0:31:020:31:05

Unesco is a United Nations organisation

0:31:050:31:08

that protects and preserves cultural and national heritage sites

0:31:080:31:11

around the world that are considered

0:31:110:31:14

to be of outstanding value to humanity.

0:31:140:31:17

These heritage sites can be buildings, structures,

0:31:170:31:20

natural wonders or parks.

0:31:200:31:22

You need to find the UK sites

0:31:220:31:25

which are currently covered by Unesco listings.

0:31:250:31:28

So, Charlie and Jim, would you like to go first or second?

0:31:280:31:31

We'll go first, Fern, thank you.

0:31:310:31:33

It's all on this question. Final question. You're going first.

0:31:330:31:36

Let's have a look at the answers.

0:31:360:31:39

Charlie, give me an answer.

0:31:390:31:41

-Stonehenge.

-Let's have a look.

0:31:410:31:43

Phew. Yes.

0:31:450:31:46

Stonehenge is correct.

0:31:460:31:48

Eve, give me an answer.

0:31:480:31:49

The Jurassic Coast.

0:31:490:31:51

Yes. East Devon and Dorset coastline, of course.

0:31:540:31:58

Jim.

0:31:580:31:59

White Cliffs of Dover.

0:32:010:32:04

The White Cliffs of Dover.

0:32:040:32:06

Oh!

0:32:060:32:07

Sadly not. Let's have a look at the other wrong answers.

0:32:090:32:12

Victoria and Albert Museum and Windsor Castle.

0:32:130:32:16

Uh-oh.

0:32:160:32:17

LAUGHTER

0:32:170:32:20

Eve and Pat, would you like to steal?

0:32:200:32:22

-I think we would.

-You know they say pigs might fly?

0:32:240:32:27

Yes.

0:32:270:32:28

-It's coming back.

-Could our pig fly, please?

0:32:280:32:30

Go on, piggy, go back to Eve and Pat.

0:32:300:32:32

-There he goes.

-He's dizzy.

0:32:320:32:34

-He must be dizzy.

-This is the most hotly contested pig in history.

0:32:340:32:38

LAUGHTER

0:32:380:32:39

That's it. Your collections are now complete and fixed,

0:32:390:32:42

and will determine which team is victorious.

0:32:420:32:44

Charlie, who are today's winners?

0:32:440:32:47

I can reveal that the team with the most valuable collection

0:32:470:32:50

and the winners of today's show are...

0:32:500:32:54

..Eve and Pat.

0:32:550:32:57

THEY LAUGH

0:32:570:32:58

APPLAUSE

0:32:580:33:01

Our commiserations, though, to Charlie and Jim.

0:33:060:33:09

You played sensationally.

0:33:090:33:11

Sadly, you didn't create a valuable enough collection,

0:33:110:33:14

but I'm quite sure that you would like to find out

0:33:140:33:17

how much the collection you have is worth.

0:33:170:33:19

Charlie.

0:33:190:33:21

Well, the watch stand is there, isn't it?

0:33:210:33:24

It's typical Gothic Revival,

0:33:240:33:27

but I suspect that this is getting on towards 1900.

0:33:270:33:31

The Gothic Revival, one thinks of Ruskin, Pugin, William Burges.

0:33:310:33:35

This is not without value.

0:33:370:33:38

£120.

0:33:380:33:39

There was a lot of chat with your diamond pendant.

0:33:400:33:44

It's a bit of a mysterious piece.

0:33:440:33:47

We don't know who made it,

0:33:470:33:48

we don't know exactly when,

0:33:480:33:51

but it does reflect the Victorian trend

0:33:510:33:53

for fashionable displays of remembrance for loved ones

0:33:530:33:57

that were inspired by Queen Victoria herself.

0:33:570:34:00

There was a discussion, wasn't there,

0:34:000:34:02

as to whether they were diamonds or whether they weren't.

0:34:020:34:04

Yes, they are. They're not the finest diamonds.

0:34:040:34:06

They're not the largest diamonds.

0:34:060:34:08

But, nevertheless, they are diamonds, and we have a value

0:34:080:34:12

perhaps you might think surprisingly low, but £300.

0:34:120:34:15

The final object is that remarkable diary.

0:34:180:34:23

It has the original burgundy leather,

0:34:230:34:25

which shows some wear and scuffing, not surprising.

0:34:250:34:29

There is also some cracking at the hinges

0:34:290:34:32

and the slight loss to the spine.

