09/11/2013 Click


09/11/2013

The creator of file sharing giant, BitTorrent, on the company's efforts to break its association with piracy. Includes tech news and Webscape.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 09/11/2013. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

acquitted. Now on BBC News, it is time for

:00:00.:00:00.

Click. This week on Click, we will look at

:00:00.:00:37.

a great way of downloading data, piece by piece, BitTorrent. But

:00:38.:00:42.

famous for its association with piracy, we will ask its creator

:00:43.:00:46.

whether it can prepare `` repair its image. As videogames grow up, we

:00:47.:00:51.

will visit a festival that celebrates them as art. We will also

:00:52.:00:55.

have this week's tech news and the best of the Web in Webscape.

:00:56.:01:02.

Welcome to Click. This is an amazing figure. Of all

:01:03.:01:07.

the data that flows across the internet every day, nearly a quarter

:01:08.:01:11.

of it is the same thing. Something called BitTorrent. It is a method of

:01:12.:01:19.

sharing large files between computer users. Files such as movies,

:01:20.:01:25.

software and TV programmes. Although it does have legitimate uses, guess

:01:26.:01:29.

what, nearly all of the files that are swapped RE legal.

:01:30.:01:36.

Never mind the fact that large organisations such as Facebook,

:01:37.:01:40.

Twitter and the team before the Large Hadron Collider and the Human

:01:41.:01:43.

Genome Project user to shift enormous amounts of data, the name

:01:44.:01:48.

BitTorrent has become synonymous with internet piracy. It is the most

:01:49.:01:54.

you `` used technology for distributing copyrighted material

:01:55.:01:58.

online. Want to know how Breaking Bad finished? 3 million people found

:01:59.:02:06.

out by downloading illegal copies. The most downloaded series of all

:02:07.:02:09.

time is the widely successful HBO fantasy drama, game of drones.

:02:10.:02:15.

According to TorrentFreak, they had 5.2 million illegal downloads

:02:16.:02:20.

between March and June this year. It is something that the entertainment

:02:21.:02:23.

industry has found difficult to fight, because it does not work in

:02:24.:02:27.

the same way as traditional services, which store all their

:02:28.:02:33.

downloadable content in one place. BitTorrent is a really clever way of

:02:34.:02:37.

moving large files around. Instead of downloading things from a central

:02:38.:02:43.

server, hundreds or even thousands of individual users each pull

:02:44.:02:46.

different parts of the final are many others who already have it.

:02:47.:02:53.

Their reserve central server, which means there is no bottleneck in the

:02:54.:02:56.

traffic to slow things down, and it also means that if these files

:02:57.:03:02.

happen to be illegal copies, there is no`one place for the authorities

:03:03.:03:09.

to go to shut them down. There are targets. Websites which point to the

:03:10.:03:14.

illegal files. Even though the sites do not store the pirated content

:03:15.:03:18.

themselves, the entertainment industry has successfully managed to

:03:19.:03:22.

shut down site such as Pirate Bay, and most recently, ISOHunt. Who is

:03:23.:03:30.

doing what and where? This is a visual representation of any legal

:03:31.:03:33.

filesharing that goes around the world, using BitTorrent. Pirates

:03:34.:03:39.

cinema, an art installation created by a French artist, makes the hidden

:03:40.:03:43.

activity and geography filesharing visible. It shows a sample of

:03:44.:03:47.

illegal videos being shared in real`time user BitTorrent. We found

:03:48.:03:54.

that the amount of content being transferred over BitTorrent has

:03:55.:04:00.

increased dramatically. In January 2013, we saw 7 billion petabyte is

:04:01.:04:04.

being transferred over BitTorrent, all of that infringing material.

:04:05.:04:10.

There is no sign whatsoever that the number of people using BitTorrent

:04:11.:04:12.

and the amount of data being transferred over BitTorrent has any

:04:13.:04:20.

sign of slowing. This amount was illegal sharing does anger a lot of

:04:21.:04:24.

content producers. Not everyone involved has such a simpleminded

:04:25.:04:29.

opinion. I see that there are two sides. If I am being honest. I see

:04:30.:04:35.

that the illegal downloading went to a lot of people watching the

:04:36.:04:39.

series, becoming aware of the series, who otherwise would not have

:04:40.:04:43.

been. So I see in some ways the illegal downloading has helped us.

:04:44.:04:46.

