01/07/2012 Countryfile


01/07/2012

Julia Bradbury and John Craven head to the Isle of Man, with its varied landscapes. Julia hopes to glimpse a basking shark, and John journeys down memory lane on a motorbike.


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Transcript


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The Isle of Man - it might be tiny,

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but the Manx mainland packs in a lot of landscape.

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Rolling green hills in the north, rocky coastline in the south,

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and a scattering of unspoilt sandy beaches.

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It's the British Isles in miniature.

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At this time of year, the waters around here

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welcome and elusive visitor, the basking shark.

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I'm hoping to catch a glimpse of this mysterious fish,

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but I'm told I need three things -

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patience, a keen eye and a little bit of help from mother nature.

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Wish me luck.

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While Julia is all at sea, I'm on dry land, reliving my youth.

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In the early 1960s, I used to get my motorbike, one just like this,

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and ride around the Isle of Man TT course.

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And now, 50 years on, I'm going to be taking a trip down memory lane.

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Tom is across the Irish Sea in Scotland.

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Birds of prey, magnificent for some, a bit of a menace for others.

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How much damage can these creatures really be doing

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to our wildlife and to our economy?

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I'll be finding out.

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And on his farm, Adam is training the movie stars of his future.

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These are a couple of my white parks

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and I've been asked to train them to be oxen,

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which means they have to wear a yoke and then pull a cart,

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which might sound easy, but that is quite a challenge.

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These are lively beasts and they are very strong.

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Ooh, steady. Ow, stood on my foot. There we go.

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33 miles long and 13 miles wide, the Isle of Man may be small,

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but it crams in an awful lot of scenery -

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mountain and moorland, all framed by spectacular coastline.

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It sits at the heart of the British Isles

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in the middle of the Irish Sea.

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The Isle of Man may be within touching distance of Britain,

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but it is not part of the United Kingdom.

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It's a Crown dependency, which means it answers to the Queen,

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but it has its own government and it isn't in the EU.

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While Julia is out at sea, I'm keeping my feet dry, exploring

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the landscape around the famous race they call the Tourist Trophy,

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better known as the TT.

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But this isn't my first trip here.

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I was in my late teens when I first came here to watch the TT races,

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I came on my bike and this was it.

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My BSA Bantam 125, not very fast, but I was tremendously proud of it.

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That's my sister sitting on the back there.

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She didn't come with me, I came with a pal who had a much bigger bike

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and he had to keep stopping so I could catch up.

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'And for old times' sake, I want to get back on one.'

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I never thought I would see one of these again.

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It is your lucky day, John.

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'There is no shortage of bikes on the island

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'and vintage bike collector, Tony East,

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'has brought along a couple of classic Bantams from 1949 and 1953.'

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I don't think today's generation realise just how important

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Bantam bikes were to the likes of you and me.

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No, they were absolutely vital. Everybody used to go to work on them.

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-That is all you could afford.

-Yes.

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And they were all this green colour.

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-Mist green.

-Everybody wanted a bantam. There is me on mine.

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That looks absolutely fantastic.

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-Did you have one?

-Yes, I had one.

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Did you come to the Isle of Man to watch the races?

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Yes, I used to come in the '60s.

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I would go round the circuit on non-race days, of course,

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like everybody does.

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The Bantam was a bit slow going up the mountain.

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There were some dodgy bits, weren't there? Remember that bridge?

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That bridge, over 30 miles an hour, particularly on these things,

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and you'd leave the ground.

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Years ago, they used to station a police sergeant there

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with his white helmet and his stick, and if you went over too fast,

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whack on your backside, just to teach you a lesson.

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There were some pretty flash bikes around.

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Not just the ones competing, but the spectators bringing theirs as well.

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They looked down their noses a bit at us Bantam riders.

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Oh, yes, us Bantam riders, yes!

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They'd forgotten that they'd probably owned them in the past.

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I think they stopped being made in the early '60s.

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The noise of the engine is something I will always remember.

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-Any chance of going for a spin?

-Of course there is.

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Well, it's 50 years since I last rode a BSA Bantam,

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but they do say you never forget how to ride a bike.

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Let's hope they're right.

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Whoo-hoo!

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This is fantastic!

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Oh, the years are rolling back!

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This is an instant transport to the days of my youth.

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The freedom that the Bantam gave us all in those days.

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We must be doing about 30 miles an hour now.

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This is the life, isn't it?

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This is really moving, as far as the Bantam is concerned.

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Riding like the wind!

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Bending it over a little bit, I haven't done that for a while.

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I'd forgotten just what fun it is.

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What great fun.

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'And I'm not the only one who thinks so.

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'For the last 105 years, these quiet island plains have been overrun by

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'leather-clad bikers, ready to take on the challenge of the TT course.

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'Not for nothing has it been called

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'one of the greatest motorcycle sporting events in the world.

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'What I'd love to do is re-ride the 37-and-three-quarter mile course

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'like I used to, all those years ago.'

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But I've only ever been round it on the dear old Bantam,

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so maybe this time something a little bit more powerful.

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Something like this - a super trike.

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Now I can let somebody who really knows the course

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do the driving and I can sit back and enjoy.

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As a passenger for once,

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I get to admire the views, and what views they are...

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whatever the weather.

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The course snakes through

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picturesque villages and stunning countryside,

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and up towards the summit of the island's only mountain, Snaefell.

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It's bends like this, known as the hairpin,

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that challenge the most experienced of riders.

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Well, exhilarating, Andy, thank you very much indeed.

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My pleasure, my pleasure.

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It really makes you realise just how demanding this course is.

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It is 37-and-three-quarter miles long

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and it's very much man and machine against the course.

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It seems to me to be much faster than it was in my day.

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There are certain things being done to the course all the time

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that improve the speed and improve

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the safety of the course as well, which is the most important thing.

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What's the top speed these days?

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They're doing over 200 miles an hour in certain places.

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Around here is roughly the fastest part of the course.

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Well, onwards, Andy, onwards.

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There's no doubt that on race days these twisting roads

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make for an intoxicating mix of thrills, danger and beauty -

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a combination that's unique to this island.

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We are just about at the highest point of the TT course now,

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Snaefell, the island's only mountain is just behind us there.

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Later, I'll be heading on foot into these uplands.

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But first, Tom is just across the sea in Scotland

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discovering why birds of prey are getting such a bad press.

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Beautiful, powerful, formidable,

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one of nature's most impressive killing machines -

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the common buzzard.

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Common by name and now common by nature.

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These amazing birds of prey have now become

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the most widespread in the United Kingdom.

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But that hasn't always been the case.

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Persecution, pesticides, habitat changes

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and even egg collectors have taken their toll on numbers in the past.

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Just 50 years ago, buzzards had become a rare sight

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in our countryside and in some areas they had been completely wiped out.

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Yet today, they're one of the great British wildlife success stories.

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They're an extremely adaptable bird

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and nowadays we see an awful lot of common buzzards

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by the side of roads where they are scavenging on roadkill,

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which is very easy food for them.

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They've adapted to a lot of changes in the countryside very well.

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So although we look at all these noble features, the beak

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and the talons, actually they're happy to scavenge

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and get what is going as well as actually hunt.

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That's right, many of them act like glorified vultures nowadays.

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It's their adaptability that has bolstered their success.

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In just 15 years, buzzards have more than doubled in number,

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a spectacular comeback.

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Woodland like this makes perfect buzzard habitat.

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In fact, some people reckon that at the height of the breeding season

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there are now close to half a million buzzards in the UK.

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That's not something that everyone is happy about.

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'The impact of birds of prey on game birds is one of

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'the most contentious issues in British conservation.

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'For gamekeepers, like Alex Hogg,

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'buzzards have become public enemy number one.'

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We're heading up here, Tom, I'll take you up and show you.

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'In a couple of weeks, Alex will release 700 young pheasants,

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'also known as poults, into his pens.

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'For the buzzards, it's like the dinner bell for an easy lunch,

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'as he found out last year.'

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As I'm letting the young poults, who only six weeks old,

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run in to the wood, I've got a buzzard coming through the trees

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and I'm shouting, "Leave them alone!"

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But in a sense it's not surprising,

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you've just unleashed a whole load of free lunch for them.

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Of course we have,

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but what we've tried to do in the past

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is we've buffer fed the buzzards with rabbits,

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we've shot rabbits and left them well out the way,

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but the buzzards just got so confident

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and so used to the Land Rover, that they just followed us round.

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I think they found the pen even easier and it made them stronger.

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Do you have any idea how many you might be losing to buzzards?

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We're probably losing

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getting on for over 1,000 pheasants a year to buzzards.

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But you are trying to rear pheasants in a natural habitat,

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isn't the buzzard pressure just a fact of that natural life?

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-Of course it is, but...

-So you should put up with it?

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No, no, because my pheasants are livestock, right,

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so would a farmer put up with a dog worrying his sheep?

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We have the same problem with buzzard predation

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on our pheasant poults.

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So what do you want to do about it?

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What we'd like to do is,

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I would love them to either come and take the buzzard away

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or allow me to shoot the young buzzards that are killing my pheasant poults.

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'This may seem a bit extreme,

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'but Alex has tried every other technique to deter the predators.'

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Absolutely useless.

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'More than three-quarters of gamekeepers

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'feel that buzzards are killing large numbers of pheasants,

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'harming a shooting industry

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'that's worth £1.6 billion a year to the UK economy.

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'That's why the government recently tried to launch

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'a controversial project to research and possibly control buzzard numbers.

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'But after a public outcry,

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'the government scrapped the plan for a rethink.

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'The RSPB was one of the loudest voices against the plan.

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'One of its teams near Dunblane is specially licensed

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'to keep an eye on buzzards.'

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Some remains of a crow up here as well,

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some feathers and some rabbit fur.

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'And that's no easy task.'

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One good-sized chick.

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Beautiful.

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Still quite downy, though.

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Is it surprised to see you?

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It hasn't even looked at me yet.

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'At this time of year, the chicks are about to fledge,

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'so it's an ideal time to ring and weigh one of the new arrivals.'

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So this is a perfect size for ringing.

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Absolutely beautiful.

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This is the sort of ugly duckling phase before they become...

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-I think that is a little harsh actually.

-Yes, come over here, yes.

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That's about 620 grams.

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When this bird's grown up, will make a meal of a lot of pheasants?

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Well, as we can see in this nest,

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this bird has been largely feeding on rabbits and crows.

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I'm not denying buzzards will kill some pheasants.

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The number of game birds they take is pretty low,

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on average, about 1 to 2%.

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A lot of gamekeepers do worry about buzzards,

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could they be doing more without actually killing them?

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There are quite a lot of non-lethal things that people could be doing.

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A lot of the conflict arises when the young buzzards

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are just out of the nests and that is precisely the time when

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a lot of gamekeepers are putting their pheasant poults in their pens.

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So another thing which a lot of gamekeepers are doing now

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is actually releasing their poults a bit later,

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because if the poults are bigger they're less successful to buzzards.

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The weather is coming in so we really do need to get this chick

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back up into the nest.

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It's headfirst into here.

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Buzzards aren't the only birds of prey which are cooking up

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a bit of a storm at the moment.

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And we'll be looking at some of the others later in the programme.

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Time to get this guy back up the tree.

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As an island nation,

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the Isle of Man's identity is shaped from the sea.

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From its earliest inhabitants who fished its waters,

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to the Vikings who sailed in and settled here in the 10th century.

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In modern times, sailors have used it as a staging post between Britain and Ireland.

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But it's not just humans that are drawn to this island. There's a massive variety of wildlife as well.

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Risso's dolphins and grey seals are common sights as are all manner of birdlife.

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But I'm going to head out into the Irish Sea to try and catch a glimpse of a more curious creature.

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Elusive and endangered, the basking shark is the second largest fish on the planet.

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Up to 40 feet long and weighing in at seven tonnes,

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they can be longer and heavier than a double-decker bus.

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'The sharks move into British coastal waters in April

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and their numbers peak here in early July.

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'My boat for the day is Happy Jack.'

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Hi, guys.

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'Jackie and Graham Hall are my crew and expert guides.'

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Hello. Hi, Graham.

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-Now, I've never seen a basking shark before. Is today going to be the moment?

-I hope so.

-So do I!

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'Jackie is a marine biologist.

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'She's been studying basking sharks around the Isle of Man for eight years.

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'We're heading to the sea off the south-west corner of the island, a favourite spot for the shark.'

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-Why is this such a good area for basking sharks?

-It is all about their food, plankton.

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When the currents hit the southern tip of the Isle of Man, they get pushed inshore.

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We find the basking sharks where we have things called tidal fronts,

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where the plankton is particularly thick.

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And where are they coming from and going to?

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-If we knew that, we wouldn't have to bother tagging them, would we?

-OK. That's all part of the research?

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-It is, yes.

-Is it fair to say they're still quite mysterious?

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These are very mysterious, enigmatic mega-beasties, yes.

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We've put 17 successful tags on them now, satellite tags these are.

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£3,500 each, which is a bit scary for a wildlife trust project working on a small budget.

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Yes.

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One of the tagged sharks, a big eight-metre-long female called Tracy, went across the Atlantic,

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which was a first for science -

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to have a tagged shark go across the Atlantic.

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All the rest of them have stayed quite local in the Irish and Celtic Seas.

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They're endangered and protected.

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How many do you reckon there are left in the world?

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Scientists estimate there are between 6,000 and 8,000 breeding females worldwide.

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-That is a tiny global population.

-It is minute.

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There are some hints that the population might be increasing

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because we are getting more middle-sized sharks now than we did even ten years ago,

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but the remaining threats are being accidentally caught in fisheries.

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There is a report of 14 basking sharks, big ones -

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eight metres long - being caught in one trawl net at once.

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Accidentally?

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Accidentally in New Zealand.

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What about the basking sharks that are not accidentally caught?

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Does it still happen in the world?

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The trouble is, all sharks worldwide are being targeted for their fins,

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for the shark fin soup industry.

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-And the basking shark fit into that category?

-Sadly, it can be.

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-What are our chances today?

-Very, very small.

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-Why? What's wrong?

-The weather conditions are wrong.

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The sharks come to the surface when it has been stable, flat,

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hot weather for a while because the plankton comes to the surface.

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At the moment, they'll still be here but they'll be feeding deeper.

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'Jackie and Graham do all this work voluntarily. It's become a labour of love.'

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-How did you get roped into this, Graham? You're not a marine biologist.

-It's why we came here.

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Jackie got involved through the sighting scheme she set up

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and then it moved from sightings to scientific work like tagging.

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We realised we couldn't really charter a boat every time we wanted to do it.

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That wasn't flexible enough. So, I decided we needed a boat so we bought this.

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-And somebody had to drive the boat!

-Somebody had to drive the boat!

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When we were learning to tag, it was kind of rudimentary

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and so we had to make our own tagging equipment.

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And then the underwater video equipment and so it goes on.

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Because I'm a bit of an engineer, I was roped into building things.

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For eight years?

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Not quite as long as Jackie but I've been putting up with it for eight years!

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Local legend says that basking sharks were in such numbers in the 1930s and '40s,

0:19:440:19:49

you could walk across the bay on them because there were so many.

0:19:490:19:53

Just one would be a welcome sight today.

0:19:540:19:57

Graham thinks he might have seen something breaking the water.

0:20:000:20:04

If he has, it would be incredibly lucky.

0:20:040:20:06

-What did you see, Graham?

-I saw a fin and it looked... it turned below the surface so...

0:20:060:20:11

Then I saw the fin go in, like a small shark fin.

0:20:110:20:15

It's just ideal under these cliffs.

0:20:150:20:17

It's where you get them really.

0:20:170:20:19

Well, it looks like that's the closest I'll get to seeing my first basking shark.

0:20:210:20:25

Jackie and Graham will be back out tomorrow to continue their work with these fantastic fish.

0:20:260:20:32

As for me, I'm heading to the Calf of Man where, hopefully,

0:20:380:20:41

I'll have a little more luck with the Isle of Man's marine wildlife.

0:20:410:20:45

Meanwhile, John's continuing his three-wheeled journey around the island.

0:20:470:20:52

'I'm exploring the scenery along the sinuous roads of the island's famous TT course.

0:20:560:21:02

'It's reckoned to be the world's most lethal motorcycle time trial.

0:21:020:21:07

'135 riders have been killed in the race's history, which goes back 105 years.'

0:21:070:21:14

One of the fastest and most challenging parts of the TT course is here in the mountain section.

0:21:140:21:20

But these uplands have a grim reputation which has got nothing to do with the dangers

0:21:200:21:26

of high-speed motorcycle racing.

0:21:260:21:28

'These peaks still bear the scars from more than 400 aircraft that have crashed here,

0:21:300:21:35

'most of them during the two world wars.

0:21:350:21:39

'The TT course winds its way between Snaefell and the neighbouring peak of North Barrule

0:21:390:21:45

'where I'm heading now in search of one particular plane that came to grief 67 years ago.

0:21:450:21:53

'To help me in my quest, I've enlisted local historian, Ivor Ramsden.'

0:21:530:21:57

We're getting there.

0:21:570:21:59

-Fantastic view!

-Beautiful, isn't it?

-How much further?

-Only another...

0:21:590:22:03

just over the corner there. Not far.

0:22:030:22:06

It's April 1945. The end of the Second World War in Europe is just two weeks away.

0:22:080:22:14

A young American pilot sets off from Essex in his B-17 flying Fortress,

0:22:160:22:21

heading to Northern Ireland with 30 US servicemen on board looking for some rest and recuperation.

0:22:210:22:27

So, unlike thousands of other bomber flights, this wasn't going to drop bombs.

0:22:280:22:33

-This was taking people to have a good time.

-Exactly.

0:22:330:22:35

These guys were going on R&R for a few days in Northern Ireland.

0:22:350:22:40

Most of them had been in the UK probably for as long as a couple of years

0:22:400:22:44

and they were mainly the guys who serviced the aircraft, loaded the bombs onto them -

0:22:440:22:49

the ground crew.

0:22:490:22:51

They never normally went into an aeroplane so it must have been quite an adventure for them.

0:22:510:22:56

As the flight was approaching the Isle of Man, what time of day was it?

0:22:560:23:00

It was about ten o'clock in the morning.

0:23:000:23:03

What were the weather conditions like?

0:23:030:23:05

It was fairly cloudy. The cloud was down to about 1,000 feet.

0:23:050:23:09

-It's often cloudy, isn't it, on the Isle of Man?

-That's right.

0:23:090:23:12

It's known as Manannan's cloak.

0:23:120:23:14

The sort of God of Man brings down his cloak of cloud

0:23:140:23:18

and, sadly, it's caught quite a few flyers out over the years.

0:23:180:23:22

-And the captain, the pilot, was he experienced?

-He was a very experienced pilot, yes.

0:23:220:23:26

He had been on 47 bombing missions over enemy territory

0:23:260:23:30

so you really couldn't get much more experienced than that in those days.

0:23:300:23:35

How come that he didn't know about this hill?

0:23:350:23:38

Well, that really remains a mystery.

0:23:380:23:41

The aircraft's flight plan took it at 5,000 feet,

0:23:410:23:46

just north of the island, but for some reason, it was much lower and much further south.

0:23:460:23:51

In the days before GPS, pilots and navigators relied entirely on visual landmarks to confirm their course,

0:23:530:24:00

so low cloud could lead to disaster.

0:24:000:24:02

CRASH!

0:24:090:24:11

It impacted just behind us.

0:24:130:24:17

Wreckage spread up the hillside, was scattered over probably 250 metres.

0:24:170:24:21

Complete devastation.

0:24:210:24:24

-And everybody died?

-Everybody was killed instantly. Not a chance of survival.

0:24:240:24:28

Just to think, everybody on board was looking forward to having a great few days.

0:24:280:24:34

They were. In fact, the flight, in a way, was oversubscribed.

0:24:340:24:38

They had to run a lottery to select the guys who went on it,

0:24:380:24:43

and a tragic way to end your life.

0:24:430:24:45

-They turned out to be the unlucky ones.

-The unlucky ones...

0:24:450:24:48

These twisted shards of metal are all that still remain.

0:24:500:24:53

The men who died here are commemorated today by a simple plaque on this windswept hillside,

0:24:560:25:03

a permanent reminder of some of the many lives these misty hills have claimed.

0:25:030:25:08

Back on the road, I'm leaving the peaks behind and heading for more fertile ground.

0:25:130:25:18

For a small island, it's remarkably self-sufficient.

0:25:180:25:22

But to see one of its best success stories, you have to know where to look.

0:25:260:25:30

Just a few steps from a notorious bend on the TT course there's this,

0:25:340:25:39

one of the most intensively farmed areas on the whole island.

0:25:390:25:44

'Cathy Erwin runs the Isle of Man's only mushroom farm.'

0:25:490:25:54

The first thing that surprises me is that the mushrooms are growing in the light.

0:25:540:25:59

I thought they had to be in the dark.

0:25:590:26:01

Not at all. They don't require the dark to grow.

0:26:010:26:04

They don't need the light either. It's a fungi. It's not using photosynthesis to grow.

0:26:040:26:08

-So that's a fallacy that mushrooms are in the dark.

-No, not at all.

0:26:080:26:13

You seem to have lots of different types all growing together.

0:26:130:26:16

It's one type of mushroom but you've got different stages of growth.

0:26:160:26:20

You start with the button.

0:26:200:26:23

Then, in 18 hours, that will double in size.

0:26:230:26:25

Then you go to the closed cup.

0:26:250:26:27

They start opening, then we leave it to grow

0:26:270:26:29

and it will become the large Portabella or breakfast flat in the white mushroom.

0:26:290:26:33

-Is there any special technique to picking them?

-It's just a very gentle...

0:26:330:26:38

-if you grab any size - and a slight twist and up.

-Twist and up.

0:26:380:26:42

-Like that?

-OK? And then we just cut away.

0:26:420:26:45

-And you grade them as you go along?

-Yes, as we go along.

0:26:450:26:48

Do you like mushrooms?

0:26:480:26:50

-Yes, luckily!

-And do you export?

-No, we don't.

0:26:500:26:55

It's a fresh product and we feel it should stay a fresh product.

0:26:550:26:58

-So, everybody on the Isle of Man eats your mushrooms if they like mushrooms?

-Hopefully!

0:26:580:27:03

We'd like to think so.

0:27:030:27:05

Well, these will come in pretty useful

0:27:110:27:14

because, later on, Julia and I will cook up

0:27:140:27:16

a special barbecue where everything comes from the Isle of Man.

0:27:160:27:20

Here's what else is on tonight's programme...

0:27:200:27:22

Adam's preparing his White Parks for their 15 minutes of fame.

0:27:220:27:27

If we can get these trained well, they'll be in a TV drama, which, at the moment, is a secret.

0:27:290:27:35

And will the sun have a starring role in the week ahead? We'll have the Countryfile forecast.

0:27:360:27:41

Earlier, we heard how the success of the common buzzard is affecting the shooting industry.

0:27:500:27:54

But as Tom has been finding out, that is not the only bird of prey, or raptor,

0:27:540:27:59

that has been accused of causing problems.

0:27:590:28:02

'In the eternal conflict of predator versus prey, there are winners and losers

0:28:020:28:06

'and that balance is constantly changing.'

0:28:060:28:10

With many raptor species on the increase, who is falling victim to those beaks and talons?

0:28:100:28:16

Well, game birds - we saw pheasant earlier - but grouse are frequently targeted.

0:28:160:28:21

Then some of our garden birds, like sparrows, are in steep decline,

0:28:210:28:24

also songbirds like thrushes...

0:28:240:28:27

and finches.

0:28:270:28:28

Some people are blaming birds of prey for this.

0:28:290:28:32

'And that's not all. Pigeons are also on the menu.

0:28:330:28:37

'The Royal Pigeon Racing Association says it has 230 reports of hawk attacks on pigeons

0:28:370:28:43

'since the start of the year.

0:28:430:28:45

'From all the way down in Cornwall, right up to here in Scotland.

0:28:450:28:49

'William Massey and his son Brian have kept pigeons for racing nearly all their lives,

0:28:510:28:55

'but the success of a nearby peregrine nest has had a huge impact on their flock.'

0:28:550:29:01

-You've actually had attacks here?

-Yes.

0:29:010:29:04

Really? Right here in your backyard?

0:29:040:29:07

Flying round here, aye.

0:29:070:29:09

-How many have you lost?

-I think I've lost about 11 this year.

0:29:090:29:12

-They were only youngsters.

-That's in the last couple of months.

0:29:120:29:15

-You've got one that's injured here, is that right?

-Yes.

0:29:150:29:18

'At five weeks old, one of their pigeons

0:29:180:29:21

'was attacked by a peregrine falcon but had a very lucky escape.'

0:29:210:29:24

She'll never lay so I think she's just a pet.

0:29:240:29:27

Sometimes they've been in the process of eating them

0:29:270:29:30

cos they come back with wounds, but they've managed to escape,

0:29:300:29:33

so the mental torture that they go through,

0:29:330:29:36

they're never the same again.

0:29:360:29:37

"Mental torture" - that's quite a tough phrase.

0:29:370:29:40

You obviously feel for them that much,

0:29:400:29:42

you think that's what it is.

0:29:420:29:44

-Definitely.

-They're terrified. They land and they're shaking.

0:29:440:29:48

Their eyes don't leave the sky and they're just different birds.

0:29:480:29:52

Two weeks' time, three weeks' time, those young peregrines

0:29:520:29:56

round about here, like last year,

0:29:560:29:58

will be leaving the nest

0:29:580:29:59

and there'll not be two hunting them, there'll be five,

0:29:590:30:02

and they've no chance.

0:30:020:30:04

-I can see it really gets to you, you really care about them?

-Yes.

0:30:060:30:10

I don't breed my pigeons to feed them and for that to happen to them,

0:30:100:30:14

they deserve better than that.

0:30:140:30:15

I spend a lot of time, effort and I love my pigeons

0:30:150:30:18

and I don't want to let them out there to get murdered.

0:30:180:30:20

The frustrating thing for people like

0:30:200:30:23

Brian and William is that the hawk problem is partly man-made.

0:30:230:30:28

Birds of prey are not only protected by law, in some cases,

0:30:280:30:31

they have actually been reintroduced into the British countryside.

0:30:310:30:34

So has this raptor revival been a little too successful?

0:30:340:30:38

We spoke to someone yesterday and they painted a picture of saying,

0:30:380:30:42

"Look, in the future we are going to have just birds of prey

0:30:420:30:45

"and corvids - crows, magpies, seagulls,

0:30:450:30:48

"that's the future for our birds."

0:30:480:30:50

-Do you think that's a possible scenario?

-I couldn't disagree more.

0:30:500:30:53

Go to anywhere on the continent of Europe where you have natural

0:30:530:30:57

bird of prey populations.

0:30:570:30:58

The simple fact is, we are not used to seeing large

0:30:580:31:03

birds of prey in our landscape, because they were removed

0:31:030:31:06

and now they are coming back, people see these changes,

0:31:060:31:09

they are obvious, the birds, so they see there is a problem

0:31:090:31:11

and of course, they try and make a link between raptors and songbirds,

0:31:110:31:15

which may not be there, of course.

0:31:150:31:16

So you don't think it is unbalanced,

0:31:160:31:18

you think we are emerging to a good and healthy equal population?

0:31:180:31:22

Yes, we are going back to a more natural situation.

0:31:220:31:25

Predation is natural and we need to learn to live with predators.

0:31:250:31:29

When it comes to birds of prey,

0:31:310:31:33

there are clearly two very different schools of thought.

0:31:330:31:36

On the one side, some claim that these feathered hunters

0:31:380:31:41

are terrorising the countryside,

0:31:410:31:44

killing game birds, pigeons and even our traditional British songbirds.

0:31:440:31:51

But then there are those that feel they are not only vulnerable,

0:31:510:31:54

but deserving of even greater protection.

0:31:540:31:57

So, who's right?

0:31:580:31:59

Well, what we need now are some good old-fashioned facts.

0:31:590:32:03

Professor Stephen Redpath from the University of Aberdeen

0:32:030:32:07

has been in raptor conservation for 30 years.

0:32:070:32:10

I think the problem is, for a lot of the systems

0:32:100:32:13

we haven't got the independent evidence to assess the impact.

0:32:130:32:17

We just don't know.

0:32:170:32:18

We don't know really what impact they have on pheasants.

0:32:180:32:20

I know some keepers see them as being a major problem

0:32:200:32:24

but we haven't got any independent evidence with which to drive

0:32:240:32:27

sensible management decisions.

0:32:270:32:29

Growing numbers of birds of prey in many ways is

0:32:290:32:32

a fantastic wildlife success story in this country.

0:32:320:32:35

Some people are worried that the numbers continuing to go up.

0:32:350:32:38

Will there be a ceiling and what will that ceiling be?

0:32:380:32:40

How will it be reached?

0:32:400:32:41

Well, not all birds of prey are increasing.

0:32:410:32:44

Buzzard numbers are clearly going up.

0:32:440:32:45

But other things like hen harriers declining quite rapidly,

0:32:450:32:49

virtually eliminated from England, for example,

0:32:490:32:51

so some species are going up, some species are going down.

0:32:510:32:54

But what is also interesting about what you are saying is that

0:32:540:32:57

it's perhaps not right to give the birds an unqualified welcome.

0:32:570:33:02

We have to acknowledge that they are going to have

0:33:020:33:04

impacts on bits of our landscape and trades within it?

0:33:040:33:08

Yes, conservation is about making choices.

0:33:080:33:12

Do we want have lots of predators around

0:33:120:33:14

which potentially have an impact, or do we want to have

0:33:140:33:17

hunting in the environment, how do we decide where the trade-offs are?

0:33:170:33:20

To do that, we need clear evidence one way or another

0:33:200:33:23

so we can make sensible, rational decisions based on the evidence.

0:33:230:33:26

So when it comes to our raptor population,

0:33:280:33:30

there are still many unanswered questions, not least,

0:33:300:33:34

which is more important, our economy or wildlife?

0:33:340:33:37

I love seeing more birds of prey.

0:33:390:33:41

On a blustery day like this, they can be a spectacular sight

0:33:410:33:44

and they are evidence of a rare triumph of British ecology.

0:33:440:33:48

But then I am not economically dependent on what they like to eat.

0:33:480:33:53

It seems to me that both sides need to come down

0:33:530:33:56

off their opinionated perches

0:33:560:33:58

and work out a solution that is best for the birds.

0:33:580:34:02

At this time of year,

0:34:070:34:09

the waters around the Isle of Man are teeming with marine wildlife.

0:34:090:34:13

As I found out earlier, when I went in search of basking sharks,

0:34:130:34:17

some are more elusive than others.

0:34:170:34:20

So it is down to luck and a keen eye.

0:34:200:34:22

This lot have definitely got their eye in.

0:34:220:34:25

Meet the Dolphineers, they're a hardy bunch

0:34:250:34:28

from the Manx Wildlife Trust. They keep watch from the shoreline,

0:34:280:34:31

armed only with a pair of binoculars, a clipboard and a pen.

0:34:310:34:35

-I must say... I do like your office.

-It's a lovely, isn't it?

0:34:380:34:42

You've got very good views! What are you spotting?

0:34:420:34:45

What are you looking for?

0:34:450:34:47

We are mainly on the lookout for dolphins or porpoises or whales.

0:34:470:34:50

The most common thing

0:34:500:34:52

you would find at this particular site is usually a porpoise.

0:34:520:34:55

It must be exciting when you see something going past?

0:34:550:34:58

It's amazing. We always get a massive thrill out of it.

0:34:580:35:00

And Hayley, what data are you collecting?

0:35:000:35:03

We collect lots of things.

0:35:030:35:04

We collect what the sea state is like, whether it is rough or clear,

0:35:040:35:08

and obviously with all the whales and dolphins, and basking sharks.

0:35:080:35:11

So we take how many there are, if they are adults or juveniles,

0:35:110:35:14

what behaviour they are displaying,

0:35:140:35:16

and then we go back to our office where we do all the data analysis.

0:35:160:35:20

The volunteers have identified at least 50 Risso's dolphins

0:35:200:35:24

and over 1,000 porpoises in Manx waters. But it is a task that takes

0:35:240:35:28

patience, coupled with the right conditions.

0:35:280:35:30

-And how long will you sit here for today?

-Three hours.

-Three hours?!

0:35:330:35:37

-And when it starts raining?

-We will probably go in.

0:35:370:35:40

All right, in which case, I'll stick with it for a while. OK, let's look.

0:35:400:35:44

While the dolphins are shy today, the seals are definitely on show.

0:35:540:35:58

Most are hauled out on the rocks around the sound,

0:35:580:36:00

between the two islands.

0:36:000:36:01

Although one is a little more inquisitive.

0:36:040:36:07

This would be an ideal location if you wanted to enter

0:36:110:36:13

the Countryfile photographic competition.

0:36:130:36:16

The theme this year is Walk On The Wild Side.

0:36:160:36:18

We want photographs of wildlife, wild landscapes and wild weather.

0:36:180:36:22

The best 12 photographs will make it into the Countryfile 2013 calendar

0:36:220:36:26

sold in aid of Children In Need.

0:36:260:36:29

Here's John with the details of how to enter,

0:36:290:36:32

and a look at some of the photos we've been sent so far.

0:36:320:36:35

Our competition isn't open to professionals,

0:36:360:36:39

and entries must not have won any other competitions

0:36:390:36:42

because what we are looking for is original work.

0:36:420:36:46

You can end up to four photos which must have been taken in the UK.

0:36:460:36:51

Please write your name, address and a daytime and evening phone number

0:36:510:36:55

on the back of each photo with a note of where it was taken.

0:36:550:36:59

And then all you have to do is send your entries to...

0:36:590:37:02

Whoever takes the winning photo,

0:37:120:37:14

as voted for by Countryfile viewers, can choose from a range

0:37:140:37:17

of the latest photographic equipment to the value of £1,000.

0:37:170:37:22

And the person who takes the picture the judges like best,

0:37:220:37:25

gets to pick equipment to the value of £500.

0:37:250:37:28

The full terms and conditions are on our website, where you will also find

0:37:300:37:33

details of the BBC's code of conduct for competitions.

0:37:330:37:37

The closing date is July 22nd and I'm sorry,

0:37:370:37:40

but we can't return any entries, so, the best of luck.

0:37:400:37:43

Now, rare breeds have lived on Adam's farm

0:37:470:37:50

since his dad started to introduce them in the '70s.

0:37:500:37:53

One of the ways to help them pay their way is to hire them out

0:37:530:37:56

as extras on film shoots. And this week,

0:37:560:37:59

Adam is preparing two of his favourites for their big moment.

0:37:590:38:02

But first, he's got a messy job to sort out.

0:38:020:38:05

We are fattening up some of our Gloucester Old Spots in here.

0:38:150:38:18

These are ready to go next week.

0:38:180:38:19

And then there's a few which will be ready in a couple of months' time.

0:38:190:38:22

And you imagine farming to be pretty idyllic but often there are jobs

0:38:220:38:26

that are far from glamorous, and mucking out is one of them.

0:38:260:38:29

I used to have to do this by hand but now I have got a machine.

0:38:290:38:32

This machine is specifically designed for mucking out

0:38:430:38:46

and makes easy work of it.

0:38:460:38:48

By hand, it would be back-breaking and would take much longer.

0:38:480:38:52

A piece of kit like this doesn't come cheap, though.

0:38:530:38:56

It cost me a few grand second-hand so I need to put it to good use

0:38:560:38:59

if it is going to pay for itself.

0:38:590:39:01

It's a bit smelly! I'm very grateful not have to do it by fork.

0:39:020:39:08

'The old bedding will be added to our muck heap and eventually,

0:39:080:39:11

'used as fertiliser out in the fields.

0:39:110:39:14

'Finally, I had some fresh straw

0:39:160:39:18

'and it is ready to home one of my animals.'

0:39:180:39:22

Just bringing this Iron Age sow into the loose box

0:39:240:39:27

where she is going to stay for a few days before she goes to the boar.

0:39:270:39:30

I use a pig board to guide a pig.

0:39:300:39:33

The idea is they won't run where they can't see and hopefully,

0:39:330:39:37

I will steer her round the gate...

0:39:370:39:38

..and in she goes.

0:39:410:39:42

What a good girl.

0:39:430:39:45

I'll give her a bit of a feed as a reward for being such a good girl.

0:39:450:39:49

There you go.

0:39:490:39:51

Years ago, my dad started providing animals for photo-shoots and films

0:39:510:39:56

and dramas, really as a form of diversification

0:39:560:39:59

to help pay for his expensive hobby keeping rare breeds, because they

0:39:590:40:02

don't really pay for themselves, that is why they are rare.

0:40:020:40:05

It worked really well.

0:40:050:40:06

We have been in all sorts of films over the years.

0:40:060:40:09

A sow like this, an Iron Age,

0:40:090:40:11

was in a film called The Hour Of The Pig with Colin Firth.

0:40:110:40:14

In the film, Colin played an advocate representing animals

0:40:150:40:18

accused of crimes.

0:40:180:40:19

It was his job to save my pig from the guillotine for committing murder.

0:40:190:40:23

I ask the court's indulgence a little longer.

0:40:230:40:25

Our Iron Age pig, Guinevere, fell in love with Colin Firth,

0:40:250:40:29

but she actually bit the actor who was playing her owner.

0:40:290:40:32

In that film, my dad was there with the pig on set for weeks,

0:40:330:40:37

just for a very small part in the film.

0:40:370:40:40

I really like to keep my animals are as friendly as I can

0:40:400:40:42

because you never know when their moment of fame might come.

0:40:420:40:45

Might make it one day, girl.

0:40:450:40:48

'My Cotswold sheep have also had their moment on screen.

0:40:480:40:52

'They starred in a film called Middlemarch

0:40:520:40:55

'where they had to run out of the way of a horse and carriage.

0:40:550:40:58

'It took us a day to get that shot, and it only lasted a few seconds.'

0:40:580:41:02

Some of our biggest claims to fame are Braveheart, with Mel Gibson,

0:41:020:41:06

we had some animals in Robin Hood which was with Russell Crowe,

0:41:060:41:09

directed by Ridley Scott.

0:41:090:41:11

And my latest challenge is to train these two White Parks.

0:41:110:41:14

I've got Tony here to give me a hand.

0:41:140:41:16

Hi, Tony, got the food there ready.

0:41:180:41:20

So Tony's helped us out with lots of films over the years.

0:41:200:41:22

-What have you been in, Tony?

-Many years ago I was in Joseph Andrews.

0:41:220:41:26

-That ended up as an X-rated, didn't it?

-Not the bits I was in!

0:41:260:41:29

THEY LAUGH

0:41:290:41:31

So with these White Parks, we've been asked to train them

0:41:310:41:34

to be a pair of oxen.

0:41:340:41:35

Oxen are any cattle animal trained to work.

0:41:350:41:38

We halter trained them as calves but we've got to give them

0:41:380:41:40

a refresher and then try and get a yoke on them.

0:41:400:41:42

So what we do is get the heads in the bucket and then try

0:41:420:41:46

and slip the halter on.

0:41:460:41:47

Over one horn, over the other horn.

0:41:470:41:50

And under the chin. There's a good girl.

0:41:500:41:52

There, that was very, very good. Got yours, Tony?

0:41:530:41:56

-Got mine, Adam, ready to roll.

-OK.

0:41:560:41:58

-Walk on, then, walk on, walk on.

-If we can get these trained well,

0:42:030:42:06

they will be in a TV drama which at the moment is a secret.

0:42:060:42:11

I'm not allowed to tell you what it's for. And they're incredibly strong.

0:42:110:42:15

They could drag us across the fields if they wanted to.

0:42:150:42:18

And sometimes the directors ask for all sorts

0:42:180:42:21

of weird and wonderful things, don't they?

0:42:210:42:23

They asked once, they wanted to put a dog in between a cow

0:42:230:42:26

and its calf and I'm afraid I said no to that one.

0:42:260:42:29

No, you have to be sensible sometimes.

0:42:290:42:31

Try and walk them quite close together,

0:42:310:42:34

because soon there'll be shackled together by what's known as a yoke.

0:42:340:42:38

So, we'll take them for a walk.

0:42:380:42:40

Let them left off a bit of steam.

0:42:400:42:43

Right, now, have to put the yoke on.

0:42:500:42:52

And yokes have been used on cattle across the world

0:42:520:42:55

for thousands of years.

0:42:550:42:58

Basically, it's a bit of timber, comes in all different designs,

0:42:580:43:02

that goes across the two necks of the cattle,

0:43:020:43:05

and then there's a loop which goes under their neck. All right, Tony?

0:43:050:43:09

-Yes, fine.

-And these two have never had one on before.

0:43:090:43:13

There's a good girl.

0:43:130:43:14

And then they'll pull from their shoulders and the weight will be

0:43:180:43:21

spread evenly between the two of them as a pole is attached to there.

0:43:210:43:25

That then goes to a cart and then they pull away. And actually...

0:43:250:43:30

..they are being very relaxed.

0:43:310:43:33

Let's let them stand there for a minute

0:43:340:43:37

and then we'll try and walk them, shall we?

0:43:370:43:39

THEY LAUGH

0:43:410:43:42

It's quite, um...

0:43:420:43:45

nerve-racking, because you don't know how they will react.

0:43:450:43:49

If they do go mad, you've got to be ready to react and cut them loose

0:43:490:43:52

and try and avoid them hurting themselves.

0:43:520:43:55

So far, so good.

0:43:550:43:57

Take them for a walk, shall we? Fingers crossed!

0:43:590:44:02

OK? I'll try and come your way.

0:44:040:44:08

Walk on, then. Walk on, good girl.

0:44:080:44:11

It's all a bit... It must be quite strange for them.

0:44:110:44:14

They've got a weight on their necks, the chains are rattling.

0:44:140:44:17

-That's it.

-That's it.

0:44:170:44:19

Ooh, now, good girl.

0:44:210:44:23

-Walk on.

-Now, this, so far, is pretty impressive.

0:44:250:44:30

It isn't normally this easy. But it is early days. Good girl.

0:44:300:44:35

Nearly spoke too soon, there.

0:44:360:44:38

That was pretty impressive for the first time out?

0:44:400:44:43

Oh, dear, I was holding my breath all the way round there.

0:44:430:44:45

I can breathe again now!

0:44:450:44:48

Well, what good girls.

0:44:480:44:50

Right, let's take this yoke off.

0:44:500:44:51

'That was a good start but these youngsters are going to take

0:44:510:44:55

'a lot more work before they are ready for a film set.

0:44:550:44:58

'It takes all sorts to star in a film.

0:45:000:45:03

'I've even had requests for my chickens, too.'

0:45:030:45:06

In Robin Hood, that was starring Russell Crowe, that we provided

0:45:060:45:09

a number of animals for, they particularly wanted a black cockerel.

0:45:090:45:12

The arts directors are not only fussy about the costume

0:45:120:45:16

and the architecture, but also that they have got the right

0:45:160:45:19

animals that fit that period of history.

0:45:190:45:21

So I went off to Cirencester market and bought this cockerel here

0:45:210:45:25

and saved him from the pot because he was for the eating.

0:45:250:45:28

Brought him back, he was in the film

0:45:280:45:29

and there were 13 hens that he was living with.

0:45:290:45:31

One day, a fox broke in, killed all the chickens and I found him

0:45:310:45:35

in the stinging nettles, thinking he was dead. I picked him up,

0:45:350:45:38

he shook his head, it was almost like he came back to life.

0:45:380:45:41

So he was playing dead and the fox just left him alone.

0:45:410:45:44

And now, he lives in here with his new harem

0:45:440:45:46

and my kids have named him Lucky.

0:45:460:45:48

And he is very, very lucky.

0:45:480:45:50

'But not all the animals on my farm pay their way.

0:45:520:45:55

'Some are just pets and recently, we have had a new arrival.'

0:45:550:45:59

A couple of weeks ago

0:46:020:46:04

it was my son Alfie's 10th birthday party and as a surprise,

0:46:040:46:07

we bought him this little Hungarian wire-haired vizsla puppy.

0:46:070:46:12

Her name's Boo and she's the same breed as Dolly,

0:46:120:46:15

although Dolly really never developed the wire hair.

0:46:150:46:18

And they are great. They get on really well. Fetch it, then!

0:46:180:46:21

It's brilliant when you throw a stick, Dolly will pick it up

0:46:210:46:25

and she will lead Boo around, treats her like her own puppy.

0:46:250:46:29

Alfie absolutely adores that puppy. In fact, we all do.

0:46:290:46:33

Yeah, you have won the battle now, Boo.

0:46:330:46:35

Such a cheeky thing!

0:46:370:46:39

'Boo came from a lovely home and she's fitting in well

0:46:390:46:42

'but owning a puppy is a big commitment

0:46:420:46:44

'so I've got my work cut out. Well, Alfie has.

0:46:440:46:48

'Next week, I'm helping a farming friend

0:46:480:46:50

'shop for some Dorset horned sheep.'

0:46:500:46:52

Dolly. WHISTLES

0:46:520:46:54

JOHN: Back on the Isle of Man, while Julia's been out at sea,

0:46:590:47:04

my bid to keep my feet on dry land is proving rather difficult.

0:47:040:47:09

We've had a real mix of weather here on the Isle of Man.

0:47:090:47:12

We've had some lovely sunshine and now there's a downpour.

0:47:120:47:15

But despite the rain, I just can't resist coming to this field

0:47:150:47:19

because, just look at this.

0:47:190:47:21

A carpet of orchids.

0:47:220:47:24

In fact, this field has one of the highest densities of orchids

0:47:240:47:28

anywhere in the British Isles.

0:47:280:47:31

The wetlands of Close Sartfield in the north-west corner

0:47:320:47:35

of the island boast tens of thousands of orchids at this time of year.

0:47:350:47:40

Six species thrive here, including the common spotted,

0:47:400:47:43

heath spotted and northern marsh.

0:47:430:47:45

But while we were filming them, our cameraman Jon was almost

0:47:460:47:50

caught on the hop when something quite unexpected popped up.

0:47:500:47:53

This wild red-necked wallaby is one of almost 100 descendants

0:47:550:47:59

of a couple that escaped from a wildlife park about 40 years ago.

0:47:590:48:03

Thankfully, orchids don't seem to feature on their menu.

0:48:040:48:08

What a wonderful sight. Well worth braving the rain for.

0:48:120:48:16

In a moment, we're going to have,

0:48:160:48:18

would you believe, a beachside picnic?

0:48:180:48:20

We've laid on a local chef, I'll take my mushrooms along,

0:48:200:48:22

and at this moment, Julia is out

0:48:220:48:25

searching for a Manx speciality, queenies.

0:48:250:48:28

Meanwhile, are we going to have rain in the week ahead?

0:48:280:48:31

Let's find out with the Countryfile forecast.

0:48:310:48:33

.

0:50:490:50:57

The Isle of Man,

0:51:110:51:12

a microcosm of the British Isles but fiercely independent of the UK.

0:51:120:51:16

While John's been on two and three wheels exploring

0:51:190:51:22

the landscape inland, I've been all at sea, in all weathers,

0:51:220:51:27

to discover what the Manx waters have to offer.

0:51:270:51:29

High finance and big business support the Isle of Man economy,

0:51:310:51:34

but the mainstay of the fishing industry are these.

0:51:340:51:36

'Almost 3,000 tonnes of scallops are landed each year,

0:51:390:51:42

'worth over £8 million to the Isle of Man's economy.'

0:51:420:51:46

This is a king scallop, this is a queen scallop,

0:51:460:51:48

entirely different species.

0:51:480:51:50

The scallop fishermen trawl for the queens during the summer months

0:51:500:51:53

and they dredge for the kings the rest of the year.

0:51:530:51:57

The queenies, however, are considered the real delicacy.

0:51:570:52:01

'Scallop fishing is part of the island's heritage.

0:52:010:52:05

'Into the 1970s,

0:52:050:52:07

'everyone on the island would have a family member who was a fisherman.

0:52:070:52:11

'Now, only 25 boats fish for queenies.

0:52:110:52:15

'Phil Comber skippers one of them.'

0:52:150:52:17

Phil, here was I all set for my first bout of queenie fishing,

0:52:180:52:21

it's just not going to happen today, no?

0:52:210:52:24

-No, sorry, the weather's a bit bad.

-Just not possible?

-No, not possible.

0:52:240:52:27

-Wouldn't be safe.

-You will have to explain it to me, then.

0:52:270:52:30

What's the difference between trawling and dredging?

0:52:300:52:33

Trawling, in the summertime, when the water warms up,

0:52:330:52:35

the queenies hear the net come along and start to swim to the bottom.

0:52:350:52:39

So the net scoops them up rather than having to dredge the bottom.

0:52:390:52:42

So the dredging is the more hard core,

0:52:420:52:44

obviously pulling along the sea bed.

0:52:440:52:46

Yes, a lot of the EU has put a ban on dredging.

0:52:460:52:49

How has that affected fishing over the last decade?

0:52:490:52:51

The Isle of Man is alive with queenies now.

0:52:510:52:55

There's virtually queenies everywhere you go.

0:52:550:52:59

Even the old grounds have very little left on them,

0:52:590:53:01

and they're all coming back now. So very good.

0:53:010:53:03

The Isle of Man might be a tiny island in the middle

0:53:060:53:09

of the Irish Sea, but it packs a punch

0:53:090:53:11

when it comes to protecting its scallop stocks.

0:53:110:53:15

The Barrule is a 72ft fishing protection vessel.

0:53:150:53:20

It's used to police the hundred miles of island coastline.

0:53:210:53:24

But with no boats braving the rough conditions, today,

0:53:240:53:27

the sea is doing the job for them.

0:53:270:53:30

We enforce Isle of Man Sea Fisheries legislation

0:53:300:53:33

and basically, we are looking for any vessel that may be infringing any

0:53:330:53:37

-regulations that we enforce.

-What are some of the basic regulations?

0:53:370:53:40

Basic regulations are vessels that might not be licensed to fish

0:53:400:53:43

in our areas, vessels that use the wrong size sort of gear.

0:53:430:53:46

Presumably sometimes you have got to get a bit tough

0:53:460:53:48

and rap people over the knuckles? What sort of things do you do?

0:53:480:53:51

If there's an infringement, we can arrest, we can bring people in.

0:53:510:53:54

They can be brought through the Isle of Man courts

0:53:540:53:57

where they will be punished for anything they do wrong.

0:53:570:54:00

-Should I be frightened of you?

-No.

0:54:000:54:02

At the end of the day, you should be if you're doing something wrong.

0:54:020:54:05

-It's something that everybody should be aware of, really.

-Yes.

0:54:050:54:10

As well as catching the crooks, the Barrule is also on patrol

0:54:110:54:15

to help keep scallop stock numbers healthy,

0:54:150:54:17

policing the closed seasons and the no-fishing zones.

0:54:170:54:20

After decades of decline, it is one of the reasons

0:54:230:54:26

the Isle of Man's fishery is enjoying a new lease of life.

0:54:260:54:29

Every skipper's catch is processed in here.

0:54:310:54:33

Cut, washed and then shipped out to Europe and the UK.

0:54:340:54:38

Every package, apart from this one.

0:54:380:54:40

This is coming with me.

0:54:430:54:45

And while Julia makes her way here with the queenies,

0:54:450:54:48

I've brought my own contribution, Portobello mushrooms,

0:54:480:54:51

for an impromptu Manx-style picnic beside the sea.

0:54:510:54:55

'And luckily, for Julia, she won't have to rely on my culinary skills.

0:54:550:55:00

'Instead, I've called in top Manx chef, John Dixon.'

0:55:000:55:05

-Here's a Portobello for you, John.

-Thank you, John.

0:55:060:55:08

-I cut it with my own fair hands, that.

-You did a lovely job.

0:55:080:55:12

-What are you going to do?

-I am going to keep it very simple.

0:55:120:55:15

Hello, hello, excuse me, excuse me.

0:55:150:55:17

I have queenies set for a queen, a rather lovely selection.

0:55:170:55:22

We have got something to put in the mushrooms now.

0:55:220:55:24

What I am going to do is quick seasoning.

0:55:240:55:26

A bit of salt, a bit of pepper, some local oil.

0:55:260:55:30

It's an extra virgin oil seed rape, pressed and grown on the Isle of Man.

0:55:300:55:34

-We'll cook with some lemon verbena.

-Lemon verbena?

0:55:340:55:37

-Yes, have a smell. It is a beautiful smell.

-Oh, wow, it's lemon!

0:55:370:55:42

Yes, really nice. A bit of oil, mind yourself, it's going to go whoosh.

0:55:420:55:47

-How many queenies?

-Well...

-I bought enough!

0:55:470:55:51

HE CHUCKLES

0:55:510:55:53

-Just a couple.

-Look at that!

-Goodness me, what a sight.

0:55:530:55:55

It doesn't get much better than this. Put some wild garlic in there.

0:55:550:55:59

Sear the mushrooms, just a couple of seconds of them.

0:55:590:56:02

-They look good.

-Not the best day for having a picnic.

-Perfect!

0:56:020:56:07

It's exactly how I like my picnics! It's absolutely fine.

0:56:070:56:09

Now, these are an absolute favourite of mine. Lovely courgette flowers.

0:56:090:56:13

Try and describe to me, John,

0:56:130:56:14

the special nature of the queenie what makes them such a good scallop?

0:56:140:56:19

Well, it's just because they are a little bit nicer flavour,

0:56:190:56:22

They are a more milder flavour. Just lovely. Really nice.

0:56:220:56:25

-What I will do now is drop a few of these.

-Look at that.

0:56:270:56:30

You see, that, is a pretty perfect dish for me.

0:56:300:56:32

It doesn't get much better than this.

0:56:320:56:34

Give that a couple of seconds just to finish off.

0:56:340:56:38

You get to try them, that's the best bit.

0:56:380:56:40

-It looks so pretty, doesn't it? Very elegant.

-Very simple.

0:56:400:56:45

With the queenies, you don't have to cook them long. There we go.

0:56:450:56:48

-Oh, lovely.

-Fit for a queenie.

0:56:480:56:50

Everybody taste them, obviously.

0:56:500:56:53

I am definitely going for the queenie, here we go.

0:56:530:56:56

-It is mouth-watering.

-Those queenies, an Isle of Man feast.

-Absolutely.

0:56:580:57:05

Well done, John. Sadly, that's all we've got time for this week.

0:57:050:57:08

Next week, we are going to be in the Kent hills

0:57:080:57:11

exploring a favourite landscape of Octavia Hill,

0:57:110:57:13

who was one of the founders of the National Trust.

0:57:130:57:16

Indeed - pioneering lady, exceptional lady.

0:57:160:57:18

I was lucky to receive an Octavia Hill award recently.

0:57:180:57:20

-Thank you for voting for me.

-Congratulations!

-Thank you!

0:57:200:57:23

-See you next week! Bye-bye.

-Bye.

-More scallops.

0:57:230:57:25

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:57:460:57:48

Julia Bradbury and John Craven head to the Isle of Man. It might be tiny, but the Manx mainland packs in lots of landscapes: rolling green hills in the north, rocky coastline in the south and a scattering of unspoilt sandy beaches. It's the British Isles in miniature.

At this time of year, the waters around its coast welcome an elusive visitor - the basking shark. Julia takes to the water hoping to get a glimpse of this mysterious fish, but it requires patience, a keen eye and a bit of help from mother nature.

While Julia is all at sea, John goes inland on a trip down memory lane. In the 1960s, he used to visit the island on his motorbike. Fifty years on, he takes a ride on a vintage motorbike along the Isle of Man TT course before swapping it for a more leisurely journey as a passenger on a trike.

Across the Irish Sea in Scotland, Tom Heap finds out why birds of prey are getting such a bad press; and down on the farm, Adam trains his rare breed cattle for a starring role on the big screen.