Episode 4 Operation Ouch!


Episode 4

Dr Chris uses a tiny camera to reveal what happens in his throat when he swallows food and Dr Xand enters a special chamber that removes sensory data from his brain.


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Transcript


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He's Dr Chris.

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He's Dr Xand.

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And, yes, we're twins.

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Do you know how brilliant your body really is?

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I'm getting better.

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Well, we're going to show you.

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Oh, there you go.

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In this series, we're pushing our bodies to their limits...

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This is my sick.

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..by doing extraordinary experiments on each other...

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-You look really funny.

-You look funny.

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..to uncover what goes on inside...

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Ooh! That just came out of my ear.

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..and out.

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Wow, that's amazing.

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From the bizarre...

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Can we get a sample of your snot?

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..to the incredible.

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It's time to find out what you're made of.

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Hello?

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Coming up...

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..on Operation Ouch!

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This man reveals a terrifying secret.

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That's amazing.

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I discover what happens when you lose your senses.

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So now I am seeing things and hearing things.

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And we reveal an amazing trick your body does every time you swallow.

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All right down there?

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Nearly half a million people come into Accident and Emergency

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every year with a sporting injury.

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Here's another one.

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Eight-year-old Mason is in Accident and Emergency

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with his mum, big sis and dad.

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He's not too happy though.

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Because he's got a dish cloth on his leg?

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No, Xand. Because...

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I hurt my ankle.

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Let's see it, then.

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My ankle's like a balloon.

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-And Mason can't bear to look.

-How did it happen?

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Check it out.

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Mason was trampolining and jumping as high as he could.

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-Higher and higher and higher.

-Is that outer space?

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It gets worse.

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His cousin was on the same trampoline,

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going as high as he could, so guess what happened next?

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They left Earth orbit and flew to Mars?

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Outer space looks a lot of fun.

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Ooh, hang on a minute, this doesn't look good.

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You're right, Xand. Here's what really happened.

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They smashed into each other, toppled down...

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and Mason twisted his ankle.

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Ouch!

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He is just a typical boy, isn't he?

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Good as gold.

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I'd be amazed if it's not broke.

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Here's the very man to tell you...

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Take a peek, Mason, you're in safe hands.

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Dr Beaves checks the sensations in Mason's foot

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as sometimes, with a bad break or bad sprain, swelling can compress

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the blood supply and nerves.

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But he's happy that they're all OK.

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We're going to get an X-ray,

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just to make sure there isn't any bony damage underneath.

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Personally, I think this is a sprain at the moment,

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but the X-ray will tell us a bit more information.

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So I'll get that sorted. We'll know what we're dealing with.

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So it's X-ray time for Mason.

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Although the doc thinks it's a sprain, you never can tell.

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That's a pretty good picture, Mason. Well done.

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Dr Beaves is checking the bones in Mason's foot.

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There's just a small fragment of bone, if you like.

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It isn't conclusive, but because of the symptoms

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on the side of his ankle,

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we're going to treat it like it's a clinical fracture.

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So the doc is treating it like a break.

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I hope you like the crutches, Mason.

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I'm kind of hoping I get crutches, so I'll be popular at school.

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What's he like?!

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We'll get you back for a fracture clinic in the next day or so.

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-Never mind that.

-Yeah, what about the crutches?

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Does he keep his weight off it?

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Yeah, we'll give him some crutches as well.

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See how he gets on with them.

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Result! But wait...

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There's no guarantee you get to take the crutches,

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cos if you can't handle the crutches...

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-MASON'S MUM: Oh, he can.

-Yeah. I've been practising...

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-OK. OK, good.

-..for when this day comes.

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Ex-squeeze me? Practising? That's keen.

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But at eight, Mason's a bit young for crutches, and even though

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he could do with them, first, he has to prove he can use them.

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Got what I wanted. Crutches.

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Not yet, you haven't.

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We don't really see them again

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once we give them to the kids, unfortunately.

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But... But, yeah, they seem to find them exciting.

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I'll be the second one in my school to have crutches.

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First one in my class.

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And what's so good about that?

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Girls.

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You'll have girls?

