29/06/2013 Click


29/06/2013

User-friendly guide to the latest technology news, issues, gadgets and apps.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 29/06/2013. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

It may be the most important question of your life.

0:00:020:00:05

How did it end?

0:00:050:00:07

This week on Click, we'll look at the technology being used to

0:00:220:00:26

answer questions when the victims can't.

0:00:260:00:29

We're at the university using virtual autopsies.

0:00:290:00:32

Digits, letters, symbols -

0:00:320:00:34

if your password's just getting too much for you, we'll find out how

0:00:340:00:38

your brain may be able to bypass your fingers and enter it for you.

0:00:380:00:43

We'll also get to grips with the best new games titles

0:00:430:00:46

promising to push the latest video games machines to their limit.

0:00:460:00:51

All that, plus the latest tech news and we get all traditional in

0:00:510:00:55

Webscape with a site that writes actual letters.

0:00:550:00:58

Welcome to Click. I'm Spencer Kelly.

0:01:030:01:05

Many TV crime dramas feature autopsy scenes to investigate

0:01:050:01:10

the cause of a character's death.

0:01:100:01:12

But, of course, in real life,

0:01:120:01:14

the issues surrounding what can be learned from an autopsy,

0:01:140:01:17

not to mention the sensitivities involved, are much more challenging.

0:01:170:01:20

Well, the University of Zurich is now using

0:01:200:01:23

a cluster of technologies usually reserved to detect

0:01:230:01:26

diseases in the living to perform virtual autopsies.

0:01:260:01:30

David Reid reports from Switzerland. Just a word of warning -

0:01:300:01:33

David's report does contain a 3-D simulation of physical injury.

0:01:330:01:38

Swiss prosecutors watching a post-mortem

0:01:410:01:44

at the University of Zurich.

0:01:440:01:45

Not for the faint-hearted, certainly, but the autopsy is

0:01:450:01:49

an indispensable tool for investigating unexplained deaths.

0:01:490:01:53

And forensic pathologists spend years honing the skills to ask how,

0:01:540:01:58

why, even when or where the person in front of them ended their days.

0:01:580:02:04

Now, a team at the university has pioneered a virtual autopsy,

0:02:070:02:11

or Virtopsy.

0:02:110:02:13

It's a digital post-mortem, new tools for a new era.

0:02:130:02:16

But there are no plans to completely do away with the scalpel yet.

0:02:160:02:20

It's not replacing this instrument,

0:02:220:02:25

it's really the added value,

0:02:250:02:27

or the quality improvement in forensic in general.

0:02:270:02:31

At the moment, we cannot replace in every case the autopsy.

0:02:310:02:35

That's absolutely clear.

0:02:350:02:36

But, to be honest, we have to say that the autopsy is not any

0:02:360:02:40

more the gold standard in the field.

0:02:400:02:44

Some image technique are better to see some findings in the body

0:02:440:02:49

than the classical autopsy.

0:02:490:02:51

Virtopsy uses an array of technologies -

0:02:520:02:55

magnetic resonance imaging that makes images of soft tissues,

0:02:550:03:00

CT or computed tomography,

0:03:000:03:02

an X-ray that slices the body into sections,

0:03:020:03:06

and 3-D scanning, which renders surface detail in high resolution.

0:03:060:03:10

What you get is a 3-D digital model of the body in question,

0:03:100:03:15

inside and out.

0:03:150:03:17

As a forensic pathologist, you not only want to see

0:03:200:03:23

the things that you obviously can see with your eyes, but with these

0:03:230:03:27

tools, we can document things that we cannot see that well.

0:03:270:03:31

And that means we can now see air or gas,

0:03:310:03:33

we can see gas distributions in the body.

0:03:330:03:36

We can see foreign bodies, like scattered metal fragments,

0:03:360:03:39

glass fragments.

0:03:390:03:41

And we can also document pathologies that, otherwise,

0:03:410:03:43

we would just cut through.

0:03:430:03:45

The victim's body is a crime scene.

0:03:470:03:49

Virtopsy allows you to move through that scene, treading lightly,

0:03:490:03:54

preserving evidence.

0:03:540:03:56

You can also pursue investigations from all angles,

0:03:560:03:59

as they did with this multiple stabbing victim.

0:03:590:04:02

The question was, in that case, we knew it would be a blade,

0:04:030:04:07

a knife, that did the stabbings,

0:04:070:04:09

but we didn't know how long the blade would be.

