05/07/2014 Click


05/07/2014

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MUSIC PLAYS

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HUMMING

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This week on Click, we are taking part in art.

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We are at the exhibition that gives your wishes and your spirits wings.

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will.i.am is here. He has reinvented music, apparently.

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So has Bjork. We'll chat with her musical director.

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And we'll find out how our feelings

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can affect the stuff we watch and the stuff we buy.

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We've got all that, plus singing trees, the latest tech news,

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and Webscape, too.

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Welcome to Click. I'm Spencer Kelly, and welcome to the Barbican Centre in London,

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home for the next three months to the Digital Revolution Exhibition.

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This is where fashion, music, performance and technology

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all come together in one big eclectic show reel of digital art.

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There's dancing, there's cartoon faces, smoking reflections

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and mobile phone birds.

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Yep, it's a right mixed bag.

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One of the big focuses here, though, is on using technology to enhance

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visual media, to get the audience more engaged

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with what they watch and even become part of the show.

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For example, this piece uses an Xbox Kinect to track my movements

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and then turn me into a very strange cartoon character.

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I can interact with various things that

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fly across the screen at the same time.

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Now, biometric data such as the way you move is

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becoming of particular interest to the film industry.

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That's because it allows for the precise response

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of the audience to be measured and that's

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information that could even be used to change the finished product.

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David Reid went to Cannes

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to experience an immersive screening for himself.

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Every year, Cannes Lions Advertising Festival gives industry bigwigs

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a glimpse at the latest emerging talent

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with the Saatchi and Saatchi New Directors' Showcase.

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This year, it was an emotionally charged affair

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and there were nurses on hand.

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At least, I think they were nurses.

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-Do either of you girls have any medical training at all?

-No.

-Yes, I have.

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No, I'm a communications student.

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The audience was given smart bracelets.

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They purport to detect how people are feeling about what they are seeing

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and were developed by the collective behind Lady Gaga's TechHaus.

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First, the devices were calibrated, then it's on with the show,

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with the bracelets glowing blue, green and red

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depending on the level of audience arousal.

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The skin holds so many clues to how we feel,

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our emotional responses to things.

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Our temperature changes,

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we know that we blush when we get embarrassed, for example.

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These are all things that we can measure electrically.

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The developers are a bit cagey

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about exactly what sensors are detecting what parameters.

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So you'll see on the back here we have two contacts.

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However, one thing the device appears to do is to run

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a current across the skin to measure resistance.

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We sweat when we get excited, for example,

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and XO's device is designed to pick up these emotional triggers.

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Data from the bracelets was used by the British company

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Marshmallow Laser Feast to create laser art depicting,

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for the audience's benefit, their collective emotions in real-time.

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We have used it to control the geometry,

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so we have basically driven a parametric design,

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which includes geometric patterns and also colours.

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But once you've got this data

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we are really interested in what else you could do.

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XO isn't the only outfit using wristbands as part of a live set.

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Earlier this year

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at South By Southwest, American start-up Lightwave rolled out

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biometric bands which detected movement,

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audio levels, temperature -

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basically just how moshy it was getting in the mosh pit.

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Back in Cannes and Studio XO believe emotional data could add

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a whole new dimension to these kinds of live events.

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These days, the live experience is paramount,

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and adding emotional technology into that is incredibly exciting.

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It's this new authentic layer where people can have really

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symbiotic experiences with their artists, with the films

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that they see, the theatre they go to, the games they are playing.

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There are wider applications for this technology, beyond live events.

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Advertisers, for example, are interested in emotional tech

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to determine if their messages are really hitting home.

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People hide their emotions well. What you get is often only a reflection.

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That's why a technology like this, which gauges the physical reactions,

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the telltale signs behind emotions, can give you

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an honest insight into what people are really thinking and feeling.

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When you have something that is directly related to the emotions

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and the way people are feeling, that is a true reaction.

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Not just - what did I click on, how long did I stay on a web page

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and what is on my mobile phone,

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but what's in my heart and what's in my mind.

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Emotion is potentially a new digital domain.

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Tech that feels us could make live events more immersive,

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but also unravel for advertisers the riddle of the human heart,

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pitching us products we might be helpless to resist.

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David Reid, getting rather emotional.

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Now, some of the work on show here at Digital Revolution

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is by what you would call traditional digital artists.

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Some is by cinematic artists like this one, and there is one

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installation on show here which is the work of a music artist.

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That's artist/creative/producer/ songwriter/technologist/

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geek/entrepreneur/artist.

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Did I say that already? It's will.i.am.

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He is one of the four Black Eyed Peas

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and his music videos speak volumes about his love of tech.