0:34:320:34:34

It's a wonderful sentimental piece,

0:34:340:34:37

and it's not without value, certainly.

0:34:370:34:40

£600 would be the auction value of this item.

0:34:400:34:44

So what's the total value of Charlie and Jim's collection?

0:34:440:34:47

The total value is £1,020.

0:34:470:34:52

-Not a bad sum.

-Not a bad sum at all.

0:34:520:34:55

Thank you so much for playing For What It's Worth.

0:34:550:34:58

APPLAUSE

0:34:580:34:59

So, well done, Eve and Pat.

0:35:030:35:05

You are today's winners.

0:35:050:35:06

All you've got to do is pick one of the lots in your collection

0:35:060:35:09

and we will give you its value in cash.

0:35:090:35:12

So, which one do you want to choose?

0:35:120:35:14

Oh, good grief. Shall we stick with our flying pig?

0:35:140:35:17

Stick with the pig.

0:35:170:35:18

LAUGHTER

0:35:180:35:20

-Well, the book...

-Although the book, yes.

0:35:200:35:22

-It was...

-It's a first edition.

-Yes, absolutely.

0:35:220:35:25

Presentation copy. It's got the envelope,

0:35:250:35:29

though the book's not in good condition.

0:35:290:35:32

No. Oh, let's stick... Shall we stick with the pig?

0:35:320:35:34

-Oh, let's stick with the pig.

-Are you happy?

-I'm happy with the pig.

0:35:340:35:37

-We will stick with our pig.

-We like the pig.

-We like our pig. We're going to stick with it.

0:35:370:35:41

Great. Sticking with the pig.

0:35:410:35:42

I think you should, after all of that anyway, don't you?

0:35:420:35:45

OK. We're going to stick with the pig.

0:35:450:35:47

So, before we tell you what the pig is worth,

0:35:470:35:51

Charlie, can you please tell us what Eve and Pat have not won?

0:35:510:35:54

I certainly can. They aren't taking home a stove.

0:35:540:35:57

Probably just as well, really, cos you wouldn't be able to pick it up.

0:35:570:36:01

This is a cast-iron stove.

0:36:010:36:03

Obviously it's seen better days but it's still functional,

0:36:030:36:06

if someone were to take the time to clean it and fit it properly,

0:36:060:36:10

because it's practically indestructible.

0:36:100:36:13

And isn't that part of its charm?

0:36:130:36:15

Whilst the exact age is indeterminate,

0:36:150:36:18

it's at least 100 years old.

0:36:180:36:20

And there's a massive market for kitchenalia in all its guises

0:36:200:36:24

and, let's face it, people collect weirder things

0:36:240:36:26

than cast-iron stoves.

0:36:260:36:29

Well, I don't think any of you really rated it, but of course,

0:36:290:36:32

you have ended up with it.

0:36:320:36:33

Auntie had one in her home, I think you said, Eve.

0:36:340:36:37

That's exactly what we both said, I think.

0:36:370:36:39

-Yes.

-Remember it well.

-It was me.

0:36:390:36:40

I remember being asked to blacklead it when I came for my holidays.

0:36:400:36:44

Oh, goodness me, they were the days!

0:36:440:36:46

Fantastically valuable,

0:36:460:36:47

because this is worth £70.

0:36:470:36:50

THEY LAUGH

0:36:500:36:52

Now, the book. We've talked about the book.

0:36:540:36:57

First edition with a signature, and a valuable item.

0:36:570:37:01

Whether it's worth more or less than the pig,

0:37:010:37:04

we will find out later, won't we, Fern?

0:37:040:37:07

But I can tell you that this splendid tome

0:37:070:37:10

is worth £800.

0:37:100:37:12

Ooh.

0:37:120:37:13

Right. Eve and Pat,

0:37:150:37:18

you have won the value of the pig sculpture.

0:37:180:37:20

And just out of interest, what do you think it's worth?

0:37:200:37:23

I would think it's probably worth over 1,000.

0:37:230:37:27

-Over 1,000?

-Is what I would say, yeah.

0:37:270:37:29

Yes. Do you agree with that, Eve?

0:37:290:37:31

I'm going with Pat because she is more clued up on these than me,

0:37:310:37:35

but, yeah, I would say around 1,000.

0:37:350:37:36

OK. Well, before we tell you what it's worth,

0:37:360:37:39

I wonder if we could tempt you with our mystery lot.

0:37:390:37:42

Would you like to join me?