Certainly in terms of brand awareness. It is the most pyrite did

:04:47.:04:53.

show in the world? You are obviously happy. `` pirated. There is a part

:04:54.:05:00.

of you where you go, yes, we are the most pirated. People who do

:05:01.:05:07.

subscribe to it through illegitimate channels, they feel part of a team

:05:08.:05:11.

effort because of it. My money has gone towards making the ground that

:05:12.:05:18.

he has caught on. It feels like an inclusive thing. It is the rise of

:05:19.:05:24.

these legitimate, easy to use channels, that is thought to have

:05:25.:05:31.

led to a decline. In North America, the amount of peaktime internet

:05:32.:05:34.

traffic generated by BitTorrent has dropped by two thirds in the last

:05:35.:05:40.

five years. From 31% in 2008, to only 9% today. We are seeing a

:05:41.:05:46.

decline in BitTorrent traffic and America as a precaution, because of

:05:47.:05:50.

the rise of some very successful legitimate alternatives, and the

:05:51.:05:54.

main driver of that is Netflix. It takes up 30% of all downstream

:05:55.:05:59.

big`time North America traffic, which is a huge amount, and on top

:06:00.:06:04.

of that, legitimate services such as Hulu and Amazon Instant, which are

:06:05.:06:08.

also taking up the bandwidth. The sharers of BitTorrent traffic is

:06:09.:06:13.

actually declining. But printing does remain popular in other parts

:06:14.:06:19.

of the world. As ISOHunt and the Pirate Bay are taking down, they are

:06:20.:06:24.

replaced by others. Still, BitTorrent is trying to repair its

:06:25.:06:28.

reputation. To this end, the company ran a billboard campaign in your ``

:06:29.:06:33.

in New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles. The creator of BitTorrent,

:06:34.:06:40.

Bram Cohen, sat down with us to talk about his attempt to distance itself

:06:41.:06:45.

from piracy, and where he understands the pirates prefer

:06:46.:06:49.

torrents to Netflix. Using BitTorrent it is possible to

:06:50.:06:54.

give customers a much better experience, with much less cost. It

:06:55.:07:05.

is not being utilised properly and it is unfortunate. It is not

:07:06.:07:10.

necessarily about a better experience, but it provides a lot of

:07:11.:07:14.

anonymity for users to be able to share copyrighted material. I

:07:15.:07:19.

disagree. Occasionally I watch things Netflix. I do watch things

:07:20.:07:28.

Netflix. I find it very frustrating because the video quality is really

:07:29.:07:36.

terrible. I really go out of my way not to give the slightest hint of

:07:37.:07:40.

pirating anything ever, but if I was a nobody who did not know about

:07:41.:07:47.

copyright, my guess is that I would probably Pirate some of the stuff

:07:48.:07:51.

that I can watch Netflix, that I have repaid to be able to watch,

:07:52.:07:56.

because I want to watch it in high resolution. BitTorrent is making a

:07:57.:07:59.

concerted effort to make sure that artists are rewarded. The idea

:08:00.:08:06.

behind BitTorrent bumbles, creators really share some content, but

:08:07.:08:10.

include other content which fans can only unlock by actively engaging, by

:08:11.:08:14.

entering an email address, which can be used for marketing. Some people

:08:15.:08:20.

would say if you had done this a long time ago, you would not have

:08:21.:08:23.

gained a reputation for being the site or the technology that

:08:24.:08:27.

facilitates piracy. Could you have coded something like this into the

:08:28.:08:32.

technology many years ago? We have tried a number of different ways

:08:33.:08:35.

with working with people, Hollywood deals. I guess you have a brand

:08:36.:08:44.

problem with Hollywood. Yes. We are treated as hostile actors,

:08:45.:08:48.

frequently, when we are trying to work with people. Although we have

:08:49.:08:54.

never been sued, so that is good. Why is that? Because we are a

:08:55.:08:57.

technology vendor. You are just the plumbing. A sickly. `` basically.

:08:58.:09:07.

When I created BitTorrent, I was literally a guy sitting in his

:09:08.:09:15.

living room in his underwear. One of the biggest problem is that he is

:09:16.:09:20.

trying to solve today concerns proceed `` privacy. With America's

:09:21.:09:26.

and is a reeling after the will revelations, he has his sights on an

:09:27.:09:31.