0:04:090:04:12

This is hard to calculate with a conventional autopsy,

0:04:130:04:17

much easier when you have a full 3-D model you can scroll through.

0:04:170:04:22

So, we were able to determine the length of the knife.

0:04:220:04:27

It's important, because, once you've found the crime tool,

0:04:270:04:32

you can take DNA from the crime tool

0:04:320:04:35

and convict the suspect.

0:04:350:04:38

Because that's what you want to do.

0:04:380:04:40

You want to find who did that to that body.

0:04:400:04:42

Investigators can now digitally reconstruct entire crime scenes.

0:04:470:04:53

Swiss police now routinely scan vehicles in criminal cases

0:04:530:04:58

and, with the data from the virtual autopsy, they can see

0:04:580:05:01

if the injuries to the victim fit with what they see in the scan.

0:05:010:05:06

All the data sets that we gather here can be linked,

0:05:110:05:14

so we can create one big dataset that documents the inside

0:05:140:05:18

and the outside of the body objectively.

0:05:180:05:21

Then, later on, we can combine this with data from the police,

0:05:210:05:23

such as plan views from the police,

0:05:230:05:25

laser scans of the scene, of weapons.

0:05:250:05:29

And we can try to combine all these informations to create

0:05:290:05:32

a virtual crime scene.

0:05:320:05:33

The virtual autopsy is a fantastic investigative tool,

0:05:350:05:38

but, what's more, the work they're doing here at

0:05:380:05:41

Zurich University is also helping families who,

0:05:410:05:44

while desperate to know why their loved one has died, are also,

0:05:440:05:48

for religious or emotional reasons, not so keen for the body

0:05:480:05:53

of their family member to have a conventional autopsy.

0:05:530:05:57

I think, for them, it's very important,

0:05:570:06:00

because we can do that in a non-invasive approach.

0:06:000:06:04

So, more and more people do not like the classical invasive

0:06:040:06:10

autopsy approach and so having this non-invasive approach,

0:06:100:06:15

I think it's great for them.

0:06:150:06:17

The autopsy is where medicine and the law meet,

0:06:200:06:24

but it's also emotionally charged.

0:06:240:06:26

Families can be conflicted by the need for answers and the desire

0:06:260:06:30

to preserve the integrity of the body that's left to them.

0:06:300:06:33

Virtopsy allows us to tread lightly where evidence is fragile

0:06:330:06:38

and sensitivities more delicate still.

0:06:380:06:41

David Reid in Switzerland.

0:06:470:06:50

And, next up, a look at this week's tech news.

0:06:500:06:52

Microsoft is offering Windows 8 users a free upgrade to

0:06:540:06:57

version 8.1, which includes a return of the much missed

0:06:570:07:00

Start button in face-lifted form.

0:07:000:07:03

Users can also start up directly on the desktop,

0:07:030:07:06

rather than in the Windows 8 tiled home screen.

0:07:060:07:09

The 8.1 full upgrade will be available later this year.

0:07:090:07:12

If you're in South Korea and on a mobile, you can

0:07:140:07:16

now download a movie in 43 seconds.

0:07:160:07:19

SK Telecom is promising 150 megabit mobile broadband,

0:07:190:07:24

the fastest in the world.

0:07:240:07:26

The South Korean mobile operator says its new LTE-Advanced

0:07:260:07:30

network can download data twice as fast as 4G or LTE connections.

0:07:300:07:34

The catch? For the first few months, at least,

0:07:340:07:37

It'll only work on a particular handset,

0:07:370:07:39

exclusively available through -

0:07:390:07:42

you've guessed it - SK Telecom.

0:07:420:07:44

A Japanese robot which has been designed to function in space

0:07:440:07:47

and communicate verbally with spacecraft crew and mission control

0:07:470:07:51

is scheduled to make a flight to the International Space Station.

0:07:510:07:55

The robot's designers are hoping that the diminutive droid

0:07:550:07:58

will act as a companion to Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata

0:07:580:08:02

on his mission to the ISS in August.

0:08:020:08:05

And, finally, a former British government minister has

0:08:060:08:09

broken the world land speed record for a lightweight electric car.

0:08:090:08:13

With an average top speed of 204.2 miles per hour, Lord Paul Drayson

0:08:130:08:18

streaked across the tarmac in his specially made Lola B12 69/EV.