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I'll have all the girls going,

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"Oh, you all right? You all right? You all right?"

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I'll be like, "Yeah."

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Playing it cool, Mason?

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BOTH: Nice!

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But first, Mason has to take his test.

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They're not taking my crutches away.

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Join us later to see if he passes the test.

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And now to our lab...

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Wow!

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..where we do incredible experiments...

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Oh, it's disgusting!

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..to show you how your body works.

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Watch this!

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Just don't try anything you see here at home.

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BOTH: Aaah!

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Your mouth and throat are awesome and we're going to show you

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one of the cleverest tricks your body does every time you eat.

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Swallowing.

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And if you're thinking, "What's the big deal with swallowing?"

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Well, here's the thing.

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Your lungs and stomach actually share part of the same tube.

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Your mouth and throat go into one tube that then splits, so that

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you can eat and breathe through the same hole.

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Now, you might be thinking,

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because everything goes in through the throat, this could get

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pretty disastrous, with all your food ending up in your lungs.

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-Right?

-Wrong.

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-He's right.

-Never fear.

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You actually have a super-duper clever bit of body kit

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that stops this happening.

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It's called the epiglottis.

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And to show you how it works,

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I'm going to put a camera up Chris's nose and down into his throat.

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This is a trans-nasal oesophagoscopic camera.

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That's a bit of a mouthful.

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But what it means is it can go up through your nose and down into

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your oesophagus, which is the tube that carries food to your tummy.

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Now, even if you do have a trans-nasal oesophagoscopic camera

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lying around at home,

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you still shouldn't try this yourself.

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We are responsible doctors and only people like us

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can use trans-nasal oesophagoscopic cameras.

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-You like saying that, don't you?

-Yes.

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OK, are you ready?

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OK, so we've just gone in to Chris's nose.

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You can see a few hairs there, a few bogies.

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You might want to save those for tea later.

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I can actually see the camera at the back of Chris's throat.

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It's like a cave in there.

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This here is actually the dangly bit at the back of your throat.

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It's called the uvula.

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Now we're going further in.

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So this, here, that's his tongue.

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And just behind that is a pink flap, the epiglottis,

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that folds over when we swallow.

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Hello, Chris's epiglottis. You all right down there?

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Still doing a good job?

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Now, at the moment, it's open, cos he's breathing.

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It's letting air into his lungs.

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But the minute he swallows, it'll really quickly close

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to prevent any food or liquid going into his lungs

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and divert it all down into his tummy.

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You'll be able to see it much better if he has some soup.

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-Ready for some soup, Chris?

-Yeah.

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-Here we go.

-Wait, wait. Is this carrot and coriander?

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-Yes. Your favourite.

-You know I hate that.

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What? Here we go. Yum, yum, yum.

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So you can actually see the spoon with the soup in it

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going into his mouth.

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We're putting the soup in, and now

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watch the epiglottis when he swallows.

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There, it moves really quickly, closes off his lungs completely,

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so that all the soup goes down into his tummy.

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Let's see that again.

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There's the wind pipe.

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Here comes the soup.

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There, the epiglottis closes -

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the soup goes down - yum.

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The epiglottis opens. Job done!

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You actually swallow about 600 times a day.

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Sometimes, when you're eating and sometimes,

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when you're just swallowing your own saliva.

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So we've shown you how your epiglottis stops you getting

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lungs full of food and spit.

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But what if you were upside down?

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Well, there's another body part that stops your food going up

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-when you're upside down.

-You mean down.

-No, up.

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From the tip of your tongue to the end of your bum, you've got a long

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tube lined with smooth muscle that squeezes food through your body.

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A bit like squeezing toothpaste out of a tube.

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It even works when you're upside down, and we're going to prove it.

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Xandy won't mind being upside down as long as I feed him.

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OK, Xand, here's some soup.

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Ooh, lovely... Mmm.

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Carrot and coriander? My favourite.

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Now, it's not a good idea to always eat soup like this.

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Imagine what restaurants would look like if we did.

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And what's happening now is that the smooth muscle in my oesophagus

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is pushing the soup up towards my stomach.

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This is called peristalsis.

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Waves of muscle contraction,

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all the way through my gut push food through my digestive system.

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So swallowing works even when you're upside down.

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But let's face it, it's not a good idea.

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You're going to end up with soup in your hair.

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Chris? Chris? Chris?

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The bathroom. A place where you can store your toiletries.

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-Is this your ducky?

-Mmm.

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A place where you can have a bath.

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Or brush your teeth.

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But the bathroom can also be a place of danger.

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-Can't it, Xand?

-Mm-mm.

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For example, the water from the hot tap could be...scalding hot.

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-Oh.

-Or...you could drop your mobile down the toilet.

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Oh!

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Or you could run out of toilet paper.

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HE GROANS

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But apart from that,

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there's absolutely nothing to worry about, is there, Xand?

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-Uh-uh.

-Oh, look, a spider.

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-Oh!

-Ow! Oh... Ah... Ooh.

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Oops. A minor injury.

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So what should you do if you get a nose bleed?

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Do you...

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The answer is B.

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If you have a bleeding nose,

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the best thing to do is sit quietly, lean forward and pinch the soft bit

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of your nose for ten minutes, while you breathe through your mouth.

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-And remember, it always looks worse than it actually is.

-Hey!

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All done! It's all stopped,

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and I've even removed the spider...

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and put it in Xand's bed.

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So remember, if you get a nose bleed, lean forward and pinch

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your nose for ten minutes.

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But if you're worried, tell an adult.

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We've got some incredible body tricks for you to show your friends.

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Here's a good one to wind your mates up with.

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-Who wants to learn a trick?

-ALL:

-Me!

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-Yeah! Me!

-OK, I'm going to show Xand

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and I want you guys to watch and then you'll do it.

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We'll get Xand's arm, as if you're cheering a football team, OK?

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-Really, really get your hands revving up like this.

-Yeah!

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So quick as you can. Really do your hand hard.

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Hard as you can, so your arm starts to really ache.

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When I say, you're going to put your hand together like that

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and put your fingers apart, OK, ready? Three...

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-BOY:

-I know that one.

-..two, one, go.

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'I'm trying to stop my fingers touching, but I can't.'

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-That's really weird.

-And what happens?

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My... This finger's moving towards that one.

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Does it work for everybody? Let's have a go.

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The most important thing is to really wind your arm up

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as hard as you can, then put your hands together, fingers apart,

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and watch what happens.

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One finger should start curling toward the other.

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What do these guys think?

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It worked.

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Well, everyone seems to know how to make it work,

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but does anyone know why it works?

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When your hand is in a fist, it gets used to being in the fist

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so when you do your fingers like that, it will curl back in

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because it's used to being like that.

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Simeon's bang-on!

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Because you're winding your arm, you have to clench your fist

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really tight and the muscles to those fingers get used to

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contracting, so when you stop and put your hands together,

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that finger wants to keep on squeezing.

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So you've got to make a tight fist for it to work.

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If you let your wrist go all loose, your fingers will fly off!

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Earlier, Mason came to Accident and Emergency after injuring his ankle.

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Let's catch up with him.

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Back in Sheffield,

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eight-year-old Mason is in with a badly swollen ankle.

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Mason was trampolining and jumping as high as he could,

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but his cousin was on the same trampoline.

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They smashed into each other, toppled down,

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and Mason twisted his ankle. Ouch!

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Dr Beaves has X-rayed Mason's foot and has seen a small fracture.

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Mason's going to need to have a plaster cast on for a few weeks,

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so why is he so happy?

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Got what I wanted. Crutches.

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But before he can get them, he needs to prove he can use them.

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First, he needs to get his plaster cast on.

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I'm never going on a trampoline ever again.

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Really, Mason? Can't imagine why(!)

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Ooh, that's nice.

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Ooh, I think he's enjoying this, Chris.

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Oh, I can feel it setting already.

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All done.

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Mason's quite young for crutches, hence the test.

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Getting my crutches now?

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Yeah, but it all depends on if you can work them.

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She says you're a bit little, but because you're so tall,

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they're going to try it.

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They're my crutches.

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The moment of truth has arrived.

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It certainly has, Xand.

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Wahey!

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Mason needs to show the nurse

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that he can get about on the crutches without falling over.

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Let's do it.

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He's styling it!

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-Success!

-Yeah!

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So, armed with his new crutches, Mason speeds off,

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ready to impress the girls.

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Was there ever any doubt in your mind?

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Little wobble, but nowt major.

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And what has he learned?

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Don't never try and do as high as you can on a trampoline,

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cos that's what happens.

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Careful, Mason.

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-Bit stumbly, but off we go.

-BOTH: Bye!

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Still to come...

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We learn how a bash turns into a bruise.

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Why this girl's ear lobes split in two...

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And I face a sensory deprivation challenge.

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It's all very strange.

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But first, did you know you use 12 muscles to smile,

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72 muscles to speak,

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and a whopping 300 muscles just to stand still?

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That's amazing!

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So is this.

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This might look like a typical man wandering along a typical street,

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but don't be fooled. In fact, he's a 13-time world champion,

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famous for his extraordinary face.

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OK, nice moustache, but what's he doing to impress this bunch?

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That's amazing. Truly amazing!

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Wondering what's causing all the commotion?

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-Well, take a look at this.

-Argh! He's an alien.

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No, Xand, this is Tommy Mattinson and he's the World Gurning Champion,

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which means he can contort his face into the most amazing expressions.

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Gurning's based on transformation,

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so it's basically how you look

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and to what you turn into.

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It's impressive. He's an ugly man though.

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I've never seen a face like that before.

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Like, that was just incredible.

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But how does Tommy's unusual face do this?

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Behind the skin, there's around 40 facial muscles.

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By stretching and contracting them,

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it's possible to make more than 4,000 different expressions.

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Over years of practice, Tommy has built up his muscles so much

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that he can move his facial features much further than most people,

0:16:380:16:41

creating some truly incredible expressions.

0:16:410:16:44

And Tommy can turn himself into a werewolf!

0:16:440:16:48

HOWLING

0:16:480:16:49

Because they're quite scary, people are, you know,

0:16:490:16:52

can be taken aback with that,

0:16:520:16:53

which the Queen was when she saw that face.

0:16:530:16:55

Her Majesty the Queen was taken aback?

0:16:550:16:58

-DR CHRIS MIMICS THE QUEEN:

-Now, that's amazing!

0:16:580:17:00

What are you doing?

0:17:080:17:10

-What are you doing?!

-Oh!

0:17:120:17:14

I'm trying to block out the rest of the world.

0:17:140:17:17

-There's a much better way of doing that!

-Really?

0:17:170:17:20

Time for Investigation Ouch!

0:17:200:17:22

We all have senses. They tell you what's going on around you

0:17:250:17:28

and then your body knows what to do.

0:17:280:17:30

Like...

0:17:300:17:31

telling your feet to dodge people in the street,

0:17:310:17:34

looking both ways before crossing the road.

0:17:340:17:38

It's all about your brain receiving data and deciphering it

0:17:380:17:41

to help you function in our busy world.

0:17:410:17:44

Even the smell of that bread is making me hungry.

0:17:440:17:46

Your brain is like a super computer,

0:17:480:17:50

receiving around 2,000 bits of information a second

0:17:500:17:53

and processing it all without you even noticing.

0:17:530:17:56

But what if we were to completely shut off all the data

0:17:560:18:00

that your brain receives?

0:18:000:18:01

Just like pulling the plug on that computer.

0:18:030:18:06

Well, I'm about to do that to my brain right now

0:18:060:18:08

and I'm a little bit scared!

0:18:080:18:10

I'll be doing it in here. This is an anechoic chamber.

0:18:110:18:15

Normally, it's used to test sound equipment, but scientists

0:18:150:18:18

often use these chambers when studying sensory deprivation.

0:18:180:18:22

It's designed to deaden any noise,

0:18:220:18:25

so there's absolutely no sound inside at all.

0:18:250:18:27

This is totally alien for a human being.

0:18:270:18:30

I'll have to be careful.

0:18:300:18:32

This foam all around me absorbs all the echoes.

0:18:320:18:36

Now, you might not have noticed this, but you hear echoes all the time.

0:18:360:18:39

They allow you to tell whether you're in a sports hall

0:18:390:18:41

or whether you're in your bedroom, even with your eyes closed.

0:18:410:18:44

But in here, it's completely different.

0:18:440:18:47

This room will prevent any

0:18:470:18:49

outside sound from reaching my ears.

0:18:490:18:51

So when that door closes, it's silence.

0:18:510:18:54

And soon, I'll be finding out what that's like.

0:18:570:19:00

But worse still, the lights are going to go out too.

0:19:000:19:02

I'll be practically senseless!

0:19:020:19:05

How will I cope? Let's speak to an expert.

0:19:050:19:08

This is Dr Oliver Mason.

0:19:090:19:12

He's a psychologist at University College London

0:19:120:19:14

and has done lots of studies on what happens to the brain

0:19:140:19:18

inside anechoic chambers.

0:19:180:19:20

So what do you think's going to happen to me in there?

0:19:200:19:22

Your sense of hearing may become more sensitive.

0:19:220:19:24

In fact, all your senses may alter. You may even hear things that,

0:19:240:19:27

-strictly, aren't there.

-You mean even if there's no sound,

0:19:270:19:30

I might still hear things?

0:19:300:19:31

That's right. Because our mind may create something for us

0:19:310:19:35

to experience because there's nothing actually happening.

0:19:350:19:38

In fact, it can be so disturbing for the mind

0:19:400:19:43

that some people totally freak out.

0:19:430:19:45

So we've taken some special precautions.

0:19:450:19:47

Oliver and James are going to be monitoring me while I'm in there.

0:19:470:19:50

They've given me a safe word, which is "ouch",

0:19:500:19:52

and I can say that at any time and they'll let me out.

0:19:520:19:55

Now, I've got this camera with me, so you're coming too. Let's go.

0:19:550:19:59

Some people manage up to half an hour in this alien environment.

0:19:590:20:02

Some just a few minutes, before they shout their escape word.

0:20:020:20:05

Let's see how long I last.

0:20:050:20:07

I'm now watching it close. It's actually pretty scary.

0:20:070:20:10

Everything is now very quiet.

0:20:130:20:15

It's hard to imagine there's anything

0:20:170:20:19

outside this room now.

0:20:190:20:20

I can't hear any other noises.

0:20:200:20:22

So the first thing that is really strange about this is...

0:20:220:20:25

it feels like my brain almost can't stay still,

0:20:250:20:28

so I'm listening very, very hard for noises.

0:20:280:20:32

I really want to hear things.

0:20:320:20:33

So I can hear something like...

0:20:330:20:37

birds chirping.

0:20:370:20:39

Or like a waterfall, maybe.

0:20:390:20:41

Like a high-pitched kind of chattering sound.

0:20:410:20:43

That's because my brain is trying to make sense of this place.

0:20:430:20:48

It thinks there must be sound, so it hears it.

0:20:480:20:50

But there's nothing here.

0:20:500:20:52

Starved of sensory data, I'm developing Spidey Senses.

0:20:530:20:58

I can hear my heart beating in my ears.

0:20:580:21:02

I can still hear my voice, but it's not my normal voice.

0:21:020:21:05

What happens if I shout?

0:21:050:21:06

Hello! Nothing.

0:21:060:21:08

It's really, really weird.

0:21:080:21:10

So it's like I'm shouting into a huge valley and nothing comes back.

0:21:100:21:15

Everything I say disappears immediately.

0:21:150:21:17

Now, most of the information

0:21:180:21:20

the brain receives is through sight,

0:21:200:21:23

so what would happen if I had none?

0:21:230:21:25

It's something I'm about to find out.

0:21:250:21:27

So he's probably even more disoriented now.

0:21:320:21:35

He not only can't hear anything, he can't see anything either.

0:21:350:21:38

I can hear my stomach gurgling.

0:21:420:21:44

I can see little flashes of light at the corners of my eyes.

0:21:440:21:49

I can hear these other noises in my ears.

0:21:490:21:51

It's all very strange.

0:21:510:21:52

So now I'm seeing things and hearing things.

0:21:550:21:58

Deprived of its normal data, my brain is reaching out

0:21:580:22:02

to make sense of this alien scenario, but without its main stimuli,

0:22:020:22:06

it's confused and I'm becoming disoriented.

0:22:060:22:08

I don't know how big this room is any more,

0:22:100:22:12

but I feel like I'm in

0:22:120:22:14

a very big forest

0:22:140:22:15

that just goes on forever.

0:22:150:22:17

I really don't like it in here.

0:22:180:22:20

I really would like that door to be opened.

0:22:200:22:22

Ouch.

0:22:250:22:26

'Did they hear me?'

0:22:260:22:27

Hope that'll make the door open.

0:22:270:22:30

'Are they still there?'

0:22:300:22:31

That is a welcome sight.

0:22:340:22:36

I feel like a bit of a baby now.

0:22:360:22:37

I wasn't really scared.

0:22:370:22:38

Wasn't scared, actually.

0:22:380:22:40

Half an hour in there felt like a lifetime.

0:22:400:22:43

It is very bright out here. And the other thing is, it's really loud.

0:22:430:22:45

I can hear my... I can hear lots of other sounds, but I can mainly hear

0:22:450:22:49

my voice very loudly, like it's echoing off everything.

0:22:490:22:51

Um, yeah, I am very pleased to be out.

0:22:510:22:55

So I quite enjoyed the 15 minutes in the light,

0:22:550:22:57

but when the lights went out, it was like a nightmare.

0:22:570:23:00

Nightmare is a really good point of comparison,

0:23:000:23:02

because your brain's probably in

0:23:020:23:04

something of a similar state in there.

0:23:040:23:05

It's got nothing to go on and everything comes from the brain.

0:23:050:23:09

That's right. We've shown the brain needs sensory data to function.

0:23:090:23:13

It just shows how much information my brain's getting every single

0:23:130:23:16

minute of the day and processing without me even knowing it.

0:23:160:23:19

So when you take those things away, things get very weird indeed.

0:23:190:23:24

Of course, I'm not really afraid of the dark.

0:23:240:23:26

When you get injured, your body is brilliant at mending itself.

0:23:310:23:34

This next boy should know - he's always having accidents.

0:23:340:23:39

# If there's a bone to break, he'll break it

0:23:390:23:41

# If there's a knee to graze, he'll graze it

0:23:410:23:43

# If there's an ankle to sprain, he'll sprain it

0:23:430:23:47

# He's the Unluckiest Kid! #

0:23:470:23:48

If your body takes a knock,

0:23:520:23:53

it won't be long before you get a whacking great bruise.

0:23:530:23:57

A bruise is when your little blood vessels break,

0:23:570:24:00

causing the red blood cells to gush out.

0:24:000:24:03

Whoa, that looks like the best waterslide ever!

0:24:040:24:07

Your red blood cells have nowhere to go, so they fill up in-between

0:24:070:24:10

your normal skin cells.

0:24:100:24:12

But the area becomes so cramped, the oxygen's cut off,

0:24:120:24:16

turning the red blood cells blue.

0:24:160:24:18

You look a bit off colour.

0:24:180:24:20

Tell me about it! I can hardly breathe.

0:24:200:24:22

Then your body breaks down the leaked blood cells.

0:24:220:24:25

Your bruise then turns greeny yellow because the blood cells

0:24:250:24:28

have been turned into bile and bilirubin,

0:24:280:24:31

the same stuff that makes your poo brown.

0:24:310:24:33

Finally, it's slowly absorbed back into the body and your skin

0:24:350:24:38

goes back to normal.

0:24:380:24:40

Oh, dear!

0:24:400:24:42

Each year, around half a million people come to Accident and Emergency

0:24:450:24:49

with a sporting injury.

0:24:490:24:50

Here's another one. Well, sort of.

0:24:500:24:52

In Sheffield, 11-year-old Chloe

0:24:540:24:56

is in Accident and Emergency with her gran and mum...

0:24:560:24:59

oh, and a freaky-looking ear lobe.

0:24:590:25:02

Well, my ear just ripped unexpectedly at an ice hockey match.

0:25:020:25:06

What?! That IS unexpected.

0:25:060:25:09

-So is it sore?

-No, it just feels normal.

0:25:090:25:12

Ears don't just split on their own, so how did this happen?

0:25:120:25:16

Chloe was at an ice hockey match with her granddad.

0:25:180:25:21

Ooh, nice shoulder pads, Chloe.

0:25:210:25:23

Ooh, I'd love a hot dog.

0:25:230:25:25

Her favourite team, the Sheffield Steelers, were playing

0:25:250:25:28

and the stadium was packed.

0:25:280:25:30

With the game in full swing and the goals flying in,

0:25:300:25:33

Chloe was getting more and more excited.

0:25:330:25:36

Everyone was excited.

0:25:380:25:40

To top it off, her favourite player scored, slamming the puck

0:25:400:25:43

into the back of the net.

0:25:430:25:45

Chloe jumped up and threw her arms in the air.

0:25:480:25:51

Her sleeve got caught in her earring

0:25:510:25:53

and ripped her ear lobe in two.

0:25:530:25:55

Ouch!

0:25:550:25:56

It was so unexpected and I started to cry.

0:25:560:25:59

I don't blame you.

0:25:590:26:01

After having her wound cleaned up by first-aiders, Chloe's now off

0:26:010:26:04

to find out what can be done about her flapping ear flesh.

0:26:040:26:07

Over to Dr Hannah Hardisty.

0:26:090:26:11

-So which ear have you done?

-This one.

0:26:120:26:15

That one. Oh, you have, haven't you?

0:26:150:26:18

Dr Hannah takes a closer look at Chloe's ear lobe

0:26:180:26:21

to see what damage has been done.

0:26:210:26:23

Fine, OK. It will heal back together.

0:26:230:26:25

You just might have a little bit of a nick in your ear

0:26:250:26:27

-and that's all, OK?

-OK.

0:26:270:26:29

Hopefully, what we can do is, we've got some magic glue,

0:26:290:26:32

a bit like super glue, that we can just stick it together.

0:26:320:26:35

If that doesn't work, then we'll have to re-evaluate

0:26:350:26:37

and look at whether she needs a stitch to hold it together.

0:26:370:26:40

Something tells me Chloe's hoping the glue will work.

0:26:400:26:43

I don't want stitches.

0:26:430:26:45

Thought you might say that.

0:26:450:26:47

No way.

0:26:470:26:49

Let's hope Nurse Sammy-Jo Grayston

0:26:490:26:51

can wield her magic with the glue.

0:26:510:26:53

That's it. Squeeze it till it sticks.

0:26:550:26:57

-Oh, wow, I didn't feel that.

-There you go.

0:26:580:27:01

It looks like it's come together well.

0:27:010:27:03

So does that mean the stitches have been avoided?

0:27:030:27:05

We were just experimenting really to see whether

0:27:050:27:08

the glue was sufficient enough to keep it closed.

0:27:080:27:11

It's held really well, actually,

0:27:110:27:13

so we're happy to send her home like that.

0:27:130:27:15

I think someone will be relieved.

0:27:150:27:17

No, not you, Gran.

0:27:170:27:18

I am really happy because I don't have to have stitches.

0:27:180:27:22

So stuck back together, Chloe's off home to practise

0:27:220:27:26

a new style of goal celebration.

0:27:260:27:28

Er, hang on, isn't that the move

0:27:280:27:30

that got her into trouble in the first place?

0:27:300:27:32

Next time on Operation Ouch!

0:27:320:27:35

What would happen if your ears had no wax?

0:27:350:27:37

-I can see right through to the other side.

-Really?

0:27:370:27:40

Has this girl swallowed something metal?

0:27:400:27:43

BEEPING

0:27:430:27:44

And we meet a man who grows spare body parts.

0:27:440:27:48

I wonder who's going to end up with this!

0:27:480:27:50

That's it till next time.

0:27:500:27:52

BOTH: Bye!

0:27:520:27:53

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:27:580:28:02

Dr Chris uses a tiny camera to reveal what happens in his throat when he swallows food and Dr Xand enters a special chamber that removes sensory data from his brain. Meanwhile, over in accident and emergency, one patient has a broken ankle and another has split her earlobe.


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