The Gentleman Vanishes New Tricks


The Gentleman Vanishes

Drama series. The UCOS team reinvestigate the disappearance of a prominent physics professor who was working on a revolutionary cold fusion research project.


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Transcript


LineFromTo

9:02pm, 7th February 2004.

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This is the 7pm train from Charing Cross to Dover,

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and it's two hours into its journey.

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Two hours? Shouldn't they be in Dover by now?

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Yeah, it should be, but a couple of miles out of the station,

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someone pulled the emergency handle. Now, watch this.

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Four seconds.

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It takes four seconds to go through that first door,

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along the short connecting corridor and then into the buffet car.

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Four seconds.

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This guy here is Dr Phillip Mackenna.

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He's a physics professor at University College London.

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He was due to catch the ferry from Dover to Calais,

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and then another train to Paris, where he was going to speak

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at a conference on theoretical physics the following evening.

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Now, keep watching.

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He talks to the blind man,

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then he gets up and heads to the buffet car.

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Four seconds.

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Doesn't matter how long you wait -

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Phillip Mackenna never comes through that door,

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and he hasn't been seen since.

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Let's not waste any time on the first mystery.

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The train was stationary for nine minutes,

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and Mackenna disappeared six minutes into that time.

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The connecting corridor between the carriages is where

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the external doors are, and it seems likely that someone opened

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that door and grabbed Mackenna on his way to the buffet car.

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Now, there's a country lane a few hundred yards from the track,

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and a witness from the local village reported seeing an unmarked van

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parked on the verge there around the time of the abduction.

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That van has never been traced.

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Yeah, but are we really sure it was an abduction?

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I mean, Mackenna didn't just do a vanishing act

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to get away from his old woman?

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There are easier ways to disappear.

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CCTV shows Mackenna

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in his seat when the emergency handle was pulled -

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he couldn't have done it himself.

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-So who did?

-Don't know, happened off camera.

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Do we know what the blind man said to Mackenna?

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He came forward as a witness in the original investigation.

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He'd been chatting to Mackenna off and on during the journey

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and had just asked him for a glass of water.

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That's a bit of a coincidence, isn't it? I mean, the timing.

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Guy checked out, apparently.

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Oh, yeah? Who was in charge of the show back then?

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-Thomas Doyle. He's a DI...

-I know Tom Doyle. He's good, detailed.

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If he said he checked out the blind man...

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The problem with Doyle's investigation was that

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they got off to a late start. Although we now know that

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Mackenna went missing from this train,

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someone using his passport boarded the ferry to Calais

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and checked into his Paris room.

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He wasn't reported missing until he failed to turn up at the conference

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the following evening.

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And because he checked into the hotel, the search started in Paris?

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Exactly. It was four days before anyone thought

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to check the CCTV from the train

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and realised that he had gone missing this side of the Channel,

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at which point it finally became Doyle's case.

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Any CCTV footage of this mystery man

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boarding the ferry or checking into the hotel?

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No, and he was careful to avoid the cameras,

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and the hotel staff don't remember him.

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So, whoever abducted Mackenna were laying a false trail to buy time.

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-But for what?

-Get him out the country.

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-A boat from the coast, a private airfield.

-Take him where?

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-Possibly Switzerland.

-Why Switzerland?

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Well, that's what this new evidence is suggesting.

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See, the original investigation hit a brick wall very quickly.

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Doyle looked at every single person on that train,

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he even interviewed most of them, but he couldn't find out

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who pulled the emergency handle and he couldn't come up with

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a single passenger that seemed in any way linked to the abduction.

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But now, there's this.

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Bea Mackenna, Phillip Mackenna's wife, came to us

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because she's been receiving anonymous e-mails claiming to know

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what happened to her husband, and the latest one came

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with a document attached, purporting to be from the archives

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of a private research institute just outside Zurich.

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Now, this document seems to suggest that the institutor

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engaged in a project which wouldn't be possible without the expertise

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that Phillip Mackenna possessed.

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-Cold fusion.

-That's what Mackenna worked on,

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and that's what this company in Switzerland are doing.

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Don't ask me to explain it.

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Oh, it's to do with splitting atoms

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and releasing huge amounts of energy, at room temperature.

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Most people don't think it'll ever be possible,

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but if Mackenna thought he had cracked it, it would be massive.

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We're talking about wiping out oil, gas and nuclear power overnight,

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and replacing it with something

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that's cheaper, cleaner and more efficient.

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I do occasionally read the bits before the sports section.

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-And is this document real?

-We don't know.

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The Swiss company obviously denies it, and we won't know

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whether it's genuine or not until we find out

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who sent it and how they got hold of it.

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"I know what happened to your husband. I'll be in touch soon."

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That was the first one, it came about a month ago.

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I have since had five more messages, each one getting a little bit more specific,

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almost as if this person is finding out more information as they go.

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-And the latest e-mail had the document attached?

-That's right.

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What did you make of the document?

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I'm not a scientist. I recognised some of the technical terms

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and phrases on there from things Phillip has talked about,

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but really it's gobbledygook to me.

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We have a deal - Phillip doesn't try to explain science to me

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and I don't bore him with anecdotes about my work.

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It's probably one of the main reasons we're still married.

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Sorry, that sounded a bit, um...

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-I just mean our lives are quite separate in a lot of ways.

-Are?

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-Excuse me?

-You said "are separate".

-Yes. As opposed to "were".

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My husband is missing, he's not...

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Is there a reason you know of why I should be talking about him

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-in the past tense?

-No, no, I suppose not.

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How are your lives separate, Mrs Mackenna?

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I just want someone to find my husband. How difficult can it be?

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He wasn't trekking through the Amazon, he was on a train to Dover.

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Why Dover?

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-What?

-London to Paris via the ferry is a good old trip.

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Oh, Phillip doesn't fly, and he doesn't like tunnels.

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It's to do with confined spaces.

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This is partly what I mean about our lives being separate.

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I work in financial PR, so my job requires a lot of socialising,

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whereas Phillip's personality is, um...

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He's not very easy with people, certainly not with large groups.

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Were your lives separate in any other respect?

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Phillip hasn't run off with another woman.

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Your predecessors wasted a lot of time looking into that possibility,

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because they didn't understand - Phillip needs me.

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He was always, um...nervous, I suppose you'd say. Highly strung.

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But over the years, he's become less good at ordinary things -

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buying food, paying bills, social interaction.

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I take care of all of that. I keep the world at bay,

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because Phillip needs stability so that he can focus on his work.

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He just doesn't cope very well with everyday life.

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If Doctor Mackenna doesn't cope very well and isn't very good with people,

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what was he doing going to Paris, alone, to address a conference?

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He was a last-minute replacement -

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that's why I wasn't able to drop everything and go with him.

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Who was he replacing?

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Brian Rutland?

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Hi. Gerry Standing.

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I'm with the Metropolitan Police's Unsolved Crime and Open Case Squad.

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-It's about Mackenna?

-That's right, yeah. Now, we understand...

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What more can you people possibly need to know?

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We're re-opening the investigation.

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Yes, I got that from the "Unsolved Crimes" reference.

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I already answered all the questions.

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I'm sure you keep records.

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-Well, maybe I have some different questions.

-I doubt it.

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Now, you were Dr Mackenna's partner in the cold-fusion project?

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Is that supposed to be an example of a question I wasn't asked before?

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Look, I'm sorry, Mr Rutland, but...

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Why don't you read the extensive records of my conversations with the police on this matter?

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I'm sure you'll find all the answers you're looking for there,

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and then you'll only be wasting your time and not mine.