0:08:180:08:23

EV as in electric vehicle.

0:08:230:08:25

He plans to enter his tricked out racer into next year's

0:08:250:08:29

Le Mans 24-hour race.

0:08:290:08:30

Let's hope he remembers his international plug adapter!

0:08:300:08:34

Over the last couple of weeks,

0:08:380:08:40

we've brought you news of the video games consoles that

0:08:400:08:42

dominated the headlines at this year's E3,

0:08:420:08:45

the largest games expo on the planet.

0:08:450:08:48

Well, now, it's time to turn our attention to the games that

0:08:480:08:51

were announced at the show.

0:08:510:08:53

Here's Marc Cieslak with more from the E3 show floor.

0:08:530:08:57

It's rare to get an E3 like this one,

0:09:000:09:03

an event that heralded the impending arrival of not one,

0:09:030:09:06

but two new home games consoles,

0:09:060:09:09

the Xbox One and the PlayStation 4.

0:09:090:09:11

All new machines,

0:09:140:09:15

but the first games for both have a distinctly familiar feel to them.

0:09:150:09:20

Indeed, lots of the early releases will appeal on current generation,

0:09:200:09:24

the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3,

0:09:240:09:27

as well as their soon-to-be-released replacements.

0:09:270:09:31

'Delta One One, we are en route to your position.'

0:09:310:09:35

Games which could be described as "man shooters",

0:09:380:09:41

as evidenced in Call Of Duty: Ghosts and Battlefield 4.

0:09:410:09:45

Although, this time round,

0:09:460:09:48

Call Of Duty has introduced a controllable dog to help out

0:09:480:09:51

the player and Battlefield allows up to 64 online PC players to

0:09:510:09:55

cause huge amounts of environmental damage.

0:09:550:09:59

EXPLOSION

0:09:590:10:02

There are, of course, games which are strictly next gen,

0:10:020:10:05

like Xbox One exclusive and zombie hurter Dead Rising 3.

0:10:050:10:09

And multiplayer armoured robot suit and man shooting in Titanfall.

0:10:170:10:22

New consoles may be on the way but new game experiences, well,

0:10:230:10:28

they're a bit thin on the ground.

0:10:280:10:30

What's great right now is we've all these new forms of technology,

0:10:300:10:33

whether it's to connect or something like the Oculus Rift,

0:10:330:10:36

you have new cloud-based ecosystems.

0:10:360:10:38

All these types of new technology that are out there

0:10:380:10:40

and, I think that publishers are still challenged in terms of

0:10:400:10:44

how we see those actually integrated in those everyday experiences.

0:10:440:10:48

What was so revolutionary about the Wii

0:10:480:10:50

when it came out more than six, seven years ago was how

0:10:500:10:52

different the types of games that were created for it.

0:10:520:10:55

It did open up all these new experiences.

0:10:550:10:57

And I will say I was a little bit disappointed by a lot

0:10:570:10:59

of the titles that were being shown, was essentially

0:10:590:11:02

sort of a person sitting in front of the television using a controller.

0:11:020:11:06

The game industry isn't alone in its fondness for sequels

0:11:060:11:09

and franchises and the return of fan favourites like sneaky stealth

0:11:090:11:13

actioner Metal Gear Solid, now with the introduction of large,

0:11:130:11:17

explorable open-world elements, are at least adding something

0:11:170:11:20

different to tried and tested ingredients.

0:11:200:11:23

But, it's slightly disheartening to discover that actually playing

0:11:250:11:28

the new consoles themselves is

0:11:280:11:30

so far not as revolutionary as some may have hoped.

0:11:300:11:34

So, I finally got my hands on an Xbox One game.

0:11:340:11:38

This is LocoCycle, an action/racing title.

0:11:380:11:41

But what are my first impressions of next-generation gaming?

0:11:410:11:45

Well, it looks and feels an awful lot like current generation gaming.

0:11:450:11:49

It's a similar story with the PlayStation 4.

0:11:500:11:53

This is Drive Club.

0:11:530:11:55

The game itself is very, very pretty indeed.

0:11:550:11:58

Although I'm getting to grips with a genuine controller,

0:11:580:12:01

I'm actually playing on a development kit which is inside this box here.

0:12:010:12:05

First impressions? Well, this is certainly a slick racing game.

0:12:050:12:08

In terms of gameplay,

0:12:080:12:10

I'm not seeing anything here I haven't really seen before.

