Episode 2 Yorkshire Wolds Way


Episode 2

Paul Rose explores the 79 miles of the Yorkshire Wolds Way. He gets a unique view of this stretch of chalk downland and gets a special invitation to a military base.


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Transcript


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I'm taking a hike through one of the least trampled parts of the UK,

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a land of big skies and majestic views.

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This is the Yorkshire Wolds,

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a swathe of rolling chalk hills

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in the eastern part of God's Own County.

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It's a tranquil corner of England that's well off

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the normal tourist track.

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But I've heard the Wolds are full of surprises.

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CHUCKLING: I just love it, they're so close.

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I love that feeling that they're sort of like little kids.

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In this series, I'll be following the 79 miles

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of Britain's least well-known national trial.

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I'll get a very different view of the Wolds.

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I'm flying over the Wolds Way. Wow, this is amazing.

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I'll be going underground, too.

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This might have been for Queen and country, but to me, it seems like

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a job from hell.

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And I'll see a side of the Wolds that's hidden from view.

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-There we go.

-Wow.

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That's a big thing up there.

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This is Yorkshire as you've never seen it before.

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Welcome to the Wolds.

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I'm used to gruelling expeditions in far-flung places.

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So, for me, the Yorkshire Wolds Way is a joy.

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It's almost 80 miles of easy-going terrain across

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the most northerly chalk landscape in England.

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And even if you take your time, you can cover it in just over a week.

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The hike starts by the Humber Estuary

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and finishes by the North Sea.

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And I'm almost at the halfway point.

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But before I hit the trail, I'm taking a short detour to Pocklington

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for a chance to see the Wolds from a whole new perspective.

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This aerodrome was once an RAF bomber base.

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These days, the flying's a lot more peaceful.

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I'm here for one of the big events in the club calendar.

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It's the national Two Seater Competition.

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The way they win these things is to fly a prescribed course,

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and the further they go, the more points they pick up.

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But if they're too ambitious,

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they're going to land in a farmer's field,

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or Sheffield, or the M62.

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More than 30 gliders are involved in the week-long event.

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Gordon Basey is a leading contender.

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But 12 years ago, his whole world came crashing down.

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One Wednesday I was on my motorbike

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and this drunk-driver turned in front of me, right in front of me,

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and I just T-boned, went over the top and landed a bit funny.

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Just nipped my spinal cord, left me paralysed from the waist down.

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The accident happened on his way to the airfield.

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It seemed Gordon's flying career was over.

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I got back in the club glider before I got driving on the road.

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-Yeah!

-How did that feel?

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It felt really good.

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-How do you fancy your chances today?

-We always fancy our chances.

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It's a fun event, but there's always that element of competition.

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And we like winning!

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Gordon now flies a specially adapted glider, and like the rest of

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the pilots, he'll be pitting his skills against the British weather.

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Ah, here's Gordon.

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Good luck, mate!

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Gordon's towed to the right height by one of the tug planes.

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They're the workhorses.

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And one pilot here now has 40,000 sorties under his belt.

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I started towing in 1974.

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-OK.

-And I've been towing regularly ever since.

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Are you one of the oldest tug pilots in the country?

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Well, I've been told I am the oldest in the country.

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-How old are you?

-87.

-87!

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Wow. Well, the extent of my research shows that being a tug pilot

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-is very good for your health.

-Yeah, keeps you going!

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PAUL LAUGHS

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With the gliders now up and away,

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instructor Graham Wadforth is going to show me the Wolds

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from a few thousand feet.

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Hang on.

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I'm looking forward to the very good feeling of being in this bird.

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-No engine.

-No engine.

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Here we go, Graham.

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We've floated off, the tug is off,

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and now it's just a case of remaining behind the tug.

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He is staying low to increase speed and, once he's got a bit more speed,

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as you can see now, we start to climb.

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Beautiful, wow!

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It's great to be up, Graham!

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PAUL LAUGHS

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It doesn't take much, does it?

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It doesn't. Going to release now,

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so watch the ripple travel along the rope.

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-OK.

-Look out to the left, it's clear.

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Pull the rope. There's the ripple. Climbing turn to the left,

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and the tug has done a diving turn to the right.

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-And he's disappeared.

-And it's so peaceful.

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I feel as if I can see almost the whole of the Wolds Way.

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-Well, you can, actually.

-Yes!

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You can, literally.

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'You can fly one of these things aged just 14,

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'which means I'm definitely old enough to have a go.'

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See the way the nose is tracking around the horizon?

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-Yeah.

-Keep the same angle of bank and just make small adjustments

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-to keep it in this turn.

-OK.

-You have control.

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-OK.

-So you're doing the flying now, Paul.

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Yeah, I've got it. Trying to keep my eye on the horizon.

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Oh, I'm actually flying, Graham!

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You're actually doing the flying, Paul.

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I'm flying over the Wolds Way!

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This has to be the perfect way to reflect on the bit of the Wolds Way

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I've done, and make a very accurate reconnaissance of where I'm going.

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'Now that's what I call an uplifting experience.'

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Wow, Graham. Thank you very much, sir.

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-Thank you!

-You're welcome.

-HE LAUGHS

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Did you enjoy it?

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Did I ever enjoy it! As you say,

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it can be addictive, or it is addictive,

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so I'm hooked.

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I've been up and down, but Gordon is still flying high.

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The gliders have been gone for most of the afternoon.

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Now the race is on to get back to the Wolds.

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Good man. There comes Gordon.

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He's been doing about 150mph.

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He's going to come down and land.

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He's had a long flight, so I expect he's done really well.

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Gordon's covered almost 200 miles.

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It's been a great effort,

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but not enough this time to land him the championship.

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CHUCKLING: Welcome back, Gordon.

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-That was good fun.

-Was it good fun? It looked fantastic.

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I know you're busy thinking about the competition,

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but what I was thinking about was the sense of freedom.

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Here's a man who got knocked off his bike.

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When you're driving around, walking around,

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you have a bit of a hard time. But when you're up there flying,

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-you're free as a bird.

-You don't think about that when you're flying,

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because you just fly along, doing it like anybody else.

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Hats off to Gordon and the rest of the gliders who ride the thermals

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high above the Wolds. But, for me,

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the view from ground level is just as stunning.

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Boy, these valleys are beautiful.

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We call them the dry valleys,

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and they're one of the real special features of the Wolds Way.

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It looks for all the world

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as if it's been sort of man-made, doesn't it?

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Like a railway cutting.

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But, in fact, it's been cut by a run-off from the last ice age.

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When the glaciers melted 11,000 years ago,

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all that water cut these wonderful valleys,

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and that water has now gone down, deep in the chalk.

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I find these valleys really beautiful.

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I'm looking forward to getting amongst it.

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There's a whole network of dry valleys in the Wolds.

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And, in summer, these well-drained banks, with its calcium-rich soil,

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burst into colour.

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You find these benches all along the Wolds Way.

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They're beautiful shapes,

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and this natural, weathered wood

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reflects the shape and texture and geology

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of the landscape. Plus, most of them have got this poetry on,

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which helps us connect with the whole idea of walking the Wolds Way.

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All in all, this is just a great place to sit and take in the view.

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There are great views around every corner,

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and artist Robert Fuller has one of the best.

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But his main interest isn't the landscape, it's the local residents.

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We've got live cameras, and these are

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all around the garden and just the surrounding area.

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So all of these are within 100 yards of here,

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but they're all live cameras on wildlife.

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So we've got all sorts of things going on here.

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And, just to be clear, this isn't your garden fenced in, you know,

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zoo-type thing. This is the wild Wolds?

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-It is, yeah.

-You just happen to have cameras in there?

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Yeah, yeah. Across the Wolds, all this action is happening,

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but we've managed to capture some of the stuff that's happening locally.

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The cameras at his gallery near the village of Thixendale have captured

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almost every detail of these animals' lives.

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So, this is the garden.

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Yes. And this is exactly what I mean.

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Because it looks at first glance just like a beautiful garden.

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With no hint of all this wonderful activity that's going on.

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Yeah, and if you start looking closely, you can see we've got

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a pile of old roots there, but inside there,

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it's like technology in there.

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We've got a feeding box, we've got a camera in there,

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we've got motion sensors, so when the weasel arrives,

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I know straightaway, it alerts me to their presence.

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The thing that really strikes me, standing here,

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is that there is the beautiful Wolds, out there,

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and of course all of this wild activity is going on all the time,

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but we can't see it when we're walking around.

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But you've managed to capture all of these secret, intimate lives?

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Yeah. It's looking into the secret world of them,

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especially the weasels.

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And then, just around the corner here, we've got the kestrel nesting.

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He's actually got so used to me now, he actually nests in the garden,

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which is just great.

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With a remarkable amount of patience,

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Robert's got close to the very best of British wildlife,

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including a family of tawny owls that nest near his gallery.

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They're tricky to spot, but they're up in this canopy.

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I can see there's one right here, he's looking straight at us.

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Yeah, they're beautiful, aren't they?

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They're about ten weeks old, these owls,

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-so they're well on their way.

-So they are flying?

-Oh, yeah.

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They can fly, yeah. They look fluffy, but they can fly well, yeah.

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Young tawny owls sometimes fall out of trees,

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and people mistakenly think they've been orphaned.

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Over the years, Robert's looked after many owlets.

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So, to keep them wild,

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he takes advantage of the fact that his own adult owls can't count.

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I've got away with putting seven in.

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They already had three chicks of their own,

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and we managed to get them to raise ten one year.

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But we do that by supplement feeding the parent birds,

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so we're not adding a vast amount of extra pressure on those birds,

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and we actually then put the food up in the garden at home,

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and the chicks then learn to come up into the garden.

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This extra feeding means Robert gets an amazing night-time show.

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One by one, the tawny owl chicks arrive for their free meal.

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I've never seen so many owls in one place.

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We've had seven baby owls, just all in the garden,

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-plus one of the parents. So it's been really good.

-Yeah.

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CHUCKLING: I just love it, they're so close.

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I love that feeling that they're sort of like your kids.

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Yeah, they are. I do feel responsible for them.

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I've brought them into this area, some of the chicks.

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I just think it's a lovely connection

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between the real bit of the wild Wolds,

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and your bit, which is right onto it.

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I think it's just terrific.

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I'm now 50 miles into the Wolds Way.

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And nestled deep in the land of dry valleys is the isolated village

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of Thixendale. A place where, for centuries, not much changed.

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Steve Lyus and Ivy Eden grew up in the village,

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just as Thixendale of old was giving way to the new.

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One day, I came home from school and my mother was scrubbing the floor

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with the light on. I couldn't believe we'd got electric!

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Electric! There was no traffic.

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Look at that, that's the main street.

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Everybody played in the street.

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And everybody made things.

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You know, you'd lose your coat in September,

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and it'd come back at Christmas as a teddy bear.

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And you thought, "I've seen that before somewhere!"

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PAUL LAUGHS

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Nobody mentioned disease or anything.

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And whatever was wrong with you, Paul, does not matter.

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Whatever was wrong with me, "Thou's been in a draught."

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What were you doing for entertainment?

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When I first came to Thixendale,

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it was just a black-and-white TV then,

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with a really poor signal.

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Watching football was like watching through a snowstorm.

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Oh, you can't...

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The only way you could tell where the ball was was by watching

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which way the players were running.

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THEY LAUGH

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The signal was poor because Thixendale lies at the bottom of

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these steep valleys.

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A communal aerial was set up with

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a cable that went in and out of people's houses.

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But interference from passing cars played havoc with the TV reception.

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You would know who was passing by the line,

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dot or square that was going along.

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Ah, because each car had a different signal?

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We knew when our George... "Where's he been?

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"He's late tonight!

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"He's going home.

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"Fred's coming."

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You know, "He shouldn't be here tonight."

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Everybody knew everybody's business by these lines on the television.

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With the arrival of digital TV in the late 1990s,

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Thixendale became one of the last places in the country to get

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a decent television signal.

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So with all those beautiful stories in mind,

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what would you sooner have - Thixendale then or Thixendale today?

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Then. Definitely then.

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-No hesitation?

-No hesitation.

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-Then.

-Then was really good, but I think possibly a bit of both.

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-Ah, well, you're very wise.

-PAUL LAUGHS

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You're very wise.

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The great thing about doing the Wolds Way is that it's so quiet,

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you can have much of the trail to yourself.

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Well, some of the time.

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Blimey, look at this lot.

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-Hello!

-Hello there.

-This is quite a parade here.

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-Where are you going?

-We're going to Sledmere, Sledmere House.

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-I'm going to Sledmere House.

-Are you? Do you want a lift?

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-Yes, please!

-Hop in.

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We're actually... There's a car rally on this weekend,

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so you couldn't have picked a better weekend to come.

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-Perfect timing. My name's Paul.

-I'm Chris. Nice to meet you.

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Thank you.

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There's a whole group of you. How many?

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We've got 30 of us out on a road run.

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Every summer, around 500 vehicles gather on the Wolds for one of

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the biggest classic car rallies in the north of England.

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Beautiful car. Is it your car?

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It is, yes, yes, thank you.

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It's a 1923 Crossley.

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-Wow.

-Perfect for a sunny summer's evening.

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It's absolutely beautiful.

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Made in Manchester. So a proper northern car.

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-Home brewed!

-Bit of northern steel.

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We're so lucky in Yorkshire. We've got the Dales to the west,

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we've got the Yorkshire Wolds with these big rolling, massive views,

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got the North York Moors.

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And this is the way to see it, isn't it?

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The cars are taking me to Sledmere,

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one of the Wolds' great country houses.

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It's been in the hands of the Sykes family since the middle of

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the 18th century. But this Georgian pile isn't all it seems.

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-Good to see you.

-Christopher, thanks a lot.

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-Come in, come in.

-Thank you very much.

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It appears to be Georgian, but in fact, the entire house is a fake.

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Because it was destroyed by a fire in 1911 and gutted,

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leaving only the outside walls.

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They were able to evacuate 90% of the contents of the house.

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Everybody in the village came.

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There was a human chain started

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with the men inside

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and the little children out on the lawn.

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The very last thing to go was the great statue of Apollo,

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which was carried out at the end by four or five men.

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Weighs at least a tonne.

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Work to rebuild the house started in 1913.

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The Great War soon followed. But despite that,

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the refurbishment continued and wasn't finished until 1916.

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It's remarkable that 90% of these contents could be salvaged.

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But even more remarkable, don't you think,

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that a house like this can be rebuilt

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during a time of such conflict?

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I know. It was rebuilt by elderly men, because all the young men

0:17:560:18:02

were at the war. I mean, the fact that during the war,

0:18:020:18:05

while people were dying on the battlefield,

0:18:050:18:07

this house was being built,

0:18:070:18:09

you know, a great house being built in Yorkshire,

0:18:090:18:12

it is quite odd, isn't it?

0:18:120:18:14

Today, Sledmere House is playing host to a nostalgia weekend.

0:18:240:18:27

And as well as the classic cars that are on parade,

0:18:300:18:32

everyone's getting in the mood with a bit of dressing up.

0:18:320:18:35

I've ended up with a little mismatch of uniforms here.

0:18:370:18:42

But it doesn't necessarily fit that well,

0:18:420:18:46

but I was more interested in the medals and the ranking.

0:18:460:18:49

Lieutenant Colonel.

0:18:490:18:51

It's fun now, but back in 1940,

0:18:570:19:00

the Yorkshire Wolds was on full invasion alert.

0:19:000:19:03

For Charlie Mason,

0:19:050:19:06

it was the start of a secret life in a small unit of volunteers who were

0:19:060:19:10

recruited to harass the enemy with bombs, bullets and assassinations.

0:19:100:19:15

This is Charlie in his latter years, and you can see he took his role

0:19:150:19:19

very seriously. Charlie's no longer with us,

0:19:190:19:22

but his daughter Jo knows his story.

0:19:220:19:25

My father, during the war,

0:19:260:19:27

was an aircraft engineer and he worked at what was then

0:19:270:19:31

Blackburn's aircraft factory.

0:19:310:19:32

And during the war he was in reserved occupation.

0:19:320:19:34

-Good-looking fellow, fit.

-Yes, he was.

0:19:340:19:36

Yes, very fit, yes, kept himself active all his life.

0:19:360:19:39

My mother didn't know anything about what was happening.

0:19:390:19:42

The only thing that he did say to my mother was,

0:19:420:19:44

if the invasion took place, that what she was to do was

0:19:440:19:47

to let the chickens out of the coop so they could fend for themselves.

0:19:470:19:49

She was to get on her bike and go to her parents

0:19:490:19:52

and stay there with them,

0:19:520:19:53

because he said, "You won't see me again."

0:19:530:19:55

Having signed the Official Secrets Act,

0:19:580:20:00

the men were determined that no-one should know their role.

0:20:000:20:03

I think some people started to get

0:20:030:20:05

a bit suspicious, particularly the local gamekeeper,

0:20:050:20:07

who, obviously, by the nature of his job,

0:20:070:20:09

was used to prowling around and keeping an eye on things.

0:20:090:20:11

He said to my dad one time, "I know what you're doing.

0:20:110:20:14

"I know what's going on."

0:20:140:20:15

My dad thought, "Well, that's not very good."

0:20:150:20:18

So when he talked to the rest of the unit,

0:20:180:20:19

they made an agreement between them that should the invasion take place,

0:20:190:20:23

that he was going to be the first one to go.

0:20:230:20:25

They weren't going to let him fall into enemy hands

0:20:250:20:27

and betray their secrets.

0:20:270:20:29

There's a rich vein of military history running through the Wolds,

0:20:330:20:37

but not all of it is obvious.

0:20:370:20:39

I'm on the trail of some strange structures that were built

0:20:390:20:42

when the country was gripped by the Cold War.

0:20:420:20:45

You could easily walk past this,

0:20:460:20:48

assuming it was water supply or something to do with services,

0:20:480:20:51

but it's actually a nuclear bunker.

0:20:510:20:53

And ten feet below me, three men would have been sheltering.

0:20:530:20:57

And their job? To report back on how badly Britain had been damaged

0:20:570:21:02

in a nuclear war with Russia.

0:21:020:21:04

SIREN DRONES

0:21:040:21:05

'When you hear the attack warning,

0:21:050:21:07

'you and your family must take cover at once.'

0:21:070:21:10

As East and West pointed an increasing number of warheads

0:21:120:21:16

at each other, the government made preparations

0:21:160:21:18

for nuclear Armageddon.

0:21:180:21:20

This might have been for Queen and country, but to me,

0:21:220:21:26

it seems like a job from hell.

0:21:260:21:28

You leave your family and friends behind, come down here,

0:21:280:21:32

wait for the bomb to drop.

0:21:320:21:34

The men were volunteers and trained to use monitoring equipment

0:21:390:21:43

for detecting the size and direction of a nuclear attack.

0:21:430:21:47

And this 7x16 foot room would have been their home.

0:21:470:21:50

Wow. It feels pretty good down here.

0:21:520:21:55

I thought it was going to smell like hell,

0:21:550:21:56

but it's in pretty good condition.

0:21:560:21:58

It's warm, pretty dry.

0:21:580:22:00

This concrete bunker high on the Wolds was one of around 1,500

0:22:020:22:07

built across the UK. They were only stood down in the early 1990s.

0:22:070:22:11

The team down here had one single important thing on their mind,

0:22:110:22:16

and that was, after the blast,

0:22:160:22:18

get up, retrieve the equipment, come back down,

0:22:180:22:21

report the findings to their headquarters in York.

0:22:210:22:24

It was then a case of sitting out the nuclear fallout.

0:22:240:22:28

But with limited air filtration,

0:22:280:22:30

it's sobering to think that this building

0:22:300:22:33

could so easily have become a tomb.

0:22:330:22:35

The Cold War bunkers aren't easy to find.

0:22:400:22:43

But there are other wartime locations on the Wolds

0:22:430:22:46

that are impossible to miss.

0:22:460:22:48

These buildings can be seen for miles,

0:22:480:22:51

and they have a proud history.

0:22:510:22:52

In the late 1930s, with a war against Germany on the cards,

0:22:540:22:57

the government set up a network of radar bases

0:22:570:23:01

to keep the Luftwaffe at bay.

0:23:010:23:03

Remote Radar Head Staxton Wold is the only one that remains,

0:23:030:23:07

making it the oldest radar base on the planet.

0:23:070:23:10

At the height of the Battle of Britain,

0:23:100:23:12

Staxton Wold was in the thick of it,

0:23:120:23:15

countering German attacks

0:23:150:23:16

during a critical part of the air war in August 1940.

0:23:160:23:20

The Wolds Way passes right by the base.

0:23:210:23:24

And I've been given special permission to have a look inside.

0:23:240:23:28

Oh, yes, good afternoon. It's Paul Rose here, BBC.

0:23:280:23:31

All right to come in? Oh, thank you very much, thanks.

0:23:310:23:34

The original radar has been replaced by something

0:23:370:23:39

a lot more sophisticated. But it's still looking

0:23:390:23:42

for unauthorised incursions into British airspace.

0:23:420:23:45

There she is up close.

0:23:470:23:49

And, of course, it's a bit noisy, isn't it?

0:23:490:23:51

It is, there's a lot of moving parts going round and round.

0:23:510:23:54

-How far can that thing see?

-It can see out to 250 nautical miles.

0:23:540:23:57

Which is quite a way.

0:23:570:23:59

That gives us a 360 degrees look.

0:23:590:24:03

So we've got a series of these air defence radars all round

0:24:030:24:06

-the UK's coast.

-OK.

0:24:060:24:08

Which give us long range look-out so that we can identify and detect

0:24:080:24:12

anything flying around the UK's airspace.

0:24:120:24:14

Wow. 250 nautical miles, 360 degrees.

0:24:140:24:18

-That's right.

-We're looking at the whole of our skies.

0:24:180:24:22

Staxton Wold has been a lookout post for more than 1,000 years.

0:24:220:24:26

Viking raiders were spotted from here.

0:24:260:24:28

And today, it's still keeping the country safe.

0:24:280:24:31

Here's the radar picture that we can see from the radar we've just been

0:24:310:24:34

looking at. Just to give you a bit of orientation,

0:24:340:24:37

we've got Humber down here, up to Flamborough Head,

0:24:370:24:41

Filey, and on up to Scarborough.

0:24:410:24:42

So this is the Wolds Way, which is good, because there's Filey.

0:24:420:24:45

-Exactly what you've walked.

-There's the Wolds Way, great, OK!

0:24:450:24:48

All the green responses you see,

0:24:480:24:50

that's where we've detected something

0:24:500:24:52

and the radar's making up its mind

0:24:520:24:54

whether there's an aircraft there or not.

0:24:540:24:56

When it's happy there's an aircraft,

0:24:560:24:58

we get one of these yellow responses,

0:24:580:25:00

-such as this one down here.

-Yeah.

0:25:000:25:02

And the leader, the little stick you see on the front,

0:25:020:25:05

-the longer that is, the faster it's going.

-Right.

0:25:050:25:08

Anything suspicious could mean fighter jets

0:25:080:25:11

being scrambled to intercept.

0:25:110:25:13

A few months ago, we had some Russian aircraft coming through

0:25:130:25:16

the UK Flight Information Region.

0:25:160:25:18

The Russian aircraft don't send out a...

0:25:180:25:22

secondary surveillance response,

0:25:220:25:24

which our air traffic-ers use to tell

0:25:240:25:26

where it's going and what height it's at.

0:25:260:25:28

So by us launching a pair of Typhoons and intercepting it,

0:25:280:25:32

it was making that area safe for flight.

0:25:320:25:34

Keeping the skies safe by this brilliant technology.

0:25:340:25:38

Exactly.

0:25:380:25:39

With the radar base behind me,

0:25:420:25:44

I'm on the downhill stretch to the coast.

0:25:440:25:46

Ah! An important moment. I can see the sea.

0:25:480:25:53

Filey's just five miles away.

0:25:540:25:56

But before I head there,

0:25:560:25:58

I'm going to spend my final night on the Wolds

0:25:580:26:00

at one of my favourite spots on the east coast.

0:26:000:26:04

There's a great view, which I'm going to save till morning.

0:26:040:26:07

That's it. It's the end of a long, pretty hard day

0:26:090:26:13

and I can't think of a better way to celebrate

0:26:130:26:17

than camp right up here. Fantastic.

0:26:170:26:19

Wow. It is the east coast. Couldn't see this last night.

0:26:390:26:43

It's beautiful.

0:26:430:26:45

And sheep. Good morning!

0:26:450:26:48

SHEEP BLEATS

0:26:480:26:49

Has to be THE perfect place to wake up in the morning.

0:26:520:26:55

I've camped close to the RSPB reserve at Bempton Cliffs.

0:26:580:27:02

At the height of the breeding season,

0:27:020:27:05

there's 250,000 sea birds here.

0:27:050:27:07

They call it a "seabird city",

0:27:070:27:09

and these chalk cliffs are its skyscrapers.

0:27:090:27:13

I can see the end of my walk, just around the corner.

0:27:130:27:16

And at last, I can see what I've been walking on for all these miles.

0:27:160:27:19

The chalk that is the whole bedrock

0:27:190:27:21

and underlays the complete Wolds Way.

0:27:210:27:23

It's terrific to be here.

0:27:230:27:25

Filey is a fitting end to a great walk.

0:27:280:27:30

It's not the biggest of Yorkshire's seaside resorts,

0:27:300:27:33

but it is one of the prettiest.

0:27:330:27:36

When the railways arrived in the 1840s,

0:27:360:27:38

Victorian holiday-makers flocked here, building these grand villas.

0:27:380:27:43

Today, Filey remains timeless and popular.

0:27:430:27:47

The walk ends just outside the town on Filey Brigg,

0:27:480:27:52

a dramatic spit of land that juts into the North Sea.

0:27:520:27:56

Well, that's it. My walk is over.

0:27:590:28:02

It's almost 80 miles from the Humber Estuary to the North Sea,

0:28:020:28:06

here at Filey Brigg.

0:28:060:28:08

And, you know, some hikes can be just sort of tests of endurance,

0:28:080:28:11

but I found it accessible, easy, surprising.

0:28:110:28:15

There's something great around every single corner.

0:28:150:28:19

So if I can encourage you to do one thing,

0:28:190:28:21

it's go and take a walk on the Wold side.

0:28:210:28:24

And I think you'll find it every bit as great as I did.

0:28:240:28:27

Adventurer Paul Rose continues his exploration of the Yorkshire Wolds Way, arguably Britain's least well-known national walking trail. The 79-mile trail starts at the Humber Estuary and ends at the Yorkshire seaside resort of Filey. In this episode, Paul takes to the skies to get a unique view of this stretch of chalk downland and gets a special invitation to a military base that's been keeping the country safe since the start of the Second World War.


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