0:37:420:37:43

Eve and Pat, here you are.

0:37:470:37:49

Here is your beautiful piggy.

0:37:490:37:52

-Aw, he's lovely.

-Now, what was it about him

0:37:520:37:54

that really made you fall in love?

0:37:540:37:55

Well, I like pigs in the first place.

0:37:550:37:58

I used to collect little pigs at one point,

0:37:580:38:00

so I sort of gravitated straight towards him,

0:38:000:38:02

but I wasn't sure because he's a bit shiny.

0:38:020:38:04

-I thought he was a bit too shiny for an antique, you see.

-Mm.

0:38:040:38:07

So when I picked him up and he was such a heavy weight,

0:38:070:38:10

and I thought, there's something about this.

0:38:100:38:12

It's very heavy, it's very solid.

0:38:120:38:13

Got a gorgeous expression when you look at him face on.

0:38:130:38:16

-Yes. Very unusual.

-Yeah.

0:38:160:38:17

But I think we ought to bring in the third party now.

0:38:170:38:20

So would you like to reveal the mystery lot?

0:38:200:38:22

Will I put my temptation hat on?

0:38:220:38:24

-Mm-hm.

-Here we go, girls.

-I don't want to be tempted.

0:38:240:38:27

-I'm no good at that.

-I'm going to tempt you.

0:38:270:38:29

-Oh.

-Ah. Gosh, that's pretty, isn't it?

0:38:300:38:33

-Oh, that's gorgeous.

-Ooh!

-I thought so.

0:38:330:38:36

"Oh, I love you, piggy, I love you, piggy - oh, hang on a minute."

0:38:360:38:39

LAUGHTER

0:38:390:38:40

How fickle you are, girls.

0:38:400:38:42

You've forgotten about your pig now, haven't you?

0:38:420:38:44

Oh, he's beautiful, but they're beautiful, aren't they?

0:38:440:38:47

They are lovely.

0:38:470:38:48

-Would you like to know something about it?

-Yes, please.

0:38:480:38:51

Well, the tea service -

0:38:510:38:54

it is extremely beautiful.

0:38:540:38:56

Silver and enamel tea service.

0:38:560:38:59

It dates from around the 1920s or '30s.

0:38:590:39:02

Can't be certain, because there are no official hallmarks

0:39:020:39:06

stamped on any of the silver surfaces,

0:39:060:39:08

but there's a silver mark at the very bottom of each piece

0:39:080:39:11

inscribed into the enamel,

0:39:110:39:13

confirming that it is, indeed, proper silver.

0:39:130:39:17

Below that are two Chinese characters

0:39:180:39:20

which are the maker's mark.

0:39:200:39:22

Unfortunately, the maker cannot be traced, as the tea service was made

0:39:220:39:26

for the Chinese export market.

0:39:260:39:28

It's what's known as a cabinet piece -

0:39:280:39:30

created purely for decorative purposes.

0:39:300:39:34

As bizarre as it seems,

0:39:340:39:35

there was, and still is, a big market

0:39:350:39:38

for such non-functional ornamental pieces.

0:39:380:39:41

This service is in pristine condition.

0:39:410:39:44

It's never seen action.

0:39:440:39:46

Couple that with the recent boom in the market for Chinese objects,

0:39:460:39:50

and this could be a very exciting object indeed.

0:39:500:39:56

Having said that,

0:39:560:39:58

is it more exciting than a pig?

0:39:580:40:00

Well, we'll find out in a minute.

0:40:010:40:03

Ah, you see, all that's left for you to decide now

0:40:030:40:06

is which one to go for.

0:40:060:40:08

Tell me your immediate thoughts on this tea set.

0:40:080:40:10

Well, it is so beautiful. It's so unusual and dainty, isn't it?

0:40:100:40:14

The silver and enamel is lovely.

0:40:140:40:17

Oh, good gracious me.

0:40:170:40:19

Charlie, what have you done to us?

0:40:190:40:21

LAUGHTER

0:40:210:40:23

-Because I still love the pig.

-I still love the pig.

0:40:230:40:25

Well, we were saying whatever the mystery object is, we're going to stick with our pig.

0:40:250:40:29

Whatever it is, we're going to stick with our pig, and then we looked at it, and oh, it's beautiful!

0:40:290:40:33

-It is beautiful.

-It is beautiful, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:40:330:40:36

-Oh, I think I'm going to stick with the pig.

-Pig.

-If you're happy.

0:40:360:40:39

-Shake.