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I could phone my Detective Superintendent and get her

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to drag you down to the station for a formal interview.

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Fine. Yes, I was Phillip Mackenna's partner in the fusion project.

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You were supposed to be giving a lecture at a conference in Paris?

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Yes, but I couldn't go, so Phillip took my place. Except he didn't.

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And why couldn't you go?

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All this was dealt with in the original investigation.

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My house was burgled the night before.

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They took my passport, among other things.

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It was easier for Phillip to go in my stead

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than for me to get a replacement passport in time.

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And you reported the burglary?

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I did, yes. A policeman came round, said it was probably kids,

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gave me a crime number for my insurance policy

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and was out the door again inside ten minutes.

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Marvellous service you people provide(!)

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What made him think kids?

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I'm not party to the synaptic firework display that went off

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in that super-sleuth's brain but...

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-But how did they get in?

-They broke a window.

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You didn't think it was odd a bunch of kids nicked your passport?

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Perhaps they wanted to go to Disneyland(!)

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It wasn't just my passport. They broke a window to my office,

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took whatever was immediately available to hand.

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Laptop, some spare cash...

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My passport was in one of the drawers.

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None of which struck me as anything other than

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completely bloody irritating at the time.

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Now this talk you were supposed to give in Paris was

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about the cold-fusion project that you and Mackenna were working on?

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Well, it was a process that could ultimately lead to cold fusion, yes.

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Do you care to be more specific?

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No, I wouldn't. Partly because the work was subject to

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many different confidentiality agreements

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and partly because you wouldn't understand a word of it.

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-Try me.

-No, I don't think I will.

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-Are you still working on the project?

-No, I'm not.

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Phillip and I were working together,

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but separately, coming at the problem from different angles.

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Without his knowledge, there is no way to move on.

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What about his notes?

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Phillip's notes were incomplete at best.

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The important information was stored in his head.

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Now, if this thing worked,

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presumably it would be worth a great deal of money?

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You have no idea.

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Were you ever approached to sell the research?

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Once or twice a month, yes.

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What corporate entity wouldn't want a chance at providing clean,

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low-cost energy to the world? But...

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-My loyalty, Mr...

-Standing.

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..Mr Standing, is to this institution,

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and to the notion of science as a means of human advancement.

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I'm not in it to make a quick buck.

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And did Dr Mackenna think the same way?

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Well, he's not here to answer that question,

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so I suppose you must draw your own conclusions.

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So, Rutland's burgled and gets his passport nicked.

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-And Mackenna has to go to Paris in his place.

-What a coincidence.

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OK, dig out the original crime report and let's take a look at that.

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Oh, you won't get anything there. They thought it was kids.

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Apparently, they sent one uniform and a crime number.

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You all right, Brian?

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-Brian?

-Oh, there you are.

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-I've got something.

-What?

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-It's big.

-What is it?

-It's very big.

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Well, what is it, Brian?!

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Phillip Mackenna was abducted by ghosts.

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If Barton was masquerading as Elster, she was only doing it for the money.

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But where did that money go? Check the private and business accounts

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of every single player on this board,

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find that cash. And look at Ferguson again,

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he spent enough time with Barton, he must have known what she was up to.

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-DI Doyle?

-Yes.

-Detective Superintendent...

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Pullman, yes, I've seen you around. UCOS, isn't it?

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-You're reopening the Mackenna case.

-That's right. This is Brian Lane.

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-Memory Lane? Pleased to meet you.

-Hi.

-Is Jack Halford still over there?

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-Oh, yes, he is.

-Give him my best.

-Yeah, I will do.

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We've got a couple of things we'd like to go over with you.

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-Is there somewhere we can go?

-Of course. This way.

-Thank you.

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We're here about the blind man on the train.

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The one who asked Mackenna for a glass of water?

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-I don't remember his name.

-Geoffrey Bloom.

-Bloom, that's right.

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-You met him?

-Yeah, he came in after we appealed for witnesses.

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Do you remember anything unusual about him?

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-Other than the fact he was blind?

-Other than the fact he was dead.

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Excuse me?

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Geoffrey Bloom died 17 days before that train left London.

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The man who was on that train,

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the man you subsequently interviewed, was not Geoffrey Bloom.

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Oh, that's not possible. We got the names of the passengers

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from their credit-card bookings and we cross-referenced those

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with our databases. The system would have thrown up a red flag if...

0:13:120:13:15

No, no, not necessarily.

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Not in cases where someone dies, leaving no family

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or friends behind, pressing for the paperwork to be done.

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By the time Geoffrey Bloom's death had entered the system,

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your case was all but closed.

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What about Derek Mills?

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He was the man who went through to the restaurant car

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ahead of Phillip Mackenna.

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-Yes.

-Well, he came in as a witness.

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Yeah, he was a walk-in too.

0:13:350:13:37

Derek Mills died 11 days before the man you spoke to got on the train.

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-Lucy Dawson?

-How many more are there?

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That's it. Two men and a woman.

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-Lucy Dawson didn't come in, and we couldn't find her.

-Why not?

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The address we had was wrong. A screw-up on the database

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or her name wasn't on the electoral register...

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I can't remember, but we couldn't track her down.

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Yeah, we don't have an image of her either.

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The CCTV camera that was supposed to be

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covering her end of the carriage was on the blink.

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But we think she was the person who

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triggered the alarm to stop the train.

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-Here.

-Anything you can remember about

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these two men would be extremely helpful.

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-It was a long time ago.

-I know, but anything, speech pattern, accent...

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-I know what you need. I just...

-It's all up there, everything.

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-You just need to access it.

-I'm sure that's easy for you to say.

0:14:220:14:25

There are techniques. Now, just think yourself back into that room.

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A man comes in and he sits opposite you. Geoffrey Bloom.

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-He's a blind man, yes?

-Well, he was wearing dark glasses. Big glasses.

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-Presumably to hide his face.

-Yeah, he was good.

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He came in on the arm of a WPC.

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His hand on top of her arm, so she was guiding him rather than leading.

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The way he found the edge of the table, got into his chair.

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-You'd never have known he was faking.

-And when he spoke?

0:14:570:15:02

No, I can't hear him. I can't hear his voice.

0:15:020:15:05

So it was probably neutral. No heavy accent or unusual speech pattern?

0:15:050:15:09

No, but there was, um...something... A muscle thing, on his face.

0:15:090:15:15

-What do you call it? A tic?

-Twitch.

-Yes. It was subtle.

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And like I say, he was wearing those big glasses,

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which almost hid it completely.

0:15:230:15:25

-Which side?

-The left.

-Your left, his left?

-His left.

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Like I say, it wasn't a big thing,

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but it would have been more noticeable without those glasses.

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Yeah, twitch. He had a twitch.

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PHONE RINGS

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-MAN:

-Show Mr Halford in, please, Daph?

0:15:410:15:45

-Uh, Mr Halford, Mr Fallon will...

-Yes, I heard.

0:15:450:15:50

Chief Superintendent.

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Oh, Mr now, Martin. Retired.

0:15:520:15:54

Oh, well, that's a very sad loss to the force.

0:15:540:15:57

I mean, all this is down to you -

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if you hadn't put in a good word for me in court...

0:15:580:16:00

You were never malicious, Martin, just stupid.

0:16:000:16:03

That's very kind of you to say so. Could I offer you a tea? A coffee?

0:16:030:16:07

Coffee would be nice.

0:16:070:16:08

Two coffees, please, Daph. How do you take it?

0:16:110:16:13

-Milk, two sugars.

-Did you hear that?

0:16:130:16:17

-DAPH:

-Yes, Martin.

0:16:170:16:21

-Ah, business is booming?

-It doesn't look like much, I know.

0:16:210:16:24

But we're doing OK. A lot of companies are waking up to the fact

0:16:240:16:27

that they need, well, people like me

0:16:270:16:29

to protect their computer systems from...

0:16:290:16:31

From people like you?

0:16:310:16:32

Ha ha! Yes, well, poacher turned gamekeeper now,

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and that's all down to you, Mr Halford.

0:16:350:16:37

-I've got a little job for you, Martin.

-Really?

0:16:370:16:41

I help the police sort out unsolved cases.

0:16:410:16:44

These e-mails are from our current investigation.

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I'd like to know who sent them.

0:16:470:16:48

I did hear a rumour one or two policemen had learned

0:16:480:16:51

how to use a computer - couldn't one of them...?

0:16:510:16:53

Yes, if I want to take a ticket and make myself comfortable

0:16:530:16:56

for a couple of weeks. They're too busy chasing...

0:16:560:16:58

People like me.

0:16:580:17:00

Yes, we're not easy to catch.

0:17:000:17:03

What about this one? Is he easy to catch?

0:17:040:17:08

Hmm. Well, you see, his IP address changes with each message, you know.

0:17:080:17:16

Some of these are Russian, they're Japanese.

0:17:160:17:19

He's bouncing these messages halfway around the world

0:17:190:17:22

and back again to muddy his tracks.

0:17:220:17:24

-Can you give me a name?

-For a fee?

0:17:240:17:29

-No.

-Oh. Because I owe you one.

0:17:290:17:34

This is your chance to pay me back

0:17:340:17:36

for this corporate empire I helped you create.

0:17:360:17:38

That's rather good,

0:17:490:17:50

but you need to give it five more minutes than they say.

0:17:500:17:53

Stephen Fisher. Well, well, well...

0:17:530:17:56

For my money, though, the cod's slightly better.

0:17:560:17:58

-How are you, Robert?

-I'm fine.

0:17:580:18:00

Still overseeing Unsolved Crimes and Open...

0:18:010:18:04

Among other things, yes. And you?

0:18:040:18:07

Oh, you know me - paddled around for a while in the shallow ends of

0:18:070:18:11

the Special Department until someone found me a cosy desk in Whitehall.

0:18:110:18:14

A few more years pushing paper and I'll collect a fat pension.

0:18:160:18:19

-Thinking of settling somewhere green, might write a book.

-Oh?

0:18:190:18:24

Japanese mythology. It's a current passion of mine.

0:18:240:18:27

You should read up on it, Robert. Fascinating stuff. Dining alone?

0:18:270:18:31

Oh, afraid so.

0:18:310:18:33

Miserable, isn't it? Audrey's off on some evening class or other.

0:18:340:18:39

Fad of the week stuff.

0:18:390:18:40

Can I buy you dinner?

0:18:420:18:43

Well, I suppose...

0:18:440:18:46

It'd be good to catch up.

0:18:460:18:47

I know a place that does a beef Wellington you won't forget in a hurry.

0:18:470:18:51

-You haven't turned vegetarian or anything, have you?

-Me? No.

0:18:510:18:54

Excellent. We can get a table before the rush starts.

0:18:540:18:59

Fascinating stuff, I'd have thought,

0:18:590:19:01

sniffing out people who think they got away with it years ago.

0:19:010:19:04

Well, it can be. Satisfying to get cases off the books.

0:19:040:19:07

The Wellington was very good, Carlo. As always.

0:19:090:19:12

Thank you, sir, I'll pass that on. Will you have dessert?

0:19:120:19:15

-Not for me...

-You'll try the baked Alaska.

0:19:150:19:17

-Really...

-You'd never forgive yourself.

0:19:170:19:19

-Two baked Alaska?

-Thank you, Carlo.

0:19:190:19:21

Of course, news of UCOS's escapades does reach us

0:19:210:19:25

in Whitehall from time to time.

0:19:250:19:26

-Oh, really?

-In the most positive light, of course.

0:19:260:19:29

I'm still not clear on exactly what it is you do now, Stephen.

0:19:290:19:33

Although lately perhaps, the light isn't quite so positive.

0:19:330:19:36

I'm sorry?

0:19:360:19:38

We shouldn't talk shop.

0:19:380:19:39

What did you mean by that?

0:19:390:19:41

Perhaps past successes have gone to your head.

0:19:440:19:46

Perhaps that has encouraged your team to get involved with cases

0:19:480:19:51

that don't always represent the best use of scarce resources.

0:19:510:19:56

Such as?

0:19:560:19:57

A man disappears from a train

0:19:570:19:59

with a lot of very important knowledge in his head.

0:19:590:20:02

Is this really something a bunch of over-the-hill bobbies

0:20:020:20:05

should be concerned with?

0:20:050:20:07

The Mackenna case falls very well within our purview.

0:20:070:20:10

As does a whole host of unsolved murders and robberies that would,

0:20:100:20:14

I'm sure, prove a better focus for your concern

0:20:140:20:17

than pursuing the likes of Simon Crane.

0:20:170:20:20

Simon Crane?

0:20:200:20:23

I'm simply expressing concern.

0:20:230:20:25

One likes one's friends to be well thought of.

0:20:250:20:28

What exactly is your job now, Stephen?

0:20:320:20:34

Doesn't this look wonderful?

0:20:340:20:37

Who is Simon Crane?

0:20:370:20:38

Delicious.

0:20:430:20:45

There are seven Simon Cranes with criminal records,

0:20:450:20:48

none of whom seem linked to Mackenna.

0:20:480:20:50

This one may not have a criminal record.

0:20:500:20:53

Is Fisher trying to help us, do you think, or is he warning us off?

0:20:540:20:57

Stephen Fisher is never that black and white.

0:20:570:21:00

It's possible someone has told him to warn us off

0:21:000:21:03

and that he has a completely different agenda.

0:21:030:21:05

So what do you want to do?

0:21:050:21:07

Keep this Simon Crane in mind, in case his name comes up,

0:21:070:21:10

but let's not put him front and centre

0:21:100:21:12

until we have a clearer idea of the game Fisher's playing.

0:21:120:21:15

DOORBELL RINGS

0:21:150:21:17

-Kirsty Daniels?

-No.

0:21:200:21:22

-Is she in?

-What's it regarding?

0:21:220:21:24

And you are?

0:21:240:21:25

Asking you what it's regarding.

0:21:250:21:27

-Who is it?

-Kirsty Daniels?

-Yes.

0:21:270:21:30

Detective Superintendent Pullman, Brian Lane,

0:21:300:21:32

from the Metropolitan Police's Unsolved Crime and Open Case squad.

0:21:320:21:36

-This is about Dr Mackenna?

-Yes.

0:21:360:21:38

You were his research assistant at UCL?

0:21:380:21:40

-Yes.

-You don't have to let them in.

0:21:400:21:42

I know. It's fine, Alice, really.

0:21:420:21:45

Well, I've got work to do.

0:21:450:21:46

-Come in.

-Thank you.

0:21:470:21:49

-Was that your lawyer?

-No, Alice is a web designer.

0:21:520:21:56

Her last girlfriend was involved in the anti-globalisation protests,

0:21:560:22:00

so Alice has developed a bit of an attitude towards the police.

0:22:000:22:03

So you're freelance now, are you?

0:22:070:22:09

Yes, for the last three years.

0:22:090:22:11

You didn't fancy staying on at UCL?

0:22:110:22:13

I was hired specifically to assist with the research on that project.

0:22:130:22:16

Without Dr Mackenna, there was no project and no job.

0:22:160:22:19

In the weeks leading up to Dr Mackenna's disappearance,

0:22:190:22:22

-did you notice anything different about his behaviour?

-No.

0:22:220:22:25

He didn't seem agitated, worried about anything?

0:22:250:22:29

Nothing like that. I racked my brains at the time

0:22:290:22:31

for any clue something was wrong, but there was nothing.

0:22:310:22:34

If someone abducted Dr Mackenna

0:22:340:22:36

to advance their own cold fusion project, would that be possible?

0:22:360:22:40

Theoretically, yeah.

0:22:400:22:42

I don't know how you'd get that knowledge out of him, though.

0:22:420:22:45

How do you mean?

0:22:450:22:46

He could have sold his expertise to any number of companies

0:22:460:22:49

for a fortune, but he chose to work out of UCL

0:22:490:22:51

because he wanted the fruits of his labours to be available to all.

0:22:510:22:55

He really wasn't interested in financial rewards.

0:22:550:22:57

Well, it wouldn't necessarily have been money.

0:22:570:23:00

There are some pretty unpleasant ways of forcing someone to tell you what they know.

0:23:000:23:05

We understand that Dr Mackenna was quite dependent on his wife.

0:23:050:23:08

If someone threatened her, for instance...

0:23:080:23:11

I don't know. Maybe.

0:23:110:23:13

Even then, it's really hard to imagine anything

0:23:140:23:17

making him betray his work.

0:23:170:23:19

-Did he ever mention a man named Simon Crane?

-Crane?

0:23:190:23:23

Mmm.

0:23:230:23:25

No. No, I don't think so.

0:23:260:23:27

Sorry.

0:23:290:23:30

-It's the timeline that's bothering me.

-In what way?

0:23:330:23:36

Well, after the abduction, somebody checked in to the hotel in Paris,

0:23:360:23:39

pretending to be Phillip Mackenna, which bought them some time,

0:23:390:23:43

and don't forget, it was four days

0:23:430:23:44

before anyone checked the CCTV from the train.

0:23:440:23:47

Four days would be long enough to fiddle with Mackenna's passport,

0:23:470:23:50

-or get a new one, to get him out of the country.

-Plenty of time.

0:23:500:23:53

So why did two of the kidnappers stay in character

0:23:530:23:56

and present themselves to Doyle as witnesses two weeks after the abduction?

0:23:560:24:00

It doesn't make sense. It's a huge risk.

0:24:000:24:02

And one you'd only take if you really needed the extra time.

0:24:020:24:05

For what, though?

0:24:050:24:06

Perhaps it wasn't Mackenna they needed, but what he knew.

0:24:090:24:13

It's a lot easier to smuggle information across a border than a person.

0:24:130:24:18

So if they can get him to tell them what he knows here...

0:24:180:24:21

Then they don't need to take him anywhere.

0:24:210:24:24

Oh, dear God, that's why they needed the two weeks, to break him.

0:24:240:24:27

MOBILE PHONE RINGS

0:24:270:24:30

And once he'd given them what they wanted...

0:24:300:24:32

Hello?

0:24:330:24:35

Brilliant, where is he?

0:24:360:24:37

You're kidding...

0:24:380:24:40

OK, I'll meet you there in half an hour. Bye.

0:24:410:24:44

I'll give you a lift back to UCOS.

0:24:440:24:46

Pull the files of every unidentified Caucasian male body

0:24:460:24:49

found in the South East of England during the six months following the abduction.

0:24:490:24:53

Where are you going?

0:24:530:24:54

Gerry's found the blind man.

0:24:540:24:56

Oh.

0:24:560:24:57

There are seven con men on the wanted lists of seven different European police forces.

0:24:570:25:02

Now, it wasn't until we circulated a description of our blind man

0:25:020:25:07

that they all realised they were looking for the same bloke.

0:25:070:25:11

One Peter Rowley.

0:25:110:25:13

And we had you all along. 18 months into a five-year stretch for fraud.

0:25:130:25:17

It's always nice to have visitors.

0:25:170:25:19

We're here to talk about the abduction of Dr Phillip Mackenna.

0:25:190:25:23

And what are you putting on the table?

0:25:230:25:25

What are we putting on the table, Gerry?

0:25:250:25:27

Is that better?

0:25:320:25:34

Your faces.

0:25:350:25:37

You think you've cracked this whole thing by finding me, don't you?

0:25:370:25:40

Well, I've got some bad news for you.

0:25:400:25:42

I never met these people, never knew their names.

0:25:420:25:45

-Then how...

-E-mail.

0:25:450:25:47

All my instructions came via e-mail.

0:25:470:25:49

And no, I didn't keep them. I'm not that stupid.

0:25:490:25:52

The only reason I'm still walking around today is because...

0:25:520:25:55

I don't know anything.

0:25:550:25:58

That won't stop us charging you for the part you played.

0:25:580:26:00

Hard to prove conspiracy, though,

0:26:000:26:02

when I didn't know any of the conspirators.

0:26:020:26:05

Why don't you tell us what you do know?

0:26:050:26:07

-I was given a passport and a train ticket...

-How?

0:26:100:26:12

Dropped through the letter box of the place I was staying,

0:26:120:26:15

in the middle of the night.

0:26:150:26:17

They wanted me to get on a train

0:26:180:26:20

and cosy up to the guy sitting in the seat next to me.

0:26:200:26:23

They didn't even tell me his name.

0:26:230:26:26

He did, though, while we were talking. Odd bloke, nervy.

0:26:260:26:31

They said the train would stop before Dover.

0:26:320:26:35

I was to give it a couple of minutes, then ask the guy

0:26:350:26:37

if he'd fetch me a glass of water. That was it.

0:26:370:26:40

I caught the ferry, spent the night in Paris, and then I came back.

0:26:420:26:47

-You spent the night in Paris?

-Where did you stay?

0:26:470:26:49

I don't remember.

0:26:510:26:53

You checked into Mackenna's hotel.

0:26:530:26:55

-You were the one masquerading as Phillip Mackenna.

-Just a bit of fun.

0:26:550:26:59

But it didn't end there, did it? Two weeks later you presented yourself to the police.

0:26:590:27:03

That was an add-on.

0:27:030:27:05

A bonus payment to show up in character and act like I didn't know anything.

0:27:050:27:09

Didn't really have to act, did I?

0:27:090:27:11

How did you get paid?

0:27:110:27:12

Cash. In an envelope.

0:27:120:27:15

Again, it landed on my doormat while I was asleep.

0:27:150:27:20

-Easy money.

-Did you recognise anyone on the train?

0:27:200:27:23

I couldn't see much of anything.

0:27:230:27:26

Those dark glasses were practically black.

0:27:260:27:29

Helped with the act, though.

0:27:290:27:31

The original owner of that passport was registered blind,

0:27:310:27:34

would have been a bit of a giveaway to show up at passport control doing the crossword.

0:27:340:27:39

Yeah, but the glasses didn't hide the twitch, did they?

0:27:390:27:42

That's nice, bring that up.

0:27:420:27:44

Well, it's a bit of a distinguishing feature for a con man, isn't it?

0:27:440:27:48

You'd be surprised. An affliction like this tends to draw the eye.

0:27:480:27:54

People remember it, but most of the time that's all they remember.

0:27:540:27:58

You say that you didn't know the people who hired you.

0:27:580:28:01

How did they know you?

0:28:010:28:02

Mutual acquaintance.

0:28:020:28:04

Who?

0:28:040:28:05

And now you want a name. So now you have to deal.

0:28:070:28:10

I've already told you, when we charge you...

0:28:100:28:13

What difference does a few more months in here make to me,

0:28:130:28:16

versus the advantage to you in getting a name?

0:28:160:28:19

A few more months? I don't think so, Mr Rowley.

0:28:190:28:22

You see, we have reason to believe that Phillip Mackenna was murdered by whoever took him off that train.

0:28:220:28:29

-I don't know anything about that.

-Yeah, but if you're the only person involved...

0:28:290:28:33

Well, you know the courts, they're going to want to punish somebody.

0:28:330:28:38

Then we'll see how easy that money was, won't we?

0:28:380:28:41

Well played.

0:28:450:28:47

Townsend.

0:28:480:28:49

He put them on to me.

0:28:520:28:54

David Townsend.

0:28:550:28:57

Window shopping, Mr Townsend?

0:28:580:29:01

Window shopping. That's very good.

0:29:030:29:05

Detective Superintendent Pullman, Jack Halford.

0:29:050:29:08

Jack Halford, really? I thought you'd retired, Mr Halford.

0:29:080:29:11

That's right.

0:29:110:29:12

Which makes this a visit from UCOS.

0:29:120:29:14

Welcome to my fully-licensed premises.

0:29:140:29:17

It's charming.

0:29:170:29:18

I think we can allow it has character.

0:29:180:29:20

-Can I offer either of you a refreshment?

-No, we're fine.

0:29:200:29:23

What piece of gloomy underworld history can I illuminate for you?

0:29:230:29:27

-Peter Rowley.

-Peter Rowley.

0:29:270:29:29

The maestro of the short con and scourge of rich widows.

0:29:290:29:32

Currently a guest of Her Majesty, I believe.

0:29:320:29:35

-You put him on to a job.

-No, that's not right.

0:29:350:29:39

While he may have dropped by once in a while to wet his whistle after a long day peculating from

0:29:390:29:43

the gullible, our relationship didn't extend beyond cheerful publican...

0:29:430:29:47

You're an authority on the history of the underworld?

0:29:470:29:51

Well, you flatter me, but I like to consider I have a certain flair...

0:29:510:29:54

That means you must know a fair amount about the police.

0:29:540:29:57

That follows, yes.

0:29:570:29:59

What have you heard about me, Mr Townsend, that makes you think

0:29:590:30:02

I'd come in here without knowing exactly who you are and what you do?

0:30:020:30:06

-What job are we talking about?

-The abduction of Dr Phillip Mackenna.

0:30:110:30:14

-I don't know anything about that.

-That's not what Peter Rowley says.

-Criminals will say anything.

0:30:140:30:20

Yes, you will.

0:30:200:30:21

This case involves the illegal transportation

0:30:210:30:23

of sensitive information across international borders.

0:30:230:30:27

We have reason to believe the people who abducted Dr Mackenna

0:30:270:30:31

may have murdered him once he'd told them what they wanted to know.

0:30:310:30:34

That's quite a conspiracy charge you'll want to get out from under.

0:30:340:30:38

Excuse me for a moment.

0:30:390:30:42

I have an irritable bowel,

0:30:440:30:46

specifically irritated by threats from the law enforcement community.

0:30:460:30:50

Go with him.

0:30:530:30:54

Jack?

0:31:230:31:25

He came out of nowhere. Townsend took off.

0:31:260:31:29

Oh, no.

0:31:320:31:33

-Detective Superintendent Pullman.

-Can you hear me?

-An MIT and an ambulance to...

0:31:420:31:46

He's been stabbed. I don't know how many times.

0:31:460:31:49

-Sutton Yard.

-Listen.

-An ambulance is coming. You'll be OK.

-I doubt it.

0:31:490:31:52

What do you know about the Mackenna abduction?

0:31:520:31:55

Tell me something, come on!

0:31:550:31:57

-Jack...

-Come on!

0:31:570:31:58

TYRES SCREECH

0:31:580:32:00

K... K...

0:32:010:32:02

Kit.

0:32:030:32:05

Soon.

0:32:050:32:06

Jack!

0:32:060:32:07

You're sure it was the second man from the train?

0:32:120:32:15

Positive, yeah.

0:32:150:32:16

Jack?

0:32:160:32:17

-Yes.

-We need a name.

0:32:170:32:19

Somebody's got to know who he is.

0:32:190:32:21

This thing Townsend said...

0:32:210:32:22

Kit. Soon.

0:32:220:32:24

Sure that was it?

0:32:240:32:25

He'd been stabbed, if he wasn't speaking clearly...

0:32:250:32:28

It was clear enough. I don't know what it means, but that's what he said.

0:32:280:32:32

So does this case actually have a solid lead yet?

0:32:320:32:35

We think there's a good chance Mackenna never left the country,

0:32:350:32:38

whoever abducted him extracted the information they needed then killed him.

0:32:380:32:42

But there's only been a handful

0:32:420:32:44

of unidentified bodies found in that area since 2004,

0:32:440:32:47

none of them a match for Mackenna.

0:32:470:32:49

That's not to say he's not there. They just haven't found him.

0:32:490:32:52

Short of digging up the whole of the South East of England...

0:32:520:32:55

We are trying to trace the e-mails Bea Mackenna was sent.

0:32:550:32:58

Look, if you want to get that kind of information out of a man like Mackenna...

0:32:580:33:03

torture is the obvious way. I mean, even the tough-nut army guys say that everyone cracks eventually.

0:33:030:33:08

But this is complicated information. There'd be no way they could verify it then and there.

0:33:080:33:12

How could they know Mackenna had given them what they needed?

0:33:120:33:15

I don't know. Money?

0:33:150:33:18

Even his partner, Brian Rutland, said everyone has a price.

0:33:180:33:21

Not Mackenna, though. By all accounts, he was odd,

0:33:210:33:23

absolutely single-minded about his work.

0:33:230:33:25

So how do you get someone like that to talk?

0:33:250:33:29

What?

0:33:330:33:35

Slash his bicycle tyres?

0:33:350:33:38

Threaten his wife?

0:33:380:33:39

That could work, if he was that dependent on her.

0:33:390:33:42

-Noooo.

-Why not?

0:33:420:33:44

Well, for the threat to be real,

0:33:440:33:45

they'd have had to abduct the wife as well, wouldn't they?

0:33:450:33:48

They'd have to show her to him,

0:33:480:33:51

threaten to hurt her in front of him.

0:33:510:33:53

And we know Bea Mackenna wasn't abducted.

0:33:530:33:55

Well, even if she had been, it still wouldn't work as a threat.

0:33:550:33:58

How do you know they won't kill you both once you've offered up the information?

0:33:580:34:02

It wouldn't guarantee them Mackenna had told them everything.

0:34:020:34:05

So what then?

0:34:050:34:07

They'd have to make him want to talk.

0:34:090:34:11

No, there's nothing I can think of.

0:34:120:34:14

There'd be no amount of money that would make Phillip talk.

0:34:140:34:17

He's not interested in money. I don't think he even knows how much he earns.

0:34:170:34:21

-Why are you talking about him in the present tense?

-Brian!

0:34:210:34:25

-I believe he's still alive, somewhere.

-Where?

0:34:250:34:28

Well, if this Swiss company are working on the same project,

0:34:280:34:33

then how could they be doing it without Phillip's know-how?

0:34:330:34:36

You said there's no way Dr Mackenna would have sold out...

0:34:360:34:39

No, but if they were putting his work to better use...

0:34:390:34:42

Phillip was only ever concerned about how his work would benefit people.

0:34:420:34:45

Then why hasn't he been in touch since 2004?

0:34:450:34:48

Why didn't this Swiss company just offer him a job?

0:34:480:34:51

I mean, why abduct him from a train?

0:34:510:34:53

I think you should leave.

0:34:540:34:56

We have to look at every possibility, Mrs Mackenna.

0:34:580:35:01

My husband is alive.

0:35:010:35:03

Just supposing, for a moment...

0:35:030:35:04

-I've said...

-No, no, no.

0:35:040:35:06

Just supposing for a moment

0:35:060:35:08

that your husband did give up the information,

0:35:080:35:11

and it wasn't for money, or because they'd threatened him,

0:35:110:35:14

or threatened you even, and it wasn't because

0:35:140:35:17

he thought that whoever wanted it might put it to better use than him.

0:35:170:35:22

What might make him do that?

0:35:220:35:24

I've told you, I have no idea.

0:35:240:35:26

Because this is his life's work?

0:35:260:35:28

Yes.

0:35:280:35:29

You said your husband didn't socialise or have any hobbies.

0:35:290:35:34

He had work and he had home.

0:35:340:35:36

Yes.

0:35:360:35:38

What if the reason he gave up the information

0:35:380:35:40

had nothing to do with work?

0:35:400:35:43

I'm not following you.

0:35:440:35:45

He's asking if there's anything about your home life that could have been used as leverage, Mrs Mackenna.

0:35:450:35:52

Is there something they could have told him

0:35:520:35:54

that he didn't already know?

0:35:540:35:56

No, nothing.

0:35:590:36:00

-Now, if you don't mind...

-What is it, Mrs Mackenna?

0:36:020:36:05

-So you haven't been able to trace these e-mails yet?

-Um, no.

0:36:100:36:14

Do you want more time?

0:36:140:36:15

Um, no. It can't be done.

0:36:150:36:18

Whoever sent these covered their tracks very well.

0:36:180:36:21

These messages have been sent through some servers

0:36:210:36:23

-that are very hard to access.

-Great(!)

0:36:230:36:25

Although that is in itself is a clue, because whoever did this is a pro.

0:36:250:36:30

-I did have a little more luck, however, with the document.

-Go on.

0:36:300:36:35

I can't be too specific about my methods because that would compromise your position

0:36:350:36:39

-as an officer of the law...

-Look, just tell me.

0:36:390:36:42

-I hacked into the Swiss company.

-And?

0:36:420:36:45

I was actually very impressed with their security.

0:36:450:36:47

I made some notes.

0:36:470:36:48

I'm going to incorporate some of their methods into a project...

0:36:480:36:52

Does the document originate from them?

0:36:520:36:54

I believe so.

0:36:540:36:55

I mean, I couldn't get all the way into their archives,

0:36:550:36:58

but I did manage to match up some of the reference numbers

0:36:580:37:01

on this document to the numbers system that they employ.

0:37:010:37:04

So I would say there is a 90% certainty this document...

0:37:040:37:07

came from there.

0:37:070:37:09

But you didn't actually find it?

0:37:090:37:11

No.

0:37:110:37:13

Admittedly that would not stand up in a court of law,

0:37:130:37:16

but again, the fact that I couldn't get into the system,

0:37:160:37:19

whereas someone else did, is in itself a valuable clue.

0:37:190:37:21

It means the person who sent these e-mails is a better hacker than you.

0:37:210:37:26

-Yeah.

-I should have gone to him in the first place.

0:37:260:37:28

I don't think it's very likely he'd have helped you,

0:37:280:37:31

-seeing as he is in fact...

-It was a joke!

0:37:310:37:34

Oh, yeah.

0:37:340:37:35

So you have no idea who this person might be?

0:37:360:37:39

Actually, I've got a very good idea.

0:37:410:37:43

You know, out of all the hackers I know, there is only a handful

0:37:440:37:47

I can think of who could give me as many problems as this one has,

0:37:470:37:50

and of that handful there is one whose trail I've been on before,

0:37:500:37:54

-and was routing his connections through very many of the same servers as this one was.

-So?

0:37:540:37:58

Ninetails.

0:38:000:38:02

Excuse me?

0:38:020:38:04

That's the handle he uses. Ninetails.

0:38:040:38:07

I was the Ghost Doctor, he's Ninetails.

0:38:070:38:10

But what's his real name?

0:38:100:38:11

Oh, I've no idea.

0:38:110:38:12

That's the whole point of having a handle, anonymity.

0:38:120:38:15

There must be a way to find out!

0:38:150:38:17

Someone this good? No, no, no.

0:38:170:38:19

Trust me, Mr Halford, you will find Lord Lucan feeding sugar lumps

0:38:190:38:23

to Shergar before you get close to discovering Ninetails' real name.

0:38:230:38:27

We met online, on a financial forum that I help administer.

0:38:290:38:35

We got chatting over the course of a couple of weeks and...

0:38:350:38:38

This had never happened before, or since.

0:38:400:38:43

I love my husband, I consider myself very happily married, I just...

0:38:430:38:46

Phillip didn't like going out, he wasn't at all sociable.

0:38:490:38:52

I have to be in my line of work and I just started to feel as though

0:38:520:38:56

there was something missing, going out on my own all the time.

0:38:560:38:58

And this man filled the gap?

0:38:580:39:01

Yes. We'd just get together for drinks sometimes, or dinner.

0:39:010:39:05

Sex?

0:39:050:39:06

Yes.

0:39:090:39:10

It's probably hard to understand how I could love my husband and still do that...

0:39:130:39:17

Did anyone else know about this?

0:39:170:39:19

No. I didn't tell a soul.

0:39:190:39:21

Neither did he. He has a family to protect in Cambridge.

0:39:210:39:25

But if your husband had found out somehow,

0:39:250:39:28

could the revelation that you'd been unfaithful to him

0:39:280:39:32

have tipped him over the edge?

0:39:320:39:34

The realisation that everything solid and stable in his life was in flux.

0:39:340:39:38

The thought that you were about to leave him for another...

0:39:380:39:41

I had no intention of leaving!

0:39:410:39:43

He didn't know that, did he? Whoever it was that was trying to manipulate him

0:39:430:39:47

would have certainly painted the bleakest picture possible.

0:39:470:39:50

Thank you, Brian.

0:39:500:39:52

What was this man called?

0:39:540:39:55

Simon. Simon Crane.

0:39:550:39:57

What?

0:40:010:40:03

That name has already come up in connection to the disappearance.

0:40:030:40:06

No, that can't be...

0:40:060:40:09

Simon was in marketing. He had no connection at...

0:40:100:40:13

No, no, no, that's not possible.

0:40:130:40:15

We were still in contact after Phillip had disappeared.

0:40:170:40:20

For how long?

0:40:200:40:21

Not long. A week, maybe ten days.

0:40:230:40:25

Simon said he felt uncomfortable continuing the relationship,

0:40:260:40:30

given how worried I was about Phillip.

0:40:300:40:32

He called it off?

0:40:320:40:34

Yes.

0:40:340:40:36

Have you spoken to him since?

0:40:360:40:38

No.

0:40:390:40:41

We both wanted a clean break.

0:40:410:40:43

Neither of us wanted to make things difficult.

0:40:430:40:46

I did try, once, a few weeks later.

0:40:460:40:48

I just needed somebody to talk to and, um...

0:40:480:40:51

..his phone was dead.

0:40:530:40:55

And I sent him an e-mail

0:40:560:40:57

and it bounced back, saying the recipient's address was unknown.

0:40:570:41:01

I don't suppose you have a photograph of Simon Crane?

0:41:010:41:04

And no-one else ever saw him but you.

0:41:070:41:09

How could I have been so stupid?

0:41:130:41:15

There was something.

0:41:200:41:22

Erm, Simon's parents had left him a house, here in London, in the suburbs,

0:41:220:41:27

which he used to use if he had to stay over for work.

0:41:270:41:30

-You went there?

-Yeah. Yes, I did, a few times, because I couldn't bring him here.

0:41:300:41:33

We'll need the address of the house.

0:41:330:41:36

The house is owned by a company called InfoTech Analysts.

0:41:440:41:48

They bought it in November 2003.

0:41:480:41:51

The company's registered in Luxembourg,

0:41:510:41:54

they have no offices or employees etc, they're just a shell company.

0:41:540:41:59

Looks like it's been empty for a while.

0:41:590:42:01

Yeah, the articles of incorporation list

0:42:010:42:03

Simon Crane as the director of the company.

0:42:030:42:06

Is there an address for him?

0:42:060:42:08

Right here.

0:42:080:42:10

Oh, I don't think he's home.

0:42:100:42:13

Not exactly riddled with clues, is it?

0:42:250:42:28

Ah, that's interesting.

0:42:300:42:32

What?

0:42:320:42:33

Hold on.

0:42:390:42:41

This is a co-axial cable carrying a video signal from...

0:42:470:42:51

Ah.

0:42:510:42:52

-What you got?

-Hidden camera.

0:43:050:43:08

It's proper kit too, the sort our surveillance guys use.

0:43:110:43:15

See, the cable runs all the way round there,

0:43:150:43:19

through the other side of the wall and then straight downstairs.

0:43:190:43:23

Wow, look at this.

0:43:320:43:33

Bolted to the floor.

0:43:340:43:36

Here's our cable, and...

0:43:360:43:39

this is a bracket for a TV.

0:43:390:43:41

Feeding pictures from the bedroom...

0:43:410:43:44

So whoever was in the chair was forced to watch...

0:43:440:43:48

Mrs Mackenna? Detective Superintendent Pullman.

0:43:480:43:51

Did you ever spend a night with Simon Crane after your husband disappeared?

0:43:510:43:55

Mackenna was grabbed from the train, driven here and put in the basement.

0:43:570:44:01

And given Mackenna's aversion to confined spaces, that was probably bad enough.

0:44:010:44:05

The next night, Simon Crane invited Bea Mackenna over.

0:44:050:44:09

She didn't have a clue her husband was missing - she thought he was still in Paris,

0:44:090:44:13

and they ended up having sex in this bedroom.

0:44:130:44:15

And Mackenna was forced to watch from the basement.

0:44:150:44:18

'He must have been horrified.'

0:44:180:44:20

That's how they finally cracked him.

0:44:200:44:22

He thought he had a secure, stable home life and they pulled the rug out from underneath him.

0:44:220:44:27

-Pretty nasty, eh?

-< Have a look at this.

0:44:270:44:30

Hang on, Jack.

0:44:300:44:31

What?

0:44:360:44:37

Look. In the corner.

0:44:370:44:38

Where?

0:44:410:44:42

In front of the tree.

0:44:420:44:44

The foxes have paid more attention to that patch there

0:44:440:44:47

than to the rest of the garden.

0:44:470:44:49

They can smell something.

0:44:490:44:51

-They found him?

-The remains in the garden were male -

0:44:540:44:57

right height and age. It'll take a few days to confirm, but it's going to be Mackenna.

0:44:570:45:01

-So it's a murder charge.

-Yeah, if we could ever find anyone to arrest.

0:45:010:45:05

Simon Crane. Somewhere there's a trace of that man.

0:45:050:45:08

What about Strickland's mate? Maybe he knows more than he's letting on.

0:45:080:45:12

But whether he gives it up or not is going to be down to Strickland.

0:45:120:45:16

Any luck with Fallon?

0:45:160:45:17

Yes, and no. He's pretty certain the document is genuine

0:45:170:45:20

and he thinks he knows who sent the e-mails.

0:45:200:45:22

-That's a result, isn't it?

-Not really. He thinks he's a hacker, only knows him by his nickname -

0:45:220:45:28

Ninetails.

0:45:280:45:29

-Like the fox?

-You what?

0:45:290:45:31

Japanese mythology.

0:45:310:45:33

Esther did a night class in Japanese painting, few months back.

0:45:330:45:38

-There's a god in Japanese mythology, a trickster...

-A trickster?

0:45:380:45:42

Yeah - a being not to be trusted, that goes out of its way to deceive.

0:45:420:45:46

The shape that it usually takes is that of a fox with nine tails.

0:45:460:45:51

I thought Esther had lost the plot with the paintbrush

0:45:510:45:54

-but, no, nine tails.

-Kitsune!

-Eh?

0:45:540:45:56

Kitsune. That's the name of this Japanese nine-tailed fox! Kitsune.

0:45:560:46:00

That's what David Townsend was trying to tell us.

0:46:000:46:03

So the word Townsend said to you and the nickname

0:46:030:46:06

-of the hacker who sent the document to Bea Mackenna are the same?

-Yeah.

0:46:060:46:10

But if the hacker was Townsend's original contact,

0:46:100:46:13

he helped plan the abduction in the first place.

0:46:130:46:16

So what's he doing now sending clues as to what happened?

0:46:160:46:19

Maybe he had a change of heart and wanted to make amends.

0:46:190:46:23

Maybe Simon Crane double-crossed him and this is payback.

0:46:230:46:27

-Or her. I mean, why are we assuming that Ninetails is a man?

-Yeah.

0:46:270:46:32

The woman on the train, the one who pulled the emergency handle.

0:46:320:46:35

And she was savvy enough to avoid the CCTV.

0:46:350:46:38

Doyle said they couldn't trace her because her records got mixed up.

0:46:380:46:41

Maybe she hacked the databases.

0:46:410:46:43

Oh, blimey. If she's that good, what chance have we got of finding her?

0:46:430:46:46

She wants us to find her.

0:46:460:46:50

Ninetails is a fox.

0:46:500:46:53

A fox.

0:46:530:46:55

"A. Fox".

0:46:550:46:56

DOORBELL RINGS

0:46:560:46:58

Sorry, now's not a very good time.

0:47:070:47:08

Actually, we'd like to speak to Alice.

0:47:100:47:12

Alice?

0:47:120:47:13

-Is she in?

-No, she...

0:47:130:47:15

She's not here. She left.

0:47:160:47:19

When's she coming back?

0:47:190:47:21

She's not, is she?

0:47:210:47:22

Alice Fox.

0:47:330:47:35

I was out at a meeting this morning.

0:47:350:47:37

When I came back, she'd packed up her things and...

0:47:370:47:40

Did she leave a note?

0:47:410:47:44

She said she was sorry she'd lied to me. That was it.

0:47:440:47:47

What did she lie about?

0:47:490:47:51

Everything.

0:47:510:47:53

Could we see Alice's office?

0:47:530:47:57

Sure.

0:47:570:47:58

Simon Crane.

0:48:280:48:30

The chops are particularly good tonight, Robert, can I tempt you?

0:48:310:48:35

That photograph was left for us by a woman named Alice Fox.

0:48:350:48:40

Ah, yes, the delightful Ninetails.

0:48:400:48:44

Quite a resourceful character, I'm led to believe.

0:48:440:48:47

Japanese mythology.

0:48:490:48:50

Just another breadcrumb on a trail

0:48:500:48:52

your team followed quite impressively. You should be proud.

0:48:520:48:56

Alice left behind her confession, along with that picture.

0:48:560:48:59

-Did she happen to mention her real name?

-No.

0:48:590:49:03

Not much of a confession then, is it?

0:49:030:49:04

She was on the train, she pulled the emergency handle

0:49:040:49:08

so that Crane could abduct Mackenna.

0:49:080:49:10

Crane had hired her to construct the false identities of his associates.

0:49:100:49:14

She claims she didn't know he was planning to torture and kill Mackenna.

0:49:140:49:18

When she found out, she threatened to blow the whistle

0:49:180:49:21

and Crane tried to kill her. She's been in hiding ever since,

0:49:210:49:24

trying to gather evidence against Crane.

0:49:240:49:26

That sounds about right.

0:49:260:49:28

So who is he?

0:49:280:49:30

Crane?

0:49:300:49:31

Usual story. We trained him, Army Intelligence, then he went freelance.

0:49:320:49:38

Abducting Mackenna was the tip of the iceberg.

0:49:380:49:40

Simon Crane has been a very naughty boy, I'm afraid.

0:49:400:49:44

But he has dirt on all the right people,

0:49:450:49:48

so no-one could get the green light to go after him.

0:49:480:49:50

But when Alice Fox contacted Bea Mackenna and Bea came to us...

0:49:500:49:54

Awkward, yes. I was asked to... gently steer you off the case.

0:49:540:50:00

But you didn't want Crane to get away with it.

0:50:000:50:03

Well, if I happen to casually let slip a couple of useful details

0:50:030:50:06

over a pleasant dinner with an old friend...

0:50:060:50:09

So your bosses were quite prepared to let Crane walk away, just to protect their own reputations?

0:50:090:50:15

Despite the fact that he'd stolen something worth billions to this country?

0:50:150:50:19

Billions?

0:50:190:50:21

I rather think not.

0:50:210:50:22

Why not?

0:50:220:50:24

It doesn't work.

0:50:270:50:29

As I'm sure your detectives have gathered by now,

0:50:290:50:32

Phillip Mackenna was as mad as a box of frogs.

0:50:320:50:36

I'm sure he was quite brilliant in his own way, but cold fusion was a pipe dream, I'm afraid.

0:50:360:50:41

-You used us.

-Hardly.

0:50:410:50:44

Simon Crane wasn't to know cold fusion was dead in the water.

0:50:440:50:47

He still abducted and murdered a British citizen

0:50:470:50:50

and your people tracked him down. Well done.

0:50:500:50:54

Except we don't know where he is.

0:50:540:50:56

Oh, that's easy.

0:50:560:50:57

He'll be at St Pancras Station tomorrow morning.

0:50:580:51:00

He and his associate, Paul Leonard -

0:51:000:51:03

whom you'll recognise as the other person you've been looking for -

0:51:030:51:07

are booked on the 8:17 to Brussels.

0:51:070:51:10

Obviously, you don't have to act on that information, Robert.

0:51:130:51:17

Wouldn't want you to feel used.

0:51:190:51:21

So what was the point of all this?

0:51:210:51:23

This is the intelligence community, Robert.

0:51:240:51:27

If you start worrying about the point of it all,

0:51:270:51:29

you'll end up tying yourself in all sorts of knots.

0:51:290:51:32

Yep. They're here and they're going downstairs.

0:52:170:52:20

That's them.

0:52:220:52:24

No-one approaches till they go through check-in. I don't want anyone getting hurt.

0:52:270:52:31

Crane's buying a newspaper.

0:52:370:52:38

-They're very aware of their surroundings.

-Yeah.

0:52:410:52:44

-Your men are all out of sight, yeah?

-Yes, yes.

0:52:440:52:47

OK. Here they come.

0:52:470:52:49

What's happened?

0:52:530:52:54

-I've lost all the signals.

-Well, get them back!

-Radios are down.

0:52:540:52:58

I'm going to change position.

0:52:590:53:02

Hello?

0:53:020:53:03

Brian, we've lost camera feed, can you see them? Brian?

0:53:030:53:07

Brian? ..Gerry, can you hear me?

0:53:070:53:10

Governor? ..Sandra?

0:53:100:53:13

Can anybody hear me?

0:53:140:53:16

Shit!

0:53:210:53:23

Hello? Hello?

0:53:230:53:25

Can you hear me?

0:53:450:53:46

Cos Alice Fox is here.

0:53:460:53:48

Hi, Gerry, it's me.

0:53:490:53:51

All the radios are down and we've lost CCTV feed. I don't know how.

0:53:510:53:55

Yeah, can you make sure that Crane and Leonard don't come back past you?

0:53:550:53:59

Have you see Brian?

0:53:590:54:01

Yeah. Well, I could a minute ago. Where the bloody hell's he gone?!

0:54:010:54:04

OK, cheers.

0:54:120:54:13

We've lost contact with Brian, but Gerry's on his way back. ..Jack!

0:54:130:54:18

Stop him!

0:54:340:54:36

-Stay where you are!

-Don't move!

0:54:410:54:44

GUNSHOT

0:56:090:56:11

There's somebody shooting! Hello?

0:56:110:56:14

Excuse me, can I help you?

0:56:190:56:22

Yes, please, quick. Come on.

0:56:220:56:24

SHE SHRIEKS

0:56:260:56:27

-You're all right now!

-There's a man up there with a gun!

0:56:270:56:31

Get back to the concourse, find a policeman.

0:56:310:56:33

-Hold it! Police!

-It's me, Brian!

0:57:030:57:06

-Where is she?

-I was following Crane, I heard a shot.

0:57:060:57:09

-Alice Fox.

-Alice...?

0:57:090:57:10

Oh, shit!

0:57:140:57:16

'Well, good luck in finding her, she's well gone.'

0:57:160:57:19

How did she know Crane was going to be at the station?

0:57:190:57:22

-I imagine she was tipped off by the same person that told us.

-Your friend making sure Crane never got away.

0:57:220:57:27

Or that Crane didn't embarrass anyone with his testimony.

0:57:270:57:30

Good riddance to bad rubbish, if you ask me. Crane, I mean.

0:57:300:57:33

-He should have stood trial for murder.

-He was never going to stand trial.

0:57:330:57:37

-No, he'd have wriggled out of it.

-It's still vigilante justice, Brian.

0:57:370:57:41

Well, as Gerry says, good luck tracking down Alice Fox.

0:57:410:57:44

On the other hand, she might be hiding in the pub!

0:57:440:57:47

I'll get the first round in.

0:57:470:57:49

Bloody hell!

0:57:490:57:50

Yeah, well, don't get used to it.

0:57:500:57:52

I don't think there's any danger of that, Sir.

0:57:520:57:55

# It's all right It's OK

0:58:100:58:13

# Doesn't really matter if you're old and grey

0:58:130:58:16

# It's all right I say it's OK

0:58:160:58:18

# Listen to what I say

0:58:180:58:21

# It's all right, doing fine

0:58:210:58:24

# Doesn't really matter if the sun don't shine

0:58:240:58:27

# It's all right I say it's OK

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# We're gettin' to the end of the day. #

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Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

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E-mail [email protected]

0:58:340:58:37

The UCOS team reinvestigate the disappearance of a prominent physics professor who was working on a revolutionary cold fusion research project. But the investigation takes an unusual twist when a Whitehall suit warns them off the case.


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