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For the Digital Revolution Show, he has co-created this work -

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Pyramidi, which involves in part reimagining the guitar,

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the piano and the drum.

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The three new instruments live inside these pyramids and,

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controlled through a MIDI interface,

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play the tune that Will wrote to accompany the piece.

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That's him, by the way,

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looking down on it all from his face palace in the sky.

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What is the story behind Pyramidi, then?

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We created a song for a museum, but then also created

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the instruments that the song is to be played through.

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We created a player band that play in unison to songs that have been

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inputted with MIDI.

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It is a crazy, crazy, awesome, you know, level.

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A totally different level to create on. It's so exciting.

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You just open up the whole gamut on anything is possible.

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People are walking around with their phones and their tablets,

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you know, multi-tasking, living two lives at once.

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You go on a date with your loved one, your significant other,

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-and... you're not even there.

-You're tweeting.

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You're tweeting, both of you guys are tweeting...

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it's kind of nuts. It's new, though.

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But I think this is just an interim, I don't think it's going to be

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like this for ever, I think this is just right now.

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Right now the cloud is something, like,

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we don't realise what we're giving away.

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Right?

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You don't realise that you're giving away everything

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for the sake of convenience.

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It's all new, Facebook isn't 20 years old, it's new.

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It's big, it's cool, but it's just right now. It ain't for ever.

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Especially when you know someone is going to get hip to the fact that,

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"Wait a second, you mean this company is worth billions of dollars

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"just because I gave my stuff away?

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"And I didn't get nothing for it?" One day we're going to wake up.

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And what will that future look like if we sleepwalk into it?

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You remember the movie The Matrix?

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Everyone is plugged into something.

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The ultimate data mining and they would just rather be in this machine

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and totally forget what real life is about.

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Everyone is following, everyone is liking,

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but on these social platforms, it's not understanding.

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There is no button to understand.

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They don't care if you understand what is popping off.

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So...we have surrendered and are surrendering so much

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for this convenience, for free.

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Will, thanks very much for your time.

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Your thoughts on what Will says would be very welcome.

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On Twitter we are @bbcclick.

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We are also on Facebook as well. (Don't tell Will.)

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OK. Next up, a look at this week's tech news.

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And we start with Facebook:

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A UK regulator is investigating

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whether the social network broke data protection laws

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when it conducted a psychological study on users

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without their consent.

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The test saw Facebook manipulate the newsfeeds of nearly 700,000

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users to control which emotional expressions they were exposed to.

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Seven internet service providers have filed a legal complaint

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against the UK's intelligence agency GCHQ,

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alleging it used malicious software against their networks.

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The ISPs - from the UK, US, Germany, South Korea, the Netherlands

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and Zimbabwe - are working with campaign group

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Privacy International on the complaint.

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The ISPs claim the alleged network attacks were illegal

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and undermine the goodwill the organisations rely on.

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The cost of surfing the internet on your phone while travelling

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in the EU has been cut by half, as new rules come into force.

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Changes, which activated on 1st July, see the cost of browsing fall

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to 16p per megabyte.

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The price of calling and texting has also been reduced.

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In April, the European Parliament voted

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to scrap roaming fees altogether,

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although this still needs final approval of all EU governments.

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Sticking with musicians who love their tech,

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this is one of Bjork's music apps.

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It's part of her Biophilia project and tour,

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which lasted for three years.

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Recently we visited her musical director

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Matt Robertson in his studio to discuss

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the evolution of Bjork's instruments and what they mean for performance.

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# I shuffle around... #

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I was working closely with Bjork and the technical team to come up

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with ways that some of her custom instruments could be controlled

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and also live musicians interact with that on stage.

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The Reactable is a visual synthesiser, I think

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is the best way to describe it.

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The user's got lots of different blocks and patterns

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that you can make on it that create different electronic sounds.

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So, depending on the blocks that you put on it,

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the orientation of the blocks and the order of the blocks,

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you get different sounds coming out of it.

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One of the things with playing something like a piano or

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an organ is that your hands tend to fall in particular shapes

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when you sit down and play it.

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Wouldn't it be fun if there was a note down here and a note up there

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and a bunch in the middle that you would never be able to reach,

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and then they all happen really quickly.

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# My mind in... #

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So, Bjork had some pipe organs made for her.

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The idea was integrating the acoustic instrument

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and the electronic control.

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There are little solenoid motors underneath every key

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so that you can remote control it, basically.

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# ..Or have I too often... #

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We had two pipe organs on tour and also what we called a gamalest.

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It does give you a, kind of, a different sound world.

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Does it make you actually compose things differently?

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I'm not exactly sure.

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Does it open up a whole load of possibilities that you didn't have

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before that you can then choose to use or not use?

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Absolutely, yes.

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For me, I think it's really important that

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when you see a gig, that there are aspects of it that you are in awe of,

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and aspects where you are like, "Wow, I've never seen that before".

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So in the Bjork show,

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with the huge pendulum harps that were on stage, when they actually

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start moving and you hear what's happening and you get some kind

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of sense that actually these really big things are making this really

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amazing harp pluck sound, I think it does help that level of interaction.

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I think a key thing is to be inspired by the instruments that you have.

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And if interface with computers can be made more interactive

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and more intuitive and quicker and more fun

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then I think you're going to be more inspired by the sounds that

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you are creating and, by extension, write more interesting music.

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# ..Craving miracles... #

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CHEERING AND APPLAUSE

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Matt Robertson.

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I'll tell you, all of those amazing-looking instruments really

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make me wish that I had something groovy to make beautiful music with.

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CHIMING

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This is Forest, a dark hazy space full of laser trees,

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which you can wobble.

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Accelerometers atop each pole detect the slightest movement

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and each one emits a different note as they move.

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Meaning a walk through the woods will definitely invoke a weird,

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but I have to say, very soothing, composition.

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I think it was a teacher... And all the kids that were interacting

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with the space had left, and they were left on their own

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in the environment and they just started aeroplaning around.

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Basically. They became a big kid again. That was a really nice moment.

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Now, if you wanted to buy a piece of art, ordinarily you would do it

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at an auction where the person with the most money wins.

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But one recent Swedish art auction didn't want cash or cheque, instead

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bidders registered their interest by making a more emotional investment.

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LJ Rich went to Stockholm to find out more.

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A glitzy art auction in Sweden.

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25,000 euros worth of artefacts up for grabs.

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But put your wallets away because money won't win you the prize.

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If you want a piece of art, right here is where you start paying...

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with emotion.

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Pop into a private booth, get wired up, and then you are exposed to this.

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Or this.

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Or this,

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for 60 emotional seconds.

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This is completely different auction. It's not that I can say,

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"This is what I'm going to pay, I want it",

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it is my feeling, my emotion, that has to pay for it.

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And if I don't feel, if I don't have enough emotion, I can't buy it.

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So it's really different.

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Welcome to the world's first emotional auction,

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where your biometric reading makes up your bid.

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So, how does it work?

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To run your own emotional excitement auction, you'll need -

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an Arduino board, sensors,

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and a specially calibrated programme.

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And probably Andreas, the developer.

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Two things are measured - your heart rate and your sweat. Mmm!

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The posh term is galvanic skin response, or GSR,

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which sounds much more savoury.

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We're not going to judge you for having sweaty palms,

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we're going to take the change in the sweat on your fingers

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and we are also going to use an ear clip to get your heart rate.

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We're going to combine these values.

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It doesn't really matter if you feel happy about it or

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if you feel sad or angry, or just...

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Just don't be monotone, just feel something at least.

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Back to the auction and things are hotting up.

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The art pieces have been kept secret until the auction,

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so they will be revealed to the bidder when they sit in front of it.

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I'd love to see the film afterwards and see everyone's reaction.

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Well, it's clear some of these pieces

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may have been designed to get a response.

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This lady's reaction won her... well, it's a candle holder.

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I didn't think about that, I didn't think "I really want it",

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I just thought about that it was a really fun piece and, you know,

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it made me laugh.

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And I guess that means that I want it.

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OK, I may not have won anything at the auction, but it did make me

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think, although this thing is really only really measuring

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our heightened response to something,

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as opposed to actual emotions,

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could there be a future where you could tell what I'm thinking?

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Knowing LJ that'll be something about music, I can guarantee it.

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Anyway, that was LJ Rich in Sweden.

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Back here in the DevArt room in London,

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a piece of art that also taps into your emotions.

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This wall of butterflies is called The Wishing Wall.

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The first thing you have to do

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is make a wish into one of these microphones.

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I wish for world peace.

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That wish then becomes script on the wall,

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which then becomes a cocoon, which then becomes a new butterfly,

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which you can briefly hold in your hand, before it takes flight.

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That piece of magic is thanks to, if you ask me,

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the real hero of this show -

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the Kinect motion sensor.

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Here, accurately detecting the position of the hand that

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the butterfly is projected onto and elsewhere around the event,

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really allowing these pieces of art to interact seamlessly with

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viewers' movements.

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Different types of wish here at the wall

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create different coloured wings.

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My positive wish has given birth to a yellow butterfly,

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which then flutters off, presumably to make that wish come true.

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But more prosaically, one thing we all wish for in the world of tech

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is a better connection, so here is Kate Russell with Webscape.

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# ..Don't stop me now! #

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Not all mobile networks were made equal.

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In fact, different carriers often have better coverage

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in different areas,

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which is why RootMetrics is running a crowd-sourced project

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to map the performance of services all over the world, helping

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you to see what kind of connectivity to expect where you live.

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# I'm burning through the sky, yeah 200 degrees... #

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Currently, the app is being used to measure

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hundreds of operators in every continent.

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And as time goes on, the data will become more and more accurate.

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Use the map to hone into your area

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and then flip between available service providers

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to see which is likely to give you smoothest connection.

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Contribute to the project with the iPhone and Android apps,

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but if you set the Android app to run continuously in the background,

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bear in mind there might be battery implications.

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# I wanna make a supersonic woman of you... #

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Another connectivity issue is with Wi-Fi performance.

0:20:360:20:39

-# Hey, hey, hey...

-Don't stop me, don't stop me, ooh, ooh, ooh... #

0:20:390:20:42

There are lots of variables that can affect this,

0:20:420:20:45

such as distance between your device and the router

0:20:450:20:48

or the number of walls the signal has to pass through.

0:20:480:20:51

Android users can download the free Wi-Fi analyser app from farproc,

0:20:510:20:56

to see at a glance how their wireless network is performing

0:20:560:20:59

and how many other people in the area are on the same channel.

0:20:590:21:03

There are 13 channels in total, and most wireless routers are set up

0:21:050:21:09

with channel number six as the default.

0:21:090:21:12

So, if you live in a built-up area

0:21:120:21:14

with lots of people using this channel,

0:21:140:21:16

you might get better Wi-Fi speeds

0:21:160:21:18

if you switch to a less crowded frequency.

0:21:180:21:21

You can actually do this yourself quite easily.

0:21:210:21:24

# I want to break free... #

0:21:260:21:28

You need to access the router's interface by putting

0:21:280:21:32

the IP address into a browser.

0:21:320:21:35

You'll find this in the manual or on the bottom of your router.

0:21:350:21:38

Once you've accessed the router interface with your username

0:21:380:21:42

and password, which should also be in the paperwork

0:21:420:21:45

that came with your router, look for the Wi-Fi settings

0:21:450:21:48

and the channel number should be selectable via a drop-down menu.

0:21:480:21:53

Save and you're done.

0:21:530:21:54

Hey, everyone, it's Kristin coming at you from StayAtHomeSingle.

0:21:580:22:02

Another quick and dirty trick to boost your range involves

0:22:020:22:06

a little bit of craft work.

0:22:060:22:08

I'm going to try something

0:22:080:22:09

and use the shiny side facing outward to deflect my Wi-Fi.

0:22:090:22:16

This super-simple DIY tip uses tinfoil to reflect

0:22:160:22:21

and direct your Wi-Fi signal where you need it.

0:22:210:22:24

There are loads of guides to do this online,

0:22:240:22:27

just search "how to make a parabolic Wi-Fi extender with tinfoil".

0:22:270:22:31

Once you've finished your little craft project, why not check out

0:22:310:22:35

the before and after speeds on a site like speedtest.net?

0:22:350:22:39

Are you serious?

0:22:410:22:43

Kate Russell's Webscape.

0:22:430:22:45

And just before we leave Digital Revolution here in London,

0:22:450:22:49

I have to show you this. This is one of the major works here,

0:22:490:22:52

it's called The Treachery of Sanctuary.

0:22:520:22:54

And, well, watch this.

0:22:540:22:58

This is the vision of Hollywood musical director Chris Milk.

0:23:030:23:07

Three giant screens which take your silhouette through birth,

0:23:070:23:11

death, and transfiguration.

0:23:110:23:14

Once again,

0:23:140:23:15

it's Kinect motion sensors which turn your body into a shadow,

0:23:150:23:19

which is then created, destroyed, and reborn in front of your eyes.

0:23:190:23:24

You really can lose yourself in this piece.

0:23:240:23:27

It's actually quite emotional to watch yourself being devoured

0:23:270:23:30

by birds and then earning your own pair of wings in the final act.

0:23:300:23:35

And, if you get it just right, you yourself can take to the skies

0:23:360:23:41

and join the flock.

0:23:410:23:42

That was a really weird experience, I have to say.

0:23:440:23:47

And that is it for Click at Digital Revolution.

0:23:470:23:50

I hope you've enjoyed our arty outlook this week.

0:23:500:23:52

For more from us, check out our website:

0:23:520:23:56

If you'd like to get in touch with us, we live

0:23:560:23:58

on Twitter @bbcclick and on the e-mail [email protected]

0:23:580:24:01

Thanks for watching.

0:24:010:24:02

See you next time and I'm off to play some classic video games.

0:24:020:24:05

Do excuse me.

0:24:050:24:07

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