NSA`proof missions in service to keep out conversations away from

:09:32.:09:36.

prising eyes. People issue when they communicate with others that what

:09:37.:09:42.

they are doing is private. There has been a lot of implicit trust in

:09:43.:09:48.

third parties. Which we now know has been violated. That is the issue.

:09:49.:09:54.

There is the fabulous technology that makes possible, to make it

:09:55.:10:01.

impossible for someone else to snoop on what you are doing. Is this a

:10:02.:10:07.

libertarian philosophy? It gets to be a complicated issue in personal

:10:08.:10:12.

communications. Sometimes law enforcement needs to do things. They

:10:13.:10:21.

need to come in and spy on people. So it is suitable for regulation?

:10:22.:10:26.

For law enforcement. Those infringement of copyright for into

:10:27.:10:32.

that category? Copyright infringement is not a crime in the

:10:33.:10:37.

way that beating someone up is a crime, or stealing something is a

:10:38.:10:41.

crime. Stealing a physical thing from a stall. It is something else.

:10:42.:10:47.

Finally, what would you like your legacy to be? Do you want to go down

:10:48.:10:52.

as a guy who created a hugely disruptive world changing

:10:53.:10:55.

technology? I would like to do something in a space that fills more

:10:56.:11:00.

important than entertainment. I would like to do something such as

:11:01.:11:05.

power generation or industry, manufacturing. I am interested in

:11:06.:11:09.

3`D printing and things like that. I do not think my work is done.

:11:10.:11:18.

This is always a hot topic. We would love to get your thoughts on it.

:11:19.:11:27.

Next up, a look at this week's tech news. Apple has revealed how many

:11:28.:11:31.

times governments around the world have requested information about its

:11:32.:11:35.

users. Topping the list was the US government, which requested

:11:36.:11:39.

information up to 3000 Apple account in the six months to June. The

:11:40.:11:48.

company released data in response. In up to 1000 of the cases, the

:11:49.:11:53.

government restricts it from disclosing more information. India

:11:54.:11:59.

has successfully launched its first unmanned mission to Mars. There were

:12:00.:12:03.

cheers as a rocket blasted off from a launch facility in the Bay of

:12:04.:12:08.

Bengal, carrying a scientific probe. If all goes to plan, it will reach

:12:09.:12:16.

its destination in September of next year, and will orbit the red planet

:12:17.:12:18.

looking for signs that it can support life. You have heard of

:12:19.:12:21.

outsourcing, crowd funding, and crowd working, and that is just the

:12:22.:12:24.

tip of the iceberg. Researchers studying the effects of climate

:12:25.:12:31.

change are using people to watch the Web cams around the clock. They

:12:32.:12:38.

hoping the increased eyeball count will hope `` will flag interesting

:12:39.:12:49.

events. The entertainment industry loves its festivals. Film fans flock

:12:50.:12:55.

to Cannes in the south of France and Sunday at in the United States.

:12:56.:12:59.

Music and art fans have thousands of festivals to choose from, and now

:13:00.:13:02.

the videogame industry has a festival of its own. It celebrates

:13:03.:13:07.

games as more than just an adolescent diversion. It also... It

:13:08.:13:17.

is home in Nottingham. A fireworks display with a

:13:18.:13:31.

difference. These fireworks are entirely digital and controlled by

:13:32.:13:36.

their audience. They can trigger a motion sensor, which launches

:13:37.:13:42.

different pyrotechnics, culminating in a giant game of space invaders

:13:43.:13:45.

and the launch of the eight annual GameCity. The GameCity festival in

:13:46.:13:52.

Nottingham is unusual for a video games event, most of which look and

:13:53.:13:54.

sound like this. This festival, on the other hand, is

:13:55.:14:06.

far more concerned with the cultural impacts and potential of video games

:14:07.:14:10.

beyond commercial concerns. Evidence by this game behind me, which

:14:11.:14:13.

involves people shouting as loudly as they can. This game, where

:14:14.:14:20.

players make as much racket as possible at key moments to defeat

:14:21.:14:23.

their opponent, is typical of the innovative approach that developers

:14:24.:14:29.

have `` used, approaching games as more than artform than a commodity.

:14:30.:14:33.

The festival itself is organised with the help of Trent University.

:14:34.:14:42.