0:12:100:12:14

There are still pockets of innovation in the games industry though,

0:12:150:12:19

like this intriguing and difficult-to-categorise

0:12:190:12:22

exploration title, Hohokum.

0:12:220:12:24

This casts the player as an unusual,

0:12:240:12:26

colourful, adventuring...tentacle.

0:12:260:12:28

And then we have cute cross-platformer Doki-Doki Universe.

0:12:300:12:33

This game can be played on the PS Vita

0:12:330:12:35

and PlayStation's 3 and 4.

0:12:350:12:37

Here, the player adopts the guise of a robot,

0:12:370:12:39

which must prevent its own destruction by travelling to

0:12:390:12:42

alien worlds and helping and interacting with the beings it meets.

0:12:420:12:47

Neither features a single assault rifle, massively destructible

0:12:470:12:50

environments or special forces dog,

0:12:500:12:53

but they do help us remember that, sometimes,

0:12:530:12:55

games don't have to be part of a multi-million dollar franchise

0:12:550:12:59

or even make any sense to be a lot of fun.

0:12:590:13:02

Marc Cieslak with a taste of next-generation gaming.

0:13:030:13:06

Now, passwords have several problems.

0:13:080:13:10

They are hard to remember, easy to forget and, sometimes,

0:13:100:13:14

they're stolen.

0:13:140:13:16

But what if you replaced passwords with pass-thoughts?

0:13:160:13:20

Where, instead of scouring your memory for long,

0:13:210:13:24

obscure strings of characters, you simply had to think about something?

0:13:240:13:29

Well, Sumi Das has been to the West Coast of America to

0:13:290:13:31

investigate the researchers who are, remarkably, considering just that.

0:13:310:13:36

UC Berkeley, long known for alternative thinking,

0:13:380:13:42

is now home to a research project that could radically

0:13:420:13:45

transform passwords as we know them.

0:13:450:13:49

Professor John Chuang has developed a way to verify a person's identity

0:13:490:13:53

by analysing their brainwaves, using electroencephalograms, or EEGs.

0:13:530:13:59

You process them, and use that data to make decisions

0:13:590:14:04

about whether this brainwave signal does indeed belong

0:14:040:14:08

to the individual whose identity has been authenticated.

0:14:080:14:12

Brainwave authentication itself isn't new,

0:14:130:14:16

but it's been limited to clinical settings, where EEGs require

0:14:160:14:20

applying electrodes and gel to a subject's head.

0:14:200:14:23

Some EEGs even call for needles.

0:14:230:14:26

But, don't panic. There's no need to put needles in your scalp.

0:14:260:14:30

All you need is a headset, like this, with a built-in electrode.

0:14:300:14:35

This particular headset runs 100, and, for the record,

0:14:350:14:39

is absolutely painless.

0:14:390:14:41

The technology is still rough around the edges.

0:14:420:14:45

Currently, users must complete a one-time initialisation phase

0:14:450:14:49

that takes 40 minutes.

0:14:490:14:51

Dr Chuang hopes to cut that time in half

0:14:510:14:53

as he refines the process.

0:14:530:14:55

During initialisation, users complete seven mental tasks,

0:14:550:14:59

ranging from simple requests...

0:14:590:15:01

So, go ahead, close your eyes, focus on your breathing.

0:15:010:15:05

..To personalised questions.

0:15:080:15:10

I want you to imagine in your head, singing the song.

0:15:100:15:15

Three, two, one, go.

0:15:150:15:18

MUSIC: "The Entertainer" by Scott Joplin

0:15:180:15:20

The electrical signals recorded during each task are recorded.

0:15:240:15:28

The next time the user wants to log on to their computer,

0:15:280:15:30

they're prompted to recall one of those past acts for five seconds

0:15:300:15:35

and those electrical signals are compared

0:15:350:15:37

to the ones from the initialisation.

0:15:370:15:39

It turns out that even if two people are thinking about the same thing,

0:15:390:15:43

perhaps they share a favourite song,

0:15:430:15:45

their brain waves are distinct enough

0:15:450:15:47

to uniquely identify them with 99% accuracy.

0:15:470:15:51

Dr Chuang realises people aren't going to swap out

0:15:510:15:54

all their keyboards for EEG headsets.

