Inside Brian's Brain Click


Inside Brian's Brain

Click visits Brian Eno for a rare peek inside the studio - and mind - of the artist and producer. Also featuring the launch of the Samsung Galaxy S8.


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seeking immunity before testifying. Now it is time for click.

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This week: adventures in sound with posh cams, invisible speakers and

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cloning Brian Eno's brain. Today I am in the lead of the wizard

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who likes decibels, who likes to write a book or two, a wizard called

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Brian Eno. Do not know if should show you how this works. Let's just

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find the... These are just not bits of speakers, they are working

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speakers? Yes. On my gosh. And it is sound that these man is best known

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for. Big sound. The former member of Roxy Music has added production

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sounds to the biggest acts in the world- U2, Coldplay and some chap

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called Bali. He is a self-proclaimed non- musician who uses technology to

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make his art. There it is. Sir this essentially never repeat in billions

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of years. It is constantly generating new images. I mean,

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sometimes it does things that are so baffling fantastic you think, I

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never would have thought of that. It is Love of Brandon, generative art

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that has brought us here. His music is very atmospheric and at the wheel

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and his regarded as 'The Godfather' of ambient music and his new work,

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reflection, it is rather unpredictable. It is a generative

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music app which follows rules defined and we find by Brian Eno but

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which plays differently every time. 14% of these notes, random, will be

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pitched down by three semitones. The second is 41% on an octave. Can I

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just said... Scientist. I would go further, quantum scientist.

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Probabilities. Brian Eno has spent weeks, months, tweaking these rules

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and probabilities which when combined course of these sounds to

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bounce, transform or not play at all. These are different types of

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scripters. I like them. Who doesn't! Actually, these rules can be applied

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to any type of music. Something more pacey, there are effects become

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immediately obvious. We will make that a tedious loop. A lot of music

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is based just on things like that and it goes on for ever. Now I will

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put in some scripters. First a way of reducing the number of beads. --

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beat. It is Ali playing 80%. Already it is a pretty crappy drama.

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Actually, this is way more interesting than the original

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drumbeat. Will introduce some roles. Traditional music, Hugh have a piece

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which locks down but you are not blocking it down. You are taking

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these and locking that down, the process. I do not mind so much if

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the piece changes every time. It is a good way of explaining it. I am

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trying to make a version of me in the software, my taste, if you like.

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I interested in the edge of buying taste envelope and randomness is a

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way to find out. Mixing things up is something Brian Eno is known for.

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The legendary oblique strategy cards, the imposing a a rule, you

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reduce the possibility to solve it. If you are working with other

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people, you get information and derailment. If you are working alone

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you can easily get into a rut. Working at a different speed. That

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is a useful one. That could mean a lot of different things. It could

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change the speed or do things at different speed. Work very very

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quickly all very very slowly. Take a minute to get to that guitar. Pick

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it up. Put it on. Plug it in. Have you thought of a way to copyright

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the music that comes out? If you sell the app, do they own the music

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because they have constructed it. All the bits I never the final

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construction is that there is. It is not easy to make a case for saying

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it is my music because it sort of is in a modern sense of what composing

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means. We spent about an hour with Brian Eno and in the next few days

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you can see more inside Brian Eno's brain on online. The week in Tech,

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Elon Musk started yet another company. The company which aims to

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implant a ait technology onto the human brain. Does this guy never

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watch sci-fi films and that it never ends well. And was on the head

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honcho showed the interior space tourists will see in his origin

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spacecraft. The second richest man in the world with a net worth of $75

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billion. $10 billion behind Bill Gates, though. How about turning any

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surface into an interface without the need for a screen? A host of

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devices that like speakers, lights and thermostats can beat all the

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remote controls. , in France, a host of teams will outline vehicles built

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with less than a number of parts. 99 nanometres per hours they will

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travel. 37 million years to travel a single mile. Not exactly Formula

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One. This week, Samsung launched its latest mobile phone. Just a few

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minutes to go until the launch start and there is an incredible level of

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secrecy here but there is a lot at stake for some after the Indee Park

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all sat we're waiting to see why the S8 has in Seoul. Cold hard facts-

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phone... Well, two phones were born. S8 and S8 plus. Not that large

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because of the screens on both of them curve over the edges. A lot of

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hype about these. It does not feel like a big deal, personally but it

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means you get a screen which is bigger on a smaller size. A

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fingerprint scanner. Iris and facial recognition meaning you should not

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need a password that still achieved all the security you want. An

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invisible home button. At as you press it, you can feel some

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sensation. One thing we have had a lot of talk about is the launch of

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this... When fully functioning, the system aims to make interact in

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easier. Interacting with apps, controlling other devices and using

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artificial intelligence to land your habits and suggests what you might

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be looking for next. Naturally, I wanted test this new personal

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assistant that there is a substantial problem. It is currently

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only available in Korean. It will be released in American English in

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many. It may well be great but I cannot tell you about it. In the

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meantime, the image recognition function is in action. It has

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varying success. So the head brushing shot -- hairbrush. It

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thinks my hairbrush is a fork. I have been asking around to see what

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others think about it. Very impressive screen. 18.5 buying nine.

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That is a big screen in a very small phone. I plan ait inches and I can

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fit my hands around it. The court experience has not changed a lot. We

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have not got the dual camera. Users standard Samsung apps. I do not

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think everybody once to speak to standard apps. For the amount of

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time they made us wait for these perhaps under delivered on standout

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features we have not seen elsewhere. The phone will be released this

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month from $650. The company believed they will see explosive

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sales but let's hope not exploding phones! Now to cyborgs and when

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Hollywood imagines them look way too futuristic to become a reality. They

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did not save your life, they stole it. But are they? A special

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appointment with a professor at the University of Tokyo in Japan.

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I have come to see a professor who is apparently going to turn me into

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some sort cyborg. It is the first time a camera crew has been allowed

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in to see the process happen and it will take place through this door,

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he asked. -- here. They have come up with a thin as organic circuit,

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lighter than a feather, they could be worn like a second skin.

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Monitoring the body all as the display. We gain to introduce the

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electronic functions on the surface of the skin without causing any

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discomfort. This is human and machine coming together. The display

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they are putting on has taken three days to manufacture serve the

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research team are being very careful. Two to three micros in

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thickness. The magic is controlled by transparent electrons and conduct

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us. They are surprisingly resilient. They can scrunch them and on rubber

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even stretch of them. It still works and that is something I have come to

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put to the test. The professor has used schemes to measure heart rate

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and oxygen levels. Could we use these out and about was make can we

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go running with it? It doesn't cause any failure. It is

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flexible. Would you expect us to change this every two or three days?

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Yes, that's another possibility. If we can manufacture everything very

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cheap, so after you go to the shower and said delaminate your skin and

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put the fresh one. I expected that to break by now. And it's still very

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much alive. This is just a single digit display today, but what could

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this be the future? The second step will be much more digits and then,

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going to the high-definition display. So we could have baby 1000

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pixels? -- maybe. Yes, that's technologically possible. Now hand,

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so we could, what, talk to people now had? Yes. This could be a

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picture of my mum, for example? She would appear on my hand? Yes, that

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would be possible in the future, maybe four or five years. But

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lifetime will be the biggest issues. This is the start of the rise of the

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cyborgs. That was Dan, wearing some pretty

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advanced technology on his person. I've got my own piece of advanced

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technology here. These are the Sennheiser new headphones and would

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you like to take a guess at what is special about them? For a start,

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they cost ?54,000! Fire up, One Direction. No-one Direction? OK. So,

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I'm not a real audio expert. I used to work in the radio so I do know

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about sound. But I'm also 43, so I think I'm slightly deaf. But these

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are certainly sound very expensive. Very, very nice. What's interesting

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is that aren't boys counselling -- cancelling and I can actually hear

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other stuff in a broom. And I'm not sure whether I would expect that or

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whether I would expect to be shut off from the room when I put this on

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so you can just hear music. Wow. For people who are in love, or should I

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say obsessed with sound quality, it seems that nothing is off-limits.

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But when those people are in Japan, off-limits hits a whole new level.

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We are used to seeing unusual things in Japan, so we were not surprised

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at all to hear about group of people who would think nothing of spending

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the whole lot more than the price of these in search of audio perfection.

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It seems some people don't care what their place looks like, as long as

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it sounds amazing. But if you are into your high end audio but you

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also want something a bit more inconspicuous, then we've come here

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to London's smart apartment to see some options. These speakers are

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made by Lynn and will cost ?12,500 for the pair. They come with a

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choice of fabrics. You can choose whichever one blends into your decor

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best. The fabric apparently has been specially developed so it doesn't

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dull the sound. But metre tall speakers are always going to be

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quite attention grabbing. What if you want your speakers to be heard

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but not seen at all? So, can you spot the speakers in this room?

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Well... They are actually up there. There are lots of little speakers in

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the ceiling next to the light fittings. They were installed before

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plastering, so that they can sit flush with the ceiling. This is what

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they actually look like and the cost there's quite a few of them they

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don't have to be that loud to filter the sound. If that's still too

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conspicuous for you, this room has invisible speakers in that they are

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in the walls. You can fill them by the vibration here and here. You

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can't see them at all of course. These ones have been wallpapered

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directly over. If you are plastering the ball you can get away with two

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millimetres past only, apparently. And if you are worried that your

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speakers going wrong, the manufacturers have told us that

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within 15 years they will come and not only repair the speakers but

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also make good your decorations. And that's it from the smart apartment.

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Follow us on Twitter if you would be so kind will stop with plenty of

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this kind of stuff throughout the week and there's more coming from

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Brian soon. Thanks for watching and see you soon.

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This past week has seen some really varied weather

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