-Oh, that's it.

0:40:390:40:40

That's a definite confirmation.

0:40:400:40:42

-Yep. The pig.

-We're sticking with the pig. OK.

0:40:420:40:44

You've chosen the sculpture, and we know that now you have won

0:40:440:40:48

its value in cash.

0:40:480:40:49

So let's hope that's a lot.

0:40:490:40:52

Oh, but Charlie, before you reveal how much they're taking home today,

0:40:520:40:55

please could you tell us what they've thrown away?

0:40:550:40:58

I have to agree with you.

0:40:580:40:59

This is fantastic quality.

0:40:590:41:02

But, it is 20th century.

0:41:020:41:05

It's not everybody's cup of tea.

0:41:050:41:07

LAUGHTER

0:41:070:41:08

Oh, dear. I do apologise.

0:41:100:41:12

It gets worse, doesn't it?

0:41:120:41:13

The value of it. Yeah, it's pretty valuable.

0:41:150:41:17

As indeed, your breath was actually taken away when you saw this,

0:41:170:41:20

-wasn't it?

-Yes, yes, yes, yes.

-Yeah.

0:41:200:41:21

I think if we could attribute it to a famous maker, then frankly,

0:41:210:41:24

it would be a no-brainer, but we don't know who made it,

0:41:240:41:27

so we've put a fairly conservative price on it,

0:41:270:41:30

but nevertheless,

0:41:300:41:32

-£1,200.

-Oh, wow!

-Wow!

0:41:320:41:34

1,200 crispies.

0:41:340:41:36

-Right. We don't know whether piggy will be worth that, but never mind.

-But we like piggy.

-We like piggy.

0:41:360:41:41

-OK. The tea set has gone.

-It has.

-£1,200 has gone.

0:41:410:41:44

-Let's focus on the pig that you've been very loyal to.

-Yes.

0:41:440:41:48

-So, will you please tell us how much this pig is worth?

-I will.

0:41:480:41:51

Lucy Kinsella - very much still alive.

0:41:510:41:54

Born in 1960, but somebody that's exhibited at the Royal Academy,

0:41:540:41:58

at Olympia, the Chelsea Arts Fair.

0:41:580:42:02

And as I said earlier, if it's quality,

0:42:020:42:04

does it need to be that old? No, it doesn't, really.

0:42:040:42:07

And, of course, it's solid silver, which you spotted,

0:42:070:42:11

and the character - it's absolutely got the character.

0:42:110:42:15

-It's splendid.

-It's got attitude.

0:42:150:42:17

And what was your valuation?

0:42:170:42:18

We thought it would be about... I thought about 1,000.

0:42:180:42:21

I thought it would creep into four figures.

0:42:210:42:23

Well, I think you and I should swap positions.

0:42:230:42:26

-Ooh!

-Because I think you've won valuer of the year award.

0:42:260:42:30

Because it's worth £1,000!

0:42:300:42:32

Oh, well done!

0:42:320:42:34

APPLAUSE

0:42:340:42:36

Many congratulations.

0:42:360:42:38

-Well done.

-Thank you, Fern.

-Well done.

0:42:380:42:40

-Oh, Eve, congratulations.

-Thank you very much.

0:42:400:42:43

-Thank you, Charlie.

-Brilliant, girls.

-Fantastic.

0:42:430:42:45

So, today, Eve and Pat, you are going home

0:42:450:42:47

with £1,000, or £500 each.

0:42:470:42:49

Which way are you going to do it? What are you going to do with it?

0:42:490:42:52

-Split it down the middle.

-Oh, yes, absolutely. Split it down the middle.

0:42:520:42:55

You've been great contestants. Thank you very much. It's lovely to have you here, Charlie.

0:42:550:42:59

Thank you so much for sharing all your expertise and knowledge.

0:42:590:43:02

Thank you, girls - you've been absolutely brilliant. And thank you, too, for watching.

0:43:020:43:05

We look forward to seeing you again when more teams will be trying

0:43:050:43:08

to spot the lot to win the lot on For What It's Worth.

0:43:080:43:10

I'll see you next time. Goodbye for now. Bye!

0:43:100:43:13

Brilliant.

0:43:130:43:14

APPLAUSE

0:43:140:43:16

Charlie Ross assists Fern Britton, giving her expert insight into the wonderful world of antiques and collectibles as the three pairs of contestants answer general knowledge questions, hoping for the chance to add antiques to their collections and win the game.