0:15:540:15:58

But as we move to either wearable computing devices

0:15:580:16:02

or mobile devices, where there isn't a keyboard that's readily available

0:16:020:16:08

and a keyboard that we don't want to carry in our pocket,

0:16:080:16:11

in that case, we need to think about,

0:16:110:16:13

how do I authenticate myself to these wearable devices?

0:16:130:16:18

I think more natural authentication methods

0:16:180:16:22

will have to be developed.

0:16:220:16:24

Motorola recently announced that it's developing some

0:16:250:16:29

authentication alternatives.

0:16:290:16:31

Electronic tattoos.

0:16:310:16:32

And sensors that, when swallowed, send signals from your stomach.

0:16:320:16:37

Try stealing those passwords!

0:16:370:16:39

Dr Chuang predicts EEG devices will soon be more common.

0:16:400:16:45

This technology will continue to be miniaturised,

0:16:450:16:48

such that it becomes very straightforward

0:16:480:16:52

to integrate into existing consumer electronics,

0:16:520:16:56

wearable computing devices like Google Glass.

0:16:560:17:01

But, will pass-thoughts make the leap from research to reality?

0:17:010:17:05

Experts in the field say it has great potential.

0:17:050:17:08

It was a very simple approach to recognising people,

0:17:080:17:12

but I like the sensor, I like the idea that the sensor

0:17:120:17:15

was so easy to slip on and off.

0:17:150:17:18

One more time?

0:17:180:17:19

Easy, but Wayman says the system needs improvements.

0:17:190:17:23

What about external noise?

0:17:230:17:24

What if I got in a high electrical environment?

0:17:240:17:27

What if the 60-cycle lights overhead were turned on?

0:17:270:17:30

Also, what about my mental state that might make me unrecognisable?

0:17:300:17:34

Suppose I'm agitated, suppose I've just been running.

0:17:340:17:37

Dr Chuang plans to research those questions and others,

0:17:370:17:40

such as, could the system be hacked?

0:17:400:17:43

Our early results suggest that that is not likely.

0:17:430:17:48

Because we have different subjects perform identical tasks.

0:17:480:17:53

And you are still able to distinguish between them.

0:17:530:17:56

But, we want to do a more systematic study for that.

0:17:560:17:59

Despite reassurances, sceptics might prefer to keep tapping away at their keyboards.

0:18:020:18:07

Early adopters, on the other hand, may be eager to see passwords

0:18:070:18:11

become a thing of the past.

0:18:110:18:13

MUSIC: Final few bars of "The Entertainer"

0:18:130:18:17

Sumi, Das. Got it.

0:18:180:18:21

Now, communications these days seems to be dominated by social media,

0:18:230:18:27

where everything needs to be shorter and sweeter

0:18:270:18:30

but, what can we really say in 140 characters, anyway?

0:18:300:18:32

Well, if you lament the passing of long-form communications,

0:18:340:18:37

then Kate Russell has something for you now which should help you

0:18:370:18:41

express yourself to the full. Here's Webscape.

0:18:410:18:44

These days, it's all Tweet this, comment that, like this

0:18:460:18:51

and give those a poke.

0:18:510:18:52

Whatever happened to a good old-fashioned letter?

0:18:520:18:56

lettrs.com is trying for a revival of long-form communication

0:18:560:19:01

with a website that encourages you to write the old-fashioned way.

0:19:010:19:06

The interface is reminiscent of a physical writing desk

0:19:060:19:09

and you can scan and upload your old letters, too,

0:19:090:19:12

to store in your digital shoebox.

0:19:120:19:14

# Mailed my letter off to Dallas

0:19:150:19:18

# But her reply came from Anchorage... #

0:19:180:19:22

Send your finished letter by post

0:19:220:19:24

and they will print it out and mail it for you,

0:19:240:19:27

although the site is based in the USA,

0:19:270:19:29

so, you could pay anything up to 7, depending on location.

0:19:290:19:34

If that's too much, well, there are digital options, too,

0:19:340:19:37

by e-mail, or, as an open message for everyone to see.

0:19:370:19:41

Keyword tagging and geolocation can be added for extra context

0:19:410:19:46

although that is straying away from the idea of "old school" again.

0:19:460:19:50

Likewise, the new iPhone app, with iPad and Android ones on the way

0:19:500:19:54

isn't exactly Emily Bronte,

0:19:540:19:57

but when it comes to receiving a letter in the post,

0:19:570:20:00

surely it's the thought that counts.