Games are made by people. It's the biggest cultural industry in the

:14:43.:14:45.

world and one of the fastest`growing media industries. But unlike other

:14:46.:14:55.

creative industries, the videogames make it great that you know the fee

:14:56.:14:58.

he `` humans who made them. The key thing is about exposing the fact

:14:59.:15:02.

that games are made by people. Or the duration of the festival,

:15:03.:15:06.

developers and design students rub shoulders with industry legends and

:15:07.:15:10.

discuss and play games in interactive experiences which

:15:11.:15:15.

challenge the videogames. When somebody says to me, old maps,

:15:16.:15:20.

exciting interactive experience isn't the first thing that pops into

:15:21.:15:25.

my mind. But that's exactly the gauntlet that's been laid down by

:15:26.:15:28.

the British library to several different groups of young

:15:29.:15:32.

developers, as they engage in the off the map competition. The British

:15:33.:15:38.

library provided the maps from its archive of four million and games

:15:39.:15:43.

developer Crytek provided students with the tools to create virtual

:15:44.:15:49.

worlds by its software. Students combined the cartography and the

:15:50.:15:51.

game engine to bring the sometimes ancient maps to light. Games are

:15:52.:15:56.

virtual worlds and virtual worlds are maps in their own right. Have

:15:57.:16:00.

many maps in the British library. What we are interested to see is how

:16:01.:16:07.

this gaming engine transformed a 2`dimensional flat piece of paper,

:16:08.:16:10.

with an image on it, into a 3D world. Six teams competed against

:16:11.:16:18.

one another, with the winning entry courtesy of the Montford University

:16:19.:16:24.

in Leicester. They allow the player to explore and early version of

:16:25.:16:29.

putting lane. The story is rich with history and different elements and

:16:30.:16:33.

dynamics. Actual size of it, of course, was a real challenge. At

:16:34.:16:38.

that also getting across all of that history and characters and the

:16:39.:16:41.

streets. This story that London has to tell. We wanted to get that

:16:42.:16:46.

across visually. Other stories are being told at GameCity which aren't

:16:47.:16:51.

so visual. There is a way back for you to the world of the living. As

:16:52.:16:57.

well as up and coming students, established developers take part in

:16:58.:17:01.

the festival, often presenting unusual games and very unusual or

:17:02.:17:06.

unexpected environments. I am underneath Nottingham in the

:17:07.:17:08.

dungeons and Galleries of Justice. Not because I have been naughty but

:17:09.:17:14.

caused cost I am here to play a new smartphone game. It's a game that

:17:15.:17:18.

forces the player not to rely on their eyes but to rely on the years.

:17:19.:17:22.

That's because it's a title driven entirely by sound. What was that?

:17:23.:17:31.

The game makes use of actor Sean Bean's vocal talents to spin a yarn

:17:32.:17:34.

that sees the play a journey through window in an attempt to return to

:17:35.:17:39.

the land of the living. Brace yourself... It is spooky and

:17:40.:17:43.

atmospheric. The graphics exist purely for rudimentary navigation

:17:44.:17:47.

and movement. Everything else unfolds entirely through the

:17:48.:17:52.

narration of the actor. Not if you can hear me. `` nod. Your mind has

:17:53.:18:00.

the best graphics and what you don't have allows you to fill in the gaps

:18:01.:18:05.

and, particularly it works well with horror and adventure. Above ground,

:18:06.:18:10.

an entirely different take on the shooting genre, courtesy of one of

:18:11.:18:15.

the minds behind Golden eye. The way it works is to cameras moved over

:18:16.:18:21.

the Market Square. Each controlled by one player. Each player is

:18:22.:18:25.

supposed to choose somebody in the Market Square to make a couple or a

:18:26.:18:31.

friendship to bring to people together who were formerly strangers

:18:32.:18:36.

and create any relationship. Then those selected people come back,

:18:37.:18:40.

play the game, control the cameras. It is my impression that there's

:18:41.:18:46.

enough military shooters or manned shooters, a big burly guy with a

:18:47.:18:52.

vast array of military equipment, and a series of interaction is to go

:18:53.:18:56.

up to people and killed them repeatedly, I appreciate there are a

:18:57.:19:01.

wide range of people who enjoy that. I am creatively inspired to make new

:19:02.:19:05.

attractions and new kinds of entertainment.

:19:06.:19:10.

Whether it's using games technology in education or for entertainment,

:19:11.:19:13.

this festival is an excellent example of the growing maturity of

:19:14.:19:15.

the games industry. Games as art. A refreshing take on

:19:16.:19:26.

an industry which is often discussed in terms of its negative social

:19:27.:19:34.

impacts, with claims that games desensitise us to violence and

:19:35.:19:35.

promote criminal activity. In fact, Kate Russell has another

:19:36.:19:40.

take on the power of gaming for good next in Web Scape.

:19:41.:19:44.

The debate about green issues rages on but one thing is for sure, if the

:19:45.:19:52.

world does run out of natural resources, it's going to change

:19:53.:19:57.

everything and not in a good way. That's the message behind a Facebook

:19:58.:20:05.

game, Recharge, set in the not too distant future and aims to teach

:20:06.:20:07.

players about the of sustainable energy. `` the importance of. The

:20:08.:20:15.

driving creative force behind the gain is Linkin Park. They have been

:20:16.:20:20.

involved in the clean energy movement since 2005, when they

:20:21.:20:25.

sounded music for relief, a charity which helps those affected by

:20:26.:20:28.

natural disasters and promotes the use of clean energy. A top`down

:20:29.:20:37.

partner and shooter, Recharge is fun, whatever your view on

:20:38.:20:41.

sustainable energy. Combining the view `` appeal of gaming with Linkin

:20:42.:20:47.

Park's fan base, it's an initiative that seems bound to capture the

:20:48.:20:54.

imagination of younger generation. And if today's rising energy prices

:20:55.:20:58.

give you sleepless nights, how about trying a slick tracking app `` sleep

:20:59.:21:08.

tracking app? Sleep Time is free on iOS and Android and will monitor

:21:09.:21:11.

your movements you can build up a picture of how well are sleeping.

:21:12.:21:14.

There is a soothing soundscape to help his `` drift off and plenty of

:21:15.:21:19.

tips about how to get a better night's rest.

:21:20.:21:25.

You need to sleep with your phone resting on your bed, so the app can

:21:26.:21:30.

pick up any movement, that's how it knows when you are in deep and light

:21:31.:21:36.

sleep cycles. But the alarm will lead to a gently when you are not in

:21:37.:21:40.

deep sleep, rather than just ripping you out of your dreams at a set

:21:41.:21:45.

time. Another interesting that is sleep, free on android. It does all

:21:46.:21:53.

the slick tracking and smart alum stuff but will also kick into audio

:21:54.:21:56.

record mode if you get restless, it could reveal if you are snoring or

:21:57.:21:58.

talking in your sleep. `` SleepBot. Photography fans will love this next

:21:59.:22:14.

site. Fotor has a huge range of filters and other editing tools for

:22:15.:22:17.

you to snap up your snaps. Using the browser or download the apps for

:22:18.:22:22.

iOS, android or Windows phones are also the Windows desktop and Mac.

:22:23.:22:27.

You can get creative editing your snaps and creating the `` beautiful

:22:28.:22:30.

collages to share with your friends. One of the features I love is the

:22:31.:22:40.

ability to create HDR images, or high dynamic range. It's a striking

:22:41.:22:47.

visual effect that photographers, like Trey Ratcliff, has perfect.

:22:48.:22:51.

It's where they take several different shots of the same frame at

:22:52.:22:54.

different exposures for combining them to get the maximum detail out

:22:55.:23:03.

of all of `` then light and shaded parts of the shots. You need a

:23:04.:23:09.

camera that can take the range of shots. Then just load them up into

:23:10.:23:13.

the site and it will process them automatically.

:23:14.:23:19.

The tilt shift filter is another great look if you want to make a

:23:20.:23:22.

striking image. Google's new marketplace for experts

:23:23.:23:34.

launched this week and connects users through video chat with

:23:35.:23:36.

experts in the subjects, ranging from yoga to guitar.

:23:37.:23:43.

Tutors are all battered and they get to set their own fees, with Google

:23:44.:23:52.

taking a 20% cut. The service is available online through Google

:23:53.:23:54.

hangout and on and android app, with an IOS version in the pipeline.

:23:55.:24:00.

That was Web Scape. If you missed those links, they are all at our

:24:01.:24:04.

website. There are also clips of previous

:24:05.:24:08.

programmes and the latest tech news. You can get in touch with us if you

:24:09.:24:13.

like. E`mail us or find us on Twitter, Google and Facebook. That's

:24:14.:24:14.

it for now. See you next time. Good morning. Typhoon Haiyan is

:24:15.:24:37.

leaving the Philippines

:24:38.:24:39.

Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS