Mon, 04 Jul 2016 Ffermio


Mon, 04 Jul 2016

Meinir sy'n ymweld â Gwyl Cefn Gwlad Cymru ym Mharc Gwledig Pen-bre. Meinir visits the Welsh Game Fair at Pembrey Country Park, Alun is on the Nanhoron Estate and Daloni tastes ...


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-Hello and welcome to Ffermio.

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-We're at Pembrey Country Park

-for the Welsh Game Fair.

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-There's something for everyone

-interested in rural life...

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-..from shooting and fishing

-to clothes and food.

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-Coming up, Daloni visits a woman

-who's made a name for herself...

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-..as a producer and judge

-of Welsh honey.

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-I meet farmers near Caerphilly

-who have diversified...

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-..and established one of South

-Wales' largest recycling businesses.

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-First, we join Alun in the beautiful

-scenery of the Lleyn Peninsula.

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-At the Nanhoron Estate...

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-..they specialize

-in one of our native breeds.

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-They have over 400 Hereford cattle.

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-The history of the Nanhoron Estate

-near Pwllheli...

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-..dates back over 1,000 years.

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-The Harden family

-has been here for over 700 years.

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-This splendid estate is admired

-by visitors from all over the world.

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-Robert Jones has been working here

-for more than fifteen years.

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-What was it like here

-in the golden age of dairy farming?

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-You must have been very busy.

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-We milked three times a day.

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-The first shift began at 3.00am.

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-We also milked at lunchtime

-and then at 7.00pm.

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-That system

-didn't last for very long.

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-We then began milking

-twice a day...

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-..beginning at 6.00am

-and milking at 7.00pm.

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-After deciding to get rid

-of the dairy herd in 2006...

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-..the family began keeping

-a Hereford herd at Nanhoron.

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-They started off by introducing

-a traditional type of the breed.

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-Wow! What beautiful animals.

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-They look good-natured.

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-They have a very good nature.

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-They are more docile

-than other types of Hereford cattle.

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-They don't want any fuss.

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-What about the horns?

-Is that how they were bought?

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-We decided not to poll them

-in the early years.

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-It's nice to see them like that.

-It's how they are naturally.

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-They are a little bit rough

-with each other though.

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-I understand

-you calve outside mostly.

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-Most of them, around 150,

-are outside through the winter.

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-They all calve outside.

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-What kind of farm is Nanhoron?

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-It's actually a collection of farms.

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-We have everything

-from mountains to marsh.

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-There is good land.

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-It's scattered all around.

-We travel miles each day.

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-When we think that it was

-originally a dairy farm...

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-..we imagine

-it would be all good land...

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-..but a lot of the land

-is quite marginal and coarse.

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-A lot of it is coarse land.

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-That's the main reason

-why the Herefords came here.

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-They do well wherever they are.

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-When this was a dairy farm, there

-were 25 employees on the estate.

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-Now, just five workers

-look after 400 Hereford cattle.

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-The newest member of the team

-is Abner Roberts.

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-It's important to bring in

-new blood on a farm...

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-..not just in the cattle

-but also in the workforce.

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-Yes, someone else

-to do the running around.

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-Is that Abner's main role?!

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-Is that Abner's main role?!

-

-Yes!

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-Abner, what kind of boss is he?

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-He's OK.

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-Tell us about yourself.

-Where are you from?

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-How long have you been here?

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-I saw a job advert

-in the newspaper...

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-..and I came here

-to meet the manager.

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-I started working here last October.

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-What does your job entail?

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-I work with the cattle.

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-I round them up, feed them

-and look after them.

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-I go to see them

-first thing in the morning...

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-..and last thing at night.

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-Is the farm self-sufficient

-in terms of cattle feed?

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-I know you don't give them

-much concentrate.

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-Do you produce

-enough silage for them?

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-Yes, we do.

-We have plenty of bales stocked up.

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-To avoid dependence on one breed...

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-..four years ago,

-the family and the farm manager...

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-..decided to introduce a new breed

-to Nanhoron.

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-They invested in 200 Saler cattle.

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-Are you keeping these pure

-or will you be cross-breeding?

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-We did some cross-breeding

-last year.

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-These are Stabilizer calves.

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-What was the idea behind that?

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-What was the idea behind that?

-

-The Salers would grow too big.

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-This way,

-they'd have a smaller liveweight.

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-I hope the Stabilizers

-will keep their weight down...

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-..and give them a better shape.

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-You don't want bigger cattle

-these days...

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-..because you will be penalized

-at the abattoir.

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-What is the pattern - do they calve

-at a different time to Herefords...

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-..so you can concentrate on them?

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-They calve together.

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-We don't have problems with these.

-The calves don't need pulling.

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-How is their temperament?

-They've come to investigate.

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-They can turn sometimes,

-especially when they're calving.

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-But they're mostly fine.

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-What advantage is there

-to having the two sides?

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-Which is most profitable?

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-I'd say the Herefords

-make most money...

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-..taking into account the value

-of the calves and the premium.

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-Looking around, I can see you have

-a lot of traditional walling.

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-Do you maintain the walls?

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-It keeps John busy every day...

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-..looking after all the fencing

-and enclosures.

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-How important are they?

-I'd see them as shelter for lambs.

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-Is it the same for calves?

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-It's the same for calves.

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-Winds here can be piercing.

-The walls help the calves.

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-I notice you've put up a fence

-beyond the wall, just in case.

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-That's right. The cattle rub

-against the wall and knock it down.

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-How do you see the future?

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-Do you think things

-will work out well for this place?

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-Everyone seems to be very happy

-with the Herefords.

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-I think they'll be here

-for a long time to come.

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-Back at Pembrey Country Park...

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-..thousands of people have

-flocked here to enjoy the 30th fair.

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-One of the organizers,

-Adrian Simpson...

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-..has been here since the beginning.

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-What are the main attractions? What

-draws people back year after year?

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-I think it's the atmosphere.

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-The fair was started by three of us

-from villages near Carmarthen.

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-We were interested in rural affairs,

-fishing, hunting and shooting.

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-The main purpose of the fair

-was to celebrate...

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-..the life and interests of people

-living in the countryside.

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-When I was growing up, every child

-in the village went fishing.

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-We didn't want to lose that.

-That was the idea behind the fair.

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-In addition, shooting and fishing

-contribute to the Welsh economy.

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-Of course they do.

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-This fair is like a shop window

-for those activities.

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-Shooting alone brings in 70 million

-to the economy across Wales.

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-It's the same for fishing.

-Fishing brings in 100 million.

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-They are essential parts of rural

-life and of the Welsh countryside.

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-There are some 250 stalls at the

-fair, selling all kinds of produce.

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-One attracting plenty of interest,

-especially from children...

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-..is the beekeepers' stall.

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-Daloni visited Mid Wales...

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-..to meet someone

-who has been interested in bees...

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-..since she was a child.

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-I love this time of year.

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-It's as if nature has exploded...

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-..and we find ourselves

-surrounded by wild flowers.

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-This is also the time...

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-..when bees venture out from

-their hives to search for nectar.

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-Carys Wyn Edwards has been

-interested in beekeeping...

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-..and making honey

-since she was 12 years old.

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-Here on Ty Cerrig Farm

-in Ganllwyd...

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-..she follows

-the family beekeeping tradition.

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-She now has 50 beehives on the farm.

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-The job of a bee is pollination.

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-They fertilize the flowers

-and make your gardens beautiful.

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-They collect pollen

-and nectar from each flower.

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-Nectar is food for the bees.

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-They collect it

-and in order to store their food...

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-..they convert

-the nectar into honey.

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-They remove water from the nectar

-and that creates the honey.

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-How has the season been so far?

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-The bees have been very busy.

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-We had quite a wet winter.

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-I saw something this year

-that I've never seen before.

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-The queen thought it was May between

-Christmas and the New Year...

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-..and created a lot of queens.

-

-https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queen_bee

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-They were so strong

-during the winter.

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-They normally close down. They don't

-sleep but they keep themselves warm.

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-Throughout the year, the temperature

-in each hive is around 14 Celsius.

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-They maintain the hive at

-an even temperature all year long.

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-Most bees produce a teaspoonful

-of honey during their lifetime.

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-The production process

-is complicated.

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-Thank you

-for lending me this outfit.

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-It's important to wear

-the right clothing near the bees.

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-I wouldn't go closer than this

-without protection.

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-Carys is in blue and I'm in pink.

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-Why do you need the bellows?

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-It stops them from getting angry.

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-There's an old belief...

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-..that the bees think

-there's a fire in the forest...

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-..so they stay together

-instead of flying around.

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-What do we have here?

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-In these boxes,

-they collect the honey.

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-We put in frames and they

-start to work on the frames.

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-Is this honey?

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-Is this honey?

-

-No, this is the honeycomb.

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-Honeycomb?

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-It takes six times the nectar

-to make the honeycomb...

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-..and to make the same amount

-of honey.

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-This is the honey loft.

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-The official name for it in English

-is the super.

-

-https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honey_super

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-If we open this,

-we can see the queen excluder.

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-Under the excluder,

-the queen lives and lays her eggs.

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-We stop her from coming up...

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-..because when we collect honey,

-we don't want eggs in it.

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-At the height of summer, the queen

-lays up to 2,000 eggs each day.

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-This means the hive keeps growing.

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-When will the honey be ready?

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-It depends where you live.

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-In this area -

-and during a good year...

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-..I don't take honey

-until the beginning of July.

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-Carys is also a judge

-and a national honey award winner.

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-After taking the honey,

-she puts it in pots ready to eat.

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-She also uses the honeycomb...

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-..to make candles

-and furniture polish.

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-After collecting the honey,

-what do you do with it?

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-I put it in the jars

-as naturally as I can.

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-I don't process it in any way.

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-I just take out the honeycomb

-and put it in the jars.

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-How many kinds of honey are there?

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-Every pot can be different.

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-That's something you discover

-as a honey judge.

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-Every flower has a different taste.

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-Speaking of tasting...

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-I have two pots for you to try.

-These are very different.

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-One is a pale wildflower honey.

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-The other is a tree

-and heather honey - bell heather.

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-I'll try the pale one first.

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-When you taste honey,

-it's best to start with a pale one.

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-The darker ones

-are stronger on the palate.

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-And the darker one...

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-Both of them are good.

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-Both of them are good.

-

-Which is the best?

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-I prefer the pale one...

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-..but I'd be happy with either

-of them on my toast in the morning.

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-Very nice, Carys.

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-Very nice, Carys.

-

-Thank you, Daloni.

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-As many of you know...

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-..things aren't as sweet as honey in

-the farming industry at the moment.

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-After the break, I meet

-two brothers from Caerphilly...

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-..who have just invested

-10 million in their farm.

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-See you in two minutes.

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-.

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-Subtitles

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-Subtitles

-

-Subtitles

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-Welcome back to Ffermio.

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-I'm at the Welsh Game Fair.

-

-http://welshgamefair.com/

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-There's a whole

-host of attractions here.

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-This successful duo, Mag and Bud,

-have been drawing my attention.

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-They're part of

-the Wales Shooting Dog Team.

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-They're appearing at the fair

-for the first time.

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-Alan Rees from Capel Seion,

-Drefach, Llanelli...

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-..has been the Welsh captain

-for the last twelve years.

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-He's also a three-time

-world champion.

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-It's grown as a sport.

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-It's become quite popular in Wales.

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-In fact, it's quite popular

-across the UK.

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-We simulate exactly what happens

-in a shooting field.

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-Between August 12th and the end

-of January, we're on game.

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-Between the end of January

-and August...

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-..we do simulated shooting

-and retrieving.

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-The dogs have to do

-what they'd do out in the open.

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-Exactly.

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-When you've got a spaniel,

-that's different to a retriever.

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-I've got "non-slip" retrievers.

-

-http://www.gundogmag.com/training/training_gd_steady_0710/

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-What spaniels do is hunt,

-find, shoot, retrieve.

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-What we do is retrieve.

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-The dog should be steady

-at your side.

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-When something is shot and falls,

-you send the dog to retrieve it.

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-The interest in shooting dogs

-started...

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-..during a difficult period

-in Alan's life.

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-The dogs were comforting and gave

-him a reason to fight to recover.

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-I was in a severe car collision.

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-I broke my back in three places

-and my shoulder.

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-I can't remember all my injuries.

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-It was a tough time

-for me and my family.

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-I'd lost everything

-and didn't think I'd walk again.

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-My wife went out

-to buy me a young dog.

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-She wanted me to take an interest

-in something.

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-My father brought the dog

-to see me at hospital.

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-He'd scamper in.

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-People would shout,

-"Don't let him touch him."

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-The dog would come

-to the side of the bed...

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-..and place its hands on the bed.

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-As if he was saying "Come on."

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-You haven't looked back.

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-No, I took him to the Championships

-the following year.

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-I ran the dog in a fracture jacket.

-I couldn't move my torso at all!

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-That was a special experience.

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-You won't forget that.

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-You won't forget that.

-

-No, never.

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-I'm taking you on a journey

-across South Wales next.

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-From Pembrey in the west

-to Caerphilly...

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-..where a dairy farmer

-is turning waste into money.

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-Gelliargwellt in Gelligaer,

-Glamorgan...

-

-http://bryngroup.co.uk/

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-..is the home of brothers

-Alun and Paul Price.

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-It was originally a coal works.

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-By now, the 800-acre farm is home

-to around 1,400 dairy cattle.

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-We're the second generation

-farming here.

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-When we took over the farm,

-we had 24 cows.

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-They were in a stall cowshed.

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-Six of them were Hereford crosses.

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-We've quietly built up

-the cows from them.

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-We're milking

-just over 700 cows now.

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-We're fortunate that we have

-a contract with Sainsbury's.

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-We're on cost of production.

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-Otherwise, the dairy industry

-is in crisis at the moment.

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-It's unbelievable.

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-We thank our lucky stars we were in

-the right place at the right time.

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-Dairy farming is a small part

-of what the farm does.

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-The two brothers have developed

-five other businesses on site.

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-Their biggest project at present

-is recycling.

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-We started the recycling

-about 25 years ago.

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-We had an old tip...

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-..at the Powell Valley, their

-colliery, the Powell Works.

0:18:580:19:02

-We wanted to reclaim that

-to agriculture.

0:19:020:19:05

-We brought in muck

-to fill it up and everything.

0:19:060:19:09

-That's where the recycling business

-started from.

0:19:100:19:12

-To ensure that everything

-works well...

0:19:130:19:16

-..the brothers employ

-around 60 full-time workers.

0:19:160:19:21

-Robert Thomas, the farm manager,

-is one of those.

0:19:210:19:24

-There are around 150,000 tons

-of waste processed here each year.

0:19:250:19:30

-We succeed in recycling

-around 93% of that waste.

0:19:300:19:35

-We take out plastic, wood,

-plasterboard, soil...

0:19:350:19:40

-..anything we can recycle.

0:19:410:19:43

-We take it away so we don't have

-to bury it in landfill.

0:19:440:19:47

-The farm profits from this business.

0:19:480:19:51

-Yes, it's all tied up together.

0:19:520:19:54

-The wood is used

-under the animals as bedding.

0:19:540:19:58

-What remains from the process

-is used to plough the land.

0:19:580:20:03

-That has helped to create more

-grazing land from the old coal mine.

0:20:030:20:10

-On top of all that,

-there is a huge quarry here.

0:20:110:20:15

-Yes, we sell around 100,000 tons

-of stone from our quarry each year.

0:20:150:20:19

-We have a big supply contract

-with Tarmac.

0:20:200:20:24

-They take around 60,000 tons

-of stone from our quarry annually.

0:20:240:20:29

-Fertilizer produced by cattle

-is valuable to all farmers.

0:20:310:20:34

-On this farm,

-it's even more important.

0:20:340:20:37

-It's all swallowed up by a huge

-anaerobic digester to create energy.

0:20:370:20:45

-This was opened

-at Christmas last year.

0:20:460:20:49

-It treats food waste

-and the farm's slurry.

0:20:500:20:53

-We had everything already.

0:20:530:20:55

-The food came in from local

-contracts and slurry from the farm.

0:20:550:20:59

-Some maize is mixed in with it.

0:20:590:21:02

-We already had

-all the inputs for the system.

0:21:030:21:07

-How complicated is the process

-of creating energy...

0:21:080:21:11

-..with the anaerobic digester?

0:21:120:21:14

-Quite simply, around 15,000 tons

-of food and 8,000 tons of slurry...

0:21:140:21:18

-..from the farm are mixed together

-to create a soup-like substance.

0:21:180:21:23

-They go in to these tanks

-and then the gas is collected.

0:21:230:21:27

-That then drives the engines

-to produce electricity.

0:21:270:21:32

-They produce enough electricity

-for around 3,000 houses.

0:21:320:21:36

-That works out as enough electricity

-to boil six million kettles.

0:21:370:21:41

-Those figures are incredible.

0:21:420:21:45

-Those figures are incredible.

-

-It's a lot of electricity, yes.

0:21:450:21:48

-What comes out at the end can be

-used as fertilizer for the land.

0:21:480:21:53

-There's a lot of nitrogen in that.

0:21:530:21:55

-It works out that we have

-to buy less fertilizer...

0:21:560:22:00

-..so that helps the farm again.

0:22:000:22:02

-It must have been

-quite an investment.

0:22:020:22:05

-Between this

-and the recycling business...

0:22:050:22:08

-..they've spent around 10 million

-in the last two years.

0:22:080:22:12

-It's been quite an investment but

-it will pay for itself in future.

0:22:130:22:17

-Alun and Paul are clearly shrewd

-businessmen.

0:22:190:22:23

-They've developed several

-business ideas over the years.

0:22:230:22:27

-It all works together effectively.

0:22:270:22:30

-Central to it all

-is the agriculture.

0:22:300:22:33

-We thought

-long and hard about farming.

0:22:360:22:38

-Through it all, we're still farmers.

0:22:400:22:43

-Through it all, we're still farmers.

-

-Very true. Very true.

0:22:430:22:45

-I get more pleasure seeing the cows

-walking down to the parlour...

0:22:450:22:49

-..busting with milk...

0:22:490:22:51

-..than making a lot of money

-somewhere else to be honest.

0:22:510:22:54

-That's it for this programme

-from the Welsh Game Fair.

0:23:010:23:05

-After seeing

-all the people here today...

0:23:050:23:08

-..it's easy to see

-how rural pursuits...

0:23:080:23:11

-..like fishing and shooting is worth

-200 million to the Welsh economy.

0:23:110:23:19

-From Pembrey,

-until next time, goodbye.

0:23:190:23:23

-S4C Subtitles by Testun Cyf.

0:23:380:23:40

Meinir sy'n ymweld â Gwyl Cefn Gwlad Cymru ym Mharc Gwledig Pen-bre. Meinir visits the Welsh Game Fair at Pembrey Country Park, Alun is on the Nanhoron Estate and Daloni tastes some honey.


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