0:20:000:20:02

Global e-commerce sales topped 1 trillion for the first time last year

0:20:080:20:13

and study upon study is showing that

0:20:130:20:16

consumers are happier than ever to head online.

0:20:160:20:20

# We're S-H-O-P-P-I-N-G

0:20:200:20:23

# We're shopping... #

0:20:230:20:26

If you fancy a piece of that retail action,

0:20:260:20:28

Tictail.com is a new platform that will have you up and running

0:20:280:20:33

in just a few simple clicks. No technical know-how required.

0:20:330:20:36

Sounds good, right? And, actually, I was astounded to find out

0:20:390:20:43

that the basic service is free.

0:20:430:20:46

No monthly fees, zero percentage cut on transactions,

0:20:460:20:50

you can upload an unlimited number of products

0:20:500:20:53

and there are no additional checkout fees

0:20:530:20:55

although normal fees from the company you're processing payments to

0:20:550:20:59

will still apply.

0:20:590:21:00

This will vary, depending on your service

0:21:020:21:04

and the volume of sales you're processing.

0:21:040:21:06

For example, PayPal charges sellers between 1.4-3.4%

0:21:060:21:11

on total sale amount, plus a small charge per transaction.

0:21:110:21:15

For the ease of setting up your own shop online,

0:21:160:21:19

this site is hard to beat right now.

0:21:190:21:21

# We're shopping

0:21:210:21:23

# We're shopping #

0:21:230:21:25

To capture epic moments like a stunning sunset

0:21:280:21:32

or, just record your journey to work,

0:21:320:21:34

Lapse It is free on Android and iPhone

0:21:340:21:36

and lets you set up and record individual frames

0:21:360:21:40

over a long period of time,

0:21:400:21:41

which are then played back as super-speeded up movies.

0:21:410:21:45

Check out the What's Hot feed for ideas about what to film.

0:21:450:21:50

# Time passes slowly up here in the daylight...

0:21:500:21:54

You can set the frame capture rate to whatever you like.

0:21:560:22:00

This one here, is inside the BBC's staircase

0:22:000:22:03

and it's one snap every two seconds.

0:22:030:22:06

Although, if you're recording something less busy, like a sunset,

0:22:060:22:10

you might want to go for a little longer.

0:22:100:22:13

Once you've captured your frames,

0:22:150:22:17

you can set the playback speed to whatever you like.

0:22:170:22:20

and then render the movie to be played through your phone,

0:22:200:22:22

or published online.

0:22:220:22:24

It's the perfect way to record lasting memories

0:22:240:22:27

without eating too much of your phone's memory.

0:22:270:22:30

# Time passes slowly and fades away #

0:22:300:22:35

On 1 July, Google Reader shuts down for good,

0:22:380:22:41

so make sure you use the takeout tool to download all your data before then

0:22:410:22:46

as it won't be available afterwards.

0:22:460:22:48

We looked at Feedly a few weeks ago as a good RSS feed replacement,

0:22:540:22:59

with stress-free porting of your Google links with one click.

0:22:590:23:02

But, maybe it's time to make a change.

0:23:060:23:09

# Ch-ch-ch-changes... #

0:23:090:23:11

Major news stories surface naturally through social media streams

0:23:110:23:16

like Facebook and Twitter.

0:23:160:23:17

but get caught up in the clutter of everyday chitchat.

0:23:170:23:21

LikeHack filters out the noise to provide a digest

0:23:210:23:24

of interesting stories, based on your typical sharing history.

0:23:240:23:28

You can also add individual RSS feeds

0:23:280:23:31

and pick from their selection of popular sources,

0:23:310:23:33

plus, there's the obligatory Google Reader migrate button.

0:23:330:23:38

# But I can't trace time... #

0:23:380:23:42

Thank you, Kate, and we are always looking for new apps and sites

0:23:420:23:45

to feature on Webscape

0:23:450:23:47

so if you have any, please e-mail them our way -

0:23:470:23:50

and you can also get hold of us on Twitter, Facebook and Google Plus.

0:23:500:23:54

Now, our website contains all of our stories from recent times

0:23:540:23:57

and the very latest tech news as well.

0:23:570:23:59

It is there every day, every hour, for your convenience.

0:24:010:24:04

That's it for now.

0:24:040:24:05

Thank you very much for watching, and we will see you next time.

0:24:050:24:08

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:24:180:24:21

Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS