Massive Movers Absolute Genius: Monster Builds


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LineFromTo

-Welcome to the genius world of...

-Monster engineering!

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Each show, we're going to introduce you to three geniuses...

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-Wow!

-Oh!

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..whose ideas have quite literally built the world.

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We put all their epic brilliance...

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Yes! ..to the test...

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Hit it! Hit it!

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..when we tackle our own genius monster build.

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Don't you dare demolish this!

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Going higher... Why is it swinging?

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..faster...

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..and scarier...

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-Oh, no!

-..all in the name of science.

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That is a massive piece of construction.

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What could possibly go wrong?

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On this show, we're lifting...

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Pulling...

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..and dropping. Look out!

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As we get to grips with some seriously massive movers.

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This is...

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Absolute Genius.

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It's a puzzle that's stretched engineering's finest brains -

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how to move the stuff that's simply too heavy to lift.

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Hey! Not a lot I can't lift.

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Huh?

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I'll show you this.

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Arrrrrgh! Gah!

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Brilliant. Cheers, folks, thank you.

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The mind is definitely mightier than the muscle,

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as proved by today's three geniuses.

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So whether it's on land, on water or in the air,

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let's get massive moving!

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Oh, dear, this is hard work.

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For almost as long as there have been people on the planet,

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there has been a need to shift heavy materials.

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From the earliest civilisations onward,

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humans have needed to move loads from A to B.

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And as we got more and more ambitious about the size

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of the things we're trying to shift..

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Engineers had to come up with bigger

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and more complicated solutions for moving them.

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In the 1700s,

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our first genius devised the biggest and most impressive yet.

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Ladies and gentlemen, we give to you canal pioneer Mr James Brindley.

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-How do?

-How do?

-How do?

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-How do?

-How do?

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-BOTH:

-How do?

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Canals like these were once a lot more

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than just somewhere for a relaxing holiday.

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They were in fact floating motorways,

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which kept British industry moving.

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Canal expert Christine Richardson is here to tell us more.

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How were heavy items transported around for the canals were built?

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Well, they were mainly transported on rivers,

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or on the sea, of course, as well.

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It's fine if you want to move your heavy goods the direction

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the river is flowing, or the tide is going on the coast,

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but if you want to go in the opposite direction, it's very,

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-very difficult.

-That brings us onto Brindley.

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What was his genius?

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His genius was to be an engineer and a surveyor who could actually

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see the lie of the land by just looking at it,

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so that you could have an artificial river wherever you wanted one.

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Before, you've got to put it on a boat and then go all the way round

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the coast in storms and all the rest of it,

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so when companies needed a lot of coal or a lot of other heavy goods,

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they were suffering because they couldn't get them in time.

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But why is water such a good way of moving heavy stuff around?

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-Fran!

-Hello!

-BOTH:

-It's Fran!

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Meet Fran, our scientist friend...

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Go!

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..who can explain things in a way that even we can understand.

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It worked, Frannie!

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She loves a good experiment...

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No!

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And best of all, she pops up...

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-Hello!

-..whenever we need her.

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Frannie, everybody.

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-This is coal.

-It is.

-It is, yep.

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And these bags are full of the stuff.

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-They are.

-And they each weigh 25kg.

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-25kg! I bet I can lift that.

-Go on, lift one up. Here he goes.

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Go on, lad!

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-All right, it's heavy.

-Yeah, it's pretty heavy.

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But coal is one of the major things that they wanted to transport

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-back in the day.

-Right.

-So I was thinking,

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"How much coal can you guys pull on land?"

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Each of these sledges has been loaded with around 100kg of coal.

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That's way too much to lift, but can we drag them?

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Three, two, one...

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THEY GROAN

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Come on! Come on!

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-Little bit of movement?

-Oh, my hands!

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Come on, lad! Shift your butt!

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Go on, go on! Just a little bit.

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-A little bit of movement would be good.

-I'm trying, Fran!

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Argh! Oh, it's impossible.

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It's pretty difficult, right?

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-Why?

-Because the bottom is smooth, it should just fly along.

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Well, the thing is, what we're going to do is look at the science that

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will help you move much more weight with much less effort.

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-Let me show you.

-All right.

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So, this is another bag of coal, and this is a spring balance,

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-or some luggage scales.

-Right.

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And you can use this to see how strong a force it is,

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-because weight is actually a force.

-Is it? I never knew that.

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Yeah, yeah. So what happens is the Earth's gravity

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pulls downward on an object,

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and it's that pull that gives an object weight.

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-Wow.

-So we can use this to weigh our bag of coal.

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How much does it weigh?

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-About 9kg.

-About 9kg?

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So, on Earth, this will always weigh about 9kg, right?

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-Right.

-Right.

-Wrong.

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-Oh!

-If I take it over to some water...

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-Yes.

-..and put it in the water,

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then watch what happens to the scales.

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-Ah!

-Hang on a minute, what's happened?

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-How is that happening?

-It's hardly weighing anything now.

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Yeah, it weighs much less.

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Because there's no force on it from gravity.

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Ah, no, no. It still has the force,

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but there's something called upthrust.

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-Upthrust?

-Yeah, yeah, yeah.

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So, what's happening is the water is actually pushing upwards

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against the bag of coal,

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acting in the opposite direction to the pull of gravity.

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So the overall downwards pull is less and our object weighs less.

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Brindley knew that putting heavy objects on water

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makes them seem lighter.

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It was this genius bit of science,

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along with his engineering know-how, which produced the canal network.

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So, what I want to do is super-size this experiment

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to show the genius of Brindley.

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Uh-oh. I don't like the sound of this.

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-Come on!

-What's she like, eh?

-Eh?

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Ooh, my name's Dick, my name's Dom, and I'm scared!

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This canal boat is going to be loaded with 12 sacks of coal -

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that's a backbreaking 300kg -

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more than we've already failed to budge with those sledges.

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And, as if that doesn't provide enough of a challenge,

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Fran's invited along some cuddly chums.

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Weighing in at 169kg, it's "Iron Man" Mike Roberts.

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At 139kg, it's "Rockgod" Big 50.

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Coming in at 129kg, make way for H Block.

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Introducing Tony Bond at a solid 101kg.

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Meet Danny Masters, tipping the scales at 97kg.

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And last but not least, it's Jade at a cool 88kg.

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Throw in the weight of the boat itself...

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And that's well over 1,000kg.

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Or, to put it another way, more than a tonne.

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You think we can pull more than a tonne just because it's on water?

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I think you can do it, with this rope here,

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and we've got that upthrust from the water pushing up on it,

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-so I have confidence in you guys.

-All right, let's have a go.

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-I think you can do it.

-Come on!

-Eh?

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Leave it!

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-All right, OK.

-OK, take the strain.

-OK, are you ready?

-Got it?

-Yeah.

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Three, two, one, go!

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Come on!

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-Dom, have you got it?

-Yeah, I've got it.

-Pull, then!

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THEY SHOUT ENCOURAGEMENT

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-Come on!

-I'm pulling!

-Come on!

-I'm pulling!

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Argh!

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Come on!

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It's about time Richard did some proper work.

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That's moved like five metres.

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-It is moving.

-It's moved five metres.

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Hey, wow, I don't need to hardly pull now.

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It's moving. It's easy!

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-Is it really easy?

-Yeah.

-Dom, you still got hold?

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Yeah, yeah, I've got it. Keep going.

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And that's the thing, just with that upthrust,

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that means you can carry so much more on water than you can on land.

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-Good work, Frannie.

-Erm...

-Oh...

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FRAN LAUGHS

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Good boy.

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Right, that's quite enough huffing and puffing for one day.

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What do you mean? You didn't do anything!

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Yes, well, all that science has left me in need of a nice,

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relaxing sit down.

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So, we've left all of the hard work to the professionals.

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James Brindley, you are an absolute genius.

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All right, sweet pea?

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Ooh, what a squidge.

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Moving heavy loads over water is one thing,

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but how do you get that stuff back on land?

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-Ask a wrestler?

-No, you ask a heavyweight engineer.

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Introducing the genius behind diggers, grabbers,

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claws and cranes, it's Mr Hydraulics himself -

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William Armstrong.

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Armstrong by name, strong arms by nature.

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He-he-he!

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William Armstrong was a 19th-century industrialist

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and all-round inventing genius.

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Oh, how nice of you to say so.

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He built the first house in the world to be lit by hydroelectricity.

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Aah, moths!

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But it was another clever use of water that guaranteed his place

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in engineering history.

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Armstrong realised that liquids generate massive forces

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when they are squeezed and invented a hydraulic crane

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capable of unloading ships faster and more cheaply than ever before.

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Mmm, water!

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We've come to this scrapyard.

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It's absolutely rammed with heavy stuff that needs shifting.

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Which makes it a brilliant place to find out more

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about Armstrong's big idea.

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Scientist and genius helper Clare Hampson is going to tell us

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how hydraulics actually work.

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One of the really important things about hydraulics is that they use

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liquids to take a force from one place to another place.

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In this water gun, we've got liquid inside it.

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When we press this end of the water pistol,

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rather than squashing the liquid inside the water pistol,

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it's going to push all the way through the liquid and...

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make the water come out of the other end.

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You haven't got one of them at home? Course you haven't. No, no, no.

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What you're saying is water is really tightly packed together.

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Exactly. That's why it hurts when you belly flop into a swimming pool,

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because your belly is hitting water that doesn't squash.

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So liquids can't be squeezed,

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and that makes them perfect for moving and magnifying forces.

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Very, very, very handy when you want to move something very, very heavy.

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Right. A small amount of force from my thumb should move that heavy,

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heavy brick. All right, let's give it a go.

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-Ready?

-Three, two, one...

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-Yes!

-Brilliant!

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-Nice!

-That's great!

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We're using water here in this home-made hydraulic system,

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but what liquid is actually used in real ones?

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Well, the problem with using water in real systems...

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'Hang on a minute, where's he going?'

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..they get hot or cold, water can freeze, which isn't very good.

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-Right.

-So, instead of using water, they use another liquid -

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something like oil.

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Moving bricks is all well and good, but Armstrong was thinking bigger.

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Much bigger!

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Clare, tell me about what's actually...

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what makes up a piston.

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So, a piston's made from a liquid on the inside...

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-Yeah.

-..and some kind of container out on the outside,

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not usually made from plastic, because it's not strong enough.

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Oh, is it not? So a piston usually seems like metal on the inside,

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-but the outside I always thought plastic.

-Yeah.

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What kind of liquid...? CRUNCH!

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What kind of liquid is it?

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It's water. Well, it can be water...

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CRASH! What?!

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What are you doing?

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This car weighs almost two tonnes

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but, thanks to hydraulics,

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I can pick it up without even breaking sweat.

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Hydraulics in action!

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Dick, you haven't got a licence to drive one of those things!

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Look at it!

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'A tiny squeeze of this lever

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'pumps fluid through these thin black pipes,

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'moving the thicker steel rams with much greater force.'

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Sorry, Clare, I'll be two seconds.

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-Put it down!

-What?

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-Put it down!

-All right.

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Not now!

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Not now, you idiot!

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Get out.

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'Because of its hydraulic muscles,

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'this gigantic grabber can lift up to ten tonnes

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'and, yes, it is as much fun as it looks.'

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Whoo!

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Little movement, massive result.

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-Hydraulics are amazing. Look at that.

-Get out!

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Oh-ho-ho, that's the stuff!

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William Armstrong, you are a genius!

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You're spot on, bonny lad, he-he-he.

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Coming up, we harness the power of hydraulics

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in our very own massive moving challenge.

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What's that noise?

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Meet the Harmony of the Seas -

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it's the world's biggest cruise ship.

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There's room on board for almost 7,000 passengers

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but, with 23 pools, you'll never be stuck for somewhere to take a dip.

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Yippee!

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This huge spaceship transporter is the biggest

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self-powered vehicle in the world.

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But with a top speed of just 2mph,

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it won't be giving Lewis Hamilton any sleepless nights.

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Bye-bye!

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What weighs the same as 2.5 elephants

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and looks a bit like a massive flying bum?

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Is it your face?

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-Charming!

-No, it's the Airlander 10,

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a helium-filled airship able to carry ten tonnes of cargo.

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We've seen how genius engineering has made it possible to shift

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heavy loads across land and water.

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But now we've come to see a completely different massive mover.

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Look at that!

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Woohoo!

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This bizarre-looking plane is a specially-designed cargo aircraft

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known as the Beluga, after the whale.

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There are only five of these 86-tonne monsters

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in the whole world.

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They're used to move bulky bits of aeroplanes

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from one factory to another.

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Oh, look at the size of that!

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This one has just touched down at its base near Chester.

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It's huge!

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Without our third and final genius,

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this enormous aircraft wouldn't be able to take to the skies.

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And it's all thanks to technology that's almost 80 years old.

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Introducing to you the inventor of the jet engine - Frank Whittle.

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Please depart the aircraft via the front steps.

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It was back in the 1930s that Royal Air Force officer Frank Whittle

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first came up with his genius idea.

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His gas turbine engine sucked in air,

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which was mixed with fuel and burnt.

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This produced a hot jet of exhaust, which moved the plane forward,

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just like a skateboarder kicking back on the pavement.

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Apprentice engineer Dan Quinn is here to tell us more.

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But first, there's a job do.

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Get the 17-metre-high Beluga safely into its hangar so it can be loaded

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for the next leg of its journey.

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All right, lads? Now the Beluga's in, if you want to close the doors,

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-there's the green button.

-Sure.

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It's not going to crush the plane, is it?

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Look at that!

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Precision.

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-That's how you do it.

-Good job, that.

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The Beluga is always loaded inside to keep it sheltered from the wind.

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How much cargo can these Belugas carry?

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So, the Beluga can carry about 50 tonnes of cargo,

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which is the equivalent of 25 average family cars.

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What?! That's a lot of weight.

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How does something carrying that much cargo get off the ground?

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So, it's partly down to the lift provided from the wings,

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but it's also partly down to the thrust provided from the engines.

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Provided by Frank Whittle.

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Which are provided by Frank Whittle.

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Exactly, yes. There used to be propellers and pistons,

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but now they are turbine engines which are much more powerful.

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How powerful are you talking?

0:17:140:17:15

We're talking about 250,000 newtons of thrust, which is...

0:17:150:17:20

enough to blow a small car backwards,

0:17:200:17:23

if you put it right behind it.

0:17:230:17:24

He's not joking, either.

0:17:260:17:28

Just have a look at this absolutely mind-blowing footage.

0:17:280:17:31

Oh!

0:17:310:17:33

Whee!

0:17:360:17:38

I hope they're insured.

0:17:380:17:40

So, I think we've established that its engines are massively powerful,

0:17:430:17:47

but it's hard to imagine just how much this Beluga can shift

0:17:470:17:51

until you've seen it being loaded.

0:17:510:17:53

Dan, what is being loaded into the plane now?

0:17:530:17:55

Today we're loading an A350 wing.

0:17:550:17:56

This would basically take you on a transatlantic flight.

0:17:560:17:59

-How much does it weigh?

-So, it weighs about 25 tonnes,

0:17:590:18:02

which is the equivalent of about 12.5 standard family cars.

0:18:020:18:06

Right, so where's this wing going now?

0:18:060:18:08

So, first stop for this one, I believe,

0:18:080:18:10

will be Bremen in Germany,

0:18:100:18:11

and then it will go onto Toulouse where it will be married up

0:18:110:18:15

to the fuselage and built into your final plane.

0:18:150:18:18

The company saves time and money by moving heavy parts like this by air

0:18:180:18:22

rather than on the roads.

0:18:220:18:24

The Beluga has been on the ground for less than two hours

0:18:270:18:30

but the 25-tonne wing is already safely onboard.

0:18:300:18:33

Now it's time for this massive mover to head off to Germany.

0:18:390:18:42

For allowing aeroplanes to carry bigger and bulkier loads...

0:18:450:18:48

And for changing the history of aviation, Frank Whittle,

0:18:480:18:51

-you are... BOTH:

-Absolute Genius!

0:18:510:18:54

Chocks away, chaps!

0:18:540:18:56

Vroooooom!

0:18:560:19:02

Go! Go on, go on!

0:19:070:19:09

In this episode, we've learnt how the best and brightest

0:19:090:19:12

engineering minds have managed to make light work

0:19:120:19:16

of shifting heavy loads.

0:19:160:19:18

Thanks to our three geniuses,

0:19:230:19:24

we can now transport weights way heavier than we could before.

0:19:240:19:27

But now it's time for us to get to grips

0:19:270:19:30

with our massive moving challenge.

0:19:300:19:32

We've been given an address

0:19:370:19:38

on the outskirts of the Dutch city of Amsterdam,

0:19:380:19:41

where our challenge will happen.

0:19:410:19:42

What is this place?

0:19:440:19:45

It's really weird.

0:19:470:19:49

And the warehouse where we're going...

0:19:520:19:54

..is home to possibly the weirdest creation of the lot.

0:19:560:19:59

Maik ter Veer is its genius creator.

0:20:030:20:06

-Maik, lovely to meet you.

-Nice to meet you.

-And you.

0:20:060:20:08

Thanks for inviting us to your...

0:20:080:20:10

what can only be described as a mechanical wonderland.

0:20:100:20:13

-I mean, it is incredible here.

-Welcome.

0:20:130:20:15

What is this?

0:20:150:20:17

This is Robohand.

0:20:170:20:19

It's a hydraulic hand.

0:20:190:20:21

It's 30 times bigger than a normal hand

0:20:210:20:23

and easily 30 times stronger as well.

0:20:230:20:26

Right, let's get this straight.

0:20:260:20:28

-This hand for those the movement of your own hand?

-Yeah.

0:20:280:20:31

-So anything you do, that hand will do?

-Yeah.

0:20:310:20:33

We're going to be using this hydraulic hand,

0:20:360:20:38

the only one of its kind in the world,

0:20:380:20:41

to attempt three very different massive moving challenges.

0:20:410:20:45

First up, we're rolling out the barrels,

0:20:470:20:50

picking up and moving these oil drums.

0:20:500:20:53

Next, it's 50 green bottles, sitting on a wall.

0:20:530:20:57

Well, a crate, anyway.

0:20:570:20:59

And I've got a feeling that more than one could accidentally fall!

0:20:590:21:02

Last but not least, it's a truly titanic clash.

0:21:040:21:08

It's scrap washing machine versus honeydew melon

0:21:080:21:12

and there can only be one winner.

0:21:120:21:15

The problem is, Maik, there's only one glove here

0:21:150:21:19

and there's two of us. So, right, it's a Euro.

0:21:190:21:22

-Numbers or birds?

-Birds.

0:21:220:21:24

Numbers. Oosh!

0:21:260:21:28

With his own hand inside this mechanical glove,

0:21:280:21:31

Dom can now control the Robohand.

0:21:310:21:33

Our first challenge,

0:21:380:21:40

to move these six oil drums from here

0:21:400:21:43

to over here.

0:21:430:21:45

Let the games begin.

0:21:450:21:47

CLANG!

0:21:490:21:51

-Oops!

-Right, now pick it up.

0:21:520:21:54

-Oh!

-Yeah!

0:21:550:21:57

Ha-ha-ha!

0:21:570:21:58

-Look!

-OK, move it across.

0:21:590:22:01

Yeah, on to this side.

0:22:010:22:03

The concentration on my face.

0:22:030:22:05

Right, there's good.

0:22:110:22:12

OK, drop them.

0:22:140:22:16

-Lucky, lucky.

-Is it all right?

0:22:160:22:17

Very lucky. Well said, Maik, well said.

0:22:170:22:19

'What do you mean, lucky? That was pure skill!'

0:22:190:22:22

Index finger first.

0:22:220:22:23

-Yeah!

-Wow.

-Eh?

0:22:250:22:27

Two more over there.

0:22:270:22:28

Oh!

0:22:320:22:33

I've got one more.

0:22:350:22:36

You've got to slide it out.

0:22:360:22:38

'Oh, dear. Looks like your luck's run out.'

0:22:420:22:44

Game over!

0:22:440:22:45

'Still, two out of six...'

0:22:480:22:49

Don't look at them, don't look at them!

0:22:490:22:51

Shh, don't want to see them.

0:22:510:22:53

'I think that's pretty good, for a beginner.'

0:22:530:22:55

Now it's my turn.

0:22:550:22:57

I've got to shift a crate topped with 50 water-filled glass bottles.

0:22:570:23:01

This will need a very steady hand.

0:23:030:23:06

If you manage to come back, get all that over here with one bottle left,

0:23:060:23:10

even just one bottle, I'll kiss you.

0:23:100:23:12

Slow down a little.

0:23:150:23:16

-Stop.

-Oh, yeah, that looks good.

-Down.

0:23:200:23:23

Little bit, little bit, little...!

0:23:230:23:26

The slightest wrong movement here, all those bottles are gone.

0:23:260:23:29

'Focus, Dickie, focus.'

0:23:300:23:33

-Moment of truth.

-Middle finger here.

0:23:330:23:35

Oh!

0:23:350:23:36

-No!

-Oh, that's that, then.

0:23:390:23:41

-What have you done?!

-I'm trying to...

0:23:410:23:43

THEY SHOUT

0:23:430:23:45

-Yes!

-You made a mess, man!

0:23:460:23:49

No!

0:23:530:23:54

Bring it down!

0:23:540:23:57

-There's still a bottle up there.

-Is there?

0:23:570:23:59

-I've got one.

-Oh, yeah, one.

0:23:590:24:00

Bring it over. You wrecked my crate, guys.

0:24:000:24:03

Ta-da!

0:24:110:24:12

Well done. One bottle over.

0:24:120:24:14

You only really need one bottle, don't you?

0:24:140:24:16

You don't need more than one.

0:24:160:24:17

In fact, a closer look reveals slightly better news.

0:24:170:24:21

Did all right there. And they're not smashed.

0:24:210:24:23

'Pucker up, Dom.'

0:24:230:24:25

There were 50 bottles to start with, remember?

0:24:250:24:28

Moving swiftly on...

0:24:280:24:30

Two down, one to go,

0:24:300:24:32

it's time for our third and final challenge.

0:24:320:24:35

What better way to crush a melon than with a washing machine?

0:24:350:24:38

And what better way to make it a bit harder than with Dom blindfolded?

0:24:410:24:46

And to make it nice and easy for me,

0:24:460:24:48

me and Maik are going to be eating...

0:24:480:24:49

..melon. Right, you ready?

0:24:510:24:52

-Yes.

-Hand in.

-Thank you.

0:24:520:24:54

Put your hand in.

0:24:540:24:56

Oh, of course. I've got to guide you. In.

0:24:560:24:58

There. Up, up, up, up.

0:24:580:25:01

Still up?

0:25:030:25:04

-Left, left, left.

-Right.

0:25:060:25:09

We've no melon left!

0:25:090:25:11

-Where is it?

-Left.

0:25:110:25:13

-Am I at the washing machine yet?

-Further, further, further.

0:25:130:25:15

You're over it now.

0:25:150:25:17

Mm, good melon.

0:25:180:25:20

-Now what?

-Middle finger, middle finger in.

0:25:240:25:27

CLANKING

0:25:270:25:28

-Oh!

-All the way, all the way.

0:25:280:25:30

-What was that noise?

-That's the washing machine.

0:25:300:25:32

-That's it.

-We're in the hole.

-We're in.

0:25:320:25:34

Now, get your thumb in.

0:25:340:25:37

-Top finger.

-No, no, wait!

0:25:370:25:39

Bring your top finger all the way around.

0:25:390:25:41

-That was my dirty washing water.

-Index finger.

-Index finger?

0:25:410:25:44

-Further, further.

-That'll do! You've got it, you got it.

0:25:440:25:47

Up, up, up, up.

0:25:470:25:50

I'll just keep going up, you say stop.

0:25:500:25:52

-Beautiful grip.

-Up, up, up.

0:25:520:25:54

-And the whole arm has to go.

-Towards us.

0:25:540:25:56

Bring the whole arm across.

0:25:560:25:58

'Even a 65kg washing machine looks like a toy

0:25:580:26:01

'in the palm of this giant hydraulic hand.'

0:26:010:26:04

-You've got to get over the target.

-What target?

0:26:040:26:07

-The melon!

-I can't see the melon.

0:26:070:26:09

-Do that, do that.

-Now what?

0:26:110:26:13

I think that's good. I think that's over the melon.

0:26:130:26:15

-Is it?

-What do you think, Maik?

0:26:150:26:17

Now it comes to the art of dropping.

0:26:170:26:20

Ah.

0:26:200:26:21

'It's all come down to this moment.

0:26:260:26:28

'This is so gripping.'

0:26:290:26:31

Oh, he missed!

0:26:390:26:41

By THAT!

0:26:410:26:42

Oh, he missed!

0:26:440:26:46

By THAT!

0:26:460:26:47

Like, an inch.

0:26:490:26:51

That's your fault. Right, do it again.

0:26:510:26:55

We'll go down and get it.

0:26:550:26:57

-Look. Look at the washing machine.

-How am I going to do my washing now?

0:26:570:27:00

-It's in pieces.

-Eh?

-Eh?

0:27:000:27:01

No good to anybody.

0:27:010:27:03

There's only one thing for the melon.

0:27:030:27:04

Hai! That.

0:27:040:27:06

With the help of our three geniuses,

0:27:080:27:10

we've been able to transport even bigger and heavier objects.

0:27:100:27:15

-Whether that's on the water...

-Over land...

0:27:150:27:18

Or through the air.

0:27:190:27:20

Thanks to our three massive movers, Brindley, Armstrong and Whittle...

0:27:210:27:25

You're all absolute genius.

0:27:250:27:27

Canny lads, that Ant and Dec!

0:27:270:27:29

He's loving it!

0:27:460:27:47

I hate it!

0:27:470:27:48

Dick and Dom go supersized in this massive movers spectacular in which they trace the origins of the genius ideas that have made shifting heavy weights a whole lot easier. In their element, the boys head to a scrapyard to find out how hydraulic grabbers work, get up close to one of the weirdest-looking aircraft ever built and get to grips, literally, with the world's largest hydraulic hand.


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