Hills and Mountains Compilation Countryfile


Hills and Mountains Compilation

Ellie Harrison explores some of Britain's most spectacular hills and mountains, revealing that an iconic mountain is up for sale.


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Ancient, powerful, mighty.

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Mountains and hills can make us feel small and insignificant.

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They're special, challenging places that draw us up and away

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from the hustle and bustle of everyday life

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and it's easy to see why.

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Blencathra may not be the highest fell in the Lake District,

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but it's been a firm favourite with poets, walkers, geologists

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and many others over the centuries.

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And soon, it could be yours. Why?

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Well, because after nearly 400 years in the same family,

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it's up for sale.

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I'll be taking a trip with the man who's selling his mountain

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and finding out what the new owners can expect for their money.

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And we'll also be having a look back at some of the best bits

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of Countryfile to have featured hills and mountains.

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Like the time Adam encountered some unusual cows in the Swiss Alps.

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Just getting up close to these cattle is absolutely wonderful for me.

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The thickness of its head, it's just incredible.

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Or when Matt learned how to farm the traditional way

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in the Cambrian Mountains.

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Come on, man, come and show me your part of the world.

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And when Julia donned a skirt and hat

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to climb like ladies did a century ago.

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So, I'm about to do one of the stupidest things I have ever done,

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scrambling, in a skirt, wearing this bonnet!

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Oh!

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Our hills and mountains are cherished.

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To many of us, they offer escape, adventure and a sense of belonging.

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And if you fancied it, this one,

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the stunning Blencathra, could soon belong to you.

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Blencathra, or Saddleback as it's sometimes known,

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sits north-east of Keswick in the Northern Fells.

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And now, it's up for sale.

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I've got the brochure and I've arranged

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for the most unusual property viewing I have ever had.

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This is not an easy viewing appointment, Miles!

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LAUGHTER

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-Nice to meet you.

-Hello. And you.

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So, tell me, then, what do I get for my money?

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Well, you can buy this wonderful magnificent mountain,

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with arguably one of the most recognisable

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and best-known of the lake and fells.

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It's about 2,500 acres of fell land.

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And can you make any money on it?

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Not a lot, no.

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The grazing is all with local farmers,

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who have common grazing rights on it,

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so they've that as a right, so they don't pay for that.

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But it's not really being sold as an investment

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-that's going to produce you a big return.

-What's the price again?

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We're quoting 1.75 million, I think that's right,

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it's difficult to put a price on something like this

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because there's very little to compare it with.

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-This must be a first for you, having to sell a mountain?

-Very much so.

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There have been sales, parts of Snowdon were sold a few years ago,

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but nothing in the Lake District has ever come out,

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as far as we're aware.

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And who do you think might be interested?

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Well, that's a good question, we're waiting to see, really.

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High-worth individuals who buy investments,

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like buying a Turner or a Canaletto or something,

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instead of that, you can buy a mountain.

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Instead of hanging it on your wall, you can actually go out

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and enjoy it and walk on it.

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Later, I'll be meeting the elusive man

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who's decided to sell this mountain.

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But first...

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A couple of autumns ago, Jules headed to Snowdonia,

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where Welsh ponies braved the elements all year round

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and where he got slightly more than he bargained for

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when he agreed to help round them up.

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Snowdonia, 3,000 feet.

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This is hard terrain, it's beautiful,

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but bleak and inhospitable.

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Unless, of course, you're a wild Welsh mountain pony.

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These mini-hooved crusaders have called this beautiful

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and somewhat treacherous landscape home for the last 2,000 years.

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They are up here, whatever the weather, all year round,

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except for one day in autumn,

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when they're brought back down into the fold.

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Snowdonia is the only place in Britain that they exist.

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And farmer Gareth knows them best.

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Well, Gareth, there's no doubt that these ponies are absolutely unique,

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to withstand the weather up here,

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I mean, you wouldn't leave sheep up here through the winter, would you?

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No, no, no.

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It's most probably the only pony which would survive up here

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or anything that would survive up here. Is these little ponies.

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Because they've been bred here, in the 1940s,

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-when we had the very hard...

-1947?

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Yeah. Half the ponies on the mountains died.

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-Did they?

-My grandfather said they were stood there,

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dead, frozen on their feet.

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-Aw!

-So, the ones that did survive from that winter were really special

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and these bloodlines are still here.

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Now, you mentioned your grandfather, these have been a family obsession

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for generations for you, haven't they?

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When your family has been keeping these ponies for 300 years,

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-we can go back 300 years.

-Wow.

-And it's something powerful.

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There's something beautiful, mystic,

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just something very close to all our hearts.

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They're like us, we've been born and bred up here,

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you've got to be a special kind of person.

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You would say that, wouldn't you?

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LAUGHTER

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The ponies may be as hard as nails,

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but even they need a bit of TLC sometimes.

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Today, they're being rounded up for their annual health check

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by Gareth and the other six families that own them.

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It's all done using maximum horsepower.

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WHISTLING

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On quads and bikes.

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-Look at them!

-Yeah. It's all good fun.

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The circus has arrived on top of a mountain in Snowdonia.

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Now, does anybody know what's going on?

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Is there a plan?

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LAUGHTER

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Listen, these are all family and they all know where to go.

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Everybody has got their own spot.

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These chaps don't have time for social niceties,

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there's work to be done. It's organised chaos!

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The thing about wild ponies is that...

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well, they're wild and they don't always behave as they should,

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when being moved around by a mechanical rodeo.

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But I've got to learn fast,

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because I'm part of the team and these guys don't mess around.

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Your job is watching this ravine here.

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-They'll be wanting to break up, will they?

-Exactly.

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-OK.

-Exactly. This is all open mountain,

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so the idea is, with a big net,

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-you want to be doing a bit of shouting.

-Yeah.

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Whatever comes to mind.

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They won't understand you, they only understand Welsh up here.

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LAUGHTER

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Let's go!

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SHOUTING

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The plan was that everything was going to come

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running down that part of the hill, there.

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Unfortunately, they had other ideas and they went that way.

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I couldn't stop them, the other bikes couldn't stop them,

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they've now disappeared over the hill.

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After a manic two hours, some master driving from Gareth

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and the team, and more luck than judgment from me, it's great news.

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We've rounded up a cracking 131 ponies.

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Now, all we've got to do is get them down to the farmyard,

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where they can be checked over.

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Each pony is owned by one of seven local families.

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It's been like this for generations.

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But how on earth can they tell which pony is which?

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They've all got special earmarks in them,

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where we know whose pony is who.

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Given that they all live on the mountain,

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-does it matter who owns them, in a sense?

-Yes, it does.

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It does.

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Because these have been handed down by generations from father to son.

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And you want to keep your breeding stock going.

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Yes, yes, and you know which ponies are yours

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and some of them have got special... Close to your heart.

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Each family has to carefully manage their pony's bloodline

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to prevent interbreeding.

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It's important that there's only one stallion per herd,

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so the young males are sold off along with any other ponies

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too old or weak to survive the coming winter.

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After making sure the remainder have their earmarks,

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they'll be released back onto the mountain

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to join the few hundred living there.

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It would be nice to have rare breed status,

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and maybe get rare breed status for the families as well!

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LAUGHTER

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It's been a real privilege to have played a small part

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in helping these incredible ponies.

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These animals are a living slice of our history

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and thanks to extraordinary work from farmers like Gareth,

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they should continue to be so for generations to come.

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The Lake District's Blencathra mountain stands proudly

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above spectacular countryside.

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And for the first time in 400 years,

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this mighty mountain is on the market.

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I want to take a closer look.

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Time to ditch the glossy brochure and use a guide

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who has been indispensable for Lakeland Fell walkers for 50 years.

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Alfred Wainwright, of course.

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His books are still the guides many walkers rely on

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to navigate the slopes.

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And it's easy to see why.

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The personality of his writing and the information in this book

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is really compelling and Blencathra was one of his favourite mountains.

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He writes here, "This is a mountain that compels attention,

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"even from those dull people

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"whose eyes are not habitually lifted to the hills.

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"To artists and photographers..."

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"It is an obvious subject for their craft.

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"To sightseers passing along the road, its influence is magnetic.

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"To the dalesfolk, it is the eternal background to their lives,

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"there at birth, there at death.

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"But most of all, it is a mountaineer's mountain.

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Wainwright dedicated more pages to Blencathra

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than any other fell in his own inimitable manner.

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David Powell Thomson gives guided tours of the fells.

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-So, Wainwright loved this mountain, then?

-Oh, he did.

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Why did he love it?

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Well, it's such an iconic mountain, isn't it?

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When you look at it, from afar,

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you've got these five huge buttresses,

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four gullies, that face south.

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Has it changed much, do you think, since he was writing about it?

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It's a lot busier, I would think.

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Yeah. He came here in the winter of 1661, climbed it every Sunday,

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by a different route and didn't see a soul.

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Not during the whole of that winter,

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-he didn't see anybody else on the summit.

-Lucky man!

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-You can't do that today.

-No, indeed not.

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I would think you'd be very lucky, it would be late at night.

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And he's done this fabulous map.

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-His books, a page a night, after work.

-Wow!

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And when he wasn't doing these,

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he was out gathering notes, surveying the areas.

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They're a fabulous legacy to his work.

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He did these as an aide-memoire for himself,

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for when he became doddery and couldn't get out on the fell,

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he could actually read his book and reminisce about his own work.

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But, there are thousands, millions...

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The millionth one actually

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was sold in a book shop, with a little note in it to say

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that Wainwright would have lunch with the person who got it.

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But he didn't like people, other people, he was a solitary person.

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It's said that he went out,

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and found it and bought it himself, so that nobody else could get it!

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People say, people know these areas well,

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-I don't think anybody knew them as well as he did.

-Indeed.

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-And you come out with one of these, don't you?

-Yeah, every time, yeah.

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-I can do snap!

-You've got all the basics.

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Yeah, map, compass, whistle and a Wainwright.

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Wainwright was not the first to fall for the beauty of this place.

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Romantic poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge was smitten 200 years ago.

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But it was another beautiful landscape

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that inspired his greatest poetry.

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As Julia found out when she went to the Quantocks in Somerset.

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This is Coleridge country.

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"So, twice five miles of fertile ground

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"With walls and towers were girdled round

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"And here were gardens bright with sinuous rills

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"Where blossomed many an incense-bearing tree

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"And here were forests ancient as the hills

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"Enfolding sunny spots of greenery."

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Kubla Khan is one of Samuel Taylor Coleridge's most famous poems

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and one of the most famous in the English language

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and he wrote it 200 years ago when he was living here in the Quantocks.

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It is beautiful, with its mix of rolling hills,

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open heathland and deep, wooded valleys.

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It's easy to see what Coleridge fell in love with.

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He came here, aged 24, to escape the city.

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He was barely known as a poet when he arrived,

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but all of that was about to change.

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"Friends, whom I never more may meet again

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"On springy heath, along the hilltop edge

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"Wander in gladness and wind down

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"Perchance to that still roaring dell of which I told."

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So, here it is, Tom,

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the dell that was mentioned in many of Coleridge's poems.

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Yes, this is Holford Glen, a place which was a great inspiration

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for him and also for his friends,

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William and Dorothy Wordsworth, who lived just up the road.

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He would walk from Nether Stowey, three miles away,

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almost daily to visit them and to visit places like this

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and they were almost obsessive wanderers in this landscape

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and drew enormous inspiration from it.

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In fact, it was a key moment in the history of English poetry,

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the moment when landscape and nature

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became primary inspirations for poetic achievement.

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Another handsome view over our shoulder, Tom,

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and another inspirational spot for him.

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It was, very much so, this was a place that he visited all the time,

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daily, and, of course, it was the beginning of the journey,

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which led to his most famous poem, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner.

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He and the Wordsworths set off along the great track,

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just over there, on a November day at four in the afternoon,

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-just as the rain was beginning to fall.

-Lovely!

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And it was this landscape which was the context

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in which that great poem was brought into existence.

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The track is now named after the great man himself.

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And this is it, the Coleridge Way.

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It follows the same routes that he would have traversed 200 years ago

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and if he walked it today, he'd see that little has changed.

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The track starts here in Nether Stowey,

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the village that Coleridge lived in.

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'His cottage is now a museum, owned by the National Trust.'

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Hello. 'And they've decided to return it

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'to its original state as Coleridge's home.'

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-Afternoon, afternoon.

-Oh, hello, nice to meet you.

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-Hello, Stephen, good to see you're busy.

-We're very busy, yes.

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So, the whole house has got to be packed away, is that right?

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It is, yes, we're having a major re-presentation of the property.

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We've to start by clearing the whole place

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-and if you want to give us a hand...

-Absolutely, I will be very happy to.

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I see an awful lot, a lot of delicate little things.

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I mean, what's this?

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We have Coleridge's little ink-pot there

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-and we have his will.

-Look at that, 1829!

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Yes, lots and lots of items that were very personal to him.

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We just have to get all these packed up today.

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It's this old upstairs room that houses some of Coleridge's

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most personal treasures. The quills that he used to pen his masterpieces.

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This is the room that Coleridge wrote Frost At Midnight, isn't it?

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We're almost certain that this is the room,

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-Frost At Midnight was written in.

-Shall we have a go?

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You should be able to get about six or seven words out of every dip.

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I'm lucky if I can get six or seven LETTERS,

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let alone six or seven words!

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It's going to take me a long time, let me tell you!

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"The Frost performs its secret ministry

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"Unhelped by any wind

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"The owlet's cry came loud and hark again

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"Loud as before

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"The inmates of my cottage all at rest

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"Have left me to that solitude which suits abstruser musings..."

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Coleridge lived in the Quantocks for just three years.

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But the landscape inspired him to his greatest poetry.

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We've been enjoying our hills and mountains for generations,

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but I am not sure what they would have made of THIS

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in Coleridge's day.

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If you just look right up there, you can make out Andy Thompson,

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who's currently hurling himself down this mountain at top speed.

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It's fun, apparently.

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Oh my goodness! That's fast!

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Andy is a fell runner who's going to help me

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throw myself down a mountain as well.

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Wow! Whoa there, Andy!

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My goodness! That must be murder on your knees!

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Yeah, it can be at times.

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-You get used to after a while.

-What's the appeal of fell running?

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For me, the big excitement is running downhill,

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also being out on the fells on your own, almost having a mountain

0:19:090:19:12

to yourself, but moving at speed, yeah, it's really exciting.

0:19:120:19:16

What's so special about this particular mountain?

0:19:160:19:18

For me, on a personal point, moving up from the south,

0:19:180:19:21

it was the first mountain I ever went up in the Lake District.

0:19:210:19:25

-Tempted to put in a bid?

-Not on my wage salary!

0:19:250:19:27

Never mind! So, how about this fell running then?

0:19:270:19:31

A lot of it comes with confidence and building up slowly,

0:19:310:19:33

and then having that ability at times just to take your brain out

0:19:330:19:38

and let your legs just go down the hill,

0:19:380:19:41

but under a little bit of control.

0:19:410:19:43

For me, it's gaining a fine balance between confidence and speed.

0:19:430:19:47

You seem to be letting yourself go down there,

0:19:470:19:49

-your arms were all over the place.

-That really helps with the balance

0:19:490:19:52

and you're almost over-exaggerating your arms to compensate your feet

0:19:520:19:55

being slightly off balance at times,

0:19:550:19:57

so you're waving around a little bit and you feel a bit of a goon,

0:19:570:20:00

but you can hold your balance a lot more on the side of the fell.

0:20:000:20:05

This isn't exactly a starter slope, is it?

0:20:050:20:07

No, I would say this is fairly technical,

0:20:070:20:10

but I reckon we can give it a bit of a whirl.

0:20:100:20:13

Here we go.

0:20:130:20:14

-I can't put the brakes on!

-That's cool. Widen your stride a touch.

0:20:190:20:23

-Keep going, come on.

-This is too steep!

0:20:230:20:25

Come on, nice work, let's move.

0:20:250:20:27

Everything that isn't bone or muscle is wobbling.

0:20:270:20:30

It's better than uphill, though.

0:20:300:20:31

The uphill bits can be just as fun, I think, sometimes.

0:20:310:20:35

-Well, Andy, I'm going to leave you to it.

-OK.

-Good job.

0:20:350:20:37

Enjoy the rest of your day. See you now. Bye!

0:20:370:20:40

Now, running downhill is quite hard work,

0:20:400:20:42

but not nearly as hard as when I was challenged to ride

0:20:420:20:45

the hill in Yorkshire as part of the route of this year's Tour de France.

0:20:450:20:49

This is the sleepy village of Holme on the edge of the Peaks.

0:20:530:20:56

It may look quite quiet and serene now but, come July,

0:20:560:20:59

it's set to get the biggest wake-up call in its recent history.

0:20:590:21:04

Because, for the first time, the world-famous

0:21:040:21:08

Tour de France cycle race is set to thunder through here

0:21:080:21:12

on day two of this epic race.

0:21:120:21:15

150,000 people are expected to come along to watch.

0:21:150:21:19

But that's nothing,

0:21:190:21:20

12 million people line each stage of the route every year.

0:21:200:21:25

There's only one way to see what the Tour de France competitors

0:21:280:21:31

will face. I'm going to cycle the hill myself.

0:21:310:21:35

I am joining Mark Etches and some of the lads

0:21:350:21:37

from Sheffrec Cycling Club from Sheffield

0:21:370:21:40

and this hill is part of their training.

0:21:400:21:44

So, Mark, this is your standard route as part of your training.

0:21:440:21:48

What sort of perils are the Tour de France riders going to face?

0:21:480:21:53

Well, this is one of the penultimate climbs of stage two,

0:21:530:21:59

so this is quite a climb,

0:21:590:22:02

so we expect maybe some attacks to come on these slopes here.

0:22:020:22:06

-Right.

-So this is where it starts to kick up.

0:22:060:22:10

Mile and a quarter now to the top of the climb.

0:22:100:22:12

There's a mark in the road.

0:22:120:22:14

So we know exactly how far we've got to go.

0:22:140:22:17

Good grief, it's not easy, is it?

0:22:170:22:20

I am struggling to keep pace with Mark at around 5mph.

0:22:200:22:25

The riders in the Tour de France will be attacking this hill

0:22:250:22:28

at three times that.

0:22:280:22:30

Around this corner now, the wind will start to come across.

0:22:300:22:35

-Right.

-Can you feel the wind now?

-Yeah!

-Bit of a push...

0:22:350:22:39

6, 5, 6%, so it's just starting to...

0:22:410:22:46

-pull on those calves.

-God, it is!

-Yeah!

0:22:460:22:49

I am a keen cyclist, but this gradient is testing me to the limit.

0:22:490:22:53

I know I can do better than this and although I shouldn't blame my tools,

0:22:530:22:57

there has to be something wrong with this bike!

0:22:570:23:00

A quick stop to check and I don't believe it,

0:23:000:23:03

I have been riding with the brakes on.

0:23:030:23:06

There you go, look. I am not that unfit, the break was locked on!

0:23:060:23:09

A likely story!

0:23:090:23:12

Thank goodness, I can hold my cycling helmet high again

0:23:120:23:16

and we're nearly at the top.

0:23:160:23:18

This is where the many thousands of spectators will be jumping for joy

0:23:180:23:24

at the site of the biggest cycle race in the world.

0:23:240:23:28

-We're nearly there.

-We're getting towards the top.

0:23:280:23:30

-Yeah!

-Are we going to have a sprint?

-No, we're not!

0:23:300:23:33

Last push to the line.

0:23:330:23:35

ELLIE GROANS

0:23:350:23:37

Keep going. Let those legs burn.

0:23:370:23:40

Yes. All right.

0:23:430:23:46

I am out of breath. I have nothing to say.

0:23:480:23:52

-That was amazing.

-Did you enjoy that?

-Yeah.

0:23:520:23:55

-I feel sorry for them.

-They won't be able to enjoy this view.

0:23:550:23:58

No. It's a stunning place up here.

0:23:580:24:00

-You feel like you're on top of the world.

-Incredible, incredible.

0:24:000:24:04

Cycling up that hill with the brakes on

0:24:150:24:17

certainly put me out of my comfort zone,

0:24:170:24:19

but these Herdwick sheep are entirely comfortable out here

0:24:190:24:23

on this Lakeland mountain.

0:24:230:24:25

They belong to tenant farmer, Willie Tyson

0:24:250:24:28

who has lived here since he was two years old and, I have to say,

0:24:280:24:32

he's got one of THE nicest views I have ever seen.

0:24:320:24:36

Some of his ewes are enjoying the pastures in the field below

0:24:390:24:42

ready for lambing, but even in late spring,

0:24:420:24:45

there's no sign of his lambs just yet.

0:24:450:24:49

It looks very peaceful just now with the sun shining

0:24:490:24:52

and the grass is growing, things are starting to turn green.

0:24:520:24:56

Unfortunately, in January and February,

0:24:560:24:58

it can be a bit bleak.

0:24:580:25:00

Last year, we had quite a lot of snow at the end of March

0:25:000:25:02

and that's why we don't lamb so early,

0:25:020:25:05

because we lie about 850 feet here.

0:25:050:25:08

It isn't unknown to have a bit of snow, even in May.

0:25:080:25:11

Wow! So these Herdwicks are a very special breed, aren't they?

0:25:110:25:14

Yes, very hardy.

0:25:140:25:15

The Herdwicks, the indigenous breed, they've been here centuries,

0:25:150:25:20

there are records going back to Furness Abbey in the 12th century.

0:25:200:25:23

Probably come from Scandinavia, originally.

0:25:230:25:25

How do you feel about this mountain up for sale?

0:25:250:25:28

-What do you make of all that?

-It's a bit of an eye-opener!

0:25:280:25:30

Almost romantic, if you would.

0:25:300:25:33

As it stands at present,

0:25:330:25:35

we own what's called the common grazing rights.

0:25:350:25:38

That's a right to graze this common.

0:25:380:25:41

I think, in the event of this lump of mountain being sold,

0:25:410:25:46

the commons graziers own the grass

0:25:460:25:49

and I think an inch of the turf.

0:25:490:25:51

That's it.

0:25:510:25:53

All that's above it and below it belongs to the Lord of the Manor.

0:25:530:25:56

You've had many years of this incredible view, as well,

0:25:560:25:59

you're very lucky.

0:25:590:26:00

It doesn't pay the rent, but if I could bottle it,

0:26:000:26:02

I would be worth a fortune!

0:26:020:26:03

ELLIE LAUGHS

0:26:030:26:06

Adam wished he could have brought the view home

0:26:070:26:09

when he visited Switzerland.

0:26:090:26:11

Here, an unusual breed of cow grazes

0:26:110:26:14

amongst the mountainous Alpine scenery.

0:26:140:26:17

The Swiss Alps, where snow-capped peaks tower into the sky

0:26:200:26:25

and descend into lush valleys.

0:26:250:26:28

2,500m above sea level

0:26:330:26:36

live some big, brutal, bruising animals,

0:26:360:26:39

famous in Switzerland for fighting.

0:26:390:26:42

The Eringer cow has to be one of the most unusual breeds

0:26:420:26:45

I have ever heard of.

0:26:450:26:48

In some parts of Spain, bullfighting is quite a common

0:26:510:26:54

and controversial spectacle but, here, the cattle fight each other

0:26:540:26:59

and is often the way of the Swiss, it's a lot less controversial.

0:26:590:27:03

In Switzerland, cow fighting events are a big deal.

0:27:060:27:09

Huge crowds come to see the Eringer cows battle it out

0:27:090:27:13

until one is pronounced the winner.

0:27:130:27:15

It's completely natural behaviour.

0:27:150:27:17

Fighting is the way this breed establishes a hierarchy

0:27:170:27:20

within the herd.

0:27:200:27:22

CHEERING

0:27:220:27:24

This man farms the cows high on the slopes of the Turtman Valley.

0:27:290:27:34

He's taking me to see his cows and he's brought along his friend,

0:27:340:27:37

Florian, in case he needs help with his English.

0:27:370:27:41

Here they are, the cows!

0:27:410:27:43

-Yes, now we've found it.

-How many?

0:27:430:27:46

There are about 900 and 1,000.

0:27:460:27:49

A lot!

0:27:490:27:51

I just imagined a few, but there are lots.

0:27:510:27:53

-Can we get closer, is it safe?

-Yes, they're harmless.

0:27:530:27:57

They are like a dog.

0:27:570:28:00

They really like the people.

0:28:000:28:02

-Great, let's go and get closer.

-OK.

0:28:020:28:04

So, whilst they fight each other...

0:28:080:28:11

Hello!

0:28:110:28:14

They are so friendly!

0:28:140:28:16

They're incredibly gentle with people.

0:28:160:28:20

These ones lying down here, they're lovely.

0:28:200:28:24

The bells are huge!

0:28:280:28:31

-Very big bells.

-Yeah, and also noisy.

0:28:310:28:36

They're so friendly, they're living up here in a mountain,

0:28:380:28:42

but they're like pets!

0:28:420:28:45

I can't imagine them fighting.

0:28:450:28:48

Just getting up close to these cattle is absolutely wonderful for me

0:28:530:28:57

and holding their skin, you can feel that it's really thick.

0:28:570:29:02

Hello!

0:29:020:29:04

And their meat is just solid, it's muscle.

0:29:040:29:08

Although they're short, they're powerful little beasts.

0:29:080:29:12

Look at you!

0:29:120:29:15

Look at the thickness of its head. Just incredible!

0:29:150:29:21

Lovely!

0:29:210:29:23

-So, this is the queen of this mountain.

-The queen fighting cow?

0:29:270:29:31

-Yes.

-How did she become queen?

0:29:310:29:35

She win all the other cows.

0:29:350:29:38

So how many fights will she have?

0:29:380:29:41

Oh, this one, her third year,

0:29:410:29:45

she is queen. They make no other fight.

0:29:450:29:47

I think in 100 days, ten fights.

0:29:470:29:51

When they're fighting, it's a big event?

0:29:510:29:53

Yes, it's a big event, there are normally 200 cows.

0:29:530:29:58

And if your cow wins, do you get money?

0:29:580:30:01

No, you win a bell!

0:30:010:30:04

-You get a nice bell.

-Yes, a nice bell!

0:30:040:30:09

-So, do you breed the cows for fighting or for eating?

-For both.

0:30:090:30:13

For eating, I have prepared something for you.

0:30:130:30:16

-You have?

-Yes, we can go and take a picnic.

-Great, OK.

-Let's go.

0:30:160:30:22

-So, what have you got here?

-This is cheese. From this area, too.

0:30:300:30:36

And this is meat from the fighting cows, from a cow from me.

0:30:360:30:42

-Wonderful, so this is from one of your cows?

-Yes.

0:30:420:30:46

Mmmm! Great flavour.

0:30:490:30:52

-You like it?

-It's fantastic. You make this yourself?

0:30:520:30:56

-Yes, yes.

-So, you farm the cows and you're a butcher, too.

0:30:560:30:59

Yes, and the cows,

0:30:590:31:02

when they become older or you don't like it,

0:31:020:31:06

-we make meat.

-Really delicious, I will try some of this bread, too.

0:31:060:31:10

The food is fantastic. You must eat some, too. I am being greedy.

0:31:100:31:14

I will give you a little bit of wine and we've two red wine.

0:31:140:31:20

I don't want to drink too much, we've a long walk back down the mountain.

0:31:200:31:24

You're a big man, no problem for you!

0:31:240:31:28

I love visiting other farms to see what people are getting up to,

0:31:330:31:36

but to come up here, in this fantastic scenery,

0:31:360:31:41

to see a cattle farmer, is really quite extraordinary.

0:31:410:31:45

Back in Britain, I'm in the Lake District

0:31:550:31:57

exploring the ancient mountain, Blencathra.

0:31:570:32:00

It's one of the many mountains and hills

0:32:000:32:03

we've scaled the heights of on Countryfile.

0:32:030:32:05

A couple of years ago, John visited the Isle of Man

0:32:060:32:09

and explored the circuit of the TT course.

0:32:090:32:12

He also went to the mountain where scattered pieces of metal

0:32:120:32:17

lie as evidence of a tragedy, almost 70 years ago.

0:32:170:32:21

It's April, 1945,

0:32:230:32:25

the end of the Second World War in Europe is just two weeks away.

0:32:250:32:31

A Young American pilot sets off from Essex

0:32:310:32:33

in his B-17 Flying Fortress,

0:32:330:32:36

heading to Northern Ireland with 30 US servicemen on board,

0:32:360:32:40

looking for some rest and recuperation.

0:32:400:32:43

So, unlike thousands of other bomber flights,

0:32:430:32:45

this was not going to drop bombs,

0:32:450:32:47

this was taking people to have a good time?

0:32:470:32:49

Exactly, these guys were going on R and R

0:32:490:32:52

for a few days in Northern Ireland.

0:32:520:32:54

Most of them had been in the UK,

0:32:540:32:56

probably for as long as a couple of years

0:32:560:32:58

and they were mainly the guys who actually serviced the aircraft,

0:32:580:33:02

loaded the bombs onto them, they were ground crew,

0:33:020:33:05

they never normally went into an aeroplane,

0:33:050:33:07

so it must have been quite an adventure for them.

0:33:070:33:10

As the flight was approaching the Isle of Man,

0:33:100:33:12

what time of day would that have been?

0:33:120:33:14

It was about ten o'clock or 10:15 in the morning.

0:33:140:33:17

And what were the weather conditions like?

0:33:170:33:19

It was fairly cloudy, the cloud was down to perhaps 1,000 feet.

0:33:190:33:23

It is often cloudy on the Isle of Man!

0:33:230:33:26

That's right, it's known as Manannan's cloak,

0:33:260:33:28

the sort of god of man, brings down his cloak of cloud

0:33:280:33:32

and sadly it's caught quite a few fliers out over the years.

0:33:320:33:36

And the captain, the pilot, was he experienced?

0:33:360:33:38

He was a very experienced pilot, yeah.

0:33:380:33:41

He had been on 47 bombing missions over enemy territory,

0:33:410:33:45

so you really couldn't get much more experienced than that in those days.

0:33:450:33:49

So how come he didn't know about this hill?

0:33:490:33:52

Well, that really remains a mystery,

0:33:520:33:55

the aircraft's flight plan took it at 5,000 feet.

0:33:550:34:00

Just north of the island, but for some reason,

0:34:000:34:03

it was much lower and much further south.

0:34:030:34:07

In the days before GPS, pilots and navigators relied entirely

0:34:070:34:11

on visual landmarks, to confirm their course.

0:34:110:34:14

So low cloud could lead to disaster.

0:34:140:34:17

It impacted just behind us

0:34:280:34:30

and wreckage spread all the way up the hillside,

0:34:300:34:33

it was scattered over probably 250m, complete devastation.

0:34:330:34:38

-And everybody died.

-Everybody killed instantly, yeah.

0:34:380:34:41

Not a chance of survival.

0:34:410:34:43

Just think everybody on board was looking forward

0:34:430:34:47

to having a great few days.

0:34:470:34:49

The flight in a way was oversubscribed,

0:34:490:34:53

they had to run a lottery to select the guys who went on it.

0:34:530:34:57

And tragically to end your life.

0:34:570:35:00

-They turned out to be the unlucky ones.

-The unlucky ones.

0:35:000:35:02

These twisted shards of metal are all that still remain.

0:35:040:35:07

The men who died here are commemorated today by a simple

0:35:100:35:14

plaque on this windswept hillside.

0:35:140:35:17

A permanent reminder of some of the many lives these misty hills

0:35:170:35:21

have claimed.

0:35:210:35:23

The beautiful terrain of Blencathra also has its own intriguing history.

0:35:300:35:35

This is the Blencathra Centre on the side of the mountain.

0:35:350:35:39

It was built in 1904 as a sanatorium for people

0:35:410:35:45

suffering from tuberculosis.

0:35:450:35:47

Back then, TB was so feared that sufferers were sent away to

0:35:470:35:51

isolated places like this and given a strict dose of fresh air and rest.

0:35:510:35:56

Nowadays, the centre has a more pleasant purpose.

0:35:580:36:02

If you've ever been on a geography field trip,

0:36:020:36:05

the chances are you've stayed in a residential centre like this one.

0:36:050:36:09

This week, it's the turn of the geography

0:36:090:36:11

students at Nottingham University and instead of mucking

0:36:110:36:14

about down here, they're up there on the mountain.

0:36:140:36:18

I'm going to go and find them.

0:36:180:36:20

Your job is to pull apart what is nearly 450 million years of history.

0:36:270:36:32

'Before I know it, I'm back at university.'

0:36:320:36:36

Sketch this place. Look out for lumps, bumps, wiggles,

0:36:360:36:40

things that we can interpret later on that might tell us

0:36:400:36:43

some of the processes that have gone on in this place.

0:36:430:36:47

-How's yours looking, Lydia?

-Not too bad.

0:36:470:36:49

It's just trying hard to get the appropriate features in,

0:36:490:36:53

rather than trying to make it artistic and things like that.

0:36:530:36:56

-You like being out in the field?

-100%, definitely.

0:36:560:36:58

It's really good sort of applying what you've

0:36:580:37:01

learned in your lectures into a physical landscape and environment.

0:37:010:37:04

-It's a good way of cementing what you've learned.

-Yeah, definitely.

0:37:040:37:08

And learning new stuff as well.

0:37:080:37:10

It's not just taking what we've learned in the lectures,

0:37:100:37:13

it's actually learning new things as well, which is really good.

0:37:130:37:16

Yeah, absolutely. How's yours looking? What's that?

0:37:160:37:19

This is a feature I've noticed down in the valley bottom,

0:37:190:37:21

a braided stream, it looks like.

0:37:210:37:23

Different grasses there, which gives us that indication.

0:37:230:37:27

Missed that one. I'll copy your answers!

0:37:270:37:30

Just doing a few trees.

0:37:320:37:34

'Job done. But am I top of the class?'

0:37:350:37:39

-Really well spotted.

-Ta-da! What do you reckon?

-Ellie...it's not bad.

0:37:390:37:43

-Thanks!

-Um...

0:37:430:37:44

I really like the fact you've got the whole of the valley in.

0:37:440:37:48

-You haven't just focused on one site.

-That was my plan.

0:37:480:37:51

And I'm interested by what you've picked up in the valley

0:37:510:37:54

bottom there. Some wiggles, some lines. You've got...bits of grass?

0:37:540:37:57

It's a braided stream.

0:37:570:37:58

-A braided stream!

-What does the rest of the picture show?

0:37:580:38:01

-Is this all a glacial scene that we're looking at?

-Well, absolutely.

0:38:010:38:04

We've got a big wide valley with a massive bottom in it.

0:38:040:38:08

And actually quite a small river.

0:38:080:38:09

A river like that could never produce a valley this size,

0:38:090:38:12

so this valley has been made by something much more powerful.

0:38:120:38:15

And that, of course,

0:38:150:38:16

is the glaciers that were in this environment 20,000 years ago.

0:38:160:38:19

So, why draw? Why is it useful for your students to draw like this?

0:38:190:38:22

It's what you pick out and what you leave behind.

0:38:220:38:25

What we're trying to get them to do is learn how to pick out

0:38:250:38:27

the features in the landscape that tell its long-term story.

0:38:270:38:30

Because it's building up that understanding of the landscape

0:38:300:38:33

that's critical to being able to understand how it works today.

0:38:330:38:37

What do you think about the notion that this mountain is

0:38:370:38:40

-up for sale, that someone's going to own it?

-It's a fascinating prospect.

0:38:400:38:43

Somebody is going to buy potentially 450 million years of history.

0:38:430:38:46

You have a chance to be a custodian of a really important

0:38:460:38:50

geological and geomorphological record in this place.

0:38:500:38:54

-Can you ever really own it, if it's that old?

-No.

0:38:540:38:56

I think you can only ever be a custodian of something

0:38:560:38:59

-as important of this.

-Yeah. Maybe it'll go to a rich geologist.

0:38:590:39:03

-I think I might need to talk to my boss about a pay rise.

-Yes!

0:39:030:39:06

All club together!

0:39:060:39:09

'In our dreams!

0:39:090:39:11

'Last summer, Matt saddled up and got a taste of sheep farming,

0:39:110:39:14

'the traditional way, in the Cambrian Mountains in Wales.'

0:39:140:39:18

Terrain and climate dictate things around here.

0:39:250:39:29

For centuries,

0:39:290:39:30

farming communities have carved out a living on the open mountain,

0:39:300:39:34

using time-honoured methods passed down from generation to generation.

0:39:340:39:38

And if I'm going to go where they go, I've got to swap this

0:39:500:39:54

trusty steed for something that's stood the test of time.

0:39:540:39:58

-Lads, how are we doing? Owen. James. And who is this?

-This is Balls.

0:39:580:40:03

Balls?!

0:40:030:40:06

-Do I...? Should I ask?

-Why is he called Balls?

0:40:060:40:09

I bought him off my neighbour a few years ago and he named him

0:40:090:40:12

-and he's a bit of an eccentric character.

-Is he? Good lad!

0:40:120:40:16

Listen, Balls, it's lovely to meet you. He's a lovely lad!

0:40:160:40:20

Owen, wherever we go, we've got quite a journey,

0:40:200:40:22

but where are we headed and what's the plan?

0:40:220:40:25

We're going up on the side of the mountain there now.

0:40:250:40:28

We're going to push the sheep up.

0:40:280:40:30

They tend to come down a bit overnight,

0:40:300:40:32

especially if the weather's been bad.

0:40:320:40:34

In the morning, we push them back up where the better pasture is.

0:40:340:40:38

'Old traditions die hard in these uplands.

0:40:380:40:41

'To work the steep face of the mountain,

0:40:410:40:43

'Owen takes to the saddle, just like his forebears did,

0:40:430:40:47

'raising hefted flocks that don't stray from the mountain.'

0:40:470:40:51

-There's three lads here and one horse.

-Yeah.

0:40:530:40:57

Well, we realise you're not very fit, so you'd better have the horse!

0:40:570:41:00

Cheers, Owen. Well, Balls, this is going to be exciting. Come on, man.

0:41:000:41:04

Come and show me your part of the world.

0:41:040:41:07

There's a good boy.

0:41:110:41:13

OWEN WHISTLES

0:41:130:41:15

As soon as Owen starts whistling, that's it.

0:41:150:41:16

-He knows the commands, doesn't he?

-Yeah.

0:41:160:41:20

So these are all hefted sheep. They know the area.

0:41:200:41:22

-Basically, there's no fences.

-No, no fences.

0:41:220:41:26

Each spring, when the ewes and lambs come out,

0:41:260:41:30

the lamb learns their patch of ground from its mother every year.

0:41:300:41:35

'Owen still adheres to the old Hafod a Hendre system.

0:41:350:41:39

'After a winter down in the valley,

0:41:390:41:42

'he pushes his hefted flock up to the peat bogs

0:41:420:41:45

'and moorland of the mountain, where they graze the ancient mosses,

0:41:450:41:48

'lichen and herbs over the long summer.

0:41:480:41:51

'Bringing them back down to lower ground in the winter doesn't

0:41:510:41:54

'just give the sheep a break from the harsh mountain conditions,

0:41:540:41:57

'it allows the rich upland pastures to replenish.'

0:41:570:42:01

What is it then about this particular grassland, or even this

0:42:010:42:05

landscape, this way of life, that makes the meat taste so different?

0:42:050:42:08

Probably, you can rush it. It's a seasonal thing.

0:42:080:42:12

It's all down to the grass growth and the time of year.

0:42:120:42:16

You're dependent on that. There's nothing you can do to rush it.

0:42:160:42:21

It's a nice, steady process

0:42:210:42:22

and you get a really good product at the end of it.

0:42:220:42:25

-So tried and tested formula. If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

-Yeah.

0:42:250:42:30

'But the survival of traditional farming communities in these

0:42:300:42:34

'uplands is far from guaranteed.

0:42:340:42:37

'Already one of the least populated areas of Wales, young

0:42:370:42:40

'people are moving away in search of more lucrative professions.

0:42:400:42:44

'Farmsteads are being sold off and farmers like Owen

0:42:440:42:47

'and his brother, James, are becoming a dying breed.

0:42:470:42:51

'In response, a group of local farmers are joining forces to

0:42:530:42:57

'promote their mountain produce and breathe new life into this place.'

0:42:570:43:01

The system itself, really, over the years,

0:43:030:43:06

has been about working together, neighbours working together,

0:43:060:43:10

to gather each neighbouring block of hill.

0:43:100:43:14

It's sort of moved on now into marketing

0:43:140:43:17

and selling the lamb together.

0:43:170:43:20

A benefit, yeah, definitely.

0:43:200:43:23

'Owen is chairing the Cambrian Mountains Initiative,

0:43:230:43:26

'a marketing venture set up to help farming families

0:43:260:43:29

'capitalise on this area's natural resources.'

0:43:290:43:32

And so how has it been going, this scheme,

0:43:330:43:36

and what's the situation this year, in comparison to last year?

0:43:360:43:41

Good, yeah.

0:43:410:43:43

We moved about 4,500 lambs last year

0:43:430:43:46

and we've got potential orders up towards 20,000 lambs this year.

0:43:460:43:52

We started with nine members, we've got 21 now

0:43:520:43:55

and we're looking for more.

0:43:550:43:57

'These lambs are being weighed before they get sent to market.'

0:43:570:44:00

-That one feels quite good, actually.

-This one ready to go?

0:44:000:44:03

Yeah, if you feel there, look,

0:44:030:44:06

you can just tell cos there's just a nice covering there.

0:44:060:44:10

-Perfect.

-Yeah. Ready to go.

0:44:100:44:12

Beautiful.

0:44:120:44:14

There we are. Shut that, so they don't run all the way through.

0:44:160:44:20

-How would you describe the taste difference?

-It seems as if...

0:44:200:44:24

I don't know.

0:44:240:44:25

It's like as if there's almost a bit of sugar in it, it's that sweet.

0:44:250:44:29

Very often with meat, you want other stuff to go with it.

0:44:290:44:32

You could just eat this on its own. Just a bit on its own.

0:44:320:44:35

It's just nice.

0:44:350:44:37

The beautiful Blencathra mountain in the Northern Fells

0:44:470:44:50

of the Lake District, a favourite with walkers, poets,

0:44:500:44:54

runners and just about anybody else who gazes on it.

0:44:540:44:58

But as we've been hearing, it's about to be put up for sale.

0:44:580:45:01

Now, the man who's selling it could call himself

0:45:010:45:04

the Earl of Lonsdale or Viscount Lowther,

0:45:040:45:08

or even the Baron of Whitehaven. But I've been told to just call him Hugh.

0:45:080:45:11

-How you doing, Hugh?

-Hi.

-Good to meet you.

-Good on you.

0:45:110:45:15

-So we're going in this to see the mountain?

-That's right.

0:45:150:45:18

-I suggest you go round there and get in.

-OK.

0:45:180:45:21

-We'll go and make a go for it.

-Let's do it.

0:45:210:45:23

Hugh says the best view of the mountain is along this bumpy track,

0:45:250:45:28

so we're off-roading in his old army truck.

0:45:280:45:32

After 400 years and with a heavy heart,

0:45:320:45:34

he's decided he has to let go of

0:45:340:45:36

one of the jewels of the Lonsdale estate.

0:45:360:45:39

Why is it you're selling the mountain?

0:45:400:45:42

My father died in 2006 and I inherited the Lonsdale estates at that point.

0:45:420:45:49

-Right.

-And I was faced with a £9 million death duties bill.

-Wow.

0:45:490:45:55

And I was given ten years in which to pay it.

0:45:550:45:58

We sold a painting, which went to the Tate Gallery. It was a Turner.

0:45:580:46:03

I sold a derelict farm steading.

0:46:030:46:06

We managed to reduce it down to £2.7 million, owing,

0:46:060:46:11

but I've only got 18 months to go until I've got to finalise.

0:46:110:46:15

-Yikes.

-Right. Yikes, exactly.

0:46:150:46:17

And who do you think might go for the mountain?

0:46:170:46:19

-Who do you think is going to buy it?

-Who's got the most money?

0:46:190:46:22

-I would reckon the Russians or the Chinese.

-Yeah.

0:46:220:46:25

And I don't mind if the Russians or the Chinese own it,

0:46:250:46:28

it doesn't bother me, because I can still walk on it,

0:46:280:46:31

I can still look at it, I can still fly over it.

0:46:310:46:33

I can still take my horse up there if I want, no problem.

0:46:330:46:38

While Hugh takes me to see his mountain,

0:46:410:46:43

let's look back at the time Julia went to the West Highlands of Scotland

0:46:430:46:47

and discovered the challenges faced by women climbers a century ago.

0:46:470:46:51

Glencoe is one of Scotland's most popular climbing playgrounds.

0:46:570:47:01

Thousands take to its hills.

0:47:010:47:04

And I'm not the first woman to have been seduced by this craggy paradise.

0:47:040:47:09

In the early 1900s, many women were accomplished mountaineers,

0:47:110:47:15

but they had to climb with men.

0:47:150:47:18

They weren't allowed to join the Scottish Mountaineering Club,

0:47:180:47:21

the most prestigious and renowned climbing club of its day.

0:47:210:47:25

You can imagine how a small group of determined women climbers

0:47:250:47:29

reacted to that. So they decided to do something about it.

0:47:290:47:32

On 18th April 1908,

0:47:330:47:35

Jane Inglis Clark, her daughter Mabel, and Lucy Smith

0:47:350:47:39

conceived the idea of a climbing club of their own, for women only.

0:47:390:47:44

Imagine that!

0:47:440:47:46

And so, by a boulder a bit bigger than this one,

0:47:460:47:48

the three appointed themselves president, secretary and treasurer.

0:47:480:47:53

The Ladies Scottish Climbing Club was born.

0:47:530:47:57

And the club is still going strong.

0:47:570:48:00

I'm heading to Blackrock, their Highland headquarters,

0:48:000:48:02

to meet members Alison Higham and Rhona Weir.

0:48:020:48:06

My teacher was at that time the president of

0:48:060:48:09

the Ladies Scottish Climbing Club, and I have lived in Cornwall.

0:48:090:48:13

I came to Glasgow, and she realised I was missing the outdoors

0:48:130:48:17

and took me climbing and I loved it.

0:48:170:48:19

I'd never seen a Highland hill until she took me climbing, a real mountain.

0:48:190:48:23

-How old were

-you then? 15.

0:48:230:48:25

And, rude to ask a lady's age, I know,

0:48:250:48:28

-but please tell us how old you are.

-I'm now 92.

-Incredible.

0:48:280:48:32

-And still active in the outdoors.

-Still active.

-Climbing?

0:48:320:48:36

Not climbing, but I walk, and I go uphill, but not climbing.

0:48:360:48:40

Let's go back to the title of the club,

0:48:400:48:42

the Ladies Scottish Climbing Club,

0:48:420:48:44

-and they were indeed ladies, weren't they?

-They were ladies.

0:48:440:48:48

They didn't work.

0:48:480:48:49

For instance, the Inglis Clarks had one of the first cars

0:48:490:48:52

in Edinburgh, which Mr Inglis Clark lent us for meets.

0:48:520:48:57

The car came with a chauffeur.

0:48:570:48:59

How fantastic, being chauffeur-driven to your walk!

0:48:590:49:02

The chauffeur would meet us at the bottom,

0:49:020:49:05

at the finish at the end of the day.

0:49:050:49:06

But look how many women are on that transport.

0:49:060:49:10

And look what they're wearing! Why do they have to wear hats?

0:49:100:49:14

Just a tradition, I suppose.

0:49:140:49:16

The wild and adventurous spirit of these pioneering women is

0:49:170:49:21

reflected in the landscape they embraced.

0:49:210:49:24

It's untamed and unspoiled.

0:49:240:49:25

Now owned by the National Trust for Scotland, they go to great lengths

0:49:250:49:29

to ensure it stays that way,

0:49:290:49:31

which is exactly what our lady climbers love.

0:49:310:49:34

Time to turn back the clock and take to the hills.

0:49:340:49:37

-Right...

-Don't forget your hat.

-No, I went to get my hat.

0:49:390:49:43

Here we are, women against the elements,

0:49:430:49:45

or should I say, women against tweed?

0:49:450:49:47

It's going to be interesting walking in this garb!

0:49:470:49:50

You wouldn't have dared leave your town or village wearing trousers.

0:49:500:49:54

You might have had trousers underneath.

0:49:540:49:57

Once you got away from the village,

0:49:570:50:00

you may well have taken your skirt off

0:50:000:50:03

and hidden it behind a boulder to pick up later.

0:50:030:50:07

And I'm the next era. I'm being bold.

0:50:070:50:11

-I'm wearing breeches.

-Where are we heading, Alison?

0:50:110:50:15

We're heading up to Coire na Tulaich on Buachaille Etive Mor

0:50:150:50:18

to do some scrambling in the old style.

0:50:180:50:20

Are you going to sit this one out, Rhona, or are you coming with us?

0:50:200:50:23

I think I'm going to fall off. I'll just go back now.

0:50:230:50:25

-Have a lovely climb.

-Thank you.

-Bye-bye!

0:50:250:50:29

I don't know about you, Julia,

0:50:320:50:34

but I'm finding this really hot, these tweeds.

0:50:340:50:37

This skirt is a nightmare.

0:50:370:50:38

It clings to your legs and every time you take a step, you trip over it.

0:50:380:50:42

So I'm hauling this extra weight, and now the midges are getting me.

0:50:420:50:47

'Don't laugh! This get-up was all the rage with women climbers in 1908.'

0:50:470:50:53

It's about 20% harder in a skirt. Do you think we look glamorous?

0:50:530:50:57

They must have been hardy, climbing in heavy tweeds with no harnesses,

0:51:010:51:04

no helmets and just a line of rope attached to the lead climber.

0:51:040:51:08

Today, I'm getting a taste of what it was like back then,

0:51:090:51:12

so I'm opting not to wear a helmet, but only

0:51:120:51:15

because we're scrambling and I'm under strict supervision from Alison.

0:51:150:51:19

Do not try this at home, ladies.

0:51:190:51:21

And that's it. All I wanted was a nice, gentle stroll.

0:51:210:51:24

-We're going scrambling.

-Yeah.

0:51:240:51:27

It's a different technique from what it is these days.

0:51:270:51:32

They sound good. Making easy work of it.

0:51:320:51:36

Right, Julia, I've found a good stance,

0:51:360:51:38

-and I'll be taking the rope in. And then you can climb after me.

-Thank you.

0:51:380:51:45

Of course, women could not climb without a hat,

0:51:450:51:50

so I'm about to do one of the stupidest things I've ever done,

0:51:500:51:53

scrambling in a skirt, wearing this bonnet.

0:51:530:51:57

Ooh! Rope knocking my hat.

0:52:020:52:06

Standing on the skirt.

0:52:060:52:08

Blimey!

0:52:100:52:12

Wasn't easy being a woman in 1908.

0:52:120:52:16

You didn't hang on to your hat!

0:52:160:52:19

Of course I didn't hold on to my hat!

0:52:190:52:21

I'm more interested in holding on to the rock.

0:52:210:52:24

-Ladies used to have to hang onto the hat as well.

-How ridiculous.

0:52:240:52:28

Take your time and come round to my right.

0:52:300:52:33

I'm going to come and sit here.

0:52:330:52:36

-There we go.

-There we are. Well done.

-Lovely.

0:52:360:52:39

I take my hat off to those ladies, not that I have to,

0:52:390:52:43

because it's blown away in the wind,

0:52:430:52:45

but this makes it at least 30% more difficult.

0:52:450:52:48

Yeah. I give those ladies top marks.

0:52:480:52:51

-They were amazing.

-Very impressive.

0:52:510:52:53

-And this is beautiful.

-Isn't it beautiful?

0:52:530:52:55

Julia getting to grips with mountaineering, Victorian style.

0:53:000:53:04

In the Lake District, I'm scaling these lumps and bumps

0:53:040:53:07

in Hugh Lonsdale's old Army vehicle.

0:53:070:53:10

He's the current owner of the Lonsdale estate,

0:53:100:53:13

30,000 acres of farmland, forest and, for a little while longer,

0:53:130:53:18

Blencathra, the imposing mountain he's put up for sale.

0:53:180:53:22

So, Hugh, do you think you will be sad to see the mountain go?

0:53:260:53:30

Yes, I will be, in a way, because it is the loss of our family heritage.

0:53:300:53:35

But it's the lesser of the two evils,

0:53:350:53:37

-with me having to pay the death duties.

-That's true.

0:53:370:53:40

Without having to disrupt other people's lives.

0:53:400:53:43

If we don't sell this, I will have to start selling houses and farms

0:53:430:53:48

and things like that, which I will have to evict all the tenants

0:53:480:53:51

-and totally disrupt their lives.

-It's been a tough decision, hasn't it?

0:53:510:53:55

-Yes, well, it's the way it goes.

-It is.

-The way it goes.

0:53:550:53:58

Hugh's hoping to get around £1.75 million for Blencathra.

0:54:000:54:05

Whether you think that's good or bad value is up to you.

0:54:050:54:09

To me, the view, at least, is priceless.

0:54:090:54:12

Well, that is it from the Lake District.

0:54:140:54:16

Next week we will be in the Lee Valley, the green lung

0:54:160:54:19

of London, where Matt will be finding out why it became

0:54:190:54:22

a powerhouse for growing fruit and veg,

0:54:220:54:24

and I'll be with the RNLI on a floodwater rescue exercise.

0:54:240:54:29

Hope you can join us then. Bye-bye.

0:54:290:54:31

In this edition of Countryfile, Ellie Harrison explores some of Britain's most spectacular hills and mountains. She exclusively reveals that one of Britain's most iconic mountains is up for sale, getting a tour of the estate and meeting the people who live and work on the land.

In addition, Ellie looks back at the best bits of Countryfile to have featured hill-and-mountain-themed stories - everything from the challenges of farming on a mountain to the walkers and climbers seeking out adventure and dramatic